Discussion:
M(aste)r [W]illiam [H]erbert & *NICHOLAS STONE*
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Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-03-11 17:59:43 UTC
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---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Moore C W The Freemasons Monthly Magazine Vol IV 1845"

GRAND MASTERS, OR PATRONS, OF THE FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS IN ENGLAND,
from the coming in of the Saxons to the year 1839, Compiled and
condensed from the most authoritative records, by Br. Thomas Joseph
Tennison, President of the Masonic Council of Armagh, Ireland.
........................................................................
1607: James I., a Brother Mason, Grand Patron by Prerogative, appointed
Inigo Jones, Grand Master of all England, in which capacity he served
for 11 years. His Wardens were M(aste)r [W]illiam [H]erbert the
Earl of Pembroke, & *NICHOLAS STONE*, Esq., who, attended by many
Brothers attired in Craft clothing, walked to White Hall, and laid
the first stone of the Banquetting Hall, with knocks, huzzas,
and sound of trumpets, throwing a purse of gold upon the stone
for the operatives to drink “To the King and Craft!"

1618. [W]illiam [H]erbert , Earl of Pembroke, was chosen Grand Master.
He appointed Inigo Jones his Deputy.
--------------------------------------------------------------
http://91.1911encyclopedia.org/S/SH/SHAKESPEARE.htm
Loading Image...

<<The Stratford bust & monument must have been erected
on the N. wall. The design in its general aspect was one
often adopted by the "tombe-makers "of the period, and
according to Dugdale was executed by a *Fleming* resident
in London since 1567, Garratt Johnson (Gerard JANssen),
who was occasionally a collaborator with *NICHOLAS STONE*,
Esq., (fellow Freemason Warden with [W]illiam [H]erbert).
.............................................................
. Gerard JANssen / NICK Stone

. Q1 Rossencraft Gilderstone
. Q2 Rosencrans Guyldensterne
. F1 Rosincrane Guildensterne
. F2,3,4 Rosincross(e) Guildenstare

. Rosy Cross Stone Guild
. Rosicrucians Freemasons / the Craft
---------------------------------------------------------------
WASHINGTON IRVING, 1819 - p.48, Stratford-On-Avon, Sketch Book.
.
<<A flat stone marks the spot where the bard is buried. There
are four lines inscribed on it, said to have been written
by himself, and which have in them something extremely AWFUL.
<<Wm Herbert turned 17 on April 8, 1597, which is quite
. reasonably the time period of the first 17 Sonnets.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------
[M]r. William SHAKESPE[A|R)ES
COMEDIES, HISTO[R|I)ES, & TRAGEDIES.
Publ[I|S)hed according to t[H(e)] True Originall Co<PIES>
...............................................
_________ <= 17 =>

. [M]R. W i l l i a m S (H) A K <E S> P E
. [A|R} E S C o m e d i (E) s,H <I> s t o
. [R|I} e s&T r a g e d (I) e s <P> u b l
. [I|S} h e d a c c o r (D) i n g t o t
. [H(e)]T r u e O r i g (I) n a l l C o
. {P I E S}.
.
[MARI{He}] 17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 4174
(HEIDI) 17 : German form of "ALICE" : "of nobility"
[HIRAM] 17 : Hebrew חירָם "high-born" = 51 = 3 x 17).
-------------------------------------------------------
_________ <= 17 =>

. [M]r W H A L L {H} A P P I N E S S E
. [A]N D T H A T {E} T E R N I T I E P
. [R]O M I S E D {B}(Y) O V R E V E R L
. [I]V I N G P O {E}(T) W I S H E T H T
. {H e} W E L L W I (S) H I N G A D V E
. N T V R E R I N S E T T I N G F O
. R T H T T

[MARI{He}] 17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 10,000
(STY) -17
{HEBE} 17
----------------------------------------------------------------
Don wrote:
<<But you would be the one to make a case for Shakespeare's membership in Freemasons, maybe draw lines between known Freemasons in London during Shakespeare's time? Using Freemasons' symbolism, though, like the phoenix, doesn't add up to membership.>>
----------------------------------------------------
http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/ThomasSackville(1EDorset).htm

<<In co-operation with Thomas Norton [Thomas Sackville] wrote "The Tragedie of Gorboduc" but he handed over his other literary project "A myrroure for magistrates" to George Ferrers and William Baldwin after completing the 'Introduction'. During the year of 1561 he received the title of "Grandmaster of the Order of Freemasons". In 1563 he was once again elected to Parliament this time for Aylesbury. When he became thirty one years of age, he was knighted and raised to peerage as Lord Buckhurst which did take place on the eighth day of Jun of that year.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
[In first Quarto (1603) Guildenstern was GILDERSTONE]

Thomas Sackville, Lord Buckhurst, (1536-1608)
was the English dramatist that paved the way for Shakespeare.
Sackville was Grandmaster Freemason (1561-1567)
{Freemason => Stone Guild => Guildensteen}
---------------------------------------------------------------
Many Elizabethans (e.g., Edward Dyer, Francis Bacon,
_____________ John Dee & (maybe) William Stanley)
were Rosicrucians {Rosencrantz => Rosenkreutz}

In _Hamlet_ the Hermetic side is represented by Rosencrantz
The Masonic side is represented by Guildenstern
.............................................................
. Q1 Rossencraft Gilderstone
. Q2 Rosencrans Guyldensterne
. F1 Rosincrane Guildensterne
. F2,3,4 Rosincross(e) Guildenstare

. Rosy Cross Stone Guild
. Rosicrucians Freemasons / the Craft
--------------------------------------------------------
Terry Ross wrote: <<The emblematic device at the head
of the [*MINERVA* Britanna] title page with its motto:
........................................................
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
. ("as you burn I consume myself")
. and its picture of *TWO (Masonic?) LIGHTED CANDLES*.>>
.
Loading Image...
. (3rd Masonic candle = arm + feather)
.
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
......................................................
_______ [M-A-S-ONS]: (cui e mel {TU}i)
_______________ (and from your honey)
--------------------------------------------------------
_____ {UT} [MASTER M-A-S-ONS]
..............................................
___ <= 3 x 7 =>
.
. {U} P o n t h e L i n e s a n d L i f e o f
. {T} H e F a m o u s S c e n i c k e P o e t
.
. [M A S T E R] W I L L I A M S H A K E S P E
. [A] R E T h o s e h a n d s w h i c h y o u
. [S] O c l a p t g o n o w a n d w r i n g Y
. [O] u B r i t a i n e s b r a v e f o r d o
. [N] e a r e S h a k e s p e a r e s d a y e
. [S]

[MASONS] 21 : Prob. at start of poem ~ 1 in 9460
---------------------------------------------
William Webbe (c. 1550-1591)
A Discourse of English Poetrie 1586
http://www.bartleby.com/359/14.html

