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THE ἙΚΑΤΟΜΠΑΘΊΑ
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Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-11-21 19:10:21 UTC
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THE ἙΚΑΤΟΜΠΑΘΊΑ [HEKATOMPATHIA] OR PASSIONATE Centurie of Loue,
Diuided into two parts:
whereof, the first expresseth the Authors sufferance in Loue:
the latter, his long farewell to Loue and all his tyrannie.

Composed by Thomas Watson Gentleman;
and published at the request of certaine Gentlemen his very frendes.

LONDON ¶Imprinted by Iohn Wolfe for Gabriell Cawood,
dwellinge in Paules Churchyard at the Signe of the Holy Ghost.
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To the Right Honorable my very good Lord Edward de Vere, Earle of Oxenford, Vicount Bulbecke, Lord of Escales, and Badlesmere, and Lord High Chamberlaine of England, all happinesse.

ALexander the Great, passing on a time by the workeshop of Apelles, curiouslie surueyed some of his doings: whose long stay in viewing them, brought all the people into so great a good liking of the painters workemanship, that immediatelie after, they bought vp all his pictures, what price soeuer he set them at.

And the like good happe, (Right Honorable,) befel vnto mee latelie, concerning these my Loue Passions, which then chaunced to Apelles, for his Portraites. For since the world hath vnderstood, (I know not how) that your Honor had willinglie voutchsafed the acceptance of this worke, and at conuenient leisures fauourablie perused it, being as yet but in written hand, many haue oftentimes and earnestly called vpon mee, to put it to the presse, that for their mony they might but see, what your Lordship with some liking had alreadie perused. And therewithall some of them said (either to yeeld
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To the frendly Reader.

COurteous Reader, if anie thing herein either please or profitte thee, afforde me thy good worde in recompence of my paines: if ought offend or hurt thee, I desire that thou forget the one, and forgiue the other. This toye being liked, the next may prooue better; being discouraged, wil cut of the likeliehood of my trauaile to come▪ But by that meanes all will be well, and both parties pleased. For neither shall I repent my labour in the like, nor thou be anie more troubled with my faultes or follies.

Yet for this once I hope thou wilt in respect of my trauaile in penning these louepassions, or for pitie of my paines in suffering them (although but supposed) so suruey the faultes herein escaped, as ey[T]her to winke at them, [A|S} ouersightes of a b[L]inde L{O}uer; or to exc[U]se them, as id{L}e toye[S] proceedinge from {A} youngling frenzie; or las{T}lie, to defend them, by saying, it is nothing Praeter decorum for a maiemed man to halt in his pase, where his wound enforceth him, or for a Poete to falter in his Poëme, whē his matter requireth it. Homer in mētioning the swiftnes of the winde, maketh his verse to runne in posthaste all vpon Dactilus: and Virgill in expressing the striking downe of an oxe, letteth the end of his hexameter fall withall, Procumbit humibos.

Therefore if I roughhewed my verse, where my sense was vnsetled, whether through the nature of the passion, which I felt, or by rule of art, which I had learned, it may seeme a happie fault; or if it were so framed by counsell, thou mayest thinke it well donne; if by chaunce, happelie.

Yet write I not this to excuse my selfe of such errours, as are escaped eyther by dotage, or ignorance: but those I referre to thy gentle curtisie and fauourable construction, or lay manie of them vpon the Printers necke, whom I would blame by his owne presse, if he would suffer me.

As for any Aristarchus, Momus, or Zoilus, if they pinch me more then is reasonable, thou courteous Reader, which arte of a better disposition, shalt rebuke them in my behalfe;
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. <= 20 =>
.
. s u r v e y t h e f a u l t e s h e r e
. i n e s c a p e d,a s e y[T]h e r t o w
. i n k e a t t h e m[A|S}o v e r s i g h
. t e s o f a b[L]i n d e L{O}v e r;o r t
. o e x c[U]s e t h e m,a s i d{L}e t o y
. e[S]p r o c e e d i n g e f r o m{A}y o
. u n g l i n g f r e n z i e;o r l a s{T}
. l i e,t o d e f e n d t h e m,

