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g***@gmail.com
2018-02-01 11:07:09 UTC
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Thus pour the stars down plagues for perjury.
Can any face of brass hold longer out?
Here stand I, lady, dart thy skill at me;
Bruise me with scorn, confound me with a flout;
Thrust thy sharp wit quite through my ignorance;
Cut me to pieces with thy keen conceit;
And I will wish thee never more to dance,
Nor never more in Russian habit wait.
O, never will I trust to speeches penn'd,
Nor to the motion of a schoolboy's tongue,
Nor never come in vizard to my friend,
Nor woo in rhyme, like a blind harper's song!
Taffeta phrases, silken terms precise,
Three-piled hyperboles, spruce affectation,
Figures pedantical; these summer-flies
Have blown me full of maggot ostentation:
I do forswear them; and I here protest,
By this white glove;--how white the hand, God knows!--
Henceforth my wooing mind shall be express'd
In russet yeas and honest kersey noes:
And, to begin, wench,--so God help me, la!--
My love to thee is sound, sans crack or flaw.
- Biron LLL V,i

http://www.shakespeare.handshake.de/
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Don
2018-02-01 22:14:59 UTC
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On Thursday, February 1, 2018 at 2:07:10 AM UTC-9, ***@gmail.com wrote:
A > Thus pour the stars down plagues for perjury. p p p/ o a o o a
B > Can any face of brass hold longer out? a a a a o o o;
A > Here stand I, lady, dart thy skill at me;
B > Bruise me with scorn, confound me with a flout; me me;
C > Thrust thy sharp wit quite through my ignorance; T t t t;
D > Cut me to pieces with thy keen conceit; c c;
C > And I will wish thee never more to dance,
D > Nor never more in Russian habit wait.
E > O, never will I trust to speeches penn'd,
F > Nor to the motion of a schoolboy's tongue,
E > Nor never come in vizard to my friend,
F > Nor woo in rhyme, like a blind harper's song!
G > Taffeta phrases, silken terms precise,
H > Three-piled hyperboles, spruce affectation,
G > Figures pedantical; these summer-flies
H > Have blown me full of maggot ostentation:
I > I do forswear them; and I here protest,
J > By this white glove;--how white the hand, God knows!--
I > Henceforth my wooing mind shall be express'd
J > In russet yeas and honest kersey noes:
K > And, to begin, wench,--so God help me, la!--
K > My love to thee is sound, sans crack or flaw.
- Biron LLL V,i

22 lines of iambic pentameter in end rhymes like a sonnet, and choice management of sound and sense, so that this elevation of tone speaks to something like royalty characterizing Biron? Neat comment at end, where "sound, sans crack or flaw" is Shakespeare showing off his "white glove" treatment. Reminds us that he was once a glover, and that his first connection to the court was possibly supplying the preferred white gloves.
Post by g***@gmail.com
http://www.shakespeare.handshake.de/
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Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-02-02 04:28:10 UTC
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On Thursday, February 1, 2018, ***@gmail.com wrote:
----------------------------------------------------
Post by g***@gmail.com
Thus pour the stars down plagues for perjury.
Can *ANY FACE OF BRASS* hold longer out?
Here stand I, lady, dart thy skill at me;
Bruise me with scorn, confound me with a flout;
Thrust thy sharp wit quite through my ignorance;
Cut me to pieces with thy keen conceit;
And I will wish thee never more to dance,
Nor never more in Russian habit wait.
O, never will I trust to speeches penn'd,
Nor to the motion of a schoolboy's tongue,
Nor never come in vizard to my friend,
Nor woo in rhyme, like a blind harper's song!
Taffeta phrases, silken terms precise,
Three-piled hyperboles, spruce affectation,
Figures pedantical; these summer-flies
I do forswear them; and I here protest,
By this white glove;--how white the hand, God knows!--
Henceforth my wooing mind shall be express'd
And, to begin, wench,--so God help me, la!--
My love to thee is sound, sans crack or flaw.
- Biron LLL V,i
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https://politicworm.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/miller-oaths.pdf

OATHS FORSWORN IN Love’s Labour’s Lost
Ruth Loyd Miller
.....................................................
The memory of the forsworn de Vere/Hastings marriage contract survives in Love’s Labour’s Lost. One line in the play gives us the identity of the real life prototype of one of the Princess’s ladies: “Maria.” Longaville, one of the King’s men, says: “O sweet Maria, empress of my love!” (4.3.54), which brings us to the Russian connection in Love’s Labour’s Lost
.
“I shall be foresworn, which is a great argument of falsehood, if I love.”
- Armado (1.2.161)

Historical event: The attempt by Ivan the Terrible to arrange a marriage with Lady Mary Hastings: For the first twenty-five years of her reign, Elizabeth enjoyed a dominant role in trading with Russia. The English made no attempt to understand Russian life-style, language, religion, politics or social structure and, although for years Czar Ivan had accorded the English a virtual trade monoply, Russian diplomats coming to her Court were treated with ridicule and scorn.

