Discussion:
FAR MORE,THEN COST
(too old to reply)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-02-10 02:38:11 UTC
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Raw Message
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QUICK [NATURE DIDE] [WHoSE] [NAM {E] DO}<TH. DECK.> YS TOMBE,
FAR MORE,THEN COST: [SIEH] ALL, YT HE HATH WRITT,
.............................................................
[N(a)TUREDIDE] [.W.H.oS.E] [si eH] [NAM {E] DO}<TH. DECK.>
[He is] [E.MAN.]&[E.So. H.W.] [EDIDERUT(a)N] / {EDO} <TH. DECK.>
.............................................................
{EDO}: I give out, put or bring forth; eject, discharge.
. I produce, bear, give birth to, yield, form, *BEGET* .
. I put forth, *PUBLISH* , spread abroad.
. I *SET FORTH*, relate, tell, disclose, deliver, announce, declare.
. I produce, perform, show, inflict, bring about, cause.
. I \ARAISE\ , lift, elevate.
.
[EDIDERUNT(a)]: 3rd-person plural perfect active indicative of {EDO}
[They have *SET FORTH*]
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To [.W.H.oS.E] sound chaste wings obay.
...................................................
3: [.W.H.oS.E] fresh repaire if now thou not renewest,
8: [.W.H.oS.E] speechlesse song being many, seeming one,
....................................................
. *EDO-uardus VERUS*
....................................................
. {EDO} , edere, EDIDI, EDITum, [EDIDERUNT] (Latin)
. give out, *SET FORTH*; bring forth, beget, produce;
. relate, tell, utter; *PUBLISH*.
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http://www.bbc.com/news/education-35973094

<<There is a stage direction in King Lear, which, in the early
part of the print run, says rather cryptically "H {EDIS}",
which is then updated in later copies to "He dis"
before it is finally corrected to "He dies".>>
------------------------------------------------------
. "H {EDIS}" : {You *PUBLISH*} "H".
..................................................
_______ Sonnet 102 (Only Sonnet's *PUBLISH*)
.
. MY LOVE IS Strengthned though more weake in seeming
. I love not lesse, thogh lesse the show appeare,
. That love is marchandiz'd, whose ritch esteeming,
.
. The own[E]rs tongu[E] (DOTH} PUB[L]ISH {E}VER[Y] {WH}E{R}E) .
. Ou[R] lov{E} was [N]ew, and th[E]n but in t[H]e spring,
.
.{WH}en I was wont to greet it with my laies,
. As Philomell in summers front doth singe,
. And stops his pipe in growth of riper daies:
. Not that the summer is lesse pleasant now
. Then when her mournefull himns did hush the night,
. But that wild musick burthens *EVERy bow* ,
. And sweets growne common loose their deare delight.
. Therefore like her, I some-time hold my tongue:
. Because I would not dull you wiTH MY SONGE.
..................................................
. <= 8 =>
.
. T h(E)o w n [E]
. r s t(O)n g u [E]
. (D O T{H}P U B [L]
. I S H{E}V E R [Y]
. {W H}E{R}E)O u [R]
. l o v{E}w a s [N]
. e w,a n d t h [E]
. n b u t i n t [H]
. e s p r i n g,{W H}
.
Sidney friend/Queen's Champion:
[HENRY LEE] -8 : Prob. in any Sonnet ~ 1 in 1765
-------------------------------------------------------
. King Lear (Quarto 1, 1608)
.
Cord. All blest secrets, all you *unPUBLISHt VER(tu)Es* of the earth,
. Spring with my teares, be aidant and remediat
. In the good mans distresse, seeke, seeke for him,
. Least his vngouernd rage dissolue the life,
. That wants the meanes to leade it.
......................................................
. King Lear (Quarto 2, 1619)
.
Lear. : 'tis our fast intent,
. To *SHAKE* all Cares and Businesse from our Age,
. Conferring them on yonger strengths, while we
. Vnburthen'd crawle toward death. Our son of Cornwal,
. And you our no lesse louing Sonne of Albany,
. We haue this houre a constant *Will to PUBLISH*
. Our daughters seuerall Dowers,
......................................................................
You thus have *PUBLISH'd* me! gentle my lord, The Winter's Tale: II, i
If he be guilty, as 'tis *PUBLISHed*. King Henry VI, part II: III, ii
His second marriage shall be *PUBLISH'd*, and King Henry VIII: III, ii
Hath *PUBLISH'd* and proclaim'd it openly: The Taming of the Shrew: IV, ii
Darest thou support a *PUBLISH'd* traitor? hence; King Lear: IV, vi
......................................................................
Hath made me *PUBLISHer* of this pretence. Two Gentlemen of Verona: III, i
Shall I not lie in *PUBLISHing a TRUTH*? Troilus and Cressida: V, ii
......................................................................
Ourselves we *PUBLISH* them. All's Well that Ends Well: I, iii
And *PUBLISH* the occasion of our arms. King Henry IV, part II: I, iii
And *PUBLISH* it that she is dead indeed; Much Ado About Nothing: IV, i
A proof of strength she could not *PUBLISH* more, Troilus and Cressida: V, ii
whose trial shall better *PUBLISH* his commendation. - Merchant of Venice: IV, i
......................................................................
yet thus far I will boldly *PUBLISH her*;
she *BORE* a mind that envy could not but call fair. Twelfth Night: II, i
......................................................................
______ *BOAR* = *VERRE* (Italian)
------------------------------------------------------------
. Last speech in the First Folio (1623):
. http://tinyurl.com/q7mtmcg
. http://tinyurl.com/q3588wk
........................................
Cymbeline: *LAUD WE THE GODS* ,
. And let our crooked SMOAKES
. climbe to their Nostrils
. From our blest Altars.
. *PUBLISH* we
.
. {T}his Pe{A}ce [T]o [A]{L}[L] o[U]r [S]{U}biect{S}.
.
. Set we forward:
. Let A Roman, and a Brittish Ensigne wave
. Friendly toge(T)h(E)r: (S|O) (T)hrough Luds-Towne march,
. And in the Temple of great *IUPITER*
. Our Peace wee'l ratifie: Seale it with Feasts.
. Set on there: NEVER was a Warre did cease
. (Ere bloodie hands were wash'd) with such a Peace.
........................................
. <= 6 =>
.
. P U B L I S
. H w e {T} h i
. s P e {A} c e
. [T] o [A]{L}[L] o
. [U] r [S]{U} b i
. e c t {S}.
.
[TALUS] 2
{TALUS} 6
........................................
Prob. of 2[TALUS]'s with skip < 7
in Last FF Speech: ~ 1 in 830,000

