Discussion:
Moron Spenser's Fairy Queen
(too old to reply)
Don
2018-03-01 20:29:11 UTC
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Rather than append my reply to Art's thread on Spenser's The Fairy Queen, I better leave his longish post alone and put mine up as another thread as follows.
To the Right Noble, and Valorous, Sir Walter Raleigh, Knight, Lord Wardein of
the Stanneryes, and Her Majesties Liefetenaunt of the County of Cornewayll
SIR, knowing how doubtfully all allegories may be construed, and this booke
of mine, which I have entituled the Faery Queene, being a continued allegory,
or darke conceit, I have thought good, aswell for avoyding of gealous opinions
and misconstructions, as also for your better light in reading therof, (being
so by you commanded,) to discover unto you the general intention and meaning,
which in the whole course thereof I have fashioned, without expressing of any
particular purposes or by accidents therein occa[S]ioned. The generall end
ther[E]fore of all the booke is to fashion a ge[N]tleman or noble person in
vertuo[U]s and gentle discipline: which fo[R] that I conceived shoulde be most
(snip)

How to interpret Spenser's comments in light of FQ's allegorical quest of finding the Fairy Queen, in the process identifying all the virues a knight must have? Believe it or not, there seems to be disambiguation out there suggesting that Spenser didn't see Queen Elizabeth so favorably after he met her and her court, and the populace was critical of having a woman monarch of questionable virtues.

Considering surrounding circumstances to the publishing of The Fairy Queen, Spenser's letter no doubt bears on the important political matter of how closely it might be read, at some level, as a satire on Queen Elizabeth. My understanding is that QE was already being criticized in ways that could be interpreted in the QE, particularly how she is pictured at the end, surrounded by her court like a goddess.

Those who are better readers than I, and that have studied the issue in its historical context, could inform us better just how the publication of the FQ was received by the Queen, herself. I think I've read that she was assured by closest at court that the public probably accepted Spenser's explanation, but aware of critics among commoners, she made a doubtful comment that seems to relate to FQ as uncomplimentary, if disguised.

What Wikipedia says, at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Faerie_Queene#Social_commentary

(quote)
After the first three books of The Faerie Queene were published in 1590,
Spenser found himself disappointed in the monarchy; among other things,
"his annual pension from the Queen was smaller than he would have
liked" and his humanist perception of Elizabeth's court "was shattered
by what he saw there".[23]
(unquote)

In the end, after Spenser completed the first three of the six books and received his pension from QE, see what Spenser thought about his visit with QE and her court, mentioned in the Wikipedia article, under Social Commentary. I think I remember reading that Spenser ended his days in London in isolation and poor circumstances, possible at the direction of QE, and his funeral may have been attended by Shakespeare and many others who appreciated Spenser.

