Discussion:
hidden geometries, grid patterns and other clues
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Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-10-29 09:18:40 UTC
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https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2017/oct/28/william-shakespeare-buried-westminster-abbey-alexander-waugh

I can prove that 'William Shakespeare' is buried in Westminster Abbey – scholar

Alexander Waugh says secret clues confirm that author of world-famous plays was Edward de Vere, who lies in Poets’ Corner

The Guardian, by Dalya Alberge
Saturday 28 October 2017 02.00 EDT

<<William Shakespeare was in fact Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford, and is buried in Westminster Abbey, not the Holy Trinity Church in Stratford-upon-Avon, according to a scholar who is the grandson of the novelist Evelyn Waugh.

Alexander Waugh says he has deciphered encryptions in the title and dedication pages of Aspley’s edition of Shakespeare’s sonnets of 1609 that reveal the bard’s final resting place.

He will present his evidence at a conference at the Globe theatre in London on Sunday, where the audience will include the actors Sir Derek Jacobi and Mark Rylance, who are fellow anti-Stratfordians - long-standing doubters that Shakespeare wrote the plays and poetry that bear his name, and whose preferred authorship candidates include De Vere.

Waugh said he would show hidden geometries, grid patterns and other clues which reveal that Shakespeare’s final resting place is underneath his 1740 monument in Poets’ Corner at Westminster Abbey and that they spell out the words “Edward de Vere lies here”.

He said he had “finally decoded the mysterious dedication” to the sonnets. “Stratfordians and anti-Stratfordians have said that this dedication page must be encrypted, because it doesn’t seem to make any sense. It’s got those funny dots all over the place and there’s something very weird about it. I’ve finally cracked it.

“The title page and dedication page have encrypted in them the exact church, the exact part of that church and the exact spot … where Shakespeare is buried. It’s like an old-fashioned treasure island map. You overlay the title page on to a ground plan of Poets’ Corner and it just points to exactly where he’s buried. It’s just phenomenal.

“The dot marking the burial place on the title page landed on the exact spot where, in 1740, the famous monument to Shakespeare was erected by Alexander Pope and Lord Burlington, a direct descendant of Oxford’s sister, Mary Vere. It strongly implies that the people who put that statue there in 1740 knew damned well that he was buried right underneath it.”
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Noting that the Church of St Peter is Westminster Abbey’s correct title and that Poets’ Corner was known as South Cross aisle until the 19th century, Waugh said: “At the Globe, I will show how the dedication, when rearranged like a crossword into a grid,– reveals the message ‘To the Westminster at South Cross Ile, St Peters, Edward de Vere Lies Here’.”

He laid out the text into an equal-letter spacing grid, “a popular form of encryption in the 15th and 16th centuries … looking for messages that appear in the vertical columns”.

“People have been trying to do this for ages. What I worked out was, don’t just look in vertical columns for words going vertically downwards. Look for shapes. That changed everything … The messages were in crosses, shapes and rebuses.”

