Discussion:
this Bill is ended
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Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-04-07 17:13:12 UTC
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-------------------------------------------------
. AUBREY'S 'BRIEF LIVES'
.
. MATHEMATICS.
.
. John Newto[N] (†1678).
. {FRANCIS} Potter (†1678).
. Sir J[O]nas Moore (†1679).
. Richard Al[C]orne (†16..).
. Henry Bond (†16..).
. Mich[A]el Dary (†1679).
. William, lord [B]rereton (†1680).
.............................................
. <= 18 =>
.
. J o h n N e w t o [N]{F R A N C I S} P
. o t t e r S i r J [O] n a s M o o r e
. R i c h a r d A l [C] o r n e H e n r
. y B o n d M i c h [A] e l D a r y W i
. l l i a m,l o r d [B] r e r e t o n
.
[BACON] -18
-----------------------------------------------------------
The cryptography of Shakespeare, (1922) By Walter Arensberg
[ http://home.att.net/~mleary/baco1.htm ]
............................................................
An interesting discovery is the [BACON] acrostic
in 'Ch. Marl. THE TRAGICALL History of D.Faustus'
Printed by V. S. for [THOMAS BUSHELL]. (1604):

___ [N]ow will I make an ende immediately.
Me.[O]what will not I do to obtaine his soule?
Fau.[C O N]summatum est , this Bill is ended,
___ [A]nd Faustus hath bequeath'd his soule to LUCIFER.
___ [B]ut what is this inscription on mine arme?

Homo FUGE

FAUSTUS: I, John Faustus, OF WITTENBERG,
Doctor, by these present, do give both body and soul
To LUCIFER Prince of the East,
and his minister Mephistophilis;
-----------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Bushell_(mining_engineer)

<<[THOMAS BUSHELL] (c. 1593–1674) was a servant of Francis [BACON] who went
on to become a mining engineer & Royalist defender of Lundy Island during
the Civil War. He had an interest in solitary & penitential living.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------
. [THOMAS BUSHELL] AUBREY'S 'BRIEF LIVES'
.
[THOMAS BUSHELL] was one of the gentlemen that wayted on the Lord Chancellour Bacon.

'Twas the fashion in those dayes for gentlemen to have their suites of
clothes garnished with buttons. My Lord Bacon was then in disgrace,
and his man Bushell having more buttons then usuall on his *CLOAKE*,
etc., they sayd that his lord's breech made buttons and Bushell wore
them--from whence he was called _buttond Bushell_.
.....................................................................
During the [T]i{M}e {O|F] {T}he c[I]vill [W]arre[S],
he lived in Lundy island.
..............................
{TOM} -2
[SWIFT] -5
-------------------------------------------------------------
The KEY word "FUGE" marking the start/end of the BACON
acrostic was given much significance in Bacon's own
(1623!!) Advancement of Learning:

http://fly.hiwaay.net/~paul/bacon/advancement/book6ch1.html

"Bi-literarie Alphabet. Say the interior Letter be 'FUGE'. Now to
the interiour letter, which is Biliterate, you shall fit a biformed
exteriour letter, which shall answer the other, letter for letter,
and afterwards set it downe. Let the exteriour example be,

Manere te volo donec venero.
aabab baabb aabba aabba
_ F __ U __ G __ E

<<A short Latin cover text meaning "Do not go until I come"
deciphers as a mesasage of the opposite advice: "FLEE">>
---------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.geni.com/people/Rev-William-Swifte/6000000008394982395

Rev. William *SWIFT* (c 1566 - 1624)
Father of Reverend Thomas *SWIFT*:
.............................................
W. H. Auden - 'Family Ghosts'
http://tinyurl.com/28usvlr

Rev. Thomas *SWIFT*
Birth: 1595 / Death: 1658;(Age 63)

Event: A staunch Royalist, 'plundred by the roundheads
. six and thirty times';(Mercurius Rusticus, 1685);

Occupation: Vicar of Goodrich, *HEREFORD*shire
http://tinyurl.com/23nmgrm

Marriage Elizabeth Dryden before 1640;(Age 45);

#1 1640 (Age 45); Son: Jonathan *SWIFT* [father of author]
#2 Son: Dryden *SWIFT*
#3 Son: Thomas *SWIFT* [son-in-law of William Davenant]
--------------------------------------------------------
Thomas Fuller, in History of the Worthies of England (1662) 1:262.
http://spenserians.cath.vt.edu/BiographyRecord.php?action=GET&bioid=62

SIR WALTER RAWLEIGH. "The sons of Heth said unto Abraham, Thou art a
great Prince among us, In the choice of our Sepulchres bury thy dead,
none shall withhold them from thee." So may we say to the memory of
this worthy Knight, repose yourself in this our Catalogue under what
Topick you please, of States-man, Sea-man, Souldier, Learned Writer,
and what not? His worth unlocks our closest Cabinets, and
provides both room and wellcome to entertain him.

He was born at Budelely in this County [Devonshire], of an Ancient Family,
but decaied in Estate, and he the youngest brother thereof. He was bred in
Oriel Colledg in Oxford, and thence coming to Court, found some hopes of
the Queens favours reflecting upon him. This made him write in a glasse Window, obvious to the Queens eye, "Fain would I climb, yet fear I to fall."
Her Majesty either espying {O}r bein{G} shown {I}t, did u{N}der-wr{I}te,
"If thy heart fails thee, climb not at all." However he at last climbed up
by the stairs of his own desert. But his Introduction into the Court bare
an elder date. From this occasion: This captain Raleigh, coming out of
Ireland to the English Court in good habit (his Cloaths being then a
considerable part of his estate) found the Queen walking, till meeting with
a Plashy place, she seemed to scruple going thereon. Presently Raleigh cast
and spread his new Plush Cloak on the ground, whereon the Queen trod gently,
rewarding him afterwards with many Suits, for his so free and seasonable
tender of so fa{I}r a foot Cl{O}ath. Thus a{N} advantag{E}ous admis{S}ion
into the first notice of a Prince, is more than half a degree to preferment.
.............................................................
{INIGO} -6
{IONES} 9 : Prob. of both in paragraph ~ 1 in 1,500
.............................................................
It is reported of Women in the Balear Islands, that to make their Sons
exper[T] archers; they will not, when children, give them their break-fast
be[F]ore they had hit the mark. Such the dealing of the Queen with this
Kn[I]ght, making him to earn his Honour, and by pain and peril, to purchase
[W]hat places or credit or profit were bestowed upon him. Indeed it
wa[S T]rue of him, what was said of Cato Uticensis: That he seemed to
be born to that onely which he went about: So dextrous was he in all his
undertakings, In Court, in Ca[M]p, by Sea, by L[A]nd, with Swo[R]d, with
Pen, w[I]tnesse in t[He] last his History of the World; wherein the onely
default or (defect rather) that it wanted was one half thereof. Yet had he
many enemies (which never man wanteth) at Court, his cowardly Detractors,
of whom Sir Walter was wont to say, If any man accuseth me to my face,
I will answer him with my mouth; but my tail is good enough to return
an answer to such who traduceth me behind my back.
.............................................................
[T/SWIFT] -55
[MARI{He}] 10
----------------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Lucy