A Preface to the Noble {POETS} of Englande. (the end)
.......................................................................
If the motion bee worthy your regard, it is enough to mooue it; if not,
my worde(S) woulde simply preuaile in perswadi(N)g you; and therefore
I rest vppon thys (O)nely request, that of your courtesie(S) you wyll
graunt passage, vnder your f(A)uourable corrections, for this my si(M)ple
censure of English Poetry, wherein, if you please to runne it ouer, you
shall knowe breefely myne opinion of the most part of your accustomed Poets,
and particularly, in his place, the lyttle somewhat which I haue sifted
out of my weake brayne concerning thys reformed versifying. - W.W.
.......................................................................
. <= 31 =>
.
. m y w o r d e (S) w o u l d e s i m p l y p r e u a i l e i n p
. e r s w a d i (N) g y o u;a n d t h e r e f o r e I r e s t v p
. p o n t h y s (O) n e l y r e q u e s t,t h a t o f y o u r c o
. u r t e s i e (S) y o u w y l l g r a u n t p a s s a g e,v n d
. e r y o u r f (A) u o u r a b l e c o r r e c t i o n s,f o r t
. h i s m y s i (M) p l e c e n s u r e o f E n g l i s h P o e t r y,
.
(MASONS) -31 : prob. at end of Preface ~ 1 in 1730
-----------------------------------------------------------
. Cymbeline (Folio 1, 1623) Act 4, scene 2
.
Imogen: I am *NOTHING* ; or if not,
. *NOTHING* to be were better: This was my {MASTER},
. A VERy valiant Britaine, and a good,
. That heere by Mountaineers lyes slaine: Alas,
. There is no more such {MASTER}s: I may wander
. From East to Occident, cry out for Seruice,
. Try many, all good: *sERVE TRUly: nEVER*
. Finde such another {MASTER}.

Lucius: 'Lacke, good youth:
. Thou mou'st no lesse with thy complaining, then
. Thy {MAISTER} in bleeding: say his name, good Friend.

Imogen: [RICHARD d][U CHAMP]: If I do lye, and do
. No harme by it, though the Gods heare, I hope
. They'l pardon it. Say you Sir?

Lucius: Thy name?

Imogen: [FIDEL]e Sir.

Lucius: Thou doo'st approue thy selfe the very same:
. Thy Name well fits thy Faith; thy Faith, thy Name:
---------------------------------------------------------
<<[RICHARD d]e BEA[UCHAMP]:
appointed Freemason Grand {MASTER} by Edward IV.>>

1471. Richard Beachamp y Bishop of Sarum, Grand Master. He repaired the Royal
Castles, after the depopulating wars between the houses of York & Lancaster.
----------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.etymonline.com/word/dust

*DUST* (n.) Old English dust, from Proto-Germanic *dunstaz
(source also of Old High German tunst "storm, breath," German Dunst
"mist, vapor," Danish dyst "milldust," Dutch duist), from PIE
*dheu- "dust, smoke, vapor" (source also of Sanskrit dhu- "SHAKE,"
Latin fumus "smoke"). Meaning "that to which living matter decays"
was in Old English, hence, figuratively, "mortal life."*
...........................................................
*POLVERE* (Italian) : *DUST*
*POL VERE* (Latin) : "by POL-lux" (i.e., truly) VERE!
--------------------------------------------------------------
<< *William Hall* , and Oxford graduate, in 1694 stood beside
the grave and after he had read the rude, absurd, and ignorant
epitaph, wrote his Commentary contained in a letter to his
friend, Edward Thwaites, preserved in the Bodleian Library.
.
The letter has brought to light the significant fact
concerning the depth of Shakspere's grave, "they have laid
him full *17 FEET DEEP* , DEEP enough to secure him.">>
.
- Shakespeare: The Personal Phase_
by *William Hall* Chapman (1920)
.......................................................
.......................................................
Dear Neddy,

I very greedily embrace this occasion of acquainting you
with something which I found at Stratford-upon-Avon.
That place I came unto on Thursday night, and Ye next
day went to visit Ye ashes of the great Shakespear which
lye interr'd in that church. The verses which, in his
life-time, he ordered to be cut upon his tomb-stone,
for his monument have others, are these which follow;
................................................
. Reader, for Jesus's sake forbear
. To dig the dust enclosed here:
. *BLESSED* be he that Spares the{S}e Ston[E|S},
. And CU[R|S|ED] be h[E] that mo[V]es my bones.
................................................
. <= 7 =>
.
. *B L E S S E D*
. b e h e t h a
. t S p a r e s
. t h e {S} e S t
. o n [E]{S},A n d
. *C U [R]{S}[E D]*b
. e h [E] t h a t
. m o [V] e s m y
. b o n e s.

[VERE] 7 : in *BLESSED/CURSED* array ~ 1 in 772
[SSS] 7 : in *BLESSED/CURSED* array ~ 1 in 14
................................................
The little learning these verses contain would be a very
strong argument of Ye want of it in the author; did not
they carry something in them which stands in need of a
comment. There is in this Church a place which they call
the bone-house, a repository for all bones they dig up, which
are so many that they would load a great number of waggons.
The Poet, being willing to preserve his bones unmoved, lays
a curse upon him that moves them, and haveing to do with
Clarks and Sextons, for Ye most part a very <i>gnorant sort
of people, he descends to Ye meanest of their capacitys; and
disrobes himself of that art which none of his Co-temporaryes
wore in greater perfection. Nor has the design mist of its
effect, for, lest they should not only draw this curse upon
themselves, but also entail it upon their posterity, they
have laid him full *SEVENTEEN FOOT DEEP*, deep enough to
secure him. And so much for Stratford, within a mile of
which Sir Robinson lives, but it was [SO LAT]e before
I knew, that I had not time to make him a visit.

Mr. Allen Hammond, the bearer hereof, my particular
acquaintance and schoolfellow, upon Mr. Dean's recommendation
designs for Queen's, and intends to have *Mr. Waugh*
for his tutor. I desire that you would assist him in
what you can as to a study, and make use of your interest
with the senior poor children to be kind to him in what
concerns the going about the fires. My bed, which is in
Pennington's chamber, I have ordered him to make use of,
if he need one, and do desire you to help him to it.

Pray give my service to Jacky White, Harry Bird, and to
all my Lichfield acquaintance, when you see them, and
to all those also that shall ask after me. As for the
Staffordshire words we talked of, I will take notice
of them and send them. Pray let me hear from you at Mr.
Hammond's man's return, wherein you will greatly oblige

. Your friend and servant, Wm. Hall.

Direct your letter for Wm. Hall, junr.,
at Ye White-hart in Lichfield.

For Mr. Edward Thwaites in Queen's College in Oxon.
........................................................
The writer of the letter, William Hall,
was, observes Mr. Macray, when favoring me
with the copy, "a Queen's College man who
took his degree of B.A. in October, 1694,
and M.A. in July, 1697 ; he appears to have
been a well-informed and zealous antiquary."
The addressee, Edward Thwaites,
was a well-known Anglo-Saxon scholar.