Waugh was led to the encryptions by what he describes as “a riddle” in the Shakespeare monument in Stratford. He argues that it alludes to Shakespeare’s burial alongside Beaumont, Chaucer and Spenser, who are buried “in precisely that order” in Poets’ Corner.
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The sonnets’ dedication, like the text on the Shakespeare monument, is “gibberish” until one deciphers its hidden messages, he said.>>
nordicskiv2
2017-10-29 12:51:42 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2017/oct/28/william-shakespeare-buried-westminster-abbey-alexander-waugh
I already called your attention to this link in another thread, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
I can prove that 'William Shakespeare' is buried in Westminster Abbey – scholar
Alexander Waugh says secret clues confirm that author of world-famous plays
was Edward de Vere, who lies in Poets’ Corner
The Guardian, by Dalya Alberge
Saturday 28 October 2017 02.00 EDT
<<William Shakespeare was in fact Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford,
and is buried in Westminster Abbey, not the Holy Trinity Church in
Stratford-upon-Avon,
Horrors! No doubt the Trust is in panic mode!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
according to a scholar who is the grandson of the
novelist Evelyn Waugh.
Alexander Waugh says he has deciphered encryptions in the title and
dedication pages of Aspley’s edition of Shakespeare’s sonnets of 1609 that
reveal the bard’s final resting place.
He will present his evidence at a conference at the Globe theatre in London
on Sunday, where the audience will include the actors Sir Derek Jacobi and
Mark Rylance, who are fellow anti-Stratfordians - long-standing doubters that
Shakespeare wrote the plays and poetry that bear his name, and whose
preferred authorship candidates include De Vere.
Waugh said he would show hidden geometries, grid patterns and other clues
which reveal that Shakespeare’s final resting place is underneath his 1740
monument in Poets’ Corner at Westminster Abbey and that they spell out the
words “Edward de Vere lies here”.
He said he had “finally decoded the mysterious dedication” to the sonnets.
“Stratfordians and anti-Stratfordians have said that this dedication page
must be encrypted, because it doesn’t seem to make any sense. It’s got those
funny dots all over the place and there’s something very weird about it.
I’ve finally cracked it.
That final word is superfluous.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
“The title page and dedication page have encrypted in them the exact church,
the exact part of that church and the exact spot … where Shakespeare is
buried. It’s like an old-fashioned treasure island map. You overlay the
title page on to a ground plan of Poets’ Corner and it just points to
exactly where he’s buried. It’s just phenomenal.
“The dot marking the burial place on the title page landed on the exact spot
where, in 1740, the famous monument to Shakespeare was erected by Alexander
Pope and Lord Burlington, a direct descendant of Oxford’s sister, Mary Vere.
It strongly implies that the people who put that statue there in 1740 knew
damned well that he was buried right underneath it.”
Advertisement
Noting that the Church of St Peter is Westminster Abbey’s correct title and
that Poets’ Corner was known as South Cross aisle until the 19th century,
Waugh said: “At the Globe, I will show how the dedication, when rearranged
like a crossword into a grid,– reveals the message ‘To the Westminster at
South Cross Ile, St Peters, Edward de Vere Lies Here’.”
He laid out the text into an equal-letter spacing grid, “a popular form of
encryption in the 15th and 16th centuries … looking for messages that appear
in the vertical columns”.
One naturally wonders whether he is as incompetent at finding equidistant letter sequences as you are, Art -- for example, can he count? Or read English?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
“People have been trying to do this for ages.
Indeed -- people have also been trying for ages to square the circle, duplicate the cube, and trisect the angle with compass and straightedge, to devise a perpetual motion machine, and to prove that pi is rational.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
What I worked out was, don’t
just look in vertical columns for words going vertically downwards. Look for
shapes. That changed everything … The messages were in crosses, shapes and
rebuses.”
Waugh was led to the encryptions by what he describes as “a riddle” in the
Shakespeare monument in Stratford. He argues that it alludes to Shakespeare’s
burial alongside Beaumont, Chaucer and Spenser, who are buried “in precisely
that order” in Poets’ Corner.
[...]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
The sonnets’ dedication, like the text on the Shakespeare monument, is
“gibberish” until one deciphers its hidden messages, he said.>>
Well, Art? What you do think (usual disclaimer) of Waugh's "decipherment"? Even Richard Ken-nada thinks (Neuendorffer disclaimer) that it is complete crap that invites mockery of Oxfordians by the sane. Only Dr. antiStratnutter seems to be a fan of this "discoVERy". Who knows -- maybe he can sell Waugh on cold fusion.
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-10-29 16:07:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
http://tinyurl.com/y9cgqbfm
Lea wrote: <<I already called your attention to this link in another thread, Art.>>

Since you've stopped responding to my responses
I've stopped paying attention to you Dave.