<<[LUCIA] appears in {DANTE A}lighieri's Inferno Canto II as the messenger
sent to Beatrice from the Virgin Mary, to rouse Beatrice to send Virgil to Dante's aid. In the Purgatorio 9:52–63, Lucy carries the sleeping {DANTE}
to the entrance to Purgatory. Then in Paradiso 32 {DANTE} places her
opposite Adam within the Mystic Rose in Canto 32 of the Paradiso.>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Thomas Fuller, in History of the Worthies of England (1662) 2:288-89.
http://spenserians.cath.vt.edu/BiographyRecord.php?action=GET&bioid=33033

<<JOHN FLETCHER, son of Richard Fletcher, D.D. was (as by proportion of time is collectable) born in this County [Northamptonshire], before his Father was Bishop of Bristol or London, and whilst as yet he was Dean of Peterborough. He had an excellent wit, which the back-friends to Stage plays will say was neither idle, nor well imploy'd. For he an{D} Francis Beaumont Esquire, like C{A}stor and Pollux (most happy when i{N} conjunction) raised the English {T}o equal the Athenian and Roman Th{E}atre; Beaumont bringing the ball{A}st of judgment, Fletcher the sail of phantasie; both compounding a Poet to admiration.>>
.............................................................
. <= 28 =>
.
. F o r h e a n {D} F r a n c i s B e a u m o n t E s q u i
. r e,l i k e C {A} s t o r a n d P o l l u x(m o s t h a p
. p y w h e n i {N} c o n j u n c t i o n)r a i s e d t h e
. E n g l i s h {T} o e q u a l t h e A t h e n i a n a n d
. R o m a n T h {E} a t r e;B e a u m o n t b r i n g i n g
. t h e b a l l {A} s t o f j u d g m e n t,F l e t c h e r
. t h e s a i l o f p h a n t a s i e;
.
{DANTE A.} 28
----------------------------------------------------
. [ALL FOR ONE]
....................................................
. Sonnet 19
.
Make glad and sorry seasons as thou fleet'st,
And do what ere (t)hou wil[T (S)WIFT]-foo(t)ed time
T(o) the wi{D}e (w)orld and [{A}LL] her fadi{N}g sweets:
Bu{T} I [FOR]bid th{E}e [ONE] most h{A}inous crime,
.
O carue not wi{T|H] thy ho{W|e]rs my l{O|V]es fair[E] brow,
No[R] draw no[E] lines there with thine antique pen,
Him in thy course vntainted doe allow,
For beauties patterne to succeding men.
.
. Yet doe thy worst ould Time dispight thy wrong,
. My love shall in my verse *EVER (liv)E YOUNG*.
..................................................
. <= 10 =>
.
. A n d d o w h a t
. e r e (t) h o u w i l
. [T (S) W I F T]-f o o (t)
. e d t i m e T (o) t h
. e w i {D} e (w) o r l d
. a n d[{A} L L] h e r f
. a d i {N} g s w e e t
. s: B u {T} I [F O R] b i
. d t h {E} e [O N E] m o
. s t h {A} i n o u s c
. r i m e,
.
{DANTE A.} 10
.........................................
. <= 7 =>
.
. O c a r u e n
. o t w i {T}[H] t
. h y h o {W}[e] r
. s m y l {O}[V] e
. s f a i r [E] b
. r o w, N o [R] d
. r a w n o [E] l
. i n e s t h e
. r e
.
[He.VERE] 7
-------------------------------------------------------------------
https://tinyurl.com/yczlkh29

“The {TWO} Most Noble Henries” – [He]nry de [VERE] & Henry Wriothesley –
No. 89 of 100 Reasons why the 17th Earl of Oxford was “Shakespeare”
....................................................................
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_de_Vere,_18th_Earl_of_Oxford

[He.] de [VERE], 18th Earl of Oxford KB (24 February 1593 – June 1625)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Lucy

<<[LUCIA] of Syracuse (283–304), also known as Saint Lucy or Saint Lucia (Latin: Sancta Lucia), was a Christian martyr who died during the Diocletianic Persecution. She is patron saint of the blind, authors, cutlers, glaziers, laborers, and peasants. She is invoked against diseases of the eye. Saint Lucy's Day is celebrated on 13 December. Absent in the early narratives and traditions is the story of Lucia tortured by eye-gouging. According to later accounts, before she died she foretold the punishment of Paschasius and the speedy end of the persecution, adding that Diocletian would reign no more, and Maximian would meet his end. This so angered Paschasius that he ordered the guards to remove her eyes. Another version has Lucy taking her own eyes out in order to discourage a persistent suitor who admired them.>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
. Ulysses (first page!)
.
He peered sideways up and gave a long slow whistle of call,
t(H)en p{A}used awhile in rapt attention, his even white teeth
gl(I)ste{N}ing here and there with gold points. Chrysostomos.
{TWO} (S)tro{N}g shrill whistles answered through the calm.
.
—Thanks, old ch{A}p, he cried briskly.
.
Th[A]t will do n[I]cely. Swit[C]h off the c[U]rrent, wil[L] you?
.........................................................................
. <= 49 =>
.
. and g avealong s lowwhist l eofcallt (H) enp {A} used a whileinra
. pta t tentionh i sevenwhi t eteethgl (I) ste {N} ingh e reandther
. ewi t hgoldpoi n tsChryso s tomos{TWO} (S) tro {N} gshr i llwhistle
. san s weredthr o ughtheca l mThankso [L] dch {A} phec r iedbriskl
. yTh [A] twilldon [I] celySwit [C] hoffthec [U] rre n twil [L] you