- J. O. HALLIWELL-PHILLIPPS.
--------------------------------------------------
. Sweet swan of Avon! what a fight it were
. To see thee in our waters yet appeare,
. And make those flights upon t{He} bankes of Tha[M]es,
. That so did t[A]ke Eliza, and ou[R] James !
. But stay, [I] see thee in the {He}misphere
........................................
_____ <= 13 =>
.
. S w e e t s w a n o f A v
. o n! w h a t a S I G H t i
. t w e r e T O s e E t h e
. e i n o u R w a T e r s y
. e t a p p e a r e, A n d m
. a k e t h o s e f l i g h
. t s u p o n t {H e} B a n k
. e S o f T H a [M]e s, T h a
. T s o d I d t [A]k e E l I
. z a, a N d o u [R]J a m E s!
. B u T s t a y [I]s e e t h
. e E i n t h e {H e} m i s p
. H e r e
.
[MARI{He}] 13 : Prob. (at end) ~ 1 in 1524 (skip < 14)
[MARI{He}]: only 5 times in modern KJV w. skip < 18
..................................................
THE LA. [MARI]e {HE}r{BE}rt COUNTESSE OF PEMBROOKE.
-------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebe_%28mythology%29

<<{HEBE} is the Greek goddess of youth and cupbearer for
the gods of Mount Olympus. {HEBE} would move among them,
bearing the *EWER* of divine draught with which she would fill
the goblets. As a result of a fall in which {HEBE} exposed herself
to the eyes of all in a rather indecent posture, she lost her
job and was replaced by Ganymede/Aquarius the Water-carrier.

The name {HEBE} comes from Greek word meaning "youth"
or "prime of life". In Euripides' play Heracleidae,
{HEBE} granted Iolaus' wish to become young again in order
to fight Eurystheus. Hebe had two children with Heracles:
(A)lexiares & (A)nicetus. {HEBE} also drew baths
for Ares and helped Hera enter her chariot.>>

{HEBE} was also worshipped as
a goddess of {PARDONS} or forgiveness;
freed prisoners would *HANG their CHAINS*
in the sacred grove of her sanctuary at Phlius.>>
--------------------------------------------------------
Loading Image...
...............................................
. GOOD FREND FOR [IE]{SUS}' SAKE FOR[BE]ARE,
___ TO DIGG THE DU[ST] ENCLOASED [HE]ARE:
---............................................
___ BLESTE BE Ye MAN Yt SPA[RE]S THES STONES,
_ AND CURST *BE HE* Yt MO[VE]S *MY BONES* .
...............................................
http://library.thinkquest.org/5175/images/grave1.jpg
...............................................
On the 14th anniversary of Anne Hathaway's death [Aug. 6, 1637].
Ben Jonson was BURIED UPRIGHT leaning against the WALL
. of his Westminster Abbey crypt as requested:
.
. ' *TWO FEET BY TWO FEET*
. *WILL* do for all I *WANT* '. - Ben Jonson
...............................................
http://library.thinkquest.org/5175/images/grave1.jpg
___________ [IE] [BE] [RE]
__________ [ST] [HE] [VE]
........................................
___ *STIE / HEBE* : *VERE*
........................................
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/array2.html

. 0807d: NTENSH *STIE* VGHENVTT
. 1713d: GI *HEBE* IN
. 1714u: S *STY* TANE
. 1909u: R *VERE* HSI
........................................
STIE/STY, v.i. To soar; to ascend.
.
STIE/STY, n. 1. A pen or inclosure for SWine.
. 2. A place of *BESTial* debauchery.
........................................
{SUS} m, f : PIG (Latin)
---------------------------------------------------
Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.
#6 in our series by Washington Irving.

STRATFORD-ON-AVON.

The inscription on the tombstone has not been without its effect.
It has prevented the removal of his remains from the bosom of
his native place to Westminster Abbey, which was at one time
contemplated. A few years since also, as some laborers were
digging to make an adjoining vault, the earth caved in, so as to
leave a vacant space almost like an arch, through which one might
have reached into his grave. No one, however, presumed to meddle
with his remains so awfully guarded by a malediction; and lest
any of the idle or the curious or any collector of relics should
be tempted to commit depredations, the old sexton kept watch
over the place for two days, until the vault was finished and
the aperture closed again. He told me that he had made bold
to look in at the hole, but could see neither coffin nor
bones--nothing but dust. It was something, I thought,
to have seen the dust of {Shakespeare}.

Next to this grave are those of his wife, his favorite daughter,
Mrs. Hall, and others of his family. On a tomb close by, also,
is a full-length effigy of his old friend John Combe, o[F]
usurious memo[R]y, on whom he is s[A]id to have writ[T]en
a ludicrous [E]pitaph. There a[R]e other monume[N]ts around,
but the mind refuses to dwell on anything that
is not connected with {Shakespeare}.
....................................................
. <= 13 =>
.
. o [F] u s u r i o u s m e m
. o [R] y, o n w h o m h e i s
. s [A] i d t o h a v e w r i
. t [T] e n a l u d i c r o u
. s [E] p i t a p h. T h e r e
. a [R] e o t h e r m o n u m
. e [N] t s a r o u n d, b u t
. t h e m i n d r e f u s e
. s t o d w e l l o n a n y
. t h i n g t h a t i s n o
. t c o n n e c t e d w i t
. h {S h a k e s p e a r e}.
.
[FRATERN.]
---------------------------------------------------------
-- There's a {GENT}leman here, sir, the attendant said,
coming forward and offering a card. From the *FREEMAN*.
He wants to see the files of the Kilkenny People
[F]o[R] l[A]s[T] y[E]a[R].
---------------------------------------------------------
http://www.crcsite.org/printfama.htm

The [FAMA] [FRATER]nitatis Rosae Crucis was first
published in German in 1614 and then in 1615 in Latin:
........................................................
Underneath they had subscribed themselves,
.......................................................
1. Fra. I.A., Fra. C.H. electione [FRATER]nitatis caput.
2. Fra. G.V. M.P.C.
3. Fra. F.[R].C. Junior ha[E]res S. Spiri[T]us
4. Fra. F.B.M. P.[A]. Pictor et A[R]chitectus
5. [F]ra. G..G. M.P.I. Cabalista
...................................
. <= 10 =>
.
. [F R A T E R] n i t a
. t i s c a p u t. F r
. a. G. V. M. P. C. F r a. F.
. [R] C. J u n i o r h a
. [E] r e s S. S p i r i
. [T] u s F r a. F. B. M. P.
. [A] P i c t o r e t A
. [R] c h i t e c t u s
. [F] r a. G. G. M. P. I. C a
. b a l i s t a
.
[FRATER] -10 : Prob. in 1st name set ~ 1 in 600
.................................
Secundi Circuli.
..................................
1. Fra. P.[A]. Successor, Fra. I.O. [M]athematicus
2. Fra. [A]. Successor Fra. P.D.
3. [F]ra. R. Successor Patris C.R.C., cum Christo triumphantis.
...................................
. <= 15 =>
.
. F r a.P.[A].S u c c e s s o r,F
. r a.I.O.[M] a t h e m a t i c u
. s F r a.[A].S u c c e s s o r F
. r a.P.D.[F] r a.R.S u c c e s s
. o r P a t r i s C.R.C.c u m C
. h r i s t o t r i u m p h a n
. t i s.

