Discussion:
Heil, Caesar!
(too old to reply)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-01-04 14:28:21 UTC
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Gladiator (2000)

The Donald: You wrote to me once, listing the four chief virtues:
Wisdom, justice, fortitude and temperance. As I read the list,
I knew I had none of them. But I have other virtues, father.
Ambition. That can be a virtue when it drives us to excel.
Resourcefulness, courage, perhaps not on the battlefield, but...
there are many forms of courage. Devotion, to my family.
But none of my virtues were on your list.
-------------------------------------------------
nordicskiv2
2017-01-05 01:06:31 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Gladiator (2000)
Wisdom, justice, fortitude and temperance. As I read the list,
I knew I had none of them. But I have other virtues, father.
Ambition. That can be a virtue when it drives us to excel.
Resourcefulness, courage, perhaps not on the battlefield, but...
there are many forms of courage. Devotion, to my family.
But none of my virtues were on your list.
Was there supposed to have been any point to your post above, Art? If so, what was it?
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-01-05 01:57:30 UTC
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----------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Gladiator (2000)
Wisdom, justice, fortitude and temperance. As I read the list,
I knew I had none of them. But I have other virtues, father.
Ambition. That can be a virtue when it drives us to excel.
Resourcefulness, courage, perhaps not on the battlefield, but...
there are many forms of courage. Devotion, to my family.
But none of my virtues were on your list.
----------------------------------------------------------
Lea wrote:

<<Was there supposed to have been any point to your post above, Art?
If so, what was it?>>

As I read the list, I noticed that both you and
Drumpf had none of the four chief virtues either.

Art
nordicskiv2
2017-01-06 02:40:10 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
----------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Gladiator (2000)
Wisdom, justice, fortitude and temperance. As I read the list,
I knew I had none of them. But I have other virtues, father.
Ambition. That can be a virtue when it drives us to excel.
Resourcefulness, courage, perhaps not on the battlefield, but...
there are many forms of courage. Devotion, to my family.
But none of my virtues were on your list.
<<Was there supposed to have been any point to your post above, Art?
If so, what was it?>>
As I read the list, I noticed that both you and
Drumpf had none of the four chief virtues either.
"...both you and Drumpf had none of the four chief virtues either"?! Is English your native tongue, Art? But I'm flattered that you devoted a post to me.

In any case, I have (fortunately) the wisdom to recognize that _Тæрин_ is not Russian for "youth"; in fact, it cannot be Russian *at all* because of the alphabet used. I also possess the wisdom to recognize that infinitely many natural numbers other than 19 have the property of being both the sum of two consecutive integers and the difference of their squares. Finally, I am wise enough to assess the reliability of sources -- unlike you and Trump, both of whom wantonly dismiss the opinions of experts and (and even objectively VERifiable facts) because those opinions and those facts undermine your own alternative VERsions of reality, which both of you attempt haplessly to salvage by inventing bizarre and farcically implausible crank conspiracy theories.

As for fortitude, I possess a sufficient amount of it to endure the moronic repetition of idiocies -- posted oVER and oVER and oVER, hundreds (if not thousands) of times -- by you, sometimes in posts at intervals of only a few minutes apart, and indeed, sometimes in the *same post*! Cleansing the legendary Augean Stables required fortitude; rebutting even a small fraction of your unceasing deluge of idiotic crap requires still more.

As for temperance, I neVER touch the stuff -- unlike, apparently, you and Trump, both of whom appear to suffer from a chronic case of DTs.

Nor do I lack justice, for that matter -- indeed, I have been more than fair to you, in that many of posts merely repeat *your* words!

Which of the virtues do you think (usual disclaimer) that Oxford possessed, Art?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Art (aka Noonedafter)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-01-06 04:16:30 UTC
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Lea wrote:

<<Which of the virtues do you think that Oxford possessed, Art?>>

I think you defame him by claiming him to be
the RogerER...when clearly he was the RogerEE:
----------------------------------------------------
. To the {R|E}ader:

. (T) his Figure, that th{O|U} here seest put,
. . It was for {G|E}ntle Shakespeare cut,
. [W]h(ER}ein the Graver had a strif{E}
. . with Nature, to out-doo the LIFE :
. (O), could he but have drawne his wit
. . As well in brasse, as he hath hit
. [H] is face ; the Print would then surpasse
. . All, that was ever writ in brasse.
. (B) ut, since he cannot, Reader, looke
. . Not on his Picture, but his Booke.
......................................................
____ <= 22 =>
.
. T o t h e {R|E} a d e r(T)h i s F i g u r e,t
. h a t t h {O|U} h e r e s e e s t p u t,I t w
. a s f o r {G|E} n t l e S h a k e s p e a r e
. c u t[W]h (E R} e i n t h e G r a v e r h a d
. a s t r i f{E} w i t h N a t u r e,t o o u t-
. d o o t h e L I F E:
.
{E.UERE} 22 : Prob. ~ 1 in 25
{ROGE/R} 22 : Prob. on left ~ 1 in 42,000
----------------------------------------------------------
Benson & Cotes's 1640 Sonnets publication
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Benson_%28publisher%29
......................................................

TO THE READ[E]R. The[R]e presu{M|E] (und[E]r f{A|V]o[U|R])
to p{R|E]s[E]nt to {Y|O|U|R] view {S|o]m[E] exce[L|L]ent and
sweetely composed Poems, of Master William Shakespeare, Which
in themselves appeare of the same purity, the Authour himselfe
then living avouched ; they had not the fortune by reason of
their Infancie in his death to have the due accomodatio of
proportionable glory with the rest of hi[S EVER-LIVIN(g) WOR]-
kes, yet the lines of themselves WILL afFORD you a more
authentick approbation than my assurance any way can, to invite
your allowance, in your perusall you shall find them Seren, cleere
and eligantly plaine, such gentle straines as shall recreate and
not perplexe your braine, no intricate or cloudy stuffe to puzzell
intellect, but perfect eloquence ; such as will raise your
admiration to his praise: this assurance I know will not differ from
your acknowledgment. And certaine I am, my opinion will be seconded
by the sufficiency of these *ENSUING* lines ; I have beene somewhat
solicitus to *BRING this FORTH* to the perfect view of all men ;
and in so doing glad to be serviceable for the continuance
of glory to the *DE(s)ERVEd Author* in these his Poems.
......................................................
____ <= 8 =>
.
. R[E]A D E R T H
. e[R]e p r e s u
. {M|E]u n d[E]r f
. {A|V]o[U|R]t o p
. {R|E]s[E]n t t o
. {Y|O|U|R]v i e *w*
. {S|o]m[E]e x c *e*
. [L|L]e n t a n *d*
. s*w*e e t e l y
. c*o*m p o s e d
. P*o*e m s

{MARY S(idney)}
[Lo. O., E. VERE]
[Lo. UERE] [UERE]
.....................................
Prob. of [MARY S.] ~ 1 in 8,000
Prob. of 2[UERE]s ~ 1 in 1,800
Prob. of [EVERE] ~ 1 in 1,000

in the first 69 letters.
----------------------------------------------------
. Ben Jonson First Folio dedication:
.
. These are, as some infamous Baud, or Whore,
. Sh[O]uld praise a Matron. What could hurt her more?
. But thou a[R]t proofe against them, and indeed
. Above th' ill fortune [O]f them, or the need.
. I, therefore will begin. Soule of the A[G]e !
. The applause ! delight ! the wonder of our Stage !
. My Shak[E]speare, rise; I will no{T LODGE} thee by
. Chaucer, or Spenser, o[R] bid Beaumont lye
. A little further, to make thee a roo[M]e :
............................................
____________ <= 45 =>