[(HIS) L/UCIA] -9
{ANNA} -49
[LUCIA] -9 : Prob. of both together (1st page!) ~ 1 in 420
.........................................................................
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucia_Joyce

[LUCIA] {ANNA} Joyce (26 July 1907, Trieste - 12 December 1982, Northampton) was a professional dancer and the daughter of Irish writer James Joyce and Nora Barnacle. Once treated by Swiss psychoanalyst Carl Jung, Joyce was diagnosed as schizophrenic in the mid 1930s and institutionalized at the Burghölzli psychiatric clinic in Zurich. In 1951, Joyce was transferred to St Andrew's Healthcare in Northampton, where she remained until her death in 1982.>>
.........................................................................
Then darkened deathchamber. Light they want. Whispering around you.
Would you like to see a priest? Then rambling and wandering. Delirium
all you hid all your life. The death struggle. His sleep is not natural.
Press his lower eyelid. Watching is his nose pointed is his jaw sinking
are the soles of his feet yellow. Pull the pillow away and finish it
off on the floor since he’s doomed. Devil in that picture of sinner’s
death showing him a woman. Dying to embrace her in his shirt. Last act
of [LUCIA]. Shall I nevermore behold thee? Bam! He expires. Gone at last.
People talk about you a bit: forget you. Don’t forget to pray for him.
Remember him in your prayers. Even Parnell. Ivy day dying out.
Then they follow: dropping into a hole, one after the other.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.bartleby.com/219/0401.html

The Cambridge History of English and American Literature (1907-21).
Volume IX. IV. § 1. [Jonathan] *SWIFT's* parentage and descent.

<<SWIFT's writings are so closely connected with the man that they
cannot be understood properly without reference to the circumstances
under which they were produced. The best way, therefore, of arriving
at Swift's views and methods will be to set out briefly the chief
events of his life, and, afterwards, to consider
the more important of his writings.
.
Jonathan Swift's royalist grandfather, Thomas Swift, of a Yorkshire
family, was vicar of Goodrich, and married Elizabeth Dryden, niece of
Sir Erasmus Dryden, the poet's grandfather. The eldest of his large
family, Godwin, a barrister, went to Ireland, where he became wealthy;
and some of his brothers followed him. One of them, Jonathan, who had
married Abigail Erick, was made steward of the king's inns, Dublin,
but he did not live long, and, seven months after his death, on 30
November, 1667, his only son, Jonathan, was born. The widow was left
dependent mainly on her husband's brother, Godwin. A nurse took the
child to Whitehaven, and kept him there three years; and, not long
after his return to Dublin, his mother returned to her relatives in
England, leaving the boy in his uncle's care. He was sent to Kilkenny
school, where he met Congreve; and, when he was fourteen, he was
entered as a pensioner at Trinity College, Dublin. Why he afterwards
felt so much resentment against his relatives is not clear;
for his uncle gave him, not "the education of a dog," but
the best obtainable in Ireland. Swift was often at war with
the college authorities; but he got his degree in 1685.>>
-------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swift%27s_Epitaph
.......................................
Epitaph written by Swift for himself in Latin:
.
. Hic depositum est Corpus
. IONATHAN SWIFT S.T.D.
. Hujus Ecclesiæ Cathedralis
. Decani,
. Ubi sæ[V]a Indignatio
. Ult[E R I U S]
. Cor lacerar[E] nequit,
. Abi Viat[O R]
. Et imitare, si pot[E]ri{S},
. Strenu{U}m pro [V]i{R}ili
. Lib{E}rtatis {V}indicatorem.