Prob. of a Royal Flush = 1 in 649,739
-------------------------------------------------------
Marston: "Kinde *KIT MARLOWE*"
......................................................
Heywood: " *MARLO* renown'd for his rare Art and wit
. Could nE'ER attaine *beyond the name of KIT* "
......................................................
Thomas Nashe in Lenten Stuffe:
.
. "Let me see, hath any bodie in Yarmouth heard of
. Leander and Hero, of whom divine MUSAEUS sung,
. and a diviner MUSE than him, *KIT MARLOW*
. Two faithfull lovers they were, a EVERy
. apprentis in Paules *CHURCHYARD* will tell
. you for your love and sel you for your mony"

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http://tei.it.ox.ac.uk/tcp/Texts-HTML/free/A18/A18762.html

Thomas *CHURCHYARD*: The Epitaph of the right honourable,

(Lor[D]) Ambrose (DUDLE[Y]) Erle of (WARWIC[K]e).

LEave off to write, spare speech a space, be [M]ute O muse of mine:
Let blubring teares bede[A]w thy face, O waile with weeping eyne:
The cou[R]se of life that drawes but breth, in dollor a[L]l his dayes:
Till hart stringes burst, till h[OWE]r of death, til pilgrim goes his wayes.
..............................................................
. <= 36 =>
.
.(L o r[D])A m b r o s e(D U D L E[Y])Erle o f(W A R W I C[K]e)L E a v e
. o f f t o w r i t e s p a r e s p eech a s p a c e b e[M]u t e O m u
. s e o f m i n e L e t b l u b r i ngte a r e s b e d e[A]w t h y f a
. c e O w a i l e w i t h w e e p i ngey n e T h e c o u[R]s e o f l i
. f e t h a t d r a w e s b u t b r ethi n d o l l o r a[L]l h i s d a
. y e s T i l l h a r t s t r i n g esbu r s t t i l l h[O W E]r o f d
. e a t h t i l p i l g r i m g o e shis w a y e s.
..............................................................
[K.MARLO/WE] 36 : Prob. in first sentence ~ 1 in 1,900,000
[KYD] -13 : Prob. in first sentence ~ 1 in 81
..............................................................
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Kyd

<<In October 1565 Thomas [KYD] (6 November 1558 - 15 August 1594) was enrolled with Thomas Lodge (1558 – Sept. 1625) & Edmund Spenser (1552 – Jan. 13, 1599) in the Merchant Taylors' School. From 1587 to 1593 he was in the service of an unidentified noble, since, after his imprisonment in 1593, he wrote of having lost "the favours of my (Lor[D]), whom I haue servd almost theis vi yeres nowe". Around 1591 [KIT MARLOWE] also joined this patron's service, and for a while [KIT MARLOWE] and [KYD] shared lodgings.>>
..............................................................
<<On 11 November 1565 Ambrose Dudley married for the third time. His bride was the 16-year-old Anne Russell, daughter of Francis Russell, 2nd Earl of Bedford. Robert Dudley, meanwhile Earl of Leicester, had arranged the match. It was an extraordinary court event [in which Edward de Vere & Edward Manners were pages]. In between tournaments and banquets [and cannon exploding killing the Queen's master gunner Robert Thomas], the bride was given away by the Earl of Leicester; she later became one of Elizabeth's closest friends.>>
......................................................................
Vaine pomp is but a puffe or toy, so is both rule and raigne:
For all that heere we do enioy, is nought but woe and paine:
Hast thou not seene the highest tree, receive his falling blowe?
Death hath respect to no degree, when life from hence must goe.
Satte Leyster not in Senate seate, as hye as man might clime?
Was never heere, none halfe so great, nor happy in our time.
Yet loe, a so daine leave he tooke, and went where God assignd:
His Brother that like Mars did looke, a man of noble minde.
Who all good men (D)id praise and love, is packt from us in poste:
Thus when of force men m(U)st remoove, and world desires hi[M] most.
His glasse is run, his date is (D)oone, [A]nd he must bid farwell:
to all the pleasu[R]es under {S}unne, and a(L)l that heere do dwe[L]l.
B{U}t Warwick that won great good wil{L}, t[O]o soone was hastned hence:
For W{A}rwick was *MOST WARLIKE* still, to s{T}and in r(I)ghtes defence.
......................................................................
. <= 28 =>
.
. g o o d m e n(D)i d p r a i s e a n d l o v e i s p a c
. k t f r o m u s i n p o s t e T h u s w h e n o f f o r
. c e m e n m(U)s t r e m o o v e a n d w o r l d d e s i
. r e s h i[M]m o s t H i s g l a s s e i s r u n h i s d
. a t e i s(D)o o n e[A]n d h e m u s t b i d f a r w e l
. l t o a l l t h e p l e a s u[R]e s u n d e r{S}u n n e
. a n d a(L)l t h a t h e e r e d o d w e[L]l B{U}t W a r
. w i c k t h a t w o n g r e a t g o o d w i l{L}t[O]o s
. o o n(E)w a s h a s t n e d h e n c e F o r W{A}r w i c
. k w a s*M O S T W A R L I K E*s t i l l t o s{T}a n d i
. n r(I)g h t e s d e f e n c e
........................................
. *MOST WARLIKE*
. *KIT MARLOWE'S*
...................................................
{TALUS} -28
[MARLO] 33
(DUDLEI) 55 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1150
-------------------------------------------------------
. *AM(b)RO(s)E*
. *MAR(l)O(w)E*
-------------------------------------------------------
https://www.lostplays.org/lpd/Category:Warwick%27s