See also commentary on Shakespeare's possible references to QE in plays. Fairy Queen in MND is said to resemble QE by some. Wildly imaginative study at https://figshare.com/article The_Fairy_Queen_Mab_Mediating_Elizabeth_in_Early_Modern_England/760610
that sees the Queen Mab figure Shakespeare provides us in RJ as based on a witch. "Mediation Theory" is the strange strategy the author uses. Notice, however, the usefulness of the site, which evidently exists for academics to post their studies for free, with few restrictions.
Don
2018-03-02 00:01:04 UTC
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Post by Don
Rather than append my reply to Art's thread on Spenser's The Fairy Queen, I better leave his longish post alone and put mine up as another thread as follows.
To the Right Noble, and Valorous, Sir Walter Raleigh, Knight, Lord Wardein of
the Stanneryes, and Her Majesties Liefetenaunt of the County of Cornewayll
SIR, knowing how doubtfully all allegories may be construed, and this booke
of mine, which I have entituled the Faery Queene, being a continued allegory,
or darke conceit, I have thought good, aswell for avoyding of gealous opinions
and misconstructions, as also for your better light in reading therof, (being
so by you commanded,) to discover unto you the general intention and meaning,
which in the whole course thereof I have fashioned, without expressing of any
particular purposes or by accidents therein occa[S]ioned. The generall end
ther[E]fore of all the booke is to fashion a ge[N]tleman or noble person in
vertuo[U]s and gentle discipline: which fo[R] that I conceived shoulde be most
(snip)
How to interpret Spenser's comments in light of FQ's allegorical quest of finding the Fairy Queen, in the process identifying all the virues a knight must have? Believe it or not, there seems to be disambiguation out there suggesting that Spenser didn't see Queen Elizabeth so favorably after he met her and her court, and the populace was critical of having a woman monarch of questionable virtues.
Considering surrounding circumstances to the publishing of The Fairy Queen, Spenser's letter no doubt bears on the important political matter of how closely it might be read, at some level, as a satire on Queen Elizabeth. My understanding is that QE was already being criticized in ways that could be interpreted in the QE, particularly how she is pictured at the end, surrounded by her court like a goddess.
Those who are better readers than I, and that have studied the issue in its historical context, could inform us better just how the publication of the FQ was received by the Queen, herself. I think I've read that she was assured by closest at court that the public probably accepted Spenser's explanation, but aware of critics among commoners, she made a doubtful comment that seems to relate to FQ as uncomplimentary, if disguised.
What Wikipedia says, at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Faerie_Queene#Social_commentary
(quote)
After the first three books of The Faerie Queene were published in 1590,
Spenser found himself disappointed in the monarchy; among other things,
"his annual pension from the Queen was smaller than he would have
liked" and his humanist perception of Elizabeth's court "was shattered
by what he saw there".[23]
(unquote)
In the end, after Spenser completed the first three of the six books and received his pension from QE, see what Spenser thought about his visit with QE and her court, mentioned in the Wikipedia article, under Social Commentary. I think I remember reading that Spenser ended his days in London in isolation and poor circumstances, possible at the direction of QE, and his funeral may have been attended by Shakespeare and many others who appreciated Spenser.
See the commentary on Shakespeare's possible references to QE in plays. Fairy Queen in MND is said to resemble QE by some. Wildly imaginative study at https://figshare.com/articles/ The_Fairy_Queen_Mab_Mediating_Elizabeth_in_Early_Modern_England/760610
that sees the Queen Mab figure Shakespeare provides us in RJ as based on a witch. "Mediation Theory" is the strange strategy the author uses. Notice, however, the usefulness of the site, which evidently exists for academics to post their studies for free, with few restrictions.
See also the Spencer's Encyclopedia as an important source.
Don
2018-03-02 00:03:15 UTC
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Post by Don
Post by Don
Rather than append my reply to Art's thread on Spenser's The Fairy Queen, I better leave his longish post alone and put mine up as another thread as follows.
To the Right Noble, and Valorous, Sir Walter Raleigh, Knight, Lord Wardein of
the Stanneryes, and Her Majesties Liefetenaunt of the County of Cornewayll
SIR, knowing how doubtfully all allegories may be construed, and this booke
of mine, which I have entituled the Faery Queene, being a continued allegory,
or darke conceit, I have thought good, aswell for avoyding of gealous opinions
and misconstructions, as also for your better light in reading therof, (being
so by you commanded,) to discover unto you the general intention and meaning,
which in the whole course thereof I have fashioned, without expressing of any
particular purposes or by accidents therein occa[S]ioned. The generall end
ther[E]fore of all the booke is to fashion a ge[N]tleman or noble person in
vertuo[U]s and gentle discipline: which fo[R] that I conceived shoulde be most
(snip)
How to interpret Spenser's comments in light of FQ's allegorical quest of finding the Fairy Queen, in the process identifying all the virues a knight must have? Believe it or not, there seems to be disambiguation out there suggesting that Spenser didn't see Queen Elizabeth so favorably after he met her and her court, and the populace was critical of having a woman monarch of questionable virtues.
Considering surrounding circumstances to the publishing of The Fairy Queen, Spenser's letter no doubt bears on the important political matter of how closely it might be read, at some level, as a satire on Queen Elizabeth. My understanding is that QE was already being criticized in ways that could be interpreted in the QE, particularly how she is pictured at the end, surrounded by her court like a goddess.
Those who are better readers than I, and that have studied the issue in its historical context, could inform us better just how the publication of the FQ was received by the Queen, herself. I think I've read that she was assured by closest at court that the public probably accepted Spenser's explanation, but aware of critics among commoners, she made a doubtful comment that seems to relate to FQ as uncomplimentary, if disguised.
What Wikipedia says, at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Faerie_Queene#Social_commentary
(quote)
After the first three books of The Faerie Queene were published in 1590,
Spenser found himself disappointed in the monarchy; among other things,
"his annual pension from the Queen was smaller than he would have
liked" and his humanist perception of Elizabeth's court "was shattered
by what he saw there".[23]
(unquote)
In the end, after Spenser completed the first three of the six books and received his pension from QE, see what Spenser thought about his visit with QE and her court, mentioned in the Wikipedia article, under Social Commentary. I think I remember reading that Spenser ended his days in London in isolation and poor circumstances, possible at the direction of QE, and his funeral may have been attended by Shakespeare and many others who appreciated Spenser.
See the commentary on Shakespeare's possible references to QE in plays. Fairy Queen in MND is said to resemble QE by some. Wildly imaginative study at https://figshare.com/articles/ The_Fairy_Queen_Mab_Mediating_Elizabeth_in_Early_Modern_England/760610
that sees the Queen Mab figure Shakespeare provides us in RJ as based on a witch. "Mediation Theory" is the strange strategy the author uses. Notice, however, the usefulness of the site, which evidently exists for academics to post their studies for free, with few restrictions.
See also the Spencer's Encyclopedia as an important source.
https://figshare.com/articles/The_Fairy_Queen_Mab_Mediating_Elizabeth_in_Early_Modern_England/760610
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-03-02 02:53:46 UTC
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Don,