[FAMA] -15 : Prob. in 2nd name set ~ 1 in 17
...................................
. <= 5 =>
.
. F r a. F. [R].
. C. J u n i
. o r h a [E]
. r e s S. S
. p i r i [T]
. u s. F r a.
. F. B. M. P. [A].
. P i c t o
. r e t A [R]
. c h i t e
. c t u s [F]
. r a. G..G. M.
. P. I. C a b
. a l i s t
. a S e c u
. n d i C i
. r c u l i.
. F r a. P. [A].
. S u c c e
. s s o r, F
. r a. I. O. [M]
. a t h e m
. a t i c u
. s F r a. [A].
. S u c c e
. s s o r F
. r a. P. D. [F]
. r a. R. S u
. c c e s s
. o r P a t
. r i s C. R.
. C.
...................................................
Prob. of both in the same direction ~ 1 in 20,000
------------------------------------------------------
Ex Deo nascimur, in Jesu morimur, per Spiritum Sanctum revivscimus.

At that time was already dead Brother I.O. and Brother D., but their burial place where is it to be found? We doubt not but our Fra. Senior hath the same, and some especial thing layd in earth, and perhaps likewise hidden. We also hope that this our example will stir up others more diligently to inquire after their names (whom we have therefore published) and to search for the place of their burial; the most part of them, by reason of their practise and physick, are yet known and praised among very old folks; so might perhaps our Gaza be enlarged, or at least be better cleared.

Concerning Minutum Mundum, we found it kept in another little altar, truly more finer then can be imagined by any understanding man, but we will leave him undescribed, until we shall be truly answered upon this our true-hearted Fama. And so we have coVERED it again with the plates, and set the altar thereon, shut the door, and made it sure, wi{T}h {A}l{L} o{U}r {S}eals.
.............................................
Final 2 sentences:

And this we say for a truth, that whosoever shall earnestly, and from his heart, bear affection unto us, it shall be beneficial {T}o him in goods, body, and soul; but he that is false-hearted, or only greedy of riches, the same first of al{L} shall not be able in any MANNER of wise to hurt us, b{U}t bring himself to utter ruin and destruction. Al{S}o our building, although one hundred thousand people had very near seen and beheld the same, shall

for EVER remain untouched, undestroyed, and hidden to the wicked world.
.
{TALUS} 41 : Prob. at end ~ 1 in 67
---------------------------------------------------------
Terry Ross wrote: <<The emblematic device at the head
of the [*MINERVA* Britanna] title page with its motto:
........................................................
"{UT} [A]LIJ[S], ME C[ONS]U[M]E"
("as you burn I consume myself")
and its picture of two lighted *CANDLES*.>>

https://hankwhittemore.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/minerva-1.jpeg
.
. "{UT} [A]LIJ[S], ME C[ONS]U[M]E"
......................................................
________ {UT} [MASTER MASONS]
..............................................
___ <= (Ezra?) 21 = 3 x 7 =>
.
. {U} P o n t h e L i n e s a n d L i f e o f
. {T} H e F a m o u s S c e n i c k e P o e t
.
. [M A S T E R] W I L L I A M S H A K E S P E
. [A] R E T h o s e h a n d s w h i c h y o u
. [S] O c l a p t g o n o w a n d w r i n g Y
. [O] u B r i t a i n e s b r a v e f o r d o
. [N] e a r e S h a k e s p e a r e s d a y e
. [S]

[MASONS] 21 : Prob. at start of poem ~ 1 in 9460
--------------------------------------------------------
http://www.bartleby.com/153/107.html
http://www.luminarium.org/renascence-editions/colin.html

Colin Clo{UT}s Co (M|E)
Home Ag (A|I)ne
BY ED. (S|P)ENCER
L (O)N DON
PRI (N)T ED FOR WILLIAM PONSONBIE
...................................................
(MASON) 8
------------------------------------------------------------
_SHAKESPEARE AND FREEMASONRY_ by Peter Dawkin 1997
http://www.sirbacon.org/Dawkinsfrmsnry.htm

<<Masonic references in the Shakespeare plays are numerous, some fairly obvious and others extremely subtle, but all woven into the text in such a way that they form a natural part of the magical garment. A Freemason is referred to several times and in several ways, as, for instance, referring to the higher degrees, 'a brother of gracious Order, late come from the Sea, in special business from his Holinesse.

In Henry V the brethren are referred to as 'the singing [MASONS] building roofs of gold';

in King John as 'a worshipful society'; whilst Love's Labour's Lost not only mentions 'profound Solomon' but also the Lodge and a password, suitably disguised:

Ar. I will visit thee at the Lodge.

Maid. Thats hereby.

Ar. I know where it is situate.

Ma. Lord how wise you are.

Ar. I will tell thee wonders.
----------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer





-------------------------------------------------
TO THE ONLIE BEGETTER OF THESE INSUING SONNETS
.
________ <= 17 =>
.
. [M]R {W H}A L L {H} A P P I N E S S E
. [A|N) D T H A T {e} T {E}R N I T I E P
. [R|O) M I S E D {B}(Y){O}U R E V E R L
. [I|V) I N G P O {e}(T){W}I S H E T H T
. {H e} W E L L W I (S){H}I N G
.
[MARI{He}] 17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 4700 (any skip)
-------------------------------------------------
[M]R. William
S(H)AK<ES>PE[A|R}ES
Comedi(E)s,
H<I>sto[R|I}es &
Traged(I)es,
<P>ubl[I|S}hed accor(D)ing to
t{H e} True Orig(I)nal Co<PIES>
.................................................
________ <= 17 =>
.
. [M]R. W i l l i a m S (H) A K <E S> P E
. [A|R} E S C o m e d I (E) s,H <I> s t o
. [R|I} e s&T r a g e D (I) e s <P> u b l
. [I|S} h e d a c c o r (D) i n g t o t
. {H e} T r u e O r i g (I) n a l C o<P I E S>

[MARI{He}] 17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 2000 (any skip)
(HEIDI) : German form of (ALICE)