.{S H|O] uldpraiseaMatronW hatcou ldhurthermoreButtho
_-u a[R] tproofeagainstthe mandin deedAbovethillfortu
_-n e[O] fthemortheneedIth erefor ewillbeginSouleofth
_ e{A|G] eTheapplausedelig htthew onderofourStageMySh
_ a{k|E] speareriseIwillno{TLODGE}theebyChaucerorSpen
_ s{e|R] orbidBeaumontlyeA little furthertomaketheear
_-o o[M] e

Prob. of [O|ROGER M.] ~ 1 in 10,500
------------------------------------------------------
1623 Folio only: << and more strange return. hamlet >>
......................................................
____ *AND MORE STRANGE RE(t)URN*
________ per anagramma
____ *ROGER MANNERS, E. RUT(l)AND*
......................................................
The only consecutive string of 24 letters containing
*ROGER MANNERS, E. RUTLAND* is

*TRAN(sf)ERR(i)NGL(y) MEASURED ON*
......................................................
. _MOBY DICK_ CHAPTER 110 "Queequeg in His Coffin"

<<[the *CARPENTER*] forthwith with all the indifferent
promptitude of his character, proceeded into the forecastle
and took Queequeg's measure with great accuracy, regularly
*CHALKing Queequeg's person as he shifted the RULE*
.
"Ah! POOR FELLOW! he'll have to die now,"
. ejaculated the Long Island sailor.
.
Going to his vice-bench, the *CARPENTER* for
convenience sake and general reference, now
.
. *TRAN(sf)ERR(i)NGL(y) MEASURED ON*
.
it the exact length the coffin was to be, and then made the
transfer permanent by cutting two notches at its extremities.>>
------------------------------------------------------
. James Joyce's _Ulysses_
...........................................................
When Rutlandbaconsouthamptonshakespeare or another poet of the same
name in the comedy of errors wrote Hamlet he was not the father of his
own son merely but, being no more a son, he was and felt himself the
father of all his race, the father of his own grandfather, the father
of his unborn grandson who, by the same token, never was born
for nature, as Mr Magee understands her, abhors perfection.
..................................................
. Bleibtreustrasse 34, Berlin, W. 15.
..................................................
-- Well, in that case, he said, I don't see why you should expect
payment for it since you don't believe it yourself. Dowden believes
there is some mystery in Hamlet but will say no more. Herr Bleibtreu,
the man Piper met in Berlin, who is working up that {RUTLAND} theory,
believes that the secret is hidden in the Stratford monument.
He is going to visit the present duke, Piper says, and
prove to him that his ancestor wrote the plays. It will
come as a surprise to his grace. But he believes his theory.
------------------------------------------------------
http://www.shakespeare-authorship.org.uk/roger-manners.htm

According to Sidney Lee, it was Roger Manners who obtained the
coat of arms for Shakspere of Stratford from the Heralds' College.
.............................................................
<<Roger Manners was 11 when he began studies
at Cambridge University and was recorded as
being there for seven years until aged 18.

Rutland thus knew well the “Cambridge terminology” found in “Hamlet”,
supposedly a rare knowledge. He visited Denmark and Elsinore,
knew and was known by the royal Court there, which as King
James’ ambassador he visited in 1603 for a royal christening.

The 5th Earl (aged 12) inherited when his father died.
He was a royal ward under Lord Burghley, but
the guardianship was undertaken by ... Francis Bacon

In the family library, a Rutland researcher in 1900 found a cache of
very old books, but more, paper records which said that the library
in Shakespeare’s time contained a number of specific books - source
books, which Shakespeare could have used in his research for the
plays. At Belvoir is a ceiling fresco, a copy of Correggio’s Io
& Jupiter, mentioned unexpectedly in The Taming of the Shrew
.................................................................
. The Taming of the Shrew Prologue, Scene 2

Lord: We'll show thee Io as she was a maid,
. And how she was beguiled and surprised,
. As lively painted as the deed was done.
...............................................................
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jupiter_and_Io

<<Jupiter & Io (c. 1530) is a painting by the Italian late
Renaissance artist Antonio Allegri da Correggio. The painting was
created as a companion piece to the Ganymede Abducted by the Eagle.
The two pictures, along with another pair, were probably intended
to decorate the Ovid Room in [Giulio Romano's] Palazzo Te for
Federico II *Gonzaga* of Mantua; however, they were presented
as a gift to Emperor Charles V. The scene of Jupiter & Io is
inspired by Ovid's classic Metamorphoses. Io, daughter of
the first king of Argos Inachus, is seduced by Jupiter, who
hides behind the dunes to avoid hurting the jealous Juno.>>
.............................................................
Rutland at 20 was at Padua University, in Italy, at the same time as
students by name Rosencrantz & Guylderstern – who in turn were at
the royal christening in 1603 (and were in Shakespeare’s Hamlet)
------------------------------------------------------
*THOMA(s) SNOUT* was the FF(1623) "WALL"
.............................................
*THOMA(s) SNOUT* , tinker
. {anagram}
*SOUTHAM(p)TON*
---------------------------------------------------
*F[RAN]cis F[LUTE]* was the Q1(1600) "WALL"
.............................................
*F[RAN]cis F[LUTE]*, bello(WS MENDER)
. {anagram}
. [E.RUTLAN.]
.
. cis: short of, before (Latin)
. {sice}: 6 {six} (Old English)
.............................................
The 6th Earl of *RUTLANd* paid Richard
Burbage (i.e., Boar-Badge) & Mr. Shakespeare each
F(orty) F(our) shillings for impreso work. (1613).
------------------------------------------------------------
. A Midsommer Nights Dreame [Act I, Scene 2] Q1(1600)
.
Bottom: And I may hide my face, let me play Thisby to:
. Ile speake in a monstrous little voice; Thisne, Thisne,
. ah Pyramus, my louer deare, thy Thysby deare, & Lady deare.
.
Quince: No, no you must play Pyramus: & F[LUTE], you Thysby.
...........................................................
. Act IV, Scene 2
.
Thisby: O sweete bully Bottome. Thus hath hee lost
. {six} pence a day, during his life: hee coulde not haue
. scaped {sixe} pence a day. And the Duke had not giuen him
. {six} pence a day, for playing Pyramus, Ile be hanged.
. He would haue DE(s)ERVED it.
. {Six} pence a day, in Pyramus, or nothing.
...........................................................
. Act V, Scene 1
.
WALL: That I, one *FLUTE* (by {NAME}) p{R}e{S}e{N}t a WALL
...........................................................
Thisby: A sleepe my *LOVE*?
. What, dead my *DOVE* ?
------------------------------------------------------------
At the coronation of Charles I, Francis Manners,
6th {E}arl of {RUTLAND} bore the rod with the *DOVE*.
............................................................
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Manners,_6th_Earl_of_Rutland

<<Francis Manners, 6th Earl of Rutland, KG (1578 – 1632) was an
English nobleman. Despite a brief imprisonment for his involvement
in the Essex Rebellion of 1601, he became prominent at the court
of James I. He lived at Belvoir Castle in Lincolnshire. In 1618,
the "Three Witches of Belvoir", who worked at his castle
were executed for witchcraft, having supposedly caused
the premature deaths of his only two sons in 1608.>>
----------------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/6luqf2

"My Lord *SOUTHAM(p)TON* and Lord *[RUTLAN]d*,
come not to the court ... They pass away the time
in London MEREly in going to plays *EVERy day* "
.
writes Rowland White to Sir Robert Sydney in 1599,
- (Sydney Papers, ed. Collins, ii. 132).>>

Henry Wriothesley,
3rd Earl of Southampton ( *6 October* 1573 – 10 November 1624)
---------------------------------------------------------------
5th Earl of Rutland ___ ( *6 October* 1576 – 26 June 1612)