[TALUS] 17
{TALOS} -22 : Prob. of both in first two dedications ~ 1 in 575
------------------------------------------------------------------------
. _Sylvie and Bruno Concluded_ - Lewis Carroll,
.........................................................................
.........................................................................
“Yes,” I thought. “This bare platform is, for me, rich with the memory
of a dear friend! She was sitting on that *VERy* bench, and invited me to
[S]hare it, with some quotation fr[O]m {SHAKESPEARE}—I forget what. I’l[L]
try the Earl’s plan for the Dram[A|T}isation of Life, and f{A}ncy tha[T]
figure to be {L}ady Muriel; and I won’t {U}ndeceive myself too {S}oon!”
.......................................................................
. <= 22 =>
.
. m e t o{S}h a r e i t,w i t h s o m e q u o
. t a t i o n f r{O}m{S H A K E S P E A R E}I
. f o r g e t w h a t.I’l{L}t r y t h e E a r
. l’s p l a n f o r t h e D r a m{A|T]i s a t
. i o n o f L i f e,a n d f[A]n c y t h a{T}f
. i g u r e t o b e[L]a d y M u r i e l;a n d
. I w o n’t[U]n d e c e i v e m y s e l f t o
. o[S]o o n!”
.
[TALUS] 18
{TALOS} -26
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Art Neuendorffer
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-11-21 19:24:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
-------------------------------------------------------------
THE ἙΚΑΤΟΜΠΑΘΊΑ [HEKATOMPATHIA] OR PASSIONATE Centurie of Loue,
Diuided into two parts:
whereof, the first expresseth the Authors sufferance in Loue:
the latter, his long farewell to Loue and all his tyrannie.

Composed by Thomas Watson Gentleman;
and published at the request of certaine Gentlemen his very frendes.

LONDON ¶Imprinted by Iohn Wolfe for Gabriell Cawood,
dwellinge in Paules Churchyard at the Signe of the Holy Ghost.
-------------------------------------------------------------
To the Right Honorable my very good Lord Edward de Vere, Earle of Oxenford, Vicount Bulbecke, Lord of Escales, and Badlesmere, and Lord High Chamberlaine of England, all happinesse.

ALexander the Great, passing on a time by the workeshop of Apelles, curiouslie surueyed some of his doings: whose long stay in viewing them, brought all the people into so great a good liking of the painters workemanship, that immediatelie after, they bought vp all his pictures, what price soeuer he set them at.

And the like good happe, (Right Honorable,) befel vnto mee latelie, concerning these my Loue Passions, which then chaunced to Apelles, for his Portraites. For since the world hath vnderstood, (I know not how) that your Honor had willinglie voutchsafed the acceptance of this worke, and at conuenient leisures fauourablie perused it, being as yet but in written hand, many haue oftentimes and earnestly called vpon mee, to put it to the presse, that for their mony they might but see, what your Lordship with some liking had alreadie perused. And therewithall some of them said (either to yeeld
-------------------------------------------------------------
To the frendly Reader.

COurteous Reader, if anie thing herein either please or profitte thee, afforde me thy good worde in recompence of my paines: if ought offend or hurt thee, I desire that thou forget the one, and forgiue the other. This toye being liked, the next may prooue better; being discouraged, wil cut of the likeliehood of my trauaile to come▪ But by that meanes all will be well, and both parties pleased. For neither shall I repent my labour in the like, nor thou be anie more troubled with my faultes or follies.

Yet for this once I hope thou wilt in respect of my trauaile in penning these louepassions, or for pitie of my paines in suffering them (although but supposed) so suruey the faultes herein escaped, as ey[T]her to winke at them, [A|S} ouersightes of a b[L]inde L{O}uer; or to exc[U]se them, as id{L}e toye[S] proceedinge from {A} youngling frenzie; or las{T}lie, to defend them, by saying, it is nothing Praeter decorum for a maiemed man to halt in his pase, where his wound enforceth him, or for a Poete to falter in his Poëme, whē his matter requireth it. Homer in mētioning the swiftnes of the winde, maketh his verse to runne in posthaste all vpon Dactilus: and Virgill in expressing the striking downe of an oxe, letteth the end of his hexameter fall withall, Procumbit humibos.