----------------------------------------------------
. Sweet swan of Avon! what a fight it were
. To see thee in our waters yet appeare,
. And make those flights upon the bankes of Tha[M]es,
. That so did t[A]ke Eliza, and ou[R] James !
. But stay, [I] see thee in the {He}misphere
........................................
_____ <= 13 =>
.
. S w e e t s w a n o f A v
. o n! w h a t a S I G H t i
. t w e r e T O s e E t h e
. e i n o u R w a T e r s y
. e t a p p e a r e, A n d m
. a k e t h o s e f l i g h
. t s u p o n t H e B a n k
. e S o f T H a [M] e s, T h a
. T s o d I d t [A] k e E l I
. z a, a N d o u [R] J a m E s!
. B u T s t a y [I] s e e t h
. e E i n t h e {H e} m i s p
. H e r e
.
[MARI{He}] 13 : Prob. (at end) ~ 1 in 1524 (skip < 14)
[MARI{He}]: only 5 times in modern KJV w. skip < 18
..................................................
THE LA. [MARI]e [He]rbert COUNTESSE OF PEMBROOKE.
-------------------------------------------------------
http://www.shakespeare-authorship.org.uk/mary-sidney-herbert.htm

<<Mary Sidney Herbert, 2nd Countess of Pembroke (1561-1621) worked to
make her home [WILTON] House in Wiltshire a leading cultural centre,
which when flourishing reminded one visiting poet "of the Court of
Urbino in Italy". The Countess encouraged writers and poets - and
'occasional' playmakers' efforts - in an academy environment "of
courtliness and piety." [WILTON]'s archives were said to have long
held Mary's letter to her son, sent in 1606, saying "We have
the man Shakespeare here - bring King James!" And that Heminges
received thirty pounds (a huge amount) for the King's Men's
performance of "As You Like It" played at [WILTON].>>
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Thomas PLATTer (b.1574) of

[BA]sle [C]ant[ON]
[BACON] latens:
(Latin present participle of lateō) lurking, skulking, hiding

[BASL]e c[ANT]on
[ST. ALBAN] once
.......................................................
http://195.167.241.43/globe/education/distancelearning/distancelearni...
.
<<In (1909) a series of remarkable documents concerning the Globe
came to light. In the German-language journal of English philology,
Anglia, Dr. Gustav Binz published excerpts from a traveler's
account of a visit to England in 1599. Thomas PLATTer
(b.1574), a Swiss of [BA]sle [C]ant[ON], had written:
.
On September 21st after lunch, about two o'clock, I and my party
crossed the water, and there in the house with the thatched
roof witnessed an excellent performance of the tragedy of
the 1st Emperor JC with a cast of some *15 people* ....>>
. (Schanzer, "PLATTer's Observations" 466-7)
....................................................
Twain's Baconiana: _Is Shakespeare Dead?_ (1909)
-------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.wwnorton.com/college/english/nael/16century/topic_4/tplatt...
.
Thomas Platter, a native of Basel, visited England in 1599. The
following excerpt from his diary, translated from the German,
describes the many popular amusements and spectacles to be
witnessed in Elizabethan London. (~8112 letters)
................................................
T[He]re are a great many [I]nns, taverns, and
bee[R]-gardens scatt(E)red [A]bout the city,
where [M]uch amusement {m}ay b(E) had with eating, drinking,
fiddling, {a}nd the rest, as for instance in our hostel{r}y,
which was visited by players almost da{i}ly. And what is
pa[r]ticularly curious is t{h}at the women as w[e]ll as the men, in
fact more often than they, [w]ill frequent the taverns or ale-houses
f[o]r enjoyment. They count it a great honour [t]o be taken there
and given wine with sugar to drink; and if one woman only is
invited, then she will bring three or four other women along and
they gaily toast each other; the husband afterwards thanks him who
has given his wife such pleasure, for they deem it a real kindness.
.............................................
_________ <= 17 =>

. T {H e} r e a r e a g r e a t m a n
. y [I] n n s,t a v e r n s, a n d b e
. e [R] g a r d e n s s c a t t (E) r e
. d [A] b o u t t h e c i t y,w h e r
. e [M] u c h a m u s e m e n t {M} a y
. b (E) h a d w i t h e a t i n g, d r
. i n k i n g,f i d d l i n g {A} n d
. t h e r e s t,a s f o r i n s t a
. n c e i n o u r h o s (T) e l {R} y,w
. h i c h w a s v i s i (T) e d b y p
. l a y e r s a l m o s (T) d a {I} l y.
. A n d w h a t i s p a [R] t i c u l
. a r l y c u r i o u s i s t {H} a t
. t h e w o m e n a s w [E] l l a s t
. h e m e n,i n f a c t m o r e o f
. t e n t h a n t h e y [W] i l l f r
. e q u e n t t h e t a v e r n s o
. r a l e-h o u s e s f [O] r e n j o
. y m e n t.T h e y c o u n t i t a
. g r e a t h o n o u r [T] o b e t a
. k e n t h e r e a n d g i v e n

- wine with sugar to drink;

[HIRAM(E)] 17
{HIRAM(E)} -34
[TOWER] -34
................................................
*RAM(E)* : To complain; moan; weep, cry.
[From Northern Middle English ramen ("to cry out, scream"),
. from Old English *hrāmian ("to scream")]
................................................
*RAM(E)* : (Dutch) singular present subjunctive of ramen.
. To guess, reckon
-----------------------------------------------------


---------------------------------------------------------------------
1607. James I., a Brother Mason, Grand Patron by Prerogative, appointed the
celebrated Inigo Jones, Grand Master of all England, in which capacity
he served for eleven years. His Wardens were the Earl of Pembroke, and
*Nicholas Stone*, Esq., who, attended by many Brothers attired in Craft
clothing, walked to White Hall, and laid the first stone of the
Banquetting Hall, with knocks, huzzas, and sound of trumpets,
throwing a purse of gold upon the stone for the operatives
to drink “To the King and Craft!"

1618. [W]illiam [H]erbert , Earl of Pembroke, was chosen Grand Master.
He appointed Inigo Jones his Deputy.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
<<Spenser was buried, at his own request, near the tomb of Chaucer,
in Westminster Abbey. His funeral was at the expense of the Earl of
Essex. The pall was held by brother poets. Mournful elegies and poems,
together with the pens that wrote them, were thrown into his grave.
Gadzooks! Zounds! This "throwing into the grave" of Spenser invites
us to imagine that Shakespeare attended the funeral, wrote something
mournful, and threw it and his pen into the grave along with other
notable literati.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Sounds like a Masonic {POETS} funeral!
------------------------------------------
. [Hamlet (Quarto 2) 5.1]
.
Clown: What is he that builds {S}tronger
. {T}hen eyth{E}r [THE MAS{O}N],
. the Shy{P}wright, or the Carpenter.
........................................
. <= 8 =>
.
. W h a t
. i s h e t h a t
. b u i l (d) s {S} t
. r o n g (e) r {T} h
. e n e y (t) h {E} r
. [T H E M (A) S {O} N]
. t h e S (h) y {P} w
. r i g h t, o r t
. h e C a r p e n
. t e r.
.
{POETS} -8: Prob. in question: ~ 1 in 660
.
Answer: (hated) [M(A)S{O}N] {POETS} ?
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
"Moore C W The Freemasons Monthly Magazine Vol IV 1845"

GRAND MASTERS, OR PATRONS, OF THE FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS IN ENGLAND,
from the coming in of the Saxons to the year 1839, with brief
references to remarkable events. Compiled and condensed from
the most authoritative records, by Br. Thomas Joseph Tennison,
President of the Masonic Council of Armagh, Ireland.
........................................................................
1422. Henry Chichely , Archbishop of Canterbury, was Grand Master Mason
under Henry V., the renowned conqueror of France. By the King’s direction
he rebuilt the Palace and Abbey of Sheen, now called Richmond-on-Thames.