Obiit 19º Die Mensis Octobris
A.D. 1745 Anno ætatis 78º.
.......................................
. <= 15 =>
.
. U b i s æ[V]a I n d i g n a t
. i o U l t[E R I U S]C o r l a
. c e r a r[E]n e q u i t,A b i
. V i a t[O R]E t i m i t a r e,
. s i p o t[E]r i s,S t r e n u
.{U}m p r o[V]i{R}i l i
.
[V E(R E)E V] -15
[VER/O] -15
[VE/RIUS] 15
.......................................
. <= 7 =>
.
. s i p o t [E] r
. i {S},S t r e n
. u {U} m p r o [V]
. i {R} i l i L i
. b {E} r t a t i
. s {V} i n d i c
. a t o r e m.
.
{VERUS} -7
-----------------------------------
"Swift's Epitaph" is a somewhat free translation by William Butler
Yeats from his 1933 collection The Winding Stair and Other Poems.
.
. Swift has sailed into his rest;
. Savage indignation there
. Cannot lacerate his Breast.
. Imitate him if you dare,
. World-Besotted Traveler; he
. Served human liberty.
----------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.quns.cam.ac.uk/Queens/Record/1997/History/Shakes.html
.
<<Queensman, John WeEVER (1576-1632), was in an extraordinarily
interesting and eccentric character - connoisseur of *GRAVEyards*
, tobacco-enthusiast, sycophant, satirist, dwarf, penner of dirty
ditties, egotist, pugnacious Lancashire man and proud of it
.
But his most fascinating and potentially important work is
his earliest one, the scruffy and badly-printed collection
of undergraduate squibs already quoted. Overleaf from
the celebration of Queens' we find the following:
.
. Ad Gulielum Shakespear
.
. Honie-tong'd Shakespeare when I saw thaie issue
. I swore Apollo got them and none other,
. Their rosie-tainted features cloth'd in tissue,
. Some heaven born goddesse said to be their mother:
. Rose checkt Adonis with his amber tresses,
. Faire fire-hot Venus charming him to love her,
. Chaste Lucretia virgine-like her dresses,
. Prowd lust-stung Tarqu[I]ne seeking still to prove h[E]r:
. Romea Richard, more whose [N]ames I know not,
. Their sugre[D] tongues, and power attract[I]ve beuty
. Say they are Saint[S] althogh that Sts they shew not
. For thousands vowes to them subiective dutie:
. They burn in love thy children Shakespear *HET THEm* ,
. Go, wo thy Muse more Nymphish brood beget them.
........................................
____ <= 23 =>
.
. P r o w d l u s t-s t u n g T a r q u [I] n e s
. e e k i n g s t i l l t o p r o v e h [E] r R o
. m e a R i c h a r d m o r e w h o s e [N] a m e
. s I k n o w n o t T h e i r s u g r e [D] t o n
. g u e s a n d p o w e r a t t r a c t [I] v e b
. e u t y S a y t h e y a r e S a i n t [S]
.
[SIDNEI] -23 : Prob. ~ 1 in 360
........................................................
[From Epigrammes in the oldest Cut, and newest Fashion.]
.
This is the earliest poem ever addressed to Shakespeare,
and one of the earliest references to him of any kind.
(Interestingly, one of the others, equally admiring,
is by Weever's own tutor, William Covell, another
Lancastrian: who passed on his enthusiasm to whom?).>>
...............................................................
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/rep.html
.
<<William Covell's _Polimanteia_ (1595) lists *SIDNEI* , Spenser,
. Alabaster, Daniel, and Shakespeare -- but not Oxford?>>
----------------------------------------------------------
. Hekatompathia by Thomas *WATSON*
. Dedications and Introductory Poems
. http://www.elizabethanauthors.com/hek005.htm
.
To the Right Honorable my
*VERY* good Lord Edward de Vere, Earle
of Oxenford, Viscount Bulbecke, Lord
of Escales, and Badlesmere, and Lord High
Chamberlain of England, *ALL HAPPINESSE* .
.
Alexander the Great, passing on a time by the workshop of *APELLES*,
..............................................................
http://www.deveresociety.co.uk/articles/AW-2014May-Weever.pdf

Alexander, the Great, Waugh:

The epigram ‘To Spurius, a certain writer’ is only four lines long:

Apelles did so paint Venus Queene,
That most supposed he had faire Venus seene,
But thy bald rimes of Venus savour so,
That I dare sweare thou dost all Venus know.

The basic joke was not original to Weever.

Timothy Kendall’s Flowers and Epigrammes of 1577,

To Cl. Marotus

Apelles learned hand, so fine did paint fair Venus Queene:
That EVERy one suposd that he, had Venus [V]ewd and s[E]en.
But w[OR]kes of t{H|I|N}e Marot[US] lewd, of Venus sauour so:
That EVERy one sure deemes, that thou dost all of Venus know.
...........................
. <= 8 =>
.
. E V E R y o n e
. s u p o s d t h
. a t h e,h a d V
. e n u s[V]e w d
. a n d s[E]e n. B
. u t w [O R]k e s
. o f t {H|I|N} e M
. a r o t[U S] l e
. w d,

[VER/O] {NIH.} [VERIU/S] 8
..............................................................
curiously surveyed some of his doings, whose long stay in viewing
them brought all the people into so great a good liking of the
painter's workmanship, that immediately after they bought up
all his pictures, *WHAT price SOEVER* he set them at.
.
And the like good *HAP* (Right Honorable) befell unto me lately
concerning these my Love Passions, which then chanced to *APELLES* for
his Portraits. For since the world hath understood (I know not how)
that your Honor had willingly vouchsafed the acceptance of this work,
and at convenient leisures favorably perused it, being as yet but
in written hand, many have oftentimes and earnestly called upon me
to put it to the press, that for their money they might but see
what your Lordship with some liking had already perused.
.
And therewithal some of them said (either to yield your Honor his due
praise, for soundness of judgment; or to please me, of whom long since
they had conceived well) that Alexander would like of no lines, but
such as were drawn by the cunning hand, and with the curious *PENCIL*
, of *APELLES*. Which I set not down here to that end, that I would
confer my Poems with Apelle's Portraits for worthiness; albeit I
fitly compare your Honor's person with Alexander's for excellence.
.
But *HOW bold SOEVER* I have been in turning out this my petty poor
flock upon the open Common of the wide world, where *EVERY* man may
behold their nakedness, I humbly make request that if any storm fall
unlooked-for (by the fault of malicious high foreheads or the poison
of evil-edged tongues) these my little ones may shroud themselves
under the broad-leafed Platane of your Honor's patronage. And thus
at this present, I humbly take my leave; but first wishing the
continual increase of your Lordship's honor, with abundance
of *TRUE* Friends, reconciliation of all Foes, and
*WHAT good SOEVER* tendeth unto perfect *HAPPINESS* .
.
Your Lordship's humbly at command, Thomas VVatson
--------------------------------------------------------
It is my contention that the good Reverend
*TOM SWIFT* (Age 36) was responsible for the
1631 "John WeEVER" tract & he signed it accordingly
(along side the Latin name of Edward de Vere):
..........................................................
17th-century References to Shakespeare's Stratford Monument
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/monrefs.html
.
<<In 1631, a year before his death, John WeEVER published the massive
Ancient Funerall Monuments, which recorded many inscriptions from
monuments around England, particularly in Canterbury, Rochester,
London, and Norwich. Shakespeare's monument does not appear in the
published book, but two of WeEVER's notebooks, containing his drafts
for most of the book as well as many unpublished notes, survive as
Society of Antiquaries MSS. 127 and 128. In one of these notebooks,
under the heading "Stratford upon Avon," WeEVER recorded the poems
from Shakespeare's monument and his gravestone, as follows:
......................................................
. Iudcio Pilum, Genio Socratem, Arte Maronem
. Terra tegit, populus maeret, Olympus habet.