Are you taking oVER from liddle Marco so Lea can go back to school?

Art
Don
2018-03-02 20:14:06 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Don,
Are you taking oVER from liddle Marco so Lea can go back to school?
Art
We wait for your crypto-analysis of The Fairy Queen, rendering it understandable to we who follow the VERE trail wherever it goes, discovering his virtues in an ideal knight, that take him before QE. That is, of course, unless you find Spenser has embedded a knight in FQ with de Vere's dubious virtues in some disguise, like yellow stockings.
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-03-02 21:02:05 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Don,
Are you taking oVER from liddle Marco so Lea can go back to school?
--------------------------------------------
Don wrote:

<<We wait for your crypto-analysis of The Fairy Queen, rendering it understandable to we who follow the VERE trail wherever it goes, discovering his virtues in an ideal knight, that take him before QE. That is, of course, unless you find Spenser has embedded a knight in FQ with de Vere's dubious virtues in some disguise, like yellow stockings.>>
---------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Shakespeare has anti-heroes,
Oxford tries to be heroic, and
fails ludicrously, in *YELLOW STOCKINGS*.
-------------------------------------------------
bookburn wrote: <<I think I remember reading in Lanier's "Fertile
Visions" that either James I or Oxford wore *YELLOW STOCKINGS* at the
court masque, which was the object of

much gossip. Whereas QE used masques as a link to the people and took
an active part, James used them to show differences and remained apart
as the director of the revels. In

Twelfth Night, Malvolio wears *YELLOW STOCKINGS* as an important
device in the love plot.>>
..........................................
JHB wrote: <<It is traditionally believed that Anne Boleyn appeared
from head to foot in bright *YELLOW* when Catherine of Aragon died.
Because of this belief it is sometimes

asserted that *YELLOW* became the official mourning colour of the
Tudor court. It is now becoming almost traditional 'business' for
Andrew Aguecheek to be dressed entirely in

yellow, so that the line in TWELFTH NIGHT 'It is a colour she abhors'
gets a big laugh at his expense.>>
..........................................
Melanie wrote: <<Does anyone know why *YELLOW STOCKINGS* caused such
mirth in Tudor days, for example in "Taming of the Shrew" when
Petruchio wears them to the wedding? In