Even so, for two decades Elizabeth was the object of perennial matrimonial proposals from Czar Ivan. The fact that sometimes Ivan had a living wife did not deter these overtures, which Elizabeth fielded with consummate skill, giving neither a “yes” or a “no,” while she kept the English ships trading with Muscovy

But Ivan’s dream of an English marriage lived on. He continued to press for a bride as a condition of continued favored treatment of the English. After some time Elizabeth named as a prospective bride a kinswoman of royal blood: Lady Mary Hastings, daughter of the Earl of Huntingdon. In 1582, to examine the prospective bride, Ivan dispatched Ambassador Theodore Andreyevitch Pisemsky to England, accompanied by a large suite. The Russian ambassador was to see Lady Mary; look at her most carefully, note her figure, face, complexion and proportions, collect information on her family and her age, and bring back her portrait.

He arrived in September. Elizabeth did not give him audience until December and not until anuary did she discuss the proposal for Mary Hastings with him. The Ambassador pressed for an introduction to Mary, but was put off. He pressed for a portrait to carry to his master, and was again put off. The Lady Mary was recovering from the pox and her beauty was temporarily marred. Finally, the meeting was scheduled in May 1583. An elaborate party was arranged in the garden of York House. A large pavilion was erected under which Mary was seated, “attended by divers great ladies and maids of honour” and a number of distinguished noblemen. The Ambassador and his attendents arrived. Mary put on “a stately countenance” to receive them. On being presented, Pisemsky “cast down his countenance, fell prostrate at her feet, rose and ran back from her, his face still towards her, she and the rest admiring at his manner” (Horsey qtd. in Lee 455). His interpreter declared “it did not suffice him to behold the angel he hoped should be his master's spouse,” commended again her angelic countenance, state, and admirable beauty.” By mid-June the portrait was finished. The envoy departed for Muscovia with the picture, but without a bride.

Similarities between the ludicrous scene in the York House garden and the visit of Navarre and his lords disguised as Russians in Love’s Labour’s Lost were noted by Sidney Lee in an article in Gentlemen’s Magazine in which he quotes Jerome Horsey (196): Both interviews take place in “a park before a pavilion,” the object of both is a “love feat”; the extravagant adulation Moth is instructed to deliver corresponds to the interpreter’s address; the shapeless gear of the Muscovites which serve as disguises for Navarre’s lords. Rosaline’s remark, “gross, gross, fat, fat” seems reminiscent of the description of the Russians as “of large size and of very fleshy bodies, accounting it grace to be somewhat gross and burly.”
--------------------------------------------------
https://sourcetext.com/chapter-10/

<<Milliners or Haberdashers had not any gloves embroidered, or trimmed with gold or silk, neither gold nor embroidered girdles nor hangers, neither could they make any costly wash or perfume; until about the fourteenth or fifteenth year of the Queen the right honourable Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, came from Italy, and brought with him gloves, sweet bags, a perfumed leather jerkin, and other pleasant things; and that year the Queen had a pair of perfumed gloves trimmed only with four tufts, or roses of coloured silk: the Queen took such pleasure in those gloves that she was pictured with those gloves upon her hands, and for many years after it was called the Earl of Oxford’s perfume.>>
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https://edevere17.com/2017/03/12/smell-the-gloves-part-1/
https://edevere17.com/2017/03/18/smell-the-gloves-part-2/
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Bero. Thus pooure the Starres downe plagues for periurie.
Can anie face of brasse hold longer out?
Heere stand I, Ladie dart thy skill at me,
Bruse me with scorne, confound me with a flout.
Thrust thy sharpe wit quite through my ignorance,
Cut me to peeces with thy keene conceit.
And I will wish thee neuer more to daunce,
Nor neuer more in Russian habite waite.
O neuer will I trust to speaches pend,
Nor to the motion of a Schoole-boyes tongue:
Nor neuer come in vizard to my friend,
Nor woo in rime like a blind harpers songue.
Taffata phrases, silken tearmes precise,
Three pilde Hiberboles, spruce affection:
Figures pedanticall, these sommer flies,
Haue blowne me full of maggot ostentation.
I do forsweare them, and I here protest,
By this white Gloue (how white the hand God knowes)
Hencefoorth my wooing minde shalbe exprest
In russet yeas, and honest kersie noes.
And to begin Wench, so God helpe me law,
My loue to thee is sound, sance cracke or flaw.
--------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer

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