. Stay Passenger, why goes[T] thou by so fast
. Read i[F] your canst whome env[I]ous death hath plac'd
. [W]ithin this monument [S]hakespeare with who[M]e
. Quick Nature dy'd wh[O]se name doth deck his [T]ombe
. far more then co{S}t, sith all yt hee hath {w}ritt
. Leaves living Art but page to serve his witt.
.
. ob Ano doi 1616 AEtat. 53. 24 die April
.
. Good {F}rend for Iesus sake [F|O}rbeare
. To digg the d[U|S}t enclosed heare
. Bl[E|S}t bee ye man that spa[R|E}s these stones
. And c[U]rst bee hee that move[S] my bones.
.........................................................
In the margin opposite the heading "Stratford upon Avon",
WeEVER wrote "Willm Shakespeare the famous poet",
.
and opposite the last two lines of the
epitaph he wrote "vpo[n] the grave stone".>>
--------------------------------------------
____________ <= 18 =>

_ I u d c i o P i l u m G e n i o S o
_ c r a t e m A r t e M a r o n e m T
_ e r r a{T}e g i t p{O}p u l u s{M}a
_ e r e t O l y m p u s h a b e t S t
_ a y P a s s e n g e r w h y g o e s
. [T] t h o u b y s o f a s t R e a d i
. [F] y o u r c a n s t w h o m e e n v
. [I] o u s d e a t h h a t h p l a c d
. [W] i t h i n t h i s m o n u m e n t
. [S] h a k e s p e a r e w i t h w h o
. [M] e Q u i c k N a t u r e d y d w h
. [O] s e n a m e d o t h d e c k h i s
. [T] o m b e f a r m o r e t h e n c o
. {S} t s i t h a l l y t h e e h a t h
. {W} r i t t L e a v e s l i v i n g A
_ r t b u t p a g e t o s e r v e h i
. {S W}i t t.

Prob. of *TOM SWIFT* ~ 1 in 3,700,000 (any skip)
....................................................
_________ <= 18 =>
.
. G O(O) D {F} r e n d f(O)r J e s u s s
. a k(E)[F]{O} r b e a r(E)T(O)d i g g t
. h{e d [U]{S} t e n c l(O)s(E)d h e a r
. e B l [E]{S} t b e e y(E)m a n t h a t
. s p a [R]{E} s t h e S e s t o n e s A
. n d c [U]_r s t b e E h e e t h a t m
. o v e [S]_M y b o n E s
........................................
{FOSSE} 18 : A grave (Old French)
[{F}UERUS] 18 ~ 1 in 23,800 (any skip)
Prob. of *UERUS* ~ 1 in 1090 (any skip)
.........................................
The Latin {FOSSE} Westminster inscription can be translated:
"Francis Vere died 28 August 1609, in the 54th year of his age"
-----------------------------------------------------
Sonnet 141

. IN faith I doe not loue thee with mine eyes,
. For they in thee a thousand errors note,
. But 'tis my heart {T}h{A}t {L}o{V}e{S} what they dispise,
. Who in dispigh[T] o[F] v[I]e[W] i[S] pleasd to dote.

[SWIFT] -2 : Prob. ~ 1 in 12 (all sonnets)
{TALVS} 2
---------------------------------------------------------
<<In _Fairie Queene_ Edmund {SPENSER} makes Sir Artegal's
IRON man [TALUS] run continually round the island of CRETE
to chastise offenders with an *IRON* flail. He represents
executive power- "[SWIFT] as a swallow & as lion strong."
When Sir Artegal fell into the power of the Amazon queen
Radigund, [TALUS] brought Britomart to the rescue.>> (1596)
......................................................
But when she parted hence, she left her groome
An *YRON* man, which did on her attend
Alwayes, to execute her stedfast doome,
And WILLed him with Artegall to wend,
And doe what EVER thing he did intend.
His name was [TALUS], made of *YRON* mould,
Immoueable, resistlesse, *WITHOUT END* .
Who in his hand an *YRON* flale did hould,
*With which he thresht out falshood, and did *TRUTH vnfould*
-------------------------------------------------------------
. Last speech in the First Folio (1623):
. http://tinyurl.com/q7mtmcg
. http://tinyurl.com/q3588wk
........................................
Cymbeline: *LAUD WE THE GODS* ,
. And let our crooked SMOAKES
. climbe to their Nostrils
. From our blest Altars.
. *PUBLISH* we
.
. {T}his Pe{A}ce [T]o [A]{L}[L] o[U]r [S]{U}biect{S}.
.
. Set we forward:
. Let A Roman, and a Brittish Ensigne wave
. Friendly toge(T)h(E)r: (S|O) (T)hrough Luds-Towne march,
. And in the Temple of great *IUPITER*
. Our Peace wee'l ratifie: Seale it with Feasts.
. Set on there: NEVER was a Warre did cease
. (Ere bloodie hands were wash'd) with such a Peace.
........................................
. <= 6 =>
.
. P U B L I S
. H w e {T} h i
. s P e {A} c e
. [T] o [A]{L}[L] o
. [U] r [S]{U} b i
. e c t {S}.
.
[TALUS] 2
{TALUS} 6
........................................
Prob. of 2[TALUS]'s with skip < 7
in Last FF Speech: ~ 1 in 830,000

