Discussion:
Professor to do research at the Folger Institute for George Chapman biography
(too old to reply)
laraine
2017-05-06 17:56:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Quoting information from two articles:


The Folger Shakespeare Library chose UNC English professor
Jessica Wolfe as one of seven long-term fellows for the 2017-18
year. The fellowship program will give her the unique opportunity
to work on a special year-long project in Washington, D.C.
....

[Folger Institute Assistant Director for Fellowships Amanda Herbert
says,] "Jessica Wolfe is known for her work on the literature and
history of early modern science, the influence of classical
literature on the early modern period and the history of the book."
....

[Jessica Wolfe says]
“In the case of my Folger proposal, I had to sell the fellowship
committee on the idea that a biography of George Chapman — a
poet and playwright who doesn’t get a lot of airtime compared to
say, Shakespeare — was not just worth doing but could also be
quite a thrilling read, both because Chapman’s works are fascinating,
but also because he was connected, through his life and his writings,
to so many other major writers and thinkers of the period, including
Ben Jonson and Francis Bacon,” she said.

“I also sold him as a bit of a ‘bad boy’ — a rather irreverent,
daring and disgruntled writer who found himself on the wrong side
of the law at several moments during his career.”

http://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2017/04/english-professor-jessica-wolfe-receives-fellowship-to-work-in-folger-shakespeare-library-in-dc

(That article has some ads in it.)


----------------

The Folger Institute is especially pleased to appoint
Dr. Jessica Wolfe, Professor of English and Comparative
Literature at UNC Chapel Hill, as the Folger’s 2017-18
O.B. Hardison, Jr. Fellow. Dr. Wolfe’s two books and
varied essays and articles reflect an eclectic and broad
range of interests: the history of science and of scholarship,
epic and romance, and the reception of classical literature
and philosophy.
....
While at the Folger, Jessica Wolfe will be engaged in “Absolute Poet:
The Life of George Chapman,” the first full-length biography
in English of the Elizabethan and Jacobean poet, playwright,
and translator George Chapman (c. 1559-1634).


A purposefully obscure poet whose “strange” poems strive to
perplex readers, a brilliant but eccentric translator who
legitimates his authority by recounting how Homer‘s ghost
visited him on a hill in Hitchin, and an accomplished, provocative
playwright whose comedies and tragedies repeatedly aroused
controversy, censorship, and even a stint in jail for their
author,

Chapman’s life was marked by legal disputes, quarrels with
fellow poets, and repeated failures to secure dependable
patronage. But Chapman also occupied a central place in the
dramatic, poetic, and scholarly culture of late Elizabethan,
Jacobean, and Caroline England, and his life and work are
closely intertwined with major figures of the era, ranging
from Marlowe and Ben Jonson to Francis Bacon.

The Folger possesses the largest collection of first editions
of Chapman’s plays and poems in the U.S., and Wolfe will consult
these, as well as several manuscript letters attributed to
Chapman himself, over the course of the fellowship year.