(With liddle' Marco gone you are more of an annoyance than relief.)
I can prove that 'William Shakespeare' is buried in Westminster Abbey –
scholar Alexander Waugh says secret clues
confirm that author of world-famous plays
was Edward de Vere, who lies in Poets’ Corner
The Guardian, by Dalya Alberge
Saturday 28 October 2017 02.00 EDT
<<William Shakespeare was in fact Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford,
and is buried in Westminster Abbey, not the Holy Trinity Church in
Stratford-upon-Avon,
Lea wrote: <<Horrors! No doubt the Trust is in panic mode!>>

Of course, I've basically been saying this for years:
------------------------------------------------------------
Sir {F}rancis [VERE] died on *St. AUGUSTINE's day* 1609 and
was buried in the chapel of *St. JOHN* in Westminster Abbey.
.........................................................
Edward de VERE died on *St. JOHN's day* 1604 [MDCIV] and
was buried in the church of *St. AUGUSTINE* in Hackney.
------------------------------------------------------------------
<<Sir Francis Vere (1560-1609) & his brother *HORACE* (1565-1635)
are buried in the chapel of St John the Ev[ANGEL]ist in the Abbey.

Francis has a large monument of alabaster and black marble showing
him lying on a carved rush mattress in civilian dress under a slab
on which is laid out his suit of armour. The slab is supported on
the shoulders of four life-sized knights in armour who kneel at
each corner. The monument seems to have been inspired by that of
*Count ENGEL(bert I)I* of Nassau-Dillenburg in the church at Breda.>>
....................................................
. This is CLEARLY the tomb of *HAM(l)ET*
. NOT that of some *Count ENGEL-BERT* :
.
. http://tinyurl.com/ycraswu
http://www.westminster-abbey.org/library/burial/vere.htm
--------------------------------------------------
*ENGEL* : *ANGEL* (Danish, Dutch, German)
..............................................
. Quarto 2 (1604) Act 5, Scene 2
.
*HORATIO/HORACE* : Good night sweete prince:
. And flights of *ANGELS* sing thee to thy rest!

Now cracks a noble hart, good night sweete Prince,
And flights of *ANGELS* sing thee to thy rest.

W[H]y dooes the dr[U]m come hether?
[E]nter Fortenb[R]asse, with the [E]mbassadors.
...............................................
____ <= 12 =>

. W [H] y d o o e s t h e d
. r [U] m c o m e h e t h e
. r?[E] n t e r F o r t e n
. b [R] a s s e,w i t h t h
. e [E] m b a s s a d o r s.

[H.UERE] 12
----------------------------------------------------------
. The Guardian, by Dalya Alberge
according to a scholar who is the grandson of the
novelist Evelyn Waugh.
Alexander Waugh says he has deciphered encryptions in the title and
dedication pages of Aspley’s edition of Shakespeare’s sonnets of 1609 that
reveal the bard’s final resting place.
He will present his evidence at a conference at the Globe theatre in London
on Sunday, where the audience will include the actors Sir Derek Jacobi and
Mark Rylance, who are fellow anti-Stratfordians - long-standing doubters that
Shakespeare wrote the plays and poetry that bear his name, and whose
preferred authorship candidates include De Vere.
Waugh said he would show hidden geometries, grid patterns and other clues
which reveal that Shakespeare’s final resting place is underneath his 1740
monument in Poets’ Corner at Westminster Abbey and that they spell out the
words “Edward de Vere lies here”.
He said he had “finally decoded the mysterious dedication” to the sonnets.
“Stratfordians and anti-Stratfordians have said that this dedication page
must be encrypted, because it doesn’t seem to make any sense. It’s got those
funny dots all over the place and there’s something very weird about it.
I’ve finally cracked it.
Lea wrote: <<That final word is superfluous.>>
---------------------------------------------------------
. A Lover's Complaint Stanza 7
.
. Of folded schedules had she many a one,
. Which she perused, sigh'd, tore, and gave the flood;
. *CRACK'd many a RING* of posied *GOLD* and bone
. Bidding them find their sepulchres in mud;
. Found yet moe letters sadly penn'd in blood,
. With sleided silk feat and affectedly
. Enswathed, and *SEAL'd to curious secrecy*.
---------------------------------------------------------
. Hamlet, Prince of Denmark Act 2, Scene 2
.
HAMLET: Pray God, your voice, like apiece of uncurrent *GOLD*
. be not *CRACKED within the RING*.
. *MASTERS*, you are all welcome. We'll e'en to't
. like French falconers, fly at any thing we see:
. we'll have a speech straight: come, give us a taste
. of your quality; come, a passionate speech.
-----------------------------------------------------------
Finnegans Wake p.332 (8th 100 letter *THUNDER* word)
http://everything2.com/title/thunderword
...........................................................
Snip snap snoody. *Noo err historyend goody*.
Of a lil trip trap and a big treeskooner for he
put off the ketyl and they made three (for fie!) and
if hec dont love alpy then lad you annoy me. For hanigen
with hunigen still haunt ahunt to finnd their hinnigen