<<Roger Manners, was “too young and unproven” to be
Shakespeare, is the widely-held belief. Again, to be
taken seriously, he would have had to be a literary genius
in 1593 at the age of 16 (when Venus & Adonis was published).
There is no evidence of this. Nor was there evidence that
this future “Courtier, nobleman, law student, classicist and
linguist, sportsman, soldier, witness to a great storm at sea”
had ever involved himself in poesy, theatre or players.

http://www.shakespeare-authorship.org.uk/roger-manners.htm
------------------------------------------------------
The 5th Earl (aged 12) inherited when his father died.
He was a royal ward under Lord Burghley, but the
guardianship was undertaken by ... Francis Bacon
-----------------------------------------------------------
. . Rosicrucians. . Freemasons
. . Rosy Cross[the Craft] Stone Guild
.........................................................
. Q1. *ROSsenCRAFT*. . *GuilderSTONE* : Oxford
.........................................................
. Q2. ROSencrans. . Guyldensterne : Rutland
.........................................................
. F1. ROSincrane. . Guildensterne
. F2,3,4 *ROSinCROSSe* . . Guildenstare
----------------------------------------------------------------
The 'Hunt for Pan' Folio headpiece:
.
Loading Image...

Loading Image...
Loading Image...
Loading Image...

http://www.cuttingedge.org/news/k1003.cfm
.
1) Indian child w/two phalli: Ferdinando & William Stanley
2) Peacock [ *PAVO* ] : Roger & Francis {MANNERS}.
3) Grapes/CORNucopia: Oxford? SOUTHAM(p)TON?
4) Five petaled *Wild ROSE* : Holy Grail (Henry *ROSE-LY* ?)
5) Arrow PHEON: SIDNEY/Pembroke
6) Coney back: Francis Bacon
7) Greyhound: Oxford (Talbot?)
---------------------------------------------------------
. Nathaniel *HAWTHORNE* wrote the PREFACE and
. sponsored Delia Bacon's book of almost 700 pages,
. _The Philosophy of Shakespeare's Plays Unfolded_,
. which came out in London & Boston in 1857.
.
Delia Bacon: *HAWTHORNE's Last Heroine* by Nina Baym
...................................................
THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE PLAYS OF SHAKSPERE UNFOLDED.
BY DELIA BACON. WITH A PREFACE BY NATHANIAL HAWTHORNE:
http://tinyurl.com/3drmcss

<<'The principal
wo[R]ks of the Elizabethan Philosophy, th[O]se in which the
new method of learnin[G] was practically applied to the nobl[E]st
subjects, were presented to the wo[R]ld in the form of {AN ENIGMA}.
It was a for[M] well fitted to divert inquiry, and baffle even the
research of the scholar for a time; but one calculated to provoke
the philosophic curiosity, and one which would inevitably command a
research that could end only with the *TRUE* solution. That solution
was resERVED for one who would recognise, at last, in the *DISGUISE*
of the great impersonal teacher, the *DISGUISE* of a new learning. It
waited for the reader who would observe, at last, those thick-strewn
scientific clues, those thick-crowding ENIGMAS, those perpetual
beckonings from the "theatre" into the judicial palace of the mind. It
was resERVED for the student who would recognise, at last, the mind
that was seeking so persEVERingly to whisper its tale of outrage, and
"the secrets it was forbid." It waited for one who would answer, at
last, that philosophic challenge, and say, "Go on, I'll follow thee!"
It was resERVED for one who would count years as days, for the love
of the *TRUTH* it hid; who would nEVER turn back on the long road of
initiation, though all "THE IDOLS" must be left behind in its stages;
who would nEVER stop until it stopped in that new cave of Apollo,
where the handwriting on the wall spells anew the old Delphic
motto, and publishes the word that "_unties_ the spell.">>
...........................................
. <= 31 =>
.
. T h e p r i n c i p a l w[O|R] k s o f t h e E l i z a b e t h
. a n P h i l o s o p h y t h[O] s e i n w h i c h t h e n e w m
. e t h o d o f l e a r n i n[G] w a s p r a c t i c a l l y a p
. p l i e d t o t h e n o b l[E] s t s u b j e c t s w e r e p r
. e s e n t e d t o t h e w o[R] l d i n t h e f o r m o f{A N E
. N I G M A}I t w a s a f o r[M] w e l l f i t t e d t o d i v e
. r t i n q u i r y a n d b a f f l e e v e n t h e r e s e a r
. c h o f t h e s c h o l a r

Prob. of [O|ROGER M.] with skip < 32 ~ 1 in 580
.......................................................
<<[O]rlando, called Rotolando, Roland, Rodlan, Hroudland,
& *RUTLANDus* in the Latin chronicles of the Middle Ages,
the *PALADIN*, was lord of Anglant, KNIGHT of Brava, son
of Milo d'Anglesis and Bertha, sister of Charlemagne.>>
---------------------------------------------------------
http://www.philological.bham.ac.uk/anagrams/text.html
.
____ *EDOUARUS V(e)IERUS*
_____ per anagramma
____ *AURE SURDUS VI(d)EO*
------------------------------------------------------
. Hamlet (Quarto 2, 1604) Act 4, Scene 7
.
Queen: There is a Willow growes ascaunt the Brooke
. That showes his horry leaues in the glassy streame,
. Therewith *FANTASTIQUE gaRLANDs did she make
. Of Crowflowers, Nettles, Daises, and long Purples
. That liberall Shepheards giue a *GROS(s)ER NAME* ,
. But our cull-cold maydes doe dead mens fingers call them.
. There on the pendant boughes her *CORONET WEEDES*
. Clambring to hang, an *ENVIOU(s) SLIVER* broke,
....................................................
____ *GROS(s)ER NAME* : *ENVIOU(s) SLIVER*
____ *ROGE(r) MANERS* : *NIL VE(r)O VERIUS*
....................................................
. . Hamlet (Quarto 1, 1603)

Queene: O my Lord, the yong Ofelia
. Hauing made a garland of sundry sortes of floures,
. Sitting vpon a willow by a brooke,
. The *ENVIOUS SPRIG* broke, into the brooke she fell,
----------------------------------------------------
. Love's Labour's Lost (FF, 1623) Act 1, Scene 1
.
DuMANE: My louing Lo[R]d, DuMANE is m[O]rtified,
. The *[G]ROS(s)ER MANN[E]R* of these wo[R]lds delights,
. He throwes vpon the grosse worlds baser slaues:
. To loue, to wealth, to pompe, I pine and die,
. With all these liuing in Philosophie.
.........................................
. *[G]ROS(s)ER MANN[E]R*
. *RO[G]ER(s) MANN[E]RS*
....................................................
. - <= 11 =>

. M y l o u i n g L o [R]
. d,D u m a n e i s m [O]
. r t i f i e d,T h e [G]
. r o s s e r*M A N N [E]
. R*o f t h e s e w o [R]
. l d s d e l i g h t s,

[ROGER] 11
-------------------------------------------------
______ <= 18 =>
.
. L e t t h e b i r d o f l o u d e s
. t l a y O n t h e s o l e A r a b i
. a n t r e e H e r a l d s a d a n d
. t r u m p e t b e T o w h o s e s o
. u n d c h a[S]t e w i n g s o b e y
_ B u t t h o[U]s h r i e k i n g h a
_ r b i n g e[R]F o u l p r e c u r r
__e r o f t h[E]f i e n d A u g u r o
__f t h e f e[V]E R s e n d T o t h i
. s t r o u p{E|C O M E}t h o u n o t
. n e a r
.
Prob. of *EVERUS* ~ 1 in 12,240 (any skip)
........................................
. {ed}ouard{[U]s} *VERUS* , COMES Oxoniae,
. Vicecomes Bulbeck, Dominus de Scales
. & Badlismer, D. Magnus Angliae Ca-
. merarius: Lectori. S. D.
.
http://comp.uark.edu/~mreynold/aulicus.html
-------------------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/pl9azeo

WERE I a kinge I cou(L)d(E CO)maund(E CO)ntent,
Were I obscure hid{DE N} sh(O|U]ld(E) b[E] my (C)a[R]es,
(O|R} were I dea{DE N}o car[E]s sho[U]l(D)e m[E] torm[E]nt,
no[R] hopes, {N}or hates, nor loues nor (G)r{E}ifes nor feares:
A doubtfull choice of thes(E) three wch to craue,
a Kingdom or a Cottage or a Graue.

- Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, by 1586
.......................
. <= 5 =>
.
. I o b s c
. u r e h i
. d {D E N} s
. h (O)[U] l d
. (E) b [E] m y
. (C) a [R] e s,
. (O){R} w e r
. e I d e a
. {D E N} o c
. a r [E] s s
. h o {U} l (D)
. e m [E] t o
. r m [E] N t
. n o [R] h o
. p e s,{N} o
. r h a t e
. s, n o r l
. o u e s n
. o r (G) r {E}
. i f e s
.......................
(LODGE) 38
{RUNE} 21
(E.C.O.) 5,1,1
{NED} -1
[UER] -5
{NED} -1
[E.UEER] -5
-----------------------------------------------------
Ben Jonson (1623) _To the Memory of Shakespeare_
.................................................
My Shakespeare, rise ; *I WILL no[T LODGE] THee* by
Chaucer, or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lye
A little further to make thee a roome ;
Thou art a Moniment, without a tombe,
........................................
Shine forth, thou StarrE Of Poets, and wi[T]h rage,
Or inf[L]uence, chide, [O]r cheere the [D]rooping Sta[G]e;
Which, sinc[E] thy flight fro' hence, hath mourn'd like night,
And despaires day, but for thy Volumes light.
........................................
. <= 11 =>
.
. S h i n e f o r t h, t
. h o u S t a r r E O f
. P o e t s,a n d w i [T]
. h r a g e.O r i n f [L]
. u e n c e,c h i d e,[O]
. r c h e e r e t h e [D]
. r o o p i n g S t a [G]
. e;W h i c h,s i n c [E]
. t h y f l i g h t

[T.LODGE] 11 : Prob. at beginning or end ~ 1 in 12,000
........................................................
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Lodge

<<[T]HOMAS [LODGE] (c. 1558 - September 1625) was an English
dramatist & writer of the Elizabethan & Jacobean periods.>>
------------------------------------------------------------
_ROSALYNDE OR, EUPHUES' GOLDEN LEGACY_ BY [T]HOMAS [LODGE]
................................................
_Saladyne's Sonnet_

When Saladyne had a long while concealed a secret resolution of
revenge, and could no longer hide fire in the flax, nor oil in the
flame, for envy is like lightning, that will appear in the darkest
fog, it chanced on a m[O]rning [V]ERY ea[R]ly he c[A]lled u[P]
certain of his servants, and went with them to the chamber of
Rosader, which being open, he entered with his crew, and
surprised his brother being asleep, and bound him in fetters,
and in the midst of his hall *CHAINED him to a post*.

[PARVO] -6 {2,500,000} [~200,000 letters]
................................................
If it be true that heav[E]n's ete[R]nal co[U]rse
Wi[T]h rest[L]ess sw[A]y and ceaseless turning glides;

[E.RUTLA] 6 {1,700,000} [~200,000 letters]

Why then, if the patients that are sick of this disease can
find in themselves neither reason to persuad[E], nor a[R]t
to c[U]re, ye[T], Rosa[L]ynde, [A]dmit of the counsel of a
friend, and apply the salves that may appease thy passions.

[E.RUTLA] 5 {2,100,000} [~200,000 letters]
-------------------------------------------------------------
In the CHETHam MS.8012 is Philip Sidney's reply to this poem.

Sidney's Answer:

[W]ERT thou a Kinge, y[E]t not comaund{E CO}ntent
[S]eth Empi{R}e [N]one thy minde co{U}ld yet suffic[E]
W[E]r{T} thou obscure, stil{L} cares wo[U|L|D]e y e tormen{T},
but wert tho{U} dead[E], all ca{R}e & sorrowe di{E}s :
An easy choice of these three wch to crave
No kingdome, nor a Cottage but a grave.
.............................................................
. <= 28 =>
.
.[W]E R T t h o u a K i n g e,y[E]t n o t c o m a u n d{E
. C O}n t e n t[S]e t h E m p i{R}e[N]o n e t h y m i n d
. e c o{U}l d y e t s u f f i c[E]W[E]r{T}t h o u o b s c
. u r e,s t i l{L}c a r e s w o[U|L|D]e y e t o r m e n{T},
. b u t w e r t t h o{U}d e a d[E]a l l c a{R}e&s o r r o
. w e d i{E}s:A n e a s y c h o i c e o f t h e s e t h r
. e e w c h t o c r a v e N o k i n g d o m e,n o r a C o
. t t a g e b u t a g r a v e.

[NED] 28
[E.UERE] -28 : Prob. of both in quat. ~ 1 in 85
{E.RUTL.} -11,16: Prob. of both in quat. ~ 1 in 14,500
----------------------------------------------------------
. _MOBY DICK_ CHAPTER 107 "The CARPENTER"
.
<<You might almost say, that this STRANGE uncompromisedness
in him involved *a sort of unintelligence* ; for in his
numerous trades, he did not seem to work so much by reason
or by instinct, or simply because *he had been TUTORed to it*
, or by any intermixture of all these, even or UNEVEN; but
merely by kind of DEAF & DUMB, spontaneous literal process.
.
He was a pure manipulater; his BRAIN,
if he had EVER had one, must have early oozed
along into the muscles of his fingers. He was like
one of those unreasoning but still highly useful,
.
. *MULTUM IN PArVO* , >>
----------------------------------------------------
And though thou hadst *SMALL LATINE* , and lesse Greeke,
.
. *PARVO* : *SMALL* (Latine)
.
. *MULTUM IN PARVO*
. *Much in Little*
.
. motto of : {E. RUTLAND} ROGER Manners
...........................................
. Twixt this T{URTLE AND} his Queen.
.......................................
. Whereupon it made this Threne,
. To the {PHOENIX} and the *DOVE*,
. {C}o-su[P]r{E}mes [A]n{D} sta[R]s {O}f lo[V]e,
. As Ch[O]rus to their Tragic scene.
....................................
___ <= 6 =>
.
. {C} o -s u-[P] r
. {E} m e s [A] n
. {D} s t a [R] s
. {O} f l o [V] e,
. A s c h [O] r
. u s t o t h
. e i r t r a
. g i c s c e
. n e.