http://collation.folger.edu/2017/04/2017-2018-long-term-fellows/

(Some information about the other fellows there too.)
A***@germanymail.com
2017-05-07 15:04:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by laraine
The Folger Shakespeare Library chose UNC English professor
Jessica Wolfe as one of seven long-term fellows for the 2017-18
year. The fellowship program will give her the unique opportunity
to work on a special year-long project in Washington, D.C.
....
[Folger Institute Assistant Director for Fellowships Amanda Herbert
says,] "Jessica Wolfe is known for her work on the literature and
history of early modern science, the influence of classical
literature on the early modern period and the history of the book."
....
[Jessica Wolfe says]
“In the case of my Folger proposal, I had to sell the fellowship
committee on the idea that a biography of George Chapman — a
poet and playwright who doesn’t get a lot of airtime compared to
say, Shakespeare — was not just worth doing but could also be
quite a thrilling read, both because Chapman’s works are fascinating,
but also because he was connected, through his life and his writings,
to so many other major writers and thinkers of the period, including
Ben Jonson and Francis Bacon,” she said.
“I also sold him as a bit of a ‘bad boy’ — a rather irreverent,
daring and disgruntled writer who found himself on the wrong side
of the law at several moments during his career.”
http://www.dailytarheel.com/article/2017/04/english-professor-jessica-wolfe-receives-fellowship-to-work-in-folger-shakespeare-library-in-dc
(That article has some ads in it.)
----------------
The Folger Institute is especially pleased to appoint
Dr. Jessica Wolfe, Professor of English and Comparative
Literature at UNC Chapel Hill, as the Folger’s 2017-18
O.B. Hardison, Jr. Fellow. Dr. Wolfe’s two books and
varied essays and articles reflect an eclectic and broad
range of interests: the history of science and of scholarship,
epic and romance, and the reception of classical literature
and philosophy.
....
The Life of George Chapman,” the first full-length biography
in English of the Elizabethan and Jacobean poet, playwright,
and translator George Chapman (c. 1559-1634).
A purposefully obscure poet whose “strange” poems strive to
perplex readers, a brilliant but eccentric translator who
legitimates his authority by recounting how Homer‘s ghost
visited him on a hill in Hitchin, and an accomplished, provocative
playwright whose comedies and tragedies repeatedly aroused
controversy, censorship, and even a stint in jail for their
author,
Chapman’s life was marked by legal disputes, quarrels with
fellow poets, and repeated failures to secure dependable
patronage. But Chapman also occupied a central place in the
dramatic, poetic, and scholarly culture of late Elizabethan,
Jacobean, and Caroline England, and his life and work are
closely intertwined with major figures of the era, ranging
from Marlowe and Ben Jonson to Francis Bacon.
The Folger possesses the largest collection of first editions
of Chapman’s plays and poems in the U.S., and Wolfe will consult
these, as well as several manuscript letters attributed to
Chapman himself, over the course of the fellowship year.
http://collation.folger.edu/2017/04/2017-2018-long-term-fellows/
(Some information about the other fellows there too.)
Art N
marco
2017-05-10 03:53:49 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
work

We are but warriors for the working-day; King Henry V: IV, iii
Full of briers is this working-day world! As You Like It: I, iii

And plodded like a man for working-days, King Henry V: I, ii
working-days: your grace is too costly to wear Much Ado About Nothing: II, i

Whate'er thy thoughts or thy heart's workings be, Sonnets: XCIII

And our dull workings. o, who shall believe King Henry IV, part II: IV, ii

And mock your workings in a second body. King Henry IV, part II: V, ii

William Shakespeare, working actor
laraine
2017-05-12 23:37:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by marco
work
We are but warriors for the working-day; King Henry V: IV, iii
Full of briers is this working-day world! As You Like It: I, iii
And plodded like a man for working-days, King Henry V: I, ii
working-days: your grace is too costly to wear Much Ado About Nothing: II, i
Whate'er thy thoughts or thy heart's workings be, Sonnets: XCIII
And our dull workings. o, who shall believe King Henry IV, part II: IV, ii
And mock your workings in a second body. King Henry IV, part II: V, ii
William Shakespeare, working actor
I just happened upon this: (not Chapman)

Happy happie Fishers swaine[s]
If that yee knew your happines;
Your sport tasts sweeter by your paines,
Sure hope your labour relishes;
Your net your living, when you eate
Labour finds appetite and meat.

http://spenserians.cath.vt.edu/TextRecord.php?action=GET&textsid=33146
A***@germanymail.com
2017-05-14 17:26:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by laraine
Post by marco
work
We are but warriors for the working-day; King Henry V: IV, iii
Full of briers is this working-day world! As You Like It: I, iii
And plodded like a man for working-days, King Henry V: I, ii
working-days: your grace is too costly to wear Much Ado About Nothing: II, i
Whate'er thy thoughts or thy heart's workings be, Sonnets: XCIII
And our dull workings. o, who shall believe King Henry IV, part II: IV, ii
And mock your workings in a second body. King Henry IV, part II: V, ii
William Shakespeare, working actor
I just happened upon this: (not Chapman)
Happy happie Fishers swaine[s]
If that yee knew your happines;
Your sport tasts sweeter by your paines,
Sure hope your labour relishes;
Your net your living, when you eate
Labour finds appetite and meat.
http://spenserians.cath.vt.edu/TextRecord.php?action=GET&textsid=33146
Art N

Loading...