Prob. of a Royal Flush = 1 in 649,739
------------------------­------------------------------­-----
. And though thou hadst small Latine & less Greek,
. From thence to honour thee, I would no[T] seek
. For n[A]mes; but ca[L]l forth th[U]nd'ring AE[S]chylus,
. Euripides, and Sophocles to us,
. Paccuvius, Accius, him of Cordova dead,
. {T}o life againe, to heare thy BUSKIN tread,
. {A}nd SHAKE a stage : Or, when thy SOCKES were on,
. {L}eave thee alone, for the comparison
. {O}f all, that INSOLENT GREECE, or haughtie Rome
. {S}ent forth, or since did from their ashes come.
.........................................................
probability of {TALOS} (Greek: "SUFFERER") ~ 1 in 1,235
[TALUS] 9 : Prob. of [TALUS/TALOS] ~ 1 in 135
------------------------------­---------------------------
<< *In GREEK mythology, {TALOS} was a man of BRASS*
. the work of Hephaestos (Vulcan), who went round
. the island of CRETE thrice a day. Whenever he saw
a stranger draw near the island he either threw boulders
at them or he made himself red-hot, and embraced the stranger.
When Jason & the Argonauts escaped to CRETE with the Golden
Fleece Medea was able to remove the plug on {TALOS}' ANKLE
such that the ICHOR, his life force, FLOWED out of him.>>
------------------------------­---------------------------
. [TALUS]: Latin for ANKLE
---------------------------­------------------------------­-
<<In _Fairie Queene_ Edmund Spenser makes Sir Artegal's
iron man TALUS run continually round the island of CRETE
to chastise offenders with an iron flail. He represents
executive power- "SWift as a swallow & as lion strong.">>
--------------------------------------------------------------
<<{ART}egal is the personification & champion of Justice. Artegal has
a companion in [TALUS], a metal man who wields a flail & never sleeps
or tires but will mercilessly pursue and kill any number of villains.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Dedicatory Verse to Oxford in Spenser's Fairie Queene.
..........................................
To the right Honourable the Earle of Oxenford,
Lord high Chamberlayne of England. &c.
.
REc(E)ive most Noble Lord in gentle gree,
The unripe fruit of an u(N)ready wit:
Which BY THY COUNT{E|N}aunc[E| D}oth cra[V|e} to bee
D[E]f(E)nded f[R]om foule [E]n{V|I}es poisnous bit.
Which so to doe may th(E)e right w{E|L}l befit,
Sith th'antique glory of thine auncest{R}y
Under a *SHADY VELE* is therein writ,
And eke thin{E} owne lon(G) living memory,
Succeeding them in TRUE nobility:
And also for the love, which thou doest beare
To *th'Heliconian YMPS* , and they to thee,
<T>hey unto thee, and <T>hou to them most d<E>ar[E]:
Deare a<S> thou a[R]t unto thy self[E], <S>o lov<E>
{T}h{A}t {L}o[V]e{S} & honours the[E], as do<T>h behove.
.........................................................
[EVERE] 8,-13, 40 : Prob. 3[E.VERE]s ~ 1 in 2,250)
<TEST> -25,30
{TALVS} 2
................................................
Sonnet 145

. THose lips {T}h{A}t {L}o{V}e{S} owne hand did make,
. Breath'd forth the sound that said I hate,
................................................
{TALVS} 2
................................................
. To me that languisht for her sake:
. But when she saw my wofull state,
. Straight in her heart did mercie come,
. Chiding that tongue that euer sweet,
. Was vsde in giuing gentle dome:
. And tought it thus a new to greete:
. I hate she alterd with an end,
. That follow'd it as gentle day,
. Doth follow night who like a fiend
. From heauen to hell is flowne away.
. 'I HATE' from *HATE away* SHE threw,
. And sav'd my life, saying 'not you'
----------------------------------------------------------
*If others have their WILL Ann HATH a way - Joyce's ULYSSES*
----------------------------------------------------------
. "That I do *WASTE* with others' love,
. *that HATH myself in HATE* - E.O.
.
http://www3.telus.net/oxford/oxfordspoems.html#toppoems
-------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------­----------------------
The *MASON* poor, that builds the lordly HALLs,
Dwells not in them, they are for high degree;
His cottage is compact in paper walls,
And not with brick or stone as others be.

The *IDLE* drone that *LABOURs* not at all
Sucks up the *SWEET of HONEY* from the bee.
Who worketh most, to their share least doth fall;
With due *DESERT REWARD* will nEVER be.

The swiftest hare unto the mastiff slow
Ofttimes doth fall to him as for a prey;
The GREYHOUND thereby doth miss his game we know
For which he made such speedy *HASTE* away.
. -- Edward de Vere
.......................................................
. "{H}aste maketh *WASTE* ."
-- John Heywood. Proverbes. Part i. Chap. ii.
-----------------------------------------------
. Capital Letters: 145 (= 5 x 29)
.
__ T O.T H E.
__ O N L I E.
__ B E G E T
__ T E R.O F.
__ T H E S E.
__ I N S U I
__ N G.S O N
__ N E T S Mr
__ [W]H A L L. W{H}
_ A H[A]P P I __ {H}A
_ | _ N E[S]S E. ___ S
_ | _ A N D[T]H ___ T
. [2 9] A T.E T[E] ____ E?
_ | _ R N I T I
_ | _ E P R O M
_ v I S E D.B
__ Y.O U R.E
__ V E R-L I
__ V I N G.P
__ O E T.W I
__ S H E T H.
__ T H E.W E
__ L L-W I S
__ H I N G.A
__ D V E N T
__ U R E R I
__ N.S E T T
__ I N G.F O
__ R T H.T.T.
...................................................
. Shakspere Blazon and Coat of Arms:
. "Gold on a *BEND* sable, a *SPEAR* of the first,"
.
. *BEND* : a diagonal bar, 1/5th the width of the shield,
. from upper left to lower right as one faces the shield.
-------------------------------------------------------------
. JOYCE: Ulysses, Scylla & Charybdis
.
STEPHEN ( *Stringendo* .) He has hidden his own name, a fair name,
William, in the plays, a super *HERE* , a clown there, as a
painter of old Italy set his face in a dark corner of his canvas.
.
He has *REVEalED* it in the sonnets
where there is *wil{L IN OVER}plus* .
.
Like John O'Gaunt his name is dear to him, as dear
as the coat of arms he toadied for, *on a BEND* sable
a spear or steeled argent, honorificabilitudinitatibus,
dearer than his glory of greatest shakescene
in the country. What's in a name?
---------------------------------------------------------
____ *L IN OVER*
____ *NIL VERO*
____ *NE LIVOR* : *NOT ENVY* (Latin)
.................................................
PEACHam: <<*Edward, Earl of Oxford* , the Lord Buckhurst,
Henry Lord Paget; our Phoenix, the noble Sir Philip Sidney,
M. Edward Dyer, M. Edmund *Spencer* , M. Samuel Daniel,
. with sundry others; whom, *NOT out of ENVY* >>
.................................................
. 1640 *Wit's Recreation*:
. To Master William Shakespeare
.
. Shakespeare, we must be silent in thy *pRAISE* ,
. 'Cause our encomiums will but blast thy bays,
. Which *ENVY could NOT* , that thou didst so well
. *Let thine own HISTORIES prove thy chronicle*
---------------------------------------------------------
John Davies of *HEREFORD* : The Scourge of Folly (1610)
http://shakespeareauthorship.weebly.com/q--a.html
.................................................
159. To our English Terence Mr. Will: Shake-speare.
.
. SOME say good Will (which I, in sport, do sing)
. Had'st thou not plaid some Kingly parts in sport,
. Thou hadst bin a companion for a King ;
. And, beene a King among {T}he meaner sort.
. Some others raile ; but r{A}ile as they thinke fit,
. Thou hast no ray{L}ing, but, a raigning Wit :
. And honesty tho{U} sow'st, which they do reape ;
. So, to increa{S}e their Stocke which they do keepe.