Hatfield Museum there were a pair of *YELLOW SILK STOCKINGS* (the
first worn in Britain) which belonged to Elizabeth I.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
. JOYCE: Ulysses, Telemachus
.
STATELY, PLUMP BUCK MULLIGAN CAME FROM THE STAIRHEAD, bearing
. a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed.
. *A YELLOW dressing gown* , ungirdled, was sustained
. gently-behind him by the mild morning air.
--------------------------------------------------------------
<<Liturgically, the color *YELLOW* has many negative connotations:
.
1) infernal light,
2) degradation,
3) jealousy,
4) treason, and
5) deceit.
.
The traitor Judas is frequently
painted in a garment of dingy *YELLOW*.
.
In the Middle Ages heretics were obliged to wear *YELLOW*">>
.
. -- George Ferguson, _Signs and Symbols in Christian Art_.
---------------------------------------------------------------
. JOYCE: Ulysses, Lestrygonians
.
<<They remind one of *DON Quixote and Sancho Panza* .
Our national epic has yet to be written, Dr Sigerson says.
Moore is the man for it. A knight of the rueful
countenance HERE in Dublin. With a *SAFFRON* kilt?>>
------------------------------------------------------------------
. NOTES ON ARISTOPHANES ' FROGS
http://www.angelfire.com/art/archictecture/articles/frogs.html
.
A comical pair enter the Orchestra.

DiONySUS, the god, is an ungodly sight, for over his own usual, rather
effeminate *YELLOW* tunic he wears the formidable lion-skin of
Herakles and he holds the club of Herakles in his delicate hands.

His slave, Xanthias, carries a heavy load of baggage over his
shoulder, and *is riding on a DONKEY* .

They are clearly prepared for a long journey. But Aristophanes leaves
the audience to wonder for a while where these two are going.
Meanwhile he exploits some well seasoned jokes about *PORTERS*
carrying baggage.

The pair come to a door in the skene building, and stop.
Herakles appears in a lion-skin over a *YELLOW* nightdress.

The *YELLOW* tunic was worn by participants in Dionysiac festivals,
by women, by effeminate men and by members of royal houses.

The large club is characteristically carried by DiONySUS.
The contrast is ultimately between the soft, luxurious
costume of D. and that of the rugged arduous H.
-------------------------------------------------------------
Many were the compliments and expressions of politeness that passed
between Don Quixote and Don Fernando; but they were brought to an end
by a traveller who at this moment

entered the inn, and who seemed from his attire to be a Christian
lately come from the country of the Moors, for he was dressed in a
short-skirted coat of blue cloth with half-

sleeves and without a collar; his breeches were also of blue cloth,
and his cap of the same colour, and he wore *YELLOW* buskins and had a
Moorish cutlass slung from a baldric

across his breast.
...........................................................
. Don Quixote by Cervantes - Translated by John Ormsby
. ( PART 2 - CHAPTER 18 )
.
<<They led Don Quixote into a room, and Sancho removed his armour,
leaving him in loose [*YELLOW*] WALLOON breeches and chamois-leather
doublet, all stained with the rust of his armour; his collar was a
falling one of scholastic cut, without starch or lace, his buskins
buff-coloured, and his shoes polished.>>
..........................................
Don Quixote beheld his opposite, and perceived that his helmet was on
and drawn, so that he could not see his face ; but he saw that he was
well set in his body, though not tall