<<Ambrose Dudley, earl of Warwick (1561-1590) and brother of Robert Dudley (earl of Leicester), was patron of a playing company in 1559-64, and again in 1572-5. Both configurations were active in the provinces, and both appeared at court.

The earlier of the companies was formed before Ambrose received the earldom. Under the name of Lord Dudley's players, the company performed at Gloucester, Bristol, Norwich, Cambridge, and Bridgwater and Winchester. As the Earl of Warwick's players, the company performed at Grimsby, Oxford (8 June 1562), Lydd, Exeter, Plymouth, and Grimsthorpe; their venues were usually guild or common halls, but at Grimsthorpe they performed the hall at Grimsthorpe Castle (1562). Stops along the southeastern circuit included Dover and Lydd in addition to Canterbury. The company gave two performances at court during Christmas, 1564-5.

The later company had a much lighter touring schedule, 1572-5. It performed at Tavistock and Coventry; its venue at Tavistock was St. Eustachius' Church. It also visited Leicester in 1574-5 and Lichfield on 27 July 1575, as well as Grimsby in 1575-6. Queen Elizabeth was on progress in the summer of 1575, and the earl of Warwick was in attendance; his players "played before the queen in Lichfield at the beginning of August". In comparison with the earlier company, this one appeared frequently at court: 14 Feb 1574-5; 26 Dec, 1 Jan, and 6 March, 1575-6; 26 Dec and 18 Feb, 1576-7; 28 Dec, 6 Jan, and 9 Feb, 1577-8; 26 Dec and 1 March, 1578-9; and 1 Jan 1580. Furthermore, the Revels Accounts name five of their plays, all now lost: The Painter's Daughter, The Irish Knight, The Three Sisters of Mantua, The Knight in the Burning Rock, and A History of the Four Sons of Fabius. In 1575-6 the payees for the company at court were John Dutton, his brother Lawrence Dutton, and Jerome Savage. Their stories with the company include the playhouse at Newington.

Jerome Savage was "the leader of Warwick's" players in 1575. This leadership is most manifest in his involvement with the business end of the playhouse at Newington. In 1576 Savage had lodgings on the property where the playhouse would (or already did) stand. He financed its building "out of his own resources", a most remarkable and perhaps unique circumstance at the time (as James Burbage would use his brother-in-law's financial resources). In 1577 Savage was sued by the owners of the property over his lease, and they used boilerplate prejudicial language about Savage and the theatrical profession to enhance their case, calling Savage "'a verrie lewed fealowe and liveth by noe other trade then playinge of staige plaies and Interlevdes'". Nonetheless, Savage and his company continued to perform at the Newington playhouse until 1580, at which time Warwick's players broke up. Savage subsequently disappeared from theatrical records, but his will on 30 Jan 1587 indicates that he had moved to London with his family; he was buried in St. Peter Westcheap.

John and Lawrence Dutton were veteran players when they joined Savage in Warwick's troupe. One, if not both, had been with Sir Robert Lane's men in 1571-2 and the earl of Lincoln's men until they joined Warwick's in 1575. They stayed until 1580, then left to form a new company, the earl of Oxford's players . During this time the brothers had a presence in London. A brothel keeper complained to the governors of Bridewell Hospital that one of his women had been taken by Lawrence to "one Horspoll at the Bell beyond Shorditche chirche"; he added that "there is two bretherenn and by reporte both their wyves are whores". The Duttons (at least Lawrence) were notorious as knaves in business and personal behavior in a profession generally but falsely notorious for knavery. Nonetheless, John Dutton joined the Queen's players in 1583 at their inception, and Lawrence was a member by 1589.>>
------------------------------------­---------------
__ *(To the m)[eMOry of my beloVED]"
__ *(To them) [my OM, by fo(DEVere)ol]*
------------------------------------­--
______ *fo(DEVere)ol's ISCHIA*
______ *of HeroICAl DEVISes*
..........................................
. A Garden *of HeroICAl DEVISes*
or Henry Peacham's Minerva Britanna
.
. http://home.att.net/~tleary/minerva.htm
---------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford%27s_Men

<<The Earl of Oxford’s Men, alternatively Oxford’s Players, were acting companies in late Medieval and Renaissance England patronised by the Earls of Oxford. The most notable troupe of this name was the acting company of the Elizabethan era patronised by Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford (1550-1604), that originally derived from an earlier company, the Earl of Warwick’s Men, and was active from 1580 to 1587. It was revived probably in the late 1590s and ultimately was absorbed by yet another troupe, Worcester's Men, in late 1602.>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcester%27s_Men

Edward de Vere was an enthusiastic and persistent promoter of theatrical companies, and was himself known as a playwright. He sponsored both adult and boys' acting companies, and it is difficult to distinguish between their performance records. He also sponsored a Christmas 1584 court performance of tumbler John Symons and his group of acrobats between his tenure with Lord Strange's Men and Queen Elizabeth's Men.