{CEDO} 6 : I vanish, pass away (Latin)
[PARVO] 6 prob. of *PARVO* ~ 1 in 4400 (last two lines)
------------------------------------------------------
The merry Greeke, tart Aristo[P]hanes,
*NEAT* Terence, witty Plautus, now not ple[A]se;
But antiquated, and deserted lye
As they we[R]e not of Natures family.
Yet must I not give Nat[U]re all: Thy Art,
My gentle Shakespeare, must enj[O]y a part;
..................................................
. <= 38 =>
.
. ThemerryGreeketartAristo [P] hanesNeatTere
. ncewittyPlautusnownotple [A] seButantiquat
. edanddesertedlyeAstheywe [R] enotofNatures
. familyYetmustInotgiveNat [U] reallThyArtMy
. gentleShakespearemVstenj [O] yapart
.
___________ [PARUO] : skip = 38
-------------------------------------------------
___ SONNET 42 [ROGER M] : skip = 38

Louing offendors thus I will excuse yee,
Thou doost loue her, because thou knowst I loue her,
And for my sake euen so doth she abuse me,
Suff[R]ing my friend for my sake to approoue her,
If I l[O]ose thee, my losse is my loues gaine,
And loosin[G] her, my friend hath found that losse,
Both find[E] each other, and I loose both *TWAINE* ,
And both fo[R] my sake *LAY ON ME THIS CROSSE* ,
But here's the ioy, [M]Y FRIEND AND I ARE *ONE* ,
Sweete flattery, then she loues but me alone.
..................................................
_________ <= 38 =>

. Suff [R] ingmyfriendformy(s)aketoapprooueher
. IfIl [O] osetheemylosseis(M)ylouesgaineAndlo
. osin [G] hermyfriendhathf(O)undthatlosseBoth
. find [E] eachotherandIloo(S)ebothtwaineAndbo
. thfo [R] mysakeLAYONMETHI(S)CROSSEButheresth
. eioy [M] YFRIENDANDIAREON(E)

[ROGERM] 38 Prob. in any Sonnet ~ 1 in 21
--------------------------------------------------------
____ SONNET 83 *ROGER* : skip = 38

I NEVER saw that you did painting need,
And therefore to your faire no painting set,
I found (or thought I found) you did exceed,
The barren tender of a Poets debt:
And therefore haue I slept in your report,
That you your selfe being extant well might show,
How farre a moderne quill doth come to short,
Speaking of *WORTH* , what *WO[R]TH* in you doth grow,
This silence for my sinne y[O]u did impute,
Which shall be most my *GLORY* bein[G] dombe,
For I impaire not beautie being mute,
Wh[E]n others would giue life, and bring a tombe.
The[R]e liues more life in one of your faire eyes,
Then *BOTH YOUR POETS* can in praise deuise.
......................................................
Speaking of worth, what <= 38 =>

. W[O|R]T Hinyoudothgr owThissilenceformysinn
. e y[O]u didimputeWhi chshallbemostmyGLORYbe
. i n[G]d ombeForIimpa irenotbeautiebeingmute
. W h[E]n otherswouldg iuelifeandbringatombeT
. h e[R]e liuesmorelif einoneofyourfaireeyesT
. h e-n-B OTHYOURPOETS caninpraisedeuise
-----------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Manners,_5th_Earl_of_Rutland

<<Roger Manners, 5th Earl of Rutland (6 October 1576 – 26 June 1612)
was the son of John Manners, 4th Earl of Rutland. He married Elizabeth
Sidney (daughter of Sir Philip Sidney and stepdaughter of Robert
Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex), on 5 March 1599. He died in 1612,
aged 35 and his titles passed to his brother, Francis Manners.

He was a student at Oxford and Cambridge, Gray's Inn, and University
of Padua, Italy. He travelled across Europe, took part in military
campaigns led by Essex, and was a participant of Essex's rebellion
against Queen Elizabeth I. He was favoured by James I, and honoured
by his contemporaries as a man of great intelligence & talent. He
enjoyed the friendship of some of the most prominent writers and
artists of the Elizabethan-Jacobean age. In 1602 he led an Embassy to
Denmark, homeland of James' Queen Anne of Denmark. Evidence indicates
that the Earl was a patron of Inigo Jones and probably introduced
Jones to the Court of James I & Anne of Denmark, where Jones had
his impact as both an architect and a designer of Court masques.

Roger Manners (and his wife Elizabeth Sidney, daughter of the poet
Philip Sidney) are believed by some to be candidates for the author
of Shakespeare's literary work in the Shakespearean authorship
question. Karl Bleibtreu & Celestin Demblon supported this idea.>>
-----------------------------------------------------
Roger Manners: 5th Earl of Rutland
http://tinyurl.com/3usnzkb

<<Background: One of the most well-educated and remarkably literate
people of Elizabethan England. Master of Arts of Cambridge and Oxford
Universities. Was a student at Padua University (Italy) for a while,
studied law at Gray's Inn. For some time, was under the tutelage
of Sir Francis Bacon. Travelled extensively about Europe, visited
the Netherlands, Germany, France, Switzerland, Northern Italy.
Corresponded with European scholars.

Famous for: His life was closely associated with the Pembrokes and
Sidneys, with the Earl of Southampton, and the Earl of Essex. His
platonic wife and, later, co-author was Elizabeth Sidney, an only
daughter of the famous poet Sir Philip Sidney and step-daughter of
the Earl of Essex. In spite of precarious state of health, the Earl
of Rutland participated more than once in war on land and sea.
Was actively involved in Essex's rebellion and severely punished
for that by Queen Elizabeth I. After the Queen's death in 1603,
the new monarch King James I sent him as his envoy
on an honorary mission to the King of Denmark.

The Belvoir Castle archives keep a variant of a chant
from Twelfth Night written in the Earl of Rutland's hand,
and a unique record of the Castle's steward about payment
of money to Shakespeare. Poet and playwright Ben Jonson, who was
well-acquainted with the Earl and Countess of Rutland, called them
and their close circle "poets of the Belvoir Vale." The scene of some
Shakespeare's plays is laid in the very towns of Northern Italy that
Rutland had earlier visited during his European travels. The exact and
accurate Danish realities appeared in Hamlet only after the Earl's
trip to Denmark. The mysterious "Shake-Speare" ceased his creative
work at the very same time when Roger Manners, the 5th Earl of
Rutland, and his wife passed away in 1612 (in quick succession one
after the other). The First Folio was to be released in 1622, the
10th obit of the Earl and his platonic wife. The Second Folio was
published in 1632, obviously to commemorate their 20th obit.>>
----------------------------------------------------------------
. As You Like It Act 3, Scene 2
.
Touchstone: Why, if thou nEVER wast at court thou nEVER saw'st good
. *MANNERS*; if thou nEVER sawest good *MANNERS*, then thy *MANNERS*
. must be wicked; and wickedness is sin, and sin is damnation.
. Thou art in a parlous state, shepherd.
.
CORIN: Not a whit, touchstone: those that are good *MANNERS* at the
. court are as ridiculous in the country as the behavior of the country
. is most mockable at the court. You told me you salute not at the
. court, but you kiss your hands: that courtesy would be uncleanly,
. if courtiers were shepherds.
-------------------------------------------------
http://phoenixandturtle.net/loves_martyr.htm
.
LOVES MARTYR: OR, ROSALINS COMPLAINT. - Ro. Chester
.
. Phoenix of beautie, beauteous, Bird of any
. To thee I do entitle all my labour,
. More precious in mine eye by far then many
. That (FEED)st all earthly sences with thy savour:
. Accept my home-writ praises of thy love,
. And kind acceptance of thy Turtle-doue
................................................
A new Cou{R}tly Sonet, {O}f (T)he Lady {G|R|E)n
Slee{V|E|S). To the n{E|W) (T)Une of G{R|E)ensleev{E|S).
................................................
_____ <= 9 =>