William Wanefleet , Bishop of Winchester, Grand Master, built Eton College,
and King’s College, also founded Christ’s and Queen’s Colleges, Cambridge,
at the command of Henry VI., whilst Brother Wanefleet, at his own cost,
built Magdalen Hall, Oxford. In the third year of Henry’s reign, an ignorant
and illiterate Parliament passed an act "forbidding Freemasons to confederate
in chapters or congregations ; those so offending to be judged felons;
visiting Brethren to be punished by fine or imprisonment.” But this grossly
tyrannical piece of legislative humbug was never enforced, and is fully
explained in the learned Coke’s Institutes, Part. III. fol. 19.

1471. Richard Beachamp y Bishop of Sarum, Grand Master. He repaired the Royal
Castles, after the depopulating wars between the houses of York & Lancaster.

1485. The Grand Master of the Knights of Malta.

1493. John Islip , Bishop of Winchester.

1500. Henry VII, having been chosen Protector by the Grand Master and
Fellows of the Order of St. John at Rhodes, (afterwards Malta} he selected
as his Wardens, John Islip, Abbot of Westminster, and Sir Reginald Bray,
Knight of the Garter, and by them summoned a Lodge of Master Masons in the
Palace, with whom he marched in procession to the East-end of Westminster
Abbey, and with his own hand levelled the footstone of his celebrated
chapel, June 24, (St. John’s day,) 1502.

Deputy Grand Master, Sir Reginald Bray, Knight.

Cardinal Wolsey was, in the following reign, chosen Grand Master. He built
Hampton Court, Whitehall, College of Christ, Oxford, and several splendid
edifices, which, when he was hurled from “The full meridian of his glory,”
to merited degradation, were forfeited to his false and fickle monarch,
the subtle and truculent Henry VIII.

Thomas Cromwell Earl of Essex, was the next Grand Master.
He built St. James’s Palace, Christ’s Hospital, Greenwich Castle.

On Cromwell’s fall & decollation, John Touchet Lord Audley, became Grand Master.

1552. At the death of Henry, Protector Somerset was Grand Master,
and built Somerset House, which was forfeited to the Crown.
When the duke was beheaded, John Peynet, Bishop of Winchester,
was Grand Patron of Freemasons until the demise of Edward VI.

1561. Sir Thomas Sackville succeeded, and continued Grand Master, until the
accession of Elizabeth, who “ finding that Freemasons had certain secrets
which could not be revealed to her,” she sent an armed force to break up
their annual Grand Lodge at York, on St John’s day, the 27th of December;
but some of the commanding officers having been initiated, returned, and
made so favorable a report to her Majesty, that she ever afterwards
patronized and protected them.

1567. When Sir Thomas Sackville demitted, the Earl of Bedford
was chosen in the North ; and, in the South.

1570. Sir Thomas Gresham, who built the Exchange, and which was burned in 1838.

1588 to 1603. George Hastings , Earl of Huntingdon.

1602. Charles Howard , Lord of Effingham, (who, when Lord Admiral, took
or destroyed the celebrated Spanish Armada,) was Grand Master in the
South till 1558, and the Earl of Huntingdon till the Queen died. Sir
Walter Raleigh (who, without any government assistance, had colonised
New England), the Earl of Essex, the generous and affable Norfolk, and
indeed most of the great men of this interesting period, were all Freemasons.

1607. James I., a Brother Mason, Grand Patron by Prerogative, appointed the
celebrated Inigo Jones, Grand Master of all England, in which capacity
he served for eleven years. His Wardens were the Earl of Pembroke, and
*Nicholas Stone*, Esq., who, attended by many Brothers attired in Craft
clothing, walked to White Hall, and laid the first stone of the
Banquetting Hall, with knocks, huzzas, and sound of trumpets,
throwing a purse of gold upon the stone for the operatives
to drink “To the King and Craft!"

1618. William Herbert , Earl of Pembroke, was chosen Grand Master.
He appointed Inigo Jones his Deputy.

Charles I., a Royal Mason and Grand Patron by Prerogative ;
under him the Earl of Darnley, Grand Master, who erected
the beautiful gate of the Physick Gardens, at Oxford.

1630-1-2. Henry Danvers , Earl of Danby.

1634. Thomas Howard , Earl of Arundel, was Grand Master.
----------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-03-11 22:18:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, March 11, 2018 at 1:59:46 PM UTC-4, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

[Hermetic horse manure snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
[M]r. William SHAKESPE[A|R)ES
COMEDIES, HISTO[R|I)ES, & TRAGEDIES.
Publ[I|S)hed according to t[H(e)] True Originall Co<PIES>
...............................................
_________ <= 17 =>
. [M]R. W i l l i a m S (H) A K <E S> P E
. [A|R} E S C o m e d i (E) s,H <I> s t o
. [R|I} e s&T r a g e d (I) e s <P> u b l
. [I|S} h e d a c c o r (D) i n g t o t
. [H(e)]T r u e O r i g (I) n a l l C o
. {P I E S}.
.
[MARI{He}] 17
The string "MARIHE [sic]" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 17 -- or indeed, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip whateVER -- in the above text, Art. Even if it did, it would be utterly unremarkable, as "MARIHE [sic]" is moronic nonsense.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_________ <= 17 =>
. [M]r W H A L L {H} A P P I N E S S E
. [A]N D T H A T {E} T E R N I T I E P
. [R]O M I S E D {B}(Y) O V R E V E R L
. [I]V I N G P O {E}(T) W I S H E T H T
. {H e} W E L L W I (S) H I N G A D V E
. N T V R E R I N S E T T I N G F O
. R T H T T
[MARI{He}] 17
The string "MARIHE [sic]" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 17 -- or indeed, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip whateVER -- in the above text, Art. Even if it did, it would be utterly unremarkable, as "MARIHE [sic]" is moronic nonsense.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
(STY) -17
Huh? What makes you think (usual disclaimer) that "STY" has any significance, Art?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Many Elizabethans (e.g., Edward Dyer, Francis Bacon,
_____________ John Dee & (maybe) William Stanley)
were Rosicrucians
Evidence, Art?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 7 =>
.
. *B L E S S E D*
. b e h e t h a
. t S p a r e s
. t h e {S} e S t
. o n [E]{S},A n d
. *C U [R]{S}[E D]*b
. e h [E] t h a t
. m o [V] e s m y
. b o n e s.
[VERE] 7 : in *BLESSED/CURSED* array ~ 1 in 772
[SSS] 7 : in *BLESSED/CURSED* array ~ 1 in 14
What's "SSS", Art? The Selective Service System? Oxford *shirked* his military obligations. Incidentally, Art, when you registered for the draft, were you issued a daft card instead?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Mr. Allen Hammond,
But Art -- "Mister Allen Hammond" is an anagram of

Hamlet: Mason; Mr. Ed: Nil.