Oxford’s adult playing company was formed with actors who were formerly members of the Earl of Warwick’s Men in the early 1580s during the period when noblemen were using their playing companies to promote themselves at court by competing to furnish court entertainments. The original members included the well-known actor brothers John and Laurence Dutton, Robert Leveson, Thomas Chesson, and possibly Jerome Savage and Richard Tarlton. The formation of the troupe by the desertion of the Duttons caused court gossip and served as the occasion of an excoriating poem by an unknown court poet in the tradition of scatological court flyting.

Oxford's players almost immediately got involved in a brawl with some Inns of Court students while playing at The Theatre in Shoreditch, and several members were thrown into gaol, but they were out and on the road by early June. De Vere solicited letters of recommendation for his players from his father-in-law, Lord Burghley, and the Lord Chamberlain, the Earl of Sussex, addressed to the vice-chancellor of Cambridge University. Burghley's letter is dated 9 June 1580:

Where the bearers hereof servauntes to the Right honorable my very good Lord the Erle of Oxford are desierous to repaire to that universitie and there to make shewe of such playes and enterludes as have bene by them heretofore played by them publykely, aswell before the Queens majestie as in the Citie of London, and intend to spend iiij or v. daies there in Cambridg as heretofore they have accustomed to do with other matters and arguments of late yeres, and because they might the rather be permitted so to do without empeachment or lett of yow the vicechauncelor or other the heades of howses, have desired my lettre unto yow in their favor.

Loading Image...

The company supported itself touring the provinces in what appears to be a regular circuit that wound across England, ranging from Gloucestershire to Kent up to East Anglia, including towns in the Midlands. While Oxford's biographer Alan Nelson calls Oxford's troupe "one of the four principal companies of London" based it being mentioned in a 1587 letter complaining about stage plays, Gurr, a specialist in English Renaissance theatre, notes that no evidence exists that the company appeared regularly in London after 1580. John Dutton was drafted into the Queen's Men and left the company in 1583.>>
--------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Oxford

1574 Woodcut of the Earls of Oxford coat of arms
Loading Image...

<<The principal Oxford coat of arms or shield was quarterly gules and or (red and yellow) with an argent (white) five-pointed star called a mullet or molet in the first canton. By De Vere family tradition this molet is said to refer to a reappearance of the Star of Bethlehem which showed itself to an earlier De Vere while on a Crusade and thus led him to victory. In the 14th and 15th centuries the family livery worn by their retainers was orange/tawney decorated with a white molet. A later badge associated with the De Veres is a blue boar. A later shield variation of the De Vere white molet has a smaller blue molet located within the white one but this may be a simple cadency mark - in heraldry the molet is also used in any family to indicate the third son of a title holder. The third son bears his father's arms differenced with a molet. A confusion between the De Vere white molet and Edward IV's sunburst and white rose is said to have led to the friendly fire incident between (the Earl of Warwick) Neville men and De Vere's men at the Battle of Barnet in 1471. Fighting in fog, the Nevilles (former Yorkists) fired on their De Vere (staunch Lancastrian) allies and thus brought about the collapse of the Lancastrian centre and right.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------------
http://eblong.com/draconc/static/warkworth-barnet.html

Battle of Barnet [John Warkworth. Chronicle. (London: 1839)]

<<And upon Easter Eve he and all his host went towards Barnet and he took King Harry with him; for he understood that the Earl of Warwick and the Duke of Exeter, the Marquis Montagu, the Earl of Oxford, and many other knights, squires, and commons, to the number of 20,000 men, were gathered together to fight against King Edward. But it happened that he with his host entered the town of Barnet before the Earl of Warwick and his host. And so the Earl of Warwick and his host lay outside the town all night, and each of them fired guns at the other all night. And on Easter Day in the morning, the 14th April, right early, each of them came upon the other; and there was such a thick mist that neither of them might see the other perfectly. There they fought, from 4 o'clock in the morning unto 10 o'clock of the forenoon. And at various times the Earl of Warwick's party had the victory, and supposed that they had won the field. But it happened so that the Earl of Oxford's men had upon them their lord's livery, both in front and behind, which was a star with streams, which was much like King Edward's livery, a sun with streams. And the mist was so thick that a man might not properly judge one thing from another; so the Earl of Warwick's men shot and fought against the Earl of Oxford's men, thinking and supposing that they had been King Edward's men. And at once the Earl of Oxford and his men cried "Treason! Treason!" and fled away from the field with 800 men. The lord Marquis Montagu had an agreement and understanding with King Edward and put upon him King Edward's livery; and a man of the Earl of Warwick saw that and fell upon him and killed him. And when the Earl of Warwick saw his brother dead, and the Earl of Oxford fled, he leapt upon his horse, and fled to a wood by the field of Barnet, from which there was no road. And one of King Edward's men had espied him and came upon him and killed him and despoiled him naked. And so King Edward won that field.