{TALUS} 32 : Prob. ~ 1 in 500
----------------------------------------------------------
Dedicatory Verse by Ignoto in Spenser's Faerie Queene.
....................................................
TO looke upon a work[E] of [R]ar[E] (de)[V]is{E}
The which a workman setteth out to view,
A{N}d not to yield it the *DE(s)ERVED* prise,
That {U}nto such a workmanship is dew,
Doth eithe{R} prove the iudgement to be naught
Or els doth shew a mind with *{E}NVY* fraught.
..........................................................
_______________ <= 34 =>
.
. TOlookeuponaw{O}rk [E] of [R] ar [E](de)[V] is {E} Thewh
. ichaworkmanse t te t ho u tt o vi e wA {N} dnott
. oyieldittheDE(s)ER V ED p ri s eT h at {U} ntosu
. chaworkmanshi p is d ew D ot h ei t he {R} prove
. theiudgementt o be n au g ht
......................
.
. a w {O}
. r k [E]
. o f [R]
. a r [E]
. (d e) [V]
. i s {E}

[{E}VERE{O}] -3: Prob. [E.VERE] in first Ignoto line ~ 1 in 1,040
-------------------------------------------------------------
. <= 34 =>
.
.{TERRATE (G) ITP O P U L U S M[Æ] R E T O LYMPUSHABE T}
........................................................
. STAYPAS [S] ENG [E]R W H Y G O[E](S)T T H OUBYSOFAST R
. EADIFTH [O] UCA N[S]T W H O M{E}[N]V I O USDEATHHAT H
. PLASTWI [T] HIN T H[I]S M O(N|U} M[E]N T {SHAKSPEARE} W
. ITHWHOM [E] QUI C K N[A]T(U)R{E}{D}I[D]E {WHOSENAMED} O
. THDeCKY [S] TOM B E F A[R]M O{R}{E}t H[E] NCOSTSIEHA L
. LYTHEHA [T] HWR I T T L E A V{E} S L I V INGARTBUTP A
. GETOSER V EHI S W I T T


(RUNES) -33 : Prob. in Roper array ~ 1 in 4930
[E.DENE] -35
[RAISE] 35
..........................................................
the probability of David Roper's: {DE} next to {E.UERE}

assuming that the 34 letters of the
2nd line: {TERRA TEGIT POPULUS MÆRET OLYMPUS HABET}

provide the # key to the ELS array is ~ 1 in 106,000
-----------------------------------------------------
John Davies of *HEREFORD*
http://shakespeareauthorship.weebly.com/q--a.html
.................................................
The Scourge of Folly, Epigram 159-163 (1610)

To our English Terenc[E] Mr. Will: Shake-speare.
To his most constant, tho[U]gh most unknowne friend; No-body.
To my neere-de[E]re wel-knowne friend; Some-body.
To my much rega[R]ded and approved goo{D} friend, Thomas Marber{Y} [E]squire.
To my right de{E}re friend, approued fo{R} such, Iohn Panton Esquire.
..............................................
. <= 19 =>
.
. T o o u r E n g l i s h T e r e n c [E]
. M r.W i l l:S h a k e-s p e a r e. T o
. h i s m o s t c o n s t a n t,t h o [U]
. g h m o s t u n k n o w n e f r i e n
. d;N o-b o d y.T o m y n e e r e-d e [E]
. r e w e l-k n o w n e f r i e n d; S o
. m e-b o d y.T o m y m u c h r e g a [R]
. d e d a n d a p p r o v e d g o o {D} f
. r i e n d,T h o m a s M a r b e r {Y}[E]
. s q u i r e.T o m y r i g h t d e {E} r
. e f r i e n d,a p p r o v e d f o {R} s
. u c h,I o h n P a n t o n E s q u i r e.
.
{DYER} 19
[E UERE] 38 : Prob. in {DYER} array ~ 1 in 421
-------------------------------------------------
. (E)DW(E)ED [DYER/DEVERE]
...............................................
. Sonnet 76 (1609)

WHy is my verse so barren of new pride?
So far from variation or quicke change?
Why with the time do I not glance aside
To new found methods, and to compounds *STRANGE* ?

Why write I still all one, [EVER] the same,
And keepe inuention in a *NOT[(E)D W(E)ED]*,
That *[EVER]y WOR<D>* [D]oth almo{S|T} fel {M[Y] NAME},
Shewing th[E]ir birth, and whe[R]e they did proce[E]d?