. A n e (W) C {O} u {R} t
. l y S (O) n {E} t,{O} f
. (T) H (E)(L) a (D) y {G}(R)
. (E) E (N)(S) l (E) E {V}(E)
. (S) T (O) t h (E) n {E}(W)
. (T) U (N) e o (F) G {R}(E)
. e n s l E E v {E}(S)
.
(TEST) 9
{ROGVE,RE} 9 = {ROG(v)ER manners + VE,RE}
{ROGVE} 9
. {VERE} 9
----------------------------------------------------------
The Merry Wives of Windsor Act 2, Scene 2 (Quarto 1, 1602)
.
FALSTAFF: Reason you {ROGUE,RE}ason.
. Doest thou thinke Ile indanger my soule gratis?
. In briefe, hang no more about mee, I am no gybit
. for you. A short knife and a throng to your *MANNER*
. of pickt hatch, goe. Youle not beare a Letter for me
. you {ROGUE} you: you stand vpon your honor. Why
. thou vnconfinable basenesse thou, tis as much as I
. can do to keep the termes of my honor precise. I, I
. my selfe sometimes, leauing the feare of God on
. the left hand, am faine to shuffel, to filch & to lurch.
. And yet you stand vpon your honor, you {ROGUE}.
. You, you.
---------------------------------------------------
. O, could he but have drawne his wit
. As well in [BRASS]e, as he hath hit
. His face ; the Print would then surpasse
. All, that was *EVER WRIT* in [BRASS]e. - B.J.
----------------------------------------------------
<<In GREEK mythology, *TALOS* was a man of [BRASS],
the work of Hephaestos (Vulcan), who went round the
island of CRETE thrice a day. WhenEVER he saw a STRANGER
draw near the island he either threw boulders at them
or he made himself red-hot, and embraced the STRANGER.
When Jason & the Argonauts escaped to CRETE with the GOLDen
Fleece Medea was able to remove the plug on *TALOS' ANKLE*
such that the ICHOR, his life force, FLOWED out of him.>>
....................................................
[T]o life againe, to heare thy BUSKIN [*ANKLE*] tread,
[A]nd SHAKE *A STAGE* : Or, when thy SOCKES were on,
[L]eave thee alone, for the comparison
[O]f all, that INSOLENT GREECE, or haughtie Rome
[S]EnT FORTH*, or since did from their ashes come.
--------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talos

<<In the Cretan tales, *TALOS* (Τάλως) or Talon (Τάλων)
was a giant man of bronze who protected Europa in Crete
from pirates and invaders by circling the island's shores
three times daily while guarding it. *TALOS* is said to
be created from a petition from Zeus to Hephaestus, to
protect Europa from persons who would want to kidnap her.>>
------------------------------------------------------
Upon the Dramatick Poems of Mr John Fletcher (start)
prefixed to the first edition of Beaumont & Fletcher's Works,
and included (under that title) in William Cartwright's
_Comedies, Tragi-comedies, and Poems (1651)

. Though when all [FLETCH]er writ, and the entire
. Man was indulged unto that sacred fire,
. His thoughts, and his thoughts dresse, appear'd both such,
. That 'twas his happy fault to do too much;
. Who therefore wisely did submit each birth
. To knowing Beaumont e're it did come forth,
. Working againe untill he said 'twas fit,
. And made him the sobriety of his wit;
. Though thus he call'd his Judge into his fame,
. And for that aid allow'd him halfe the name,
.'Tis knowne, that sometimes he did stand alone,
. That both the Spunge and Pencill were his owne;
. That himselfe judg'd himselfe, could singly do,
. And was at last Beaumont and [FLETCH]er too;
. Else we had lost [H]is Shepherdesse , a piece
. Even and smooth, spun from a finer flee[C]e,
. Where softnesse raignes, where passions passions greet,
. Gen[T]le and high, as floods of Balsam meet.
. Where dress'd in white expr[E]ssions, sit bright Loves,
. Drawne, like their fairest Queen, by mi[L]kie Doves;
. A piece, which Johnson in a rapture bid
. Come up a glori[F]i'd Worke, and so it did.

[FLETCH] -52 : Prob. at start ~ 1 in 835
------------------------------------------------------
Upon the Dramatick Poems of Mr John Fletcher (end)
by William Cartwright

. The whole designe, the shadowes, the lights such
. That none can say he shewes or hides too much:
. Businesse growes up, ripened by just encrease,
. And by as just degrees againe doth cease,
. The heats and minutes of affaires are watcht,
. And the nice points of time are met, and snatcht:
. [N]ought later then it should, nought comes b[E]fore,
. [C]hymists, and Calculators doe e[R]re more:
. [S]ex, age, degree, affec(T)ions, co[U]ntry, place,
. [T]he inward substance, (A)nd [T]he outward face;
. [A]ll kept p{R}ecisely, a[L|L) exactly fit,
. [W]hat he wo{U}ld write, he w[A]s bef(O)re he writ.
.'[T]wix{T} Johnsons grave, and Shake(S)peares {L}ighter sound
. His muse so steer'd th{A}t something still was found,
.
[T.WATSCN]
.......................................................
. <= 30 =>
.
. n o u g h t c o m e s b[E]f o r e,C h y m i s t s,a n d C a
. l c u l a t o r s d o e e[R]r e m o r e:S e x,a g e,d e g r
. e e,a f f e c(T)i o n s,c o[U]n t r y,p l a c e,T h e i n w
. a r d s u b s t a n c e(A)n d[T]h e o u t w a r d f a c e;A
. l l k e p t p{R}e c i s e l y,a[L|L)e x a c t l y f i t,W h
. a t h e w o{U}l d w r i t e,h e w[A]s b e f(O)r e h e w r i
. t'T w i x{T}J o h n s o n s g r a v e,a n d S h a k e(S)p e
. a r e s{L}i g h t e r s o u n d H i s m u s e s o s t e e r'
. d t h{A}t s o m e t h i n g s t i l l w a s f o u n d,
.
(TALOS) 35 : Prob. at end ~ 1 in 44
[E.RUTLA.] 31
{RUTLA.} 29 : Prob. of 2{RUTLA.}'s at end ~ 1 in 17,800
..........................................................
. Nor this, nor that, nor both, but so his owne,
. That 'twas his marke, and he was by it knowne.
. Hence did he take true judgements, hence did strike
. All pallates some way, though not all alike:
. The god of numbers might his numbers crowne,
. And listning to them wish they were his owne.
. Thus welcome forth, what ease, or wine, or wit
. Durst yet produce, that is, what [FLETCH]er writ.
..........................................................
Cartwright was a brilliant and most industrious student,
"sitting sixteen hours a day at all *MANNER* of knowledge,"
. says Lloyd in his Memoirs.
----------------------------------------------------
D. Roper's _Shakespeare, to be or not to be_ p.42

<<Lady MANNERS thought *SOUTHAM(p)TON* *TOO FANTASTICAL*>>
[i.e., Elizabeth Sidney (daughter of Sir Philip Sidney)]
--------------------------------------------------------
<<The following passage by Mr. Pope stands as a preface
to the various readings at the end of the 8th volume
of his edition of Shakspeare, 1728.>> - Reed.
.......................................................
End of _Preface to Shakespeare_ By Alexander Pope

"But to the end EVERy reader may judge for himself, we have
annexed a compleat list of the rest; which if he shall think
trivial, or erroneous, either in {P}art, or in whole; at worst
it can spoil but a half sheet of paper, t{H}at chances to be
left vacant here. And we purpose for the futur{E}, to do the
same with respect to any other persons, who thro' cand{O}r or
anity, shall co[M]municate o[R] publish, th[E] least thi{N|G]s
tending t[O] the illust[R]ation of {OUR AUTHOR}."
..............................
. <= 10 =>
.
. v a n i t y s h a l
. l c o [M] m u n i c a
. t e o [R] p u b l i s
. h t h [E] l e a s t t
. h i{N}[G] s t e n d i
. n g t [O] t h e i l l
. u s t [R] a t i o n o
. f{O U R A U T H O R}
.
[ROGER M] -10 : Prob. at end ~ 1 in 8760
{PHEON} 51 : Prob. at end ~ 1 in 42
.....................................................
We have here omitted nothing but pointings and mere errors of the press, which I hope the corrector of it has rectify'd ; if not, I cou'd wish as accurate an one as Mr. Th. had been at that trouble, which I desired Mr. Tonson to solicit him to undertake. " A. P."
----------------------------------------------------------
Thomas Shelton's _The History of the Valorous &
Witty Knight-Errant D{O}n Qui{X}ote d{E} la Ma{N}cha_