And there were slain of the Earl of Warwick's party the Earl himself, Marquis Montagu, Sir William Tyrell, knight, and many others. The Duke of Exeter fought manfully there that day, and was greatly despoiled and wounded, and left naked for dead on the field, and so lay there from 7 o'clock until 4 in the afternoon; but he was taken up and brought to a house by a man of his own, and a physician was brought to him, and so afterwards he was brought into sanctuary at Westminster. And on King Edward's side were slain the Lord Cromwell, son and heir to the Earl of Essex, Lord Berners's son and heir, Lord Say, and various others, to the number of 4,000. And after the battle was over, King Edward commanded both the Earl of Warwick's body and the marquis's body to be put in a cart, and he returned with all his host again to London. And there he commanded the said two bodies to be laid in the church of St Paul's, on the pavement, that every man might see them. And so they lay three or four days, and afterwards were buried. And King Harry, being in the van during the battle, was not hurt, but he was brought again to the Tower of London, there to be kept.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------------
[King Richard the Second (Quarto) 5.6]

North. First to thy sacred state WISH I ALL HAPPINESSE,
The next newes is, I haue to London sent
The heades of OXFORD, Salisbury, Blunt and Kent,
The maner of their taking may appeare
At large discoursed in this paper heere.
---------------------------------------------------------------
SPENCER's head was substituted for OXFORD's head
in the Richard II Folio:
--------------------------------------------------------------
[King Richard the Second (Folio) 5.6]

Nor. First to thy Sacred State, WISH I ALL HAPPINESSE:
The next newes is, I haue to London sent
The heads of Salsbury, SPENCER, Blunt, and Kent:
The manner of their taking may appeare
At large discoursed in this paper heere.
-----------------------------------------------------------
And OXFORD's head is spared in Henry VI:
-------------------------------------------------------
[Henry the Sixth, Part Three (Quarto) 5.5]

Edw. Lo here a period of tumultuous broiles,
Awaie with OXFORD to Hames castell straight,
For Summerset off with his guiltie head.
Awaie I will not heare them speake.

Oxf. For my part Ile not trouble thee with words.
-----------------------------------------------------------
According to Asimov:

<<The armies collided and fought [at Tewkesbury] on May 4, 1471.
The impetuous attack of Edward & Richard carried the day
and a number of Lancastrian leaders were taken.
According to Shakespeare, one was OXFORD:>>
-------------------------------------------------------
[Henry the Sixth, Part Three (Folio) 5.5]

Edw. Now here a period of tumultuous Broyles.
Away with OXFORD, to Hames Castle straight:
For Somerset, off with his guiltie Head.
Goe beare them hence, I will not heare them speake.

Oxf. For my part, Ile not trouble thee with words.
-------------------------------------------------------
<<Opposition leaders, if taken alive, were generally executed as
traitors after the battle. Why was this not the case with OXFORD?

It was because OXFORD was not at Tewkesbury. He had fought well at
BARNET [3 weeks prior] and then went to France. It was not till 1473,
two years after Tewkesbury, which had been fought without him, that
he attempted a reinvasion of England and a revival of the ruined
Lancastrian cause. He was besieged in Cornwall and, after four and
a half months, was forced to surrender. Passions had lessened
by then and he was imprisoned rather than executed. OXFORD's
imprisonment was at a Hames Castle, near Calais, for it seemed
best to keep him away from English soil proper.>> -- Asimov
-------------------------------------------------------------------
John de Vere [the 13th Earl of OXFORD] was held for ~ELEVEN years

and released from hamMeS in 1484
hamNeT was born in 1584
-----------------------------------------------------------------
3Henry6 SCENE V Another part of the field.

KING EDWARD IV Now here a period of tumultuous broils.
Away with OXFORD to HAM(es cas)TLE straight
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Easter 18 Apr NS 1593 => William Herbert's 13th birthday
18 Apr OS 1593 => Venus & Adonis was registered

Good Friday 8 Apr 1300 => Dante descends into Hell
Easter 10 Apr 1300 => Dante returns to see stars
Easter 14 Apr 1471 => OXFORD fights at BARNET
Easter 9 Apr 1553 => FRANCOIS rabelais dies
Easter 9 Apr 1626 => FRANCIS bacon dies freezing chicken
Sunday 14 Apr 1861 => Two Ft. Sumter casualties
9 Apr 1865 => Lee surrenders to Grant
Good Friday 14 Apr 1865 => Booth shots Abraham Lincoln
26 Apr 1865 => BOSTON Corbett shots Booth
Easter 9 Apr 1882 => Dante Gabriel Rossetti dies
---------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-02-10 03:26:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Friday, February 9, 2018 at 9:38:12 PM UTC-5, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
http://www.bbc.com/news/education-35973094
<<There is a stage direction in King Lear, which, in the early
part of the print run, says rather cryptically "H {EDIS}",
which is then updated in later copies to "He dis"
before it is finally corrected to "He dies".>>
------------------------------------------------------
. "H {EDIS}" : {You *PUBLISH*} "H".
...which makes no sense whateVER. "He dies", however, makes perfect sense in the context in which it appears.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_______ Sonnet 102 (Only Sonnet's *PUBLISH*)
So? You were expecting that "publish" would appear in all of them, Art?!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. MY LOVE IS Strengthned though more weake in seeming
. I love not lesse, thogh lesse the show appeare,
. That love is marchandiz'd, whose ritch esteeming,
.
. The own[E]rs tongu[E] (DOTH} PUB[L]ISH {E}VER[Y] {WH}E{R}E) .
. Ou[R] lov{E} was [N]ew, and th[E]n but in t[H]e spring,
.
.{WH}en I was wont to greet it with my laies,
His *lays*, Art? Is he referring to Virginia Padoana, to Anne Vavasour, or to Orazio Cogno?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
______ *BOAR* = *VERRE* (Italian)
We've been through this before, Art -- many times, in fact. HoweVER, you remain irremediably ineducable, so you will no doubt continue posting this oVER and oVER and oVER, just as heedless as in the cases of _тæрин_ as Russian(!) for "youth", _vier_ as Spanish for "four", etc. HoweVER, to recapitulate, the word that you evidently have in mind (what little is left of it, at any rate) is _verro_, although the correct word for the European wild boar that appears in Oxford's heraldry is _cinghiale_, cognate to the French _sanglier_ and to the English collective expression "a singular of boars".