: upon his armour he wore an upper garment or cassock, to see to, of
pure cloth of gold, with many moons of shining looking-glasses spread
about it, which made him appear VERy

brave and gorgeous ; a great plume of green feathers waved about his
helmet, with others white and *YELLOW* ; his lance, which he had
reared up against a tree, was VERy long and

thick, and with a steel pike above a handful long.
..........................................
Up [Quixote] stood upon the bed, wrapped from head to foot
in a quilt of *YELLOW* satin, a woollen cap upon his head,
his face and mustachoes bound up, his face for his scratches,
his mustachoes because they should not dismay or fall
down, in which posture he looked like the
STRANGEst apparition that can be imagined.
..........................................
The vision came somewhat nearer, but being in the
midst of the chamber, she lifted up her eyes, and saw with
what haste Don Quixote was crossing himself; and, if he
were afraid to see such a shape, she was no less affrighted
with his, for seeing him so lank and *YELLOW* in the quilt,
and with the bands that disfigured him, she cried out,
saying, ' Jesus, what's this ? ' and, with the sudden fright,
the candle dropped out of her hand, and being in the
dark, she turned her back to be gone, but, for fear,
stumbled upon her coats, and had a sound fall.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
<<A Thomas Shelton was employed by Thomas Howard, the Earl of Walden,
later the Earl of SUFFOLK, to whom the translation of Don Quixote was
dedicated. His wife, Catherine, Lady SUFFOLK received a payment of
£1,000 a year from the King of Spain for her work on his behalf in
this
country. What this consisted of has remained a secret. Shelton may
have
worked for her and have undertaken missions in Spain, and on these
visits to MADRID, Shelton may have met and conferred with Cervantes.
From 1603 to 1614, SUFFOLK, the builder of Audley End, near *SAFFRON*
Walden in Essex, was LORD CHAMBERLAIN to the royal household.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------------
(1596) _Have With You to *SAFFRON* WALDEN_(Thomas NASHE)
-----------------------------------------------------------------
*SAFFRON*, a. Having the color of the stigmas of *SAFFRON* flowers;
. *DEEP ORANGE-YELLOW* .
---------------------------------------------------------------
. The Winter's Tale Act 4, Scene 3
.
Clown: She hath made me FOUR AND TWENTY nose-gays for
. the shearers, three-man-song-men all, and very good
. ones; but they are most of them means and bases;
. but one puritan amongst them,
. and he sings psalms to horn-pipes.
. I must have *SAFFRON* to colour the *WARDEN PIES* ;
. mace; dates?--none, that's out of my note;
. nutmegs, seven; a race or two of ginger,
. but that I may beg; four pound of prunes,
. and as many of raisins o' the SUN.
-------------------------------------------------------------
. The Taming of the Shrew > Act III, scene II

BIONDELLO: Why, Petruchio is coming in a new hat and an old
. jerkin, a pair of old breeches thrice turned, a pair
. of boots that have been candle-cases, one buckled,
. another laced, an old rusty sword ta'en out of the
. town-armory, with a broken hilt, and chapeless;
. with two broken points: his horse hipped with an
. old mothy saddle and stirrups of no kindred;
. besides, possessed with the glanders and like to mose
. in the chine; troubled with the lampass, infected
. with the fashions, full of wingdalls, sped with
. spavins, *RAYED WITH YELLOWS* ...
-------------------------------------------------
. Twelfth Night > Act II, scene V
.
MALVOLIO: M, O, A, I; this simulation is not as the former:
. and yet, to crush this a little, it would bow to me,
. for EVERy one of these letters are in my name. Soft!
. here follows prose.