CHAPTER 74: How Don Quixote fell Sick;
of the Will he made, and of his Death

All the house was in a c[O]nfusion and up[R]oar; all which
n[O]twithstandin[G], the niece ceas[E]d not to feed ve[R]y devoutly,
the [M]aidservant to drink profoundly, and Sancho to live merrily.
For, when a man is in hope to inherit anything, that hope doth
deface or at least moderate in the mind of th{E} inheritor the
remembrance o{R} feeling of the sorrow and gri{E}f which of
reason he should ha{V} e a feeling of the testator’s d{E}ath.
............................................
All the house was in

________ <= 12 =>

. a c[O]n f u s i o n a n
. d u p[R]o a r a l l w h
. i c h n[O]t w i t h s t
. a n d i n[G]t h e n i e
. c e c e a s[E]d n o t t
. o f e e d v e[R]y d e v
. o u t l y t h e[M]a i d

[O(ROGER)M] 13

servant to drink profoundly, and Sancho to live merrily.
For, when a man is in hope to inherit anything, that
hope doth deface or at least moderate in the mind of

________ <= 12 =>

. t h{E}i n h e r i t o r
. t h e r e m e m b r a n
. c e o{R}f e e l i n g o
. f t h e s o r r o w a n
. d g r i{E}f w h i c h o
. f r e a s o n h e s h o
. u l d h a{V}e a f e e l
. i n g o f t h e t e s t
. a t o r s d{E}a t h

{EVERE} -25
..........................................................
....unto his witty pen:

‘Here it is, O my slender quill, whether thou be ill

- [O|R] well cut, that thou shalt abide han
_. g [E]d upon those racks whereon they ha
_. n [G] spits and broaches, being thereun
__ t [O] fastened with this copper wire. Th
_. e [R]e shalt thou live many ages, except
_. s {O M}e rash, fond-hardy, and lewd histor
__ i {A-N}an take thee down to profane thee. Ne
_. v {E-R}theless, before they lay hands up
_ o {N}

thee, thou mayst, as it were by way of advertisement,

[{O} ROGER] -30
..........................................................
and as well as thou canst, boldly tell them, Away, pack hence, stand
afar off, you *WICKED BOTCHERS* and ungracious souters, and touch me
not, since to me only it belongs to cause to be imprinted “Cum bono
privilegio Regiae Majestatis.” Don Quixote was born for me alone,
and I had my birth only for him. If he hath been able to produce the
effects, I have had the *GLORY* to know how to write and compile them
well. To be short, he and I are but one selfsame thing, maugre and
in despite of the fabulous Scribbler de Tordesillas, who hath rashly
and malapertly dared with an ostriche’ coarse and bungling pen
to write the prowess and high feats of arms of my valorous {KNIGHT}.
------------------------------------------------------------
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206. Aula.
.
With mightie men, who likes to spend his prime,
And loues that life, which few account the best,
In hope at length vnto his heigth to clime,
By good desert, or thorough Fortune blest,
M[A]y here behold the Mode[L]l of his bliss{E},
And wha[T] his life, in summe a{N}d s[U]bstance is.
A Ladie fai[R|E}, is Favovr feign'd to b[E],
Whos{E} youthfull Cheeke, doth bea{R}e a louely blush,
And as no ni{G}gard of her courtesie,
She beares about a Holy-water brush:
Where with her bountie round about she throwes,
Faire promises, good wordes, and gallant showes.
........................................
_________ <= 21 =>
.
F o r t u n e b l e s t,M[A]y h e r e b e
h o l d t h e M o d e[L]l o f h i s b l i
s s{E}A n d w h a[T]h i s l i f e,i n s u
m m e a{N}d s[U]b s t a n c e i s.A L a d
i e f a i[R|E}i s F a v o v r f e i g n'd
t o b[E]W h o s{E}y o u t h f u l l C h e
e k e,d o t h b e a{R}e a l o u e l y b l
u s h,A n d a s n o n i{G}g a r d
.
[E.RUTLA] -19 {470,000}
{GREENE} -23 {170,000}
------------------------------------------------------
Upon the Dramatick Poems of Mr John Fletcher (start)
by William Cartwright

. Though when all [FLETCH]er writ, and the entire
. Man was indulged unto that sacred fire,
. His thoughts, and his thoughts dresse, appear'd both such,
. That 'twas his happy fault to do too much;
. Who therefore wisely did submit each birth
. To knowing Beaumont e're it did come forth,
. Working againe untill he said 'twas fit,
. And made him the sobriety of his wit;
. Though thus he call'd his Judge into his fame,
. And for that aid allow'd him halfe the name,
.'Tis knowne, that sometimes he did stand alone,
. That both the Spunge and Pencill were his owne;
. That himselfe judg'd himselfe, could singly do,
. And was at last Beaumont and [FLETCH]er too;
. Else we had lost [H]is Shepherdesse , a piece
. Even and smooth, spun from a finer flee[C]e,
. Where softnesse raignes, where passions passions greet,
. Gen[T]le and high, as floods of Balsam meet.
. Where dress'd in white expr[E]ssions, sit bright Loves,
. Drawne, like their fairest Queen, by mi[L]kie Doves;
. A piece, which Johnson in a rapture bid
. Come up a glori[F]i'd Worke, and so it did.

[FLETCH] -52 : Prob. at start ~ 1 in 835
------------------------------------------------------
Upon the Dramatick Poems of Mr John Fletcher (end)
by William Cartwright

. The whole desi{G}ne, the shadowes, the lights such
. That none can say he shewes o{R} hides too much:
. Businesse growes up, ripened by just encreas{E},
. And by as just degrees againe doth cease,
. The heats and minut{E}s of affaires are watcht,
. And the nice points of time are met, a{N}d snatcht:
.......................................................
{GREENE} 50
.......................................................
. [N]ought later then it should, nought comes b[E]fore,
. [C]hymists, and Calculators doe e[R]re more:
. [S]ex, age, degree, affec(T)ions, co[U]ntry, place,
. [T]he inward substance, (A)nd [T]he outward face;
. [A]ll kept p{R}ecisely, a[L|L) exactly fit,
. [W]hat he wo{U}ld write, he w[A]s bef(O)re he writ.
.'[T]wix{T} Johnsons grave, and Shake(S)peares {L}ighter sound
. His muse so steer'd th{A}t something still was found,
.
[T.WATSCN]
.......................................................
. <= 30 =>
.
. n o u g h t c o m e s b[E]f o r e,C h y m i s t s,a n d C a
. l c u l a t o r s d o e e[R]r e m o r e:S e x,a g e,d e g r
. e e,a f f e c(T)i o n s,c o[U]n t r y,p l a c e,T h e i n w
. a r d s u b s t a n c e(A)n d[T]h e o u t w a r d f a c e;A
. l l k e p t p{R}e c i s e l y,a[L|L)e x a c t l y f i t,W h
. a t h e w o{U}l d w r i t e,h e w[A]s b e f(O)r e h e w r i
. t'T w i x{T}J o h n s o n s g r a v e,a n d S h a k e(S)p e
. a r e s{L}i g h t e r s o u n d H i s m u s e s o s t e e r'
. d t h{A}t s o m e t h i n g s t i l l w a s f o u n d,
.
(TALOS) 35 : Prob. at end ~ 1 in 44
[E.RUTLA.] 31
{RUTLA.} 29 : Prob. of 2{RUTLA.}'s at end ~ 1 in 17,800
..........................................................
. Nor this, nor that, nor both, but so his owne,
. That 'twas his marke, and he was by it knowne.
. Hence did he take true judgements, hence did strike
. All pallates some way, though not all alike:
. The god of numbers might his numbers crowne,
. And listning to them wish they were his owne.
. Thus welcome forth, what ease, or wine, or wit
. Durst yet produce, that is, what [FLETCH]er writ.
----------------------------------------------------
Glittereyed, his rufous skull close to his GREENcapped
desklamp sought the face, bearded amid darkGREENEr
SHADOW, an ollav, holyeyed. He laughed low:

[A] sizar's [L]augh of [T]rinity: [U]nanswe[R]ed.