where - Pappappapparrassannuaragheallach[N]atullaghm[O]ngan
macma[C]macwhackf[A]lltherdeb[B]lenonthedubblandaddydoodled
............................................................
Joyce would have been familiar with the
simple gematria cipher the letters of [BACON] = #33
and :FRANCIS BACON: = #100

[BACON] cipher starts on the #33rd letter of #100 letters:
..................................
_____ <= 10 x 10 =>

. P a p (p) a p p a p p
. a r r (a) s s a n n u
. a r a (g) h e a l l a
. c h [N](a) t u l l a g
. h m [O](n)(g) a n m a c
. m a [C] m (a) c w h a c
. k f [A] l (l) t h e r d
. e b [B] l (e) n o n t h
. e d u b b l a n d a
. d d y d o o d l e d
..........................................
Prob. of [BACON] in one of FW's 10 10 x 10 arrays: ~ 1 in 855
...............................................................
and anruly person *CREEKED A JEST*. Gestapose to
*PARRY off CHEEKARS* or frankfurters on the odor.
-----------------------------------------------------------
. King Lear (Quarto 1, 1608)
. Act 3, Scene 2 : Enter Lear and Foole.
.
Lear: Blow wind & *CRACKE YOUR CHEEKES*, rage, blow
. You caterickes, & Hircanios spout til you haue drencht,
. The steeples drown'd the *COCKES*,
. you su[L]pher[O]us an[D] Thou[G]ht ex[E]cuting fires,
. vaunt-currers to Oke-cleauing *THUNDERboults*,
. singe my white head, And thou *ALL SHAKING THUNDER*,
. smite flat The thicke Rotunditie of the world, *CRACKE* natures
. Mold, all Germains spill at once that make Ingratefull man.
.
[LODGE] 5 : Prob. in speech ~ 1 in 1855
----------------------------------------------------------------
<<In 1704 Thomas Plume (1630 – 20 November 1704) founded the chair
of Plumian Professor of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy at
the University of Cambridge in order to "erect an Observatory and
to maintain a studious and learned Professor of Astronomy and
Experimental Philosophy, and to buy him and his successors
utensils and instruments quadrants telescopes etc".>>
.......................................................
. _Who Wrote Shakespeare?_ by John Michell.
.
<<Only one person claimed that he saw John Shakspere.
In the middle of the 17th century, Archdeacon Thomas Plume
of Rochester wrote down some legends about Shakspere:
.......................................................
. 'He was a glover's son.
*Sir John MENNES* saw once his old father in his shop -
. a *MERRY-CHEEKT* OLD MAN, that said,
. "Will was a good honest FELLOW, but
.
He durst have *CRACKT A JESST* with him att any time."'
.
This reference was discovered among the Plume Mss. (1657-1663)
of Maldon, Essex, by Dr. Andrew Clark, in October, 1904.
...............................................................
But *Sir John MENNES* was only 2½ when John Shakspere died;>>
.
. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Mennes
.
<<Vice Admiral *Sir John MENNES* (1 March 1599 – 18 Feb. 1671)
figures prominently in the Diary of Samuel Pepys; Pepys,
who reported directly to Mennes, thought him an incompetent
civil servant but a delightful social companion. He died
while still in the post of Controller of the Navy. The bulk
of his estate passed to his nephew *Lt. Francis Hammond*.>>
----------------------------------------------------------
. The Guardian, by Dalya Alberge
“The title page and dedication page have encrypted in them the exact church,
the exact part of that church and the exact spot … where Shakespeare is
buried. It’s like an old-fashioned treasure island map. You overlay the
title page on to a ground plan of Poets’ Corner and it just points to
exactly where he’s buried. It’s just phenomenal.
“The dot marking the burial place on the title page landed on the exact spot
where, in 1740, the famous monument to Shakespeare was erected by Alexander
Pope and Lord Burlington, a direct descendant of Oxford’s sister, Mary Vere.
It strongly implies that the people who put that statue there in 1740 knew
damned well that he was buried right underneath it.”
Advertisement
Noting that the Church of St Peter is Westminster Abbey’s correct title and
that Poets’ Corner was known as South Cross aisle until the 19th century,
Waugh said: “At the Globe, I will show how the dedication, when rearranged
like a crossword into a grid,– reveals the message ‘To the Westminster at
South Cross Ile, St Peters, Edward de Vere Lies Here’.”
He laid out the text into an equal-letter spacing grid, “a popular form of
encryption in the 15th and 16th centuries … looking for messages that appear
in the vertical columns”.
Lea wrote:
<<One naturally wonders whether he is as incompetent at
finding equidistant letter sequences as you are, Art. >>

