Discussion:
limericks?
(too old to reply)
r***@gmail.com
2017-05-09 21:23:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
I read an article, which claimed Shakey inserted a few
limericks into the plays. Or something suggestive of limericks.


Can anyone point to these?

--
Rich
marco
2017-05-09 21:44:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
here's one source

...contains great examples of Shakespeare Limericks. A limerick is a
poem consisting of 5 lines and form of poetry which rhymes.
Shakespeare Limericks are simple and short and easy for even kids and
children to write or compose.


http://limerick-and-limericks.org/shakespeare-limericks/index.htm

marc
A***@germanymail.com
2017-05-10 18:48:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by marco
here's one source
...contains great examples of Shakespeare Limericks. A limerick is a
poem consisting of 5 lines and form of poetry which rhymes.
Shakespeare Limericks are simple and short and easy for even kids and
children to write or compose.
http://limerick-and-limericks.org/shakespeare-limericks/index.htm
marc
Art N
marco
2017-05-11 04:43:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
lick

Marry, sir, 'tis an ill cook that cannot lick his Romeo and Juliet: IV, ii
Whose reverence even the head-lugg'd bear would lick, King Lear: IV, ii

Whose hand is that the forest bear doth lick? King Henry VI, part III: II, ii
The multitudinous tongue; let them not lick Coriolanus: III, i

Own fingers: therefore he that cannot lick his Romeo and Juliet: IV, ii
No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, Hamlet: III, ii

How does thy honour? let me lick thy shoe. The Tempest: III, ii
Can lick their fingers. Romeo and Juliet: IV, ii

And may diseases lick up their false bloods! Timon of Athens: IV, iii

William Shakespeare, author
A***@germanymail.com
2017-05-17 18:19:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by marco
lick
Marry, sir, 'tis an ill cook that cannot lick his Romeo and Juliet: IV, ii
Whose reverence even the head-lugg'd bear would lick, King Lear: IV, ii
Whose hand is that the forest bear doth lick? King Henry VI, part III: II, ii
The multitudinous tongue; let them not lick Coriolanus: III, i
Own fingers: therefore he that cannot lick his Romeo and Juliet: IV, ii
No, let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, Hamlet: III, ii
How does thy honour? let me lick thy shoe. The Tempest: III, ii
Can lick their fingers. Romeo and Juliet: IV, ii
And may diseases lick up their false bloods! Timon of Athens: IV, iii
William Shakespeare, author
Art N

Loading...