Orch[E]stral Satan, weeping many a rood
Tears such as angels weep.

[ERUTLA] -7 {1,200,000}
----------------------------------------------------
# finds in skips from ±2 to ±1001
..................................
String NT OT Moby Dick (4,150,000,000)
---------------------------------------------------
O(ROGER)M .45 1.4 1.6 (1 in 1,200,000,000)
ROGERM 15 56 20 (1 in 45,600,000)
PARVO 53 214 51 (1 in 13,000,000)
ERUTLA 78 297 113 (1 in 8,500,000)
PARUO 165 575 307 (1 in 4,000,000)
ROGER 673 2250 1061 (1 in 1,040,000)
------------------------------------------------------------
. Love's Labor's Lost (Folio, 1623) Act 1, Scene 1

Berowne: As painefully to poare vpon *A BOOKE*,
. To seeke the light of *TRUTH*, while *TRUTH* the while
. Doth falsely blinde the *EYE*-sight of his looke:
. Light seeeking light, doth light of light beguile:
. So ere you finde where light in darkenesse lies,
. Your light growes darke by losing of your *EYES*.
. Studie me how to please the *EYE* indeede,
. By fixing it vpon a fairer *EYE*,
. Who dazling so, that *EYE* shall be his heed,
. And giue him light that it was blinded by.
. Studie is like the heauens glorious Sunne,
. That will not be *DEEPE search'd* with sawcy lookes:
. Small haue continuall plodders *EUER wonne* ,
. Saue base authoriti{E} from other{S} *BOOKES* .
. The{S}e earthly G{O}dfathers o{F} heauens lights,
....................................................
{FOSSE} -10
....................................................
. That *GIUE A NAME to EVERy FIXED STARRE* ,
. Haue no more profit of their shining nights,
. Then those that walke and wot not what they a[R]e.
. Too much to kn[O]w, is to know nou[G]ht but *FAME* :
. And [E]VERy Godfathe[R] *can GIVE A NAME* .
....................................................
Then those that walke and wot not what they a-

. [R] e T o o m u c h t o k n
. [O] w,i s t o k n o w n o u
. [G] h t b u t F A M E A n d
. [E] u e r y G o d f a t h e
. [R] c a n G I V E A N A M E.

[ROGER] 13
-----------------------------------------------------------
Archbishop of Canterbury (1583-1603) John WHITgift
founds WHITgift School in cROYDON (1596).
(1597 was the 1000th anniversary of Christianity in England.)

Archbishop WHITgift died on February 29th 1603/4
[Exactly one century after Columbus used a lunar eclipse
. to frighten hostile Jamaican Indians!]

WHITgift formed a committee to censor plays in 1589;
. later had Queen Elizabeth issue a proclamation
. against *fiddamatorie and FANTASTICALL* writings!
--------------------------------------------------------
Willobie his Avisa (1594) Cant. XLIIII
Henrico Willobego. Italo-Hispalensis.

<<H.W. being sodenly infected with the contagion of
a *FANTASTICALL FIT* , at the first sight of *A*,
--------------------------------------------------------
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/10800/10800-h/ampart3.html

The Preface of "The Anatomy of Melancholy" (1621) Burton

<<There will not be wanting, I presume, one or other that will
much discommend some part of this treatise of love-melancholy, and
object that it is too light for a divine, too comical a subject
to speak of love symptoms, *TOO FANTASTICAL* , and fit alone
for a wanton poet, a feeling young lovesick gallant,
an effeminate courtier, or some such *IDLE* person.>>
--------------------------------------------------------
D. Roper's _Shakespeare, to be or not to be_ p.42

<<Lady MANNERS thought Southampton *TOO FANTASTICAL*>>
[i.e., Elizabeth Sidney (daughter of Sir Philip Sidney)]
---------------------------------------------------------
. Henry IV, Part 1 (Quarto 1, 1598) Act II Scene iv

Falst. Peace good pint-pot , peace good tickle-braine.
*HARRIE*, I doe not onelie maruaile where thou spendest
thy time, but also how thou art accompanied. For

though the cammomill the [M]ore it is t[R]oden on,
th[E] faster it [G]rowes: so *Y[O]UTH* the mo[R]e
it is was{T}ed, the soo{N}}er it wear{E}s: that tho{U}
art my son {I} haue part{I}y thy moth{E}rs worde,

partlie my owne opinion, but chieflie a villainous
tricke of thine eye, and a foolish hanging of thy neather
lippe, that dooth warrant me. If then thou bee sonne to mee,
heere lies the poynt, why beeing sonne to me, art thou
so pointed at? shal the blessed sunne of heauen proue a mi-
cher, and eat black-berries? a question not to be askt. Shall the
sonne of England proue a theefe, and take purses? a question to
be askt. There is a thing *HARRY*, which thou hast often heard of,
and it is knowne to many in our land by the name of pitch. This
pitch (as ancient writers do report) doth defile, so doth the com-
panie thou keepest: for Harrie now, I do not speake to thee in
drinke, but in teares; not in pleasure but in passion: not in
words onely, but in woes also: and yet there is a vertuous man,
whom I haue often noted in thy companie,
but I know not his name.
...............................................
____ <= 9 =>
.
. t h o u g h t h e
. c a m m o m i l l
. t h e [M] o r e i t
. i s t [R] o d e n o
. n,t h [E] f a s t e
. r i t [G] r o w e s:
. s o*Y [O] U T H*t h
. e m o [R] e i t i s
. w a s {T} e d,t h e
. s o o {N} e r i t w
. e a r {E} s:t h a t
. t h o {U} a r t m y
. s o n {I} h a u e p
. a r t {L} y t h y m
. o t h {E} r s w o r
. d e
.
{T.NEUILE} 9 Prob. in this speech w. skip < 10 ~ 1 in 7000
[ROGER M] -9 Prob. in this speech w. skip < 10 ~ 1 in 6400
................................................................
Young Hal / *HARRIE* ? :
[ROGER M]anners, 5th Earl of Rutland (6 Oct. 1576 - 26 June 1612)

Anti-Falstaff ? : {T}homas {NEVILE} (1544 - 10 July 1614)
--------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer

Dennis
2017-01-05 05:40:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by nordicskiv2
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Gladiator (2000)
Wisdom, justice, fortitude and temperance. As I read the list,
I knew I had none of them. But I have other virtues, father.
Ambition. That can be a virtue when it drives us to excel.
Resourcefulness, courage, perhaps not on the battlefield, but...
there are many forms of courage. Devotion, to my family.
But none of my virtues were on your list.
Was there supposed to have been any point to your post above, Art? If so, what was it?
“Nothing is more necessary than the unnecessary.”
-Uncle Eliseo, Life Is Beautiful

Amid the tragedies of the American election season, Guido in Life Is Beautiful strives to protect his sons innocence. The film highlights the critical nature of Art in everyday life, making the case that the things and people we love are the only reason for living. Never is this more clear than when Uncle Eliseo states our need for Art and Comedy so concisely.
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