O know sweet lo[V]e I alwaies writ[E] of you,
And you an[D] love are still (Y) argument:
So all (M)y best is dressing old words new,
Spending againe what is already spent:
..................................................
____ <= 14 =>
.
. A *N O T[(E) D W (E) E D] T h {A}{T}
. E V E R y w o r <D>[D] O t h a
. l m o {S}{T} F E L m [Y] N a m {E}
. S h e w i n g t {H}[E]<I> r b i
. r t h a n d w h e [R] e t h {E}
. y (D) i d p r o c e [E] d O <K> n
. o w s w e {E} t l o [V] e I a l
. w a i e s w r i t [E] o f y o
. u A n d y o u a n [D] l (O) v (E)
. a r e s t i l l m (Y) a r g u
. m e n t: S o a l l (M) y b e s
. t i s d r e s s i n g o l d
. w o r d s n e w,
..................................................
[DYER] 14 {Found by A.W.Burgstahler}
.
[(MY) DE VERE] -14 {Found by James Ferris}
.
[DYEREVED] 14 Prob. in any sonnet ~ 1 in 9375
..................................................
Edward de Vere & Edward Dyer:
.
1) Only two Shakespeare authorship candidates
. named Edward: http://tinyurl.com/6yqvqwz
.
2) Only two Shakespeare authorship candidates
. sharing yet another authorship controversy:
..........................................................
- [King Richard the Third (Quarto 1, 1597) 3.1]
.
Buckingham: [A HA] my Lord this prince is *NOT AN EDWARD* :
. He is not lulling on a lewd day bed,
. But on his knees at meditation:
--------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-04-07 18:34:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Saturday, April 7, 2018 at 1:13:13 PM UTC-4, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
During the [T]i{M}e {O|F] {T}he c[I]vill [W]arre[S],
he lived in Lundy island.
..............................
{TOM} -2
[SWIFT] -5
Have you tried looking for the Hardy Boys too, Art?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
It is reported of Women in the Balear Islands, that to make their Sons
exper[T] archers; they will not, when children, give them their break-fast
be[F]ore they had hit the mark. Such the dealing of the Queen with this
Kn[I]ght, making him to earn his Honour, and by pain and peril, to purchase
[W]hat places or credit or profit were bestowed upon him. Indeed it
wa[S T]rue of him, what was said of Cato Uticensis: That he seemed to
be born to that onely which he went about: So dextrous was he in all his
undertakings, In Court, in Ca[M]p, by Sea, by L[A]nd, with Swo[R]d, with
Pen, w[I]tnesse in t[He] last his History of the World; wherein the onely
default or (defect rather) that it wanted was one half thereof. Yet had he
many enemies (which never man wanteth) at Court, his cowardly Detractors,
of whom Sir Walter was wont to say, If any man accuseth me to my face,
I will answer him with my mouth; but my tail is good enough to return
an answer to such who traduceth me behind my back.
.............................................................
[T/SWIFT] -55
The string "TSWIFT" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip -55 (a ridiculous skip in any case!) -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
[MARI{He}] 10
The string "MARIHE [sic]" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 10 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art. MoreoVER, "MARIHE [sic]" is moronic nonsense in any case.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Lucy
Are the creators of "I love Lucy" in on the conspiracy, Art?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 7 =>
.
. O c a r u e n
. o t w i {T}[H] t
. h y h o {W}[e] r
. s m y l {O}[V] e
. s f a i r [E] b
. r o w, N o [R] d
. r a w n o [E] l
. i n e s t h e
. r e
.
[He.VERE] 7
"He Vere [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art. Hint: Utterances in English generally require *verbs* rather than VER-BS, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 49 =>
.
. and g avealong s lowwhist l eofcallt (H) enp {A} used a whileinra
. pta t tentionh i sevenwhi t eteethgl (I) ste {N} ingh e reandther
. ewi t hgoldpoi n tsChryso s tomos{TWO} (S) tro {N} gshr i llwhistle
. san s weredthr o ughtheca l mThankso [L] dch {A} phec r iedbriskl
. yTh [A] twilldon [I] celySwit [C] hoffthec [U] rre n twil [L] you
[(HIS) L/UCIA] -9
The string "HISLUCIA" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 49 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 15 =>
.
. U b i s æ[V]a I n d i g n a t
. i o U l t[E R I U S]C o r l a
. c e r a r[E]n e q u i t,A b i
. V i a t[O R]E t i m i t a r e,
. s i p o t[E]r i s,S t r e n u
.{U}m p r o[V]i{R}i l i
.
[V E(R E)E V] -15
"VEREEV [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
[VER/O] -15
The string "VERO" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip -15 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
[VE/RIUS] 15
The string "VERIUS" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 15 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 8 =>
.
. E V E R y o n e
. s u p o s d t h
. a t h e,h a d V
. e n u s[V]e w d
. a n d s[E]e n. B
. u t w [O R]k e s
. o f t {H|I|N} e M
. a r o t[U S] l e
. w d,
[VER/O] {NIH.} [VERIU/S] 8
(1) The string "VERO" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 8 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

(2) The string "VERIUS" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 8 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

(3) Both "HIN [sic]" and "NIH [sic]" are moronic nonsense, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
It is my contention that the good Reverend
*TOM SWIFT* (Age 36) was responsible for the
1631 "John WeEVER" tract & he signed it accordingly
Rubbish, Art! It is also your contention that _vier_ is Spanish for "four", that Virgil predated Herodotus, that Ann Hathaway was Shakespeare's mother, that the watt is a unit of energy, and that _Don Quixote_ was written in English! Need one say more?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
____________ <= 18 =>
_ I u d c i o P i l u m G e n i o S o
_ c r a t e m A r t e M a r o n e m T
_ e r r a{T}e g i t p{O}p u l u s{M}a
_ e r e t O l y m p u s h a b e t S t
_ a y P a s s e n g e r w h y g o e s
. [T] t h o u b y s o f a s t R e a d i
. [F] y o u r c a n s t w h o m e e n v
. [I] o u s d e a t h h a t h p l a c d
. [W] i t h i n t h i s m o n u m e n t
. [S] h a k e s p e a r e w i t h w h o
. [M] e Q u i c k N a t u r e d y d w h
. [O] s e n a m e d o t h d e c k h i s
. [T] o m b e f a r m o r e t h e n c o
. {S} t s i t h a l l y t h e e h a t h
. {W} r i t t L e a v e s l i v i n g A
_ r t b u t p a g e t o s e r v e h i
. {S W}i t t.
Prob. of *TOM SWIFT*
So you think (usual disclaimer) that William Shakespeare wrote the adventures of Tom Swift, Art?!

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
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Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
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