Therefore Oxford *cannot* have been Hamlet -- unless perhaps "Mr. Ed" refers to a talking horse -- or rather, a talking horse's hindquarters -- confirming that you are indeed a cowan, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_____ <= 13 =>
.
. S w e e t s w a n o f A v
. o n! w h a t a S I G H t i
. t w e r e T O s e E t h e
. e i n o u R w a T e r s y
. e t a p p e a r e, A n d m
. a k e t h o s e f l i g h
. t s u p o n t {H e} B a n k
. e S o f T H a [M]e s, T h a
. T s o d I d t [A]k e E l I
. z a, a N d o u [R]J a m E s!
. B u T s t a y [I]s e e t h
. e E i n t h e {H e} m i s p
. H e r e
.
[MARI{He}] 13
The string "MARIHE [sic]" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 13 -- or indeed, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip whateVER -- in the above text, Art. Even if it did, it would be utterly unremarkable, as "MARIHE [sic]" is moronic nonsense.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 13 =>
.
. o [F] u s u r i o u s m e m
. o [R] y, o n w h o m h e i s
. s [A] i d t o h a v e w r i
. t [T] e n a l u d i c r o u
. s [E] p i t a p h. T h e r e
. a [R] e o t h e r m o n u m
. e [N] t s a r o u n d, b u t
. t h e m i n d r e f u s e
. s t o d w e l l o n a n y
. t h i n g t h a t i s n o
. t c o n n e c t e d w i t
. h {S h a k e s p e a r e}.
.
[FRATERN.]
"FRATERN [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art. Even so, Oxford liked slatterns, not fraterns (although he preferred choir boys to either).

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 10 =>
.
. [F R A T E R] n i t a
. t i s c a p u t. F r
. a. G. V. M. P. C. F r a. F.
. [R] C. J u n i o r h a
. [E] r e s S. S p i r i
. [T] u s F r a. F. B. M. P.
. [A] P i c t o r e t A
. [R] c h i t e c t u s
. [F] r a. G. G. M. P. I. C a
Are you seeking "RETARD" as an equidistant letter sequence, Art? "RETARF [sic]" doesn't quite cut it.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_SHAKESPEARE AND FREEMASONRY_ by Peter Dawkin 1997
http://www.sirbacon.org/Dawkinsfrmsnry.htm
That's a nutcase source, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<Masonic references in the Shakespeare plays are numerous, some fairly
obvious and others extremely subtle, but all woven into the text in such
a way that they form a natural part of the magical garment. A Freemason
is referred to several times and in several ways, as, for instance,
referring to the higher degrees, 'a brother of gracious Order, late come
from the Sea [sic], in special business from his Holinesse.
This is idiotic, Art. It should read "from the See" (i.e., the Holy See, the seat of the Papacy), as the rest of the line makes clear. He is not referring to a Masonic brother, but to a member of a Catholic religious order.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
In Henry V the brethren are referred to as 'the singing [MASONS] building roofs of gold';
Since those masons are *building*, the are obviously *actual* masons, not Freemasons. Hint to an illiterate: The word "mason" in English (lowercase) has a meaning utterly unrelated to Hermetic horse manure.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
in King John as 'a worshipful society'; whilst Love's Labour's Lost not
only mentions 'profound Solomon' but also the Lodge and a password,
Ar. I will visit thee at the Lodge [sic].
This is idiotic, Art! The line is spoken by Armado, to Jaquenetta, "a country wench", who, as a woman, would not be admitted there!

However, if you're looking for something pertaining to Oxford in _Love's Labour's Lost_, you have only to look a few lines further in the same scene, line 158 in Ribner and Kittredge's edition, where Armado says

"Cupid's buttshaft is too hard..."

-- surely Orazio Cogno's sentiments exactly!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Maid. Thats hereby.
Ar. I know where it is situate.
Ma. Lord how wise you are.
Ar. I will tell thee wonders.
You mean, like a man bound from New Haven to New York City boarding a nonstop flight from Boston to Los Angeles?

You will tell me blunders, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
----------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
[Endlessly repetitive lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-03-11 22:33:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Moore C W The Freemasons Monthly Magazine Vol IV 1845"

GRAND MASTERS, OR PATRONS, OF THE FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS IN ENGLAND,
from the coming in of the Saxons to the year 1839, Compiled and
condensed from the most authoritative records, by Br. Thomas Joseph
Tennison, President of the Masonic Council of Armagh, Ireland.
........................................................................
1607: James I., a Brother Mason, Grand Patron by Prerogative, appointed
Inigo Jones, Grand Master of all England, in which capacity he served
for 11 years. His Wardens were M(aste)r [W]illiam [H]erbert the
Earl of Pembroke, & *NICHOLAS STONE*, Esq., who, attended by many
Brothers attired in Craft clothing, walked to White Hall, and laid
the first stone of the Banquetting Hall, with knocks, huzzas,
and sound of trumpets, throwing a purse of gold upon the stone
for the operatives to drink “To the King and Craft!"

1618. [W]illiam [H]erbert , Earl of Pembroke, was chosen Grand Master.
He appointed Inigo Jones his Deputy.
--------------------------------------------------------------
http://91.1911encyclopedia.org/S/SH/SHAKESPEARE.htm
http://www.stratford-upon-avon.org/images/memorial.jpg

<<The Stratford bust & monument must have been erected
on the N. wall. The design in its general aspect was one
often adopted by the "tombe-makers "of the period, and
according to Dugdale was executed by a *Fleming* resident
in London since 1567, Garratt Johnson (Gerard JANssen),
who was occasionally a collaborator with *NICHOLAS STONE*,
Esq., (fellow Freemason Warden with [W]illiam [H]erbert).
.............................................................
. Gerard JANssen / NICK Stone

. Q1 Rossencraft Gilderstone
. Q2 Rosencrans Guyldensterne
. F1 Rosincrane Guildensterne
. F2,3,4 Rosincross(e) Guildenstare