. [Reads]

. 'If this fall into thy hand, revolve. In my STARs I
. am above thee; but be not AFRAID of greatness: some
. are born great, some achieve greatness, and some
. have greatness thrust upon 'em. Thy *FATES* open
. their hands; let thy blood and spirit embrace them;
. and, to inure thyself to what thou art like to be,
. cast thy humble slough and appear fresh. Be
. opposite with a kinsman, surly with SERVANTs; let
. thy tongue tang arguments of state; put thyself into
. the trick of singularity: she thus advises thee
. that sighs for thee. Remember who commended thy
. *YELLOW STOCKINGS* , and wished to see thee EVER
. *CROSS-GARTERED* : I say, remember. Go to, thou art
. made, if thou desirest to be so; if not, let me see
. thee a steward still, the fellow of SERVANTs, and
. not WORTHy to touch Fortune's fingers. Farewell.
. She that would alter services with thee,
. . THE FORTUNATE-UNHAPPY.'
. Daylight and champaign discovers not more: this is
. open. I will be proud, I will read politic authors,
. I will baffle Sir Toby, I will wash off gross
. acquaintance, I will be point-devise the VERy man.
. I do not now fool myself, to let imagination jade
. me; for EVERy reason excites to this, that my lady
. loves me. She did commend my *YELLOW STOCKINGS* of
. late, she did PRAISE my leg being *CROSS-GARTERED*;
. and in this she manifests herself to my love, and
. with a kind of injunction drives me to these habits
. of her liking. I thank my STARs I am happy. I will
. be STRANGE, stout, in *YELLOW STOCKINGS*, and
. *CROSS-GARTERED*, even with the swiftness of putting
. on. Jove and my STARs be PRAISEd! Here is yet a
. postscript.
.
. [Reads]
.
. 'Thou canst not choose but know who I am. If thou
. entertainest my love, let it appear in thy smiling;
. thy smiles become thee well; therefore in my
. presence still smile, dear my sweet, I prithee.'
. Jove, I thank thee: I will smile; I will do
. EVERything that thou wilt have me.
.
. [Exit]
.
FABIAN: I will not give my part of this sport for a pension
. of thousands to be paid from the Sophy.
.
SIR TOBY BELCH: I could marry this wench for this device.
.
SIR ANDREW: So could I too.
.
SIR TOBY BELCH: And ask no other dowry with her but such another JEST.
.
SIR ANDREW: Nor I neither.
.
FABIAN: *HERE COMES* my *NOBLE GULL-catcher* .
.
. [Re-enter MARIA]
.
SIR TOBY BELCH: Wilt thou set thy foot o' my neck?
.
SIR ANDREW: Or o' mine either?
.
SIR TOBY BELCH: Shall I play my freedom at traytrip,
. and become thy bond-slave?
.
SIR ANDREW: I' faith, or I either?
.
SIR TOBY BELCH: Why, thou hast put him in such a *DREAM*,
. that when the image of it leaves him he must run mad.
.
MARIA: Nay, but say *TRUE* ; does it work upon him?
.
SIR TOBY BELCH: Like aqua-vitae with a midwife.
.
MARIA: If you will then see the fruits of the sport, mark
. his first approach before my lady: he will come to
. her in *YELLOW STOCKINGS*, and 'tis a colour she
. abhors, and *CROSS-GARTERED*, a fashion she detests;
. and he will smile upon her, which will now be so
. unsuitable to her disposition, being addicted to a
. melancholy as she is, that it cannot but turn him
. into a notable contempt.
. If you will see it, follow me.
.................................................
. Act III, scene IV
.
OLIVIA: Why, how dost thou, man? what is the matter with thee?
.
MALVOLIO: Not black in my mind, though *YELLOW* in my legs.
. It did come to his hands, and commands shall be
. executed: I think we do know the sweet Roman hand.
.
OLIVIA: Wilt thou go to bed, Malvolio?
.
MALVOLIO: To bed! ay, sweet-heart, and I'll come to thee.
.
OLIVIA: God comfort thee!
. Why dost thou smile so and kiss thy hand so oft?
.
MARIA: How do you, Malvolio?
.
MALVOLIO: At your request! yes; *NIGHTINGALES answer DAWS* .
.
MARIA: Why appear you with this ridiculous boldness before my lady?
.
MALVOLIO: 'Be not AFRAID of greatness:' 'twas well writ.
.
OLIVIA: What meanest thou by that, Malvolio?
.
MALVOLIO: 'Some are born great,'--
.
OLIVIA: Ha!
.