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Prob. of a Royal Flush = 1 in 649,739
If you're referring to the PT/DT nonsense, Art, then the probability of a royal flush is *zero* -- Oxford was absolutely shameless.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 36 =>
.
.(L o r[D])A m b r o s e(D U D L E[Y])Erle o f(W A R W I C[K]e)L E a v e
. o f f t o w r i t e s p a r e s p eech a s p a c e b e[M]u t e O m u
. s e o f m i n e L e t b l u b r i ngte a r e s b e d e[A]w t h y f a
. c e O w a i l e w i t h w e e p i ngey n e T h e c o u[R]s e o f l i
. f e t h a t d r a w e s b u t b r ethi n d o l l o r a[L]l h i s d a
. y e s T i l l h a r t s t r i n g esbu r s t t i l l h[O W E]r o f d
. e a t h t i l p i l g r i m g o e shis w a y e s.
..............................................................
[K.MARLO/WE] 36
The string "KMARLOWE" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 36 -- of indeed, of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

You should find a remedial adult education specialist to diagnose whether your main problem is a complete inability to read or a complete inability to count -- not that the two possibilities in your case are mutually exclusive, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. *AM(b)RO(s)E*
. *MAR(l)O(w)E*
That's not an anagram, Art.

In this instance, your inability to count is not relevant, so the culprit must be your inability to read, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
__ *(To the m)[eMOry of my beloVED]"
__ *(To them) [my OM, by fo(DEVere)ol]*
...which is moronic nonsense, as usual.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Easter 18 Apr NS 1593 => William Herbert's 13th birthday
18 Apr OS 1593 => Venus & Adonis was registered
Good Friday 8 Apr 1300 => Dante descends into Hell
Easter 10 Apr 1300 => Dante returns to see stars
Easter 14 Apr 1471 => OXFORD fights at BARNET
Easter 9 Apr 1553 => FRANCOIS rabelais dies
Easter 9 Apr 1626 => FRANCIS bacon dies freezing chicken
Sunday 14 Apr 1861 => Two Ft. Sumter casualties
9 Apr 1865 => Lee surrenders to Grant
Good Friday 14 Apr 1865 => Booth shots Abraham Lincoln
26 Apr 1865 => BOSTON Corbett shots Booth
Easter 9 Apr 1882 => Dante Gabriel Rossetti dies
[Yawn.] Was there supposed to have been any point to the above effusion of nutcase numerology, Art? Or was it just a Noonedafter core dump?

Out of curiosity, Art, why do you post the same crackpot cryptography, nutcase numerology, and other assorted lunatic logorrhea oVER and oVER and oVEr and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER?

Advanced senility? That's what I feared.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
---------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-02-11 01:40:19 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
http://www.bbc.com/news/education-35973094
<<There is a stage direction in King Lear, which, in the early
part of the print run, says rather cryptically "H {EDIS}",
which is then updated in later copies to "He dis"
before it is finally corrected to "He dies".>>
------------------------------------------------------
. "H {EDIS}" : {You *PUBLISH*} "H".
Leas wrote: <<...which makes no sense whateVER.
"He dies", however, makes perfect sense in the context in which it appears.>>

The wonder is, he hath endur'd so long.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_______ Sonnet 102 (Only Sonnet's *PUBLISH*)
Leas wrote: <<So?

You were expecting that "publish" would appear in all of them, Art?!>>

I was hoping that "publish" would appear in one (and only one) of them.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. MY LOVE IS Strengthned though more weake in seeming
. I love not lesse, thogh lesse the show appeare,
. That love is marchandiz'd, whose ritch esteeming,
.
. The own[E]rs tongu[E] (DOTH} PUB[L]ISH {E}VER[Y] {WH}E{R}E) .
. Ou[R] lov{E} was [N]ew, and th[E]n but in t[H]e spring,
.
.{WH}en I was wont to greet it with my laies,
Leas wrote: <<His *lays*, Art?

Is he referring to Virginia Padoana, to Anne Vavasour, or to Orazio Cogno?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lay%27s

["betcha can't eat just one."]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
______ *BOAR* = *VERRE* (Italian)
Leas wrote:

<<We've been through this before, Art -- many times, in fact. HoweVER, you remain irremediably ineducable, so you will no doubt continue posting this oVER and oVER and oVER, just as heedless as in the cases of _тæрин_ as Russian(!) for "youth", _vier_ as Spanish for "four", etc. HoweVER, to recapitulate, the word that you evidently have in mind (what little is left of it, at any rate) is _verro_, although the correct word for the European wild boar that appears in Oxford's heraldry is _cinghiale_, cognate to the French _sanglier_ and to the English collective expression "a singular of boars".>>

But "boars" is plural.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Prob. of a Royal Flush = 1 in 649,739
Leas wrote:

<<If you're referring to the PT/DT nonsense, Art, then the probability
of a royal flush is *zero* -- Oxford was absolutely shameless.>>
----------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Harington_(writer)

<<Sir John Harington (also spelled Harrington, baptised 4 August 1560 – 20 November 1612), of Kelston, but baptised in London, was an English courtier, author and translator popularly known as the inventor of the flush toilet. He became a prominent member of Queen Elizabeth I's court, and was known as her "saucy Godson". But because of his poetry and other writings, he fell in and out of favour with the Queen.