. Rosy Cross Stone Guild
. Rosicrucians Freemasons / the Craft
---------------------------------------------------------------
WASHINGTON IRVING, 1819 - p.48, Stratford-On-Avon, Sketch Book.
.
<<A flat stone marks the spot where the bard is buried. There
are four lines inscribed on it, said to have been written
by himself, and which have in them something extremely AWFUL.>>
...........................................................
<<Wm Herbert turned 17 on April 8, 1597, which is quite
. reasonably the time period of the first 17 Sonnets.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------
[M]r. William SHAKESPE[A|R)ES
COMEDIES, HISTO[R|I)ES, & TRAGEDIES.
Publ[I|S)hed according to t[H(e)] True Originall Co<PIES>
...............................................
_________ <= 17 =>

. [M]R. W i l l i a m S (H) A K <E S> P E
. [A|R} E S C o m e d i (E) s,H <I> s t o
. [R|I} e s&T r a g e d (I) e s <P> u b l
. [I|S} h e d a c c o r (D) i n g t o t
. [H(e)]T r u e O r i g (I) n a l l C o
. {P I E S}.
.
[MARI{He}] 17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 4174
(HEIDI) 17 : German form of "ALICE" : "of nobility"
[HIRAM] 17 : Hebrew חירָם "high-born" = 51 = 3 x 17).
-------------------------------------------------------
_________ <= 17 =>

. [M]r W H A L L {H} A P P I N E S S E
. [A]N D T H A T {E} T E R N I T I E P
. [R]O M I S E D {B}(Y) O V R E V E R L
. [I]V I N G P O {E}(T) W I S H E T H T
. {H e} W E L L W I (S) H I N G A D V E
. N T V R E R I N S E T T I N G F O
. R T H T T

[MARI{He}] 17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 10,000
(STY) -17
{HEBE} 17
----------------------------------------------------------------
Lea wrote:

<<The string "MARIHE [sic]" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 17 in the above text, Art. Even if it did, it would be utterly unremarkable, as "MARIHE [sic]" is moronic nonsense.
----------------------------------------------------------
"HIRAM" is an important name in Freemasonry and

"MARI He." is the mother of [soon to be Grand] M(aste)r [W]illiam [H]erbert
--------------------------------------------------
. Sweet swan of Avon! what a fight it were
. To see thee in our waters yet appeare,
. And make those flights upon t{He} bankes of Tha[M]es,
. That so did t[A]ke Eliza, and ou[R] James !
. But stay, [I] see thee in the {He}misphere
........................................
_____ <= 13 =>
.
. S w e e t s w a n o f A v
. o n! w h a t a S I G H t i
. t w e r e T O s e E t h e
. e i n o u R w a T e r s y
. e t a p p e a r e, A n d m
. a k e t h o s e f l i g h
. t s u p o n t {H e} B a n k
. e S o f T H a [M]e s, T h a
. T s o d I d t [A]k e E l I
. z a, a N d o u [R]J a m E s!
. B u T s t a y [I]s e e t h
. e E i n t h e {H e} m i s p
. H e r e
.
[MARI{He}] 13 : Prob. (at end) ~ 1 in 1524 (skip < 14)
[MARI{He}]: only 5 times in modern KJV w. skip < 18
..................................................
THE LA. [MARI]e {HE}r{BE}rt COUNTESSE OF PEMBROOKE.
-------------------------------------------------------
Terry Ross wrote: <<The emblematic device at the head
of the [*MINERVA* Britanna] title page with its motto:
........................................................
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
. ("as you burn I consume myself")
. and its picture of *TWO (Masonic?) LIGHTED CANDLES*.>>
.
https://hankwhittemore.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/minerva-1.jpeg
. (3rd Masonic candle = arm + feather)
.
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
......................................................
_______ [M-A-S-ONS]: (cui e mel {TU}i)
_______________ (and from your honey)
--------------------------------------------------------
_____ {UT} [MASTER M-A-S-ONS]
..............................................
___ <= 3 x 7 =>
.
. {U} P o n t h e L i n e s a n d L i f e o f
. {T} H e F a m o u s S c e n i c k e P o e t
.
. [M A S T E R] W I L L I A M S H A K E S P E
. [A] R E T h o s e h a n d s w h i c h y o u
. [S] O c l a p t g o n o w a n d w r i n g Y
. [O] u B r i t a i n e s b r a v e f o r d o
. [N] e a r e S h a k e s p e a r e s d a y e
. [S]

[MASONS] 21 : Prob. at start of poem ~ 1 in 9460
---------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-03-12 13:13:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, March 11, 2018 at 6:33:06 PM UTC-4, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

[Hermetic horse manure snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_________ <= 17 =>
. [M]r W H A L L {H} A P P I N E S S E
. [A]N D T H A T {E} T E R N I T I E P
. [R]O M I S E D {B}(Y) O V R E V E R L
. [I]V I N G P O {E}(T) W I S H E T H T
. {H e} W E L L W I (S) H I N G A D V E
. N T V R E R I N S E T T I N G F O
. R T H T T
[MARI{He}] 17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 10,000
(STY) -17
{HEBE} 17
----------------------------------------------------------------
<<The string "MARIHE [sic]" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 17 in the above text, Art. Even if it did, it would be utterly unremarkable, as "MARIHE [sic]" is moronic nonsense.
----------------------------------------------------------
"HIRAM" is an important name in Freemasonry
To paraphrase Walter Mondale, where's the Abiff, Art?! "Hiram" without any further identification could be anyone.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
and
"MARI He."
But I just *told* you, Art: the string "MARIHE [sic]" *does not appear* as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 17 -- or indeed, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any skip whateVER* -- in the above text, Art!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
is the mother of [soon to be Grand] M(aste)r [W]illiam [H]erbert
Want to bet, Art?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. Sweet swan of Avon! what a fight it were
. To see thee in our waters yet appeare,
. And make those flights upon t{He} bankes of Tha[M]es,
. That so did t[A]ke Eliza, and ou[R] James !
. But stay, [I] see thee in the {He}misphere
........................................
_____ <= 13 =>
.
. S w e e t s w a n o f A v
. o n! w h a t a S I G H t i
. t w e r e T O s e E t h e
. e i n o u R w a T e r s y
. e t a p p e a r e, A n d m
. a k e t h o s e f l i g h
. t s u p o n t {H e} B a n k
. e S o f T H a [M]e s, T h a
. T s o d I d t [A]k e E l I
. z a, a N d o u [R]J a m E s!
. B u T s t a y [I]s e e t h
. e E i n t h e {H e} m i s p
. H e r e
.
[MARI{He}] 13
As above, the string "MARIHE [sic]" *does not appear* as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 13 -- or indeed, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any skip whateVER* -- in the above text, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
. ("as you burn I consume myself")
. and its picture of *TWO (Masonic?) LIGHTED CANDLES*.>>
Candles need not be Masonic, Art. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar, and the same is true of candles.

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
---------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
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