Naturally.
“People have been trying to do this for ages.
<<Indeed -- people have also been trying for ages to square the circle, duplicate the cube, and trisect the angle with compass and straightedge, to devise a perpetual motion machine, and to prove that pi is rational.>>

Do you have a mathematical proof that "Edward de Vere Lies?"
----------------------------------------------
. The Guardian, by Dalya Alberge
What I worked out was, don’t
just look in vertical columns for words going vertically downwards. Look for
shapes. That changed everything … The messages were in crosses, shapes and
rebuses.”
Waugh was led to the encryptions by what he describes as “a riddle” in the
Shakespeare monument in Stratford. He argues that it alludes to Shakespeare’s
burial alongside Beaumont, Chaucer and Spenser, who are buried “in precisely
that order” in Poets’ Corner.
[...]
The sonnets’ dedication, like the text on the Shakespeare monument, is
“gibberish” until one deciphers its hidden messages, he said.>>
Lea wrote: <<Well, Art? What you do think of Waugh's "decipherment"?>>

I enjoyed his 2016 youtube:




Lea wrote:
<<Only Dr. antiStratnutter seems to be a fan of this "discoVERy".
Who knows -- maybe he can sell Waugh on cold fusion.>>

Who knows?

Art Neuendorffer
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-10-31 01:17:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
http://www.weeklystandard.com/prufrock-uncle-waugh-is-talking-about-shakespeare-again-a-history-of-europes-four-winds-and-classical-music-and-soccer/article/2010253

Prufrock: Uncle Waugh Is Talking about Shakespeare Again,
11:05 AM, Oct 30, 2017 | By Micah Mattix

<<Evelyn Waugh’s grandson is talking about Shakespeare again. He’s got proof—hard evidence—that Edward de Vere wrote the plays attributed to the (supposed) Bard of Stratford-upon-Avon. What is it, you ask? Well, let me tell you. Edward de Vere died in 1604, you see, and the dedication pages of the 1609 edition of Shakespeare’s sonnets are gibberish. This is because they are encrypted. Turns out you if you rearrange the words of the dedication in just the right way you will discover the message “To the Westminster at South Cross Ile, St Peters, Edward de Vere Lies Here.” Also, if you superimpose the title page of these same sonnets on a ground plan of the Poet’s Corner in Westminster Abbey, a dot will appear over a monument to Shakespeare that was erected by Alexander Pope and Lord Burlington—“a direct descendant of Oxford’s sister, Mary Vere”—in 1740. Could Edward de Vere be buried under this monument, thus proving beyond any reasonable doubt that De Vere wrote the plays? Yes! Of course, De Vere was buried in East London, but his first cousin claimed he was later buried in Westminster. Mr. Waugh: “I went to the Westminster Abbey archives. They said, if anyone’s reinterred, we don’t have a record of it.” Further evidence, no doubt, of a cover-up.>>
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