The work for which he is best known today, A New Discourse of a Stale Subject, called the Metamorphosis of Ajax (1596) is a political allegory and a coded attack on the monarchy. His New Discourse described a forerunner to the modern flush toilet that was installed at his house at Kelston.>>
----------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 36 =>
.
.(L o r[D])A m b r o s e(D U D L E[Y])Erle o f(W A R W I C[K]e)L E a v e
. o f f t o w r i t e s p a r e s p eech a s p a c e b e[M]u t e O m u
. s e o f m i n e L e t b l u b r i ngte a r e s b e d e[A]w t h y f a
. c e O w a i l e w i t h w e e p i ngey n e T h e c o u[R]s e o f l i
. f e t h a t d r a w e s b u t b r ethi n d o l l o r a[L]l h i s d a
. y e s T i l l h a r t s t r i n g esbu r s t t i l l h[O W E]r o f d
. e a t h t i l p i l g r i m g o e shis w a y e s.
..............................................................
[K.MARLO/WE] 36
Leas wrote:

<<The string "KMARLOWE" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence
of skip 36 -- of indeed, of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art. >>

Did I say that it did?

Leas wrote:

<<You should find a remedial adult education specialist to diagnose whether your main problem is a complete inability to read or a complete inability to count -- not that the two possibilities in your case are mutually exclusive, Art.>>

I can VI-COUNT:
----------------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/zv93mdf
.
_The MINERVA BRITANNA_ Banner Folding clearly demonstrates
how the Equidistant Linear Sequence decoding is to be performed:
..........................................................
"all thinges perish and come to theyr last end, but workes
of learned WITS & monuments of Poetry abide *for EVER* ."
..........................................................
_______ <= 7 =>
.
. [V]I __\V\ (I) T U R
. [I]N G __\E\ (N) I O
. [C]Æ|T| E \R\ (A) M
. [O]R|T| I S __\E\ (R)
. [U N T]
.
{VERE} 8 : Prob. ~ 1 in 140
(I-NAR) 8
........................................................
1579: Dedication to Oxford in the only edition of
. Geoffrey Gates' The Defence of Militarie profession.
.
. TO THE RIGHT honorable, Edward de \VERE\, Earle of
. Oxenford, [VICOUNT] Bulbecke, Lod of Escales
. and Baldesmere, and Lord great Chamberlaine of England.
------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. *AM(b)RO(s)E*
. *MAR(l)O(w)E*
Leas wrote: <<That's not an anagram, Art.>>

I just cut out the (bs).
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
__ *(To the m)[eMOry of my beloVED]"
__ *(To them) [my OM, by fo(DEVere)ol]*
Leas wrote: <<...which is moronic nonsense, as usual.>>

And my poor fool is hang'd! No, no, no Liffey!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Easter 18 Apr NS 1593 => William Herbert's 13th birthday
18 Apr OS 1593 => Venus & Adonis was registered
Good Friday 8 Apr 1300 => Dante descends into Hell
Easter 10 Apr 1300 => Dante returns to see stars
Easter 14 Apr 1471 => OXFORD fights at BARNET
Easter 9 Apr 1553 => FRANCOIS rabelais dies
Easter 9 Apr 1626 => FRANCIS bacon dies freezing chicken
Sunday 14 Apr 1861 => Two Ft. Sumter casualties
9 Apr 1865 => Lee surrenders to Grant
Good Friday 14 Apr 1865 => Booth shots Abraham Lincoln
26 Apr 1865 => BOSTON Corbett shots Booth
Easter 9 Apr 1882 => Dante Gabriel Rossetti dies
Leas wrote: <<Was there supposed to have been any point
to the above effusion of nutcase numerology, Art?>>

It was a Yeaster Rising.

Leas wrote:

<<Out of curiosity, Art, why do you post the same crackpot cryptography, nutcase numerology, and other assorted lunatic logorrhea oVER and oVER and oVEr and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER?

Advanced senility?>>

The wonder is that you & Greg have endur'd so long.
------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-02-12 14:43:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
http://www.bbc.com/news/education-35973094
<<There is a stage direction in King Lear, which, in the early
part of the print run, says rather cryptically "H {EDIS}",
which is then updated in later copies to "He dis"
before it is finally corrected to "He dies".>>
------------------------------------------------------
. "H {EDIS}" : {You *PUBLISH*} "H".
Leas [sic]
Is English your native tongue, Art?
wrote: <<...which makes no sense whateVER.
"He dies", however, makes perfect sense in the context in which it appears.>>
The wonder is, he hath endur'd so long.
It's true that your ordure is difficult to endure, Art -- the wonder is, thou hast ordured so long, let alone so repetitively. HoweVER, we must obey the Grand Master.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_______ Sonnet 102 (Only Sonnet's *PUBLISH*)
Leas [sic]
Is English your native tongue, Art?
wrote: <<So?
You were expecting that "publish" would appear in all of them, Art?!>>
I was hoping that "publish" would appear in one (and only one) of them.
Why were you hoping that, Art? What difference could it possibly make?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. MY LOVE IS Strengthned though more weake in seeming
. I love not lesse, thogh lesse the show appeare,
. That love is marchandiz'd, whose ritch esteeming,
.
. The own[E]rs tongu[E] (DOTH} PUB[L]ISH {E}VER[Y] {WH}E{R}E) .
. Ou[R] lov{E} was [N]ew, and th[E]n but in t[H]e spring,
.
.{WH}en I was wont to greet it with my laies,
Leas wrote: <<His *lays*, Art?
Is he referring to Virginia Padoana, to Anne Vavasour, or to Orazio Cogno?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lay%27s
["betcha can't eat just one."]
I wouldn't raise the spectacle of Oxford eating (or being eaten by) his lays, Art; in view of the credible accusations concerning his relations with Cogno, it's poor salesmanship.