Therefore if I roughhewed my verse, where my sense was vnsetled, whether through the nature of the passion, which I felt, or by rule of art, which I had learned, it may seeme a happie fault; or if it were so framed by counsell, thou mayest thinke it well donne; if by chaunce, happelie.

Yet write I not this to excuse my selfe of such errours, as are escaped eyther by dotage, or ignorance: but those I referre to thy gentle curtisie and fauourable construction, or lay manie of them vpon the Printers necke, whom I would blame by his owne presse, if he would suffer me.

As for any Aristarchus, Momus, or Zoilus, if they pinch me more then is reasonable, thou courteous Reader, which arte of a better disposition, shalt rebuke them in my behalfe;
---------------------------------------------------------
. <= 20 =>
.
. s u r v e y t h e f a u l t e s h e r e
. i n e s c a p e d,a s e y[T]h e r t o w
. i n k e a t t h e m[A|S}o v e r s i g h
. t e s o f a b[L]i n d e L{O}v e r;o r t
. o e x c[U]s e t h e m,a s i d{L}e t o y
. e[S]p r o c e e d i n g e f r o m{A}y o
. u n g l i n g f r e n z i e;o r l a s{T}
. l i e,t o d e f e n d t h e m,

[TALUS] 17
{TALOS} -22 : Prob. of both in first two dedications ~ 1 in 575
---------------------------------------------------------
Sonnet 88

This whole Sonnet is nothing els bvt a briefe and pithy morall, and
made after the selfe same vaine with that, which is last before it.
The two first staffes, (excepting onely the two first verses of all)
expresse the Avthovrs alteration of minde & life, and his change from
his late vaine es[T]ate an[D] folli[E]s in lo[V]e, by a m[E]tapho[R]e
of th[E] shipmā, which by shipwrakes chavnce is happely restoared on
a sodeine vnto that land, which he a long time had most wished for.
....................................................
. <= 6 =>
.
. f r o m h i
. s l a t e v
. a i n e e s
. [T] a t e a n
. [D] f o l l i
. [E] s i n l o
. [V] e,b y a m
. [E] t a p h o
. [R] e o f t h
. [E] s h i p m
.
[T.DEVERE] 6
------------------------------------------------------------------------
. _Sylvie and Bruno Concluded_ - Lewis Carroll,
.........................................................................
.........................................................................
“Yes,” I thought. “This bare platform is, for me, rich with the memory
of a dear friend! She was sitting on that *VERy* bench, and invited me to
[S]hare it, with some quotation fr[O]m {SHAKESPEARE}—I forget what. I’l[L]
try the Earl’s plan for the Dram[A|T}isation of Life, and f{A}ncy tha[T]
figure to be {L}ady Muriel; and I won’t {U}ndeceive myself too {S}oon!”
.......................................................................
. <= 22 =>
.
. m e t o{S}h a r e i t,w i t h s o m e q u o
. t a t i o n f r{O}m{S H A K E S P E A R E}I
. f o r g e t w h a t.I’l{L}t r y t h e E a r
. l’s p l a n f o r t h e D r a m{A|T]i s a t
. i o n o f L i f e,a n d f[A]n c y t h a{T}f
. i g u r e t o b e[L]a d y M u r i e l;a n d
. I w o n’t[U]n d e c e i v e m y s e l f t o
. o[S]o o n!”
.
[TALUS] 18
{TALOS} -26
.........................................................................
.........................................................................
“Who was i[T] wan[TED] to com[E] i(n)?”
Syl[V]i(e) ask[E]d, (a)s he [R]e(t)urn[E]d to his place.

“It were a Mouse,” said Bruno.
....................................................
. <= 6 =>
.
. W h o w a
. s i[T]w a n
. [T E D]t o c
. (o)m[E]i (n)?S
. (y)l[V]i (e) a
. (s)k[E]d,(a) s
. h e[R]e (t) u
. r[N E D] t o
. h i s p l a
. c e.

[TE/DEVERE] 6
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Art Neuendorffer

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