Besides, Oxford preferred ingles to Pringles.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
______ *BOAR* = *VERRE* (Italian)
Leas [sic]
Is English your native tongue, Art?
<<We've been through this before, Art -- many times, in fact. HoweVER, you
remain irremediably ineducable, so you will no doubt continue posting this
oVER and oVER and oVER, just as heedless as in the cases of _тæрин_ as
Russian(!) for "youth", _vier_ as Spanish for "four", etc. HoweVER, to
recapitulate, the word that you evidently have in mind (what little is left
of it, at any rate) is _verro_, although the correct word for the European
wild boar that appears in Oxford's heraldry is _cinghiale_, cognate to the
French _sanglier_ and to the English collective expression "a singular of
boars".>>
But "boars" is plural.
That's a different sense of the word "singular", Art, and is no doubt confusing to someone like yourself with a seVEREly deficient command of English.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Prob. of a Royal Flush = 1 in 649,739
Leas [sic]
Is English your native tongue, Art?
<<If you're referring to the PT/DT nonsense, Art, then the probability
of a royal flush is *zero* -- Oxford was absolutely shameless.>>
[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 36 =>
.
.(L o r[D])A m b r o s e(D U D L E[Y])Erle o f(W A R W I C[K]e)L E a v e
. o f f t o w r i t e s p a r e s p eech a s p a c e b e[M]u t e O m u
. s e o f m i n e L e t b l u b r i ngte a r e s b e d e[A]w t h y f a
. c e O w a i l e w i t h w e e p i ngey n e T h e c o u[R]s e o f l i
. f e t h a t d r a w e s b u t b r ethi n d o l l o r a[L]l h i s d a
. y e s T i l l h a r t s t r i n g esbu r s t t i l l h[O W E]r o f d
. e a t h t i l p i l g r i m g o e shis w a y e s.
..............................................................
[K.MARLO/WE] 36
Leas [sic]
Is English your native tongue, Art?
<<The string "KMARLOWE" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence
of skip 36 -- of indeed, of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art. >>
Did I say that it did?
If that's not what you had in mind (such as it is), then what *was* your point (if any), Art?
Leas [sic]
Is English your native tongue, Art?
<<You should find a remedial adult education specialist to diagnose whether
your main problem is a complete inability to read or a complete inability
to count -- not that the two possibilities in your case are mutually
exclusive, Art.>>
No, Art; ample evidence shows that you cannot cannot even count as high as six (or VI in the Roman numerals that you were taught at George Mason Elementary).

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. *AM(b)RO(s)E*
. *MAR(l)O(w)E*
Leas [sic]
IS English your native tongue, Art?
wrote: <<That's not an anagram, Art.>>
I just cut out the (bs).
No, Art; that would have left you with the empty post (sometimes denoted ø) -- not that that would not have been a huge improvement.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
__ *(To the m)[eMOry of my beloVED]"
__ *(To them) [my OM, by fo(DEVere)ol]*
Leas [sic]
Is English your native tongue, Art?
wrote: <<...which is moronic nonsense, as usual.>>
[...]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Easter 18 Apr NS 1593 => William Herbert's 13th birthday
18 Apr OS 1593 => Venus & Adonis was registered
Good Friday 8 Apr 1300 => Dante descends into Hell
Easter 10 Apr 1300 => Dante returns to see stars
Easter 14 Apr 1471 => OXFORD fights at BARNET
Easter 9 Apr 1553 => FRANCOIS rabelais dies
Easter 9 Apr 1626 => FRANCIS bacon dies freezing chicken
Sunday 14 Apr 1861 => Two Ft. Sumter casualties
9 Apr 1865 => Lee surrenders to Grant
Good Friday 14 Apr 1865 => Booth shots Abraham Lincoln
26 Apr 1865 => BOSTON Corbett shots Booth
Easter 9 Apr 1882 => Dante Gabriel Rossetti dies
Leas [sic]
IS English your native tongue, Art?
wrote: <<Was there supposed to have been any point
to the above effusion of nutcase numerology, Art?>>
It was a Yeaster Rising.
It looks more like a keister falling, Art.
<<Out of curiosity, Art, why do you post the same crackpot cryptography,
nutcase numerology, and other assorted lunatic logorrhea oVER and oVER and
oVEr and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER?
Advanced senility?>>
The wonder is that you & Greg have endur'd so long.
It's true that your ordure is difficult to endure, Art -- the wonder is, thou hast ordured so long, let alone so repetitively. HoweVER, we must obey the Grand Master.

But you still failed to answer my question, Art: Why do you post the same crackpot cryptography, nutcase numerology, and other assorted idiotic ordure oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER
and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER and oVER?

Advanced senility? That is indeed what I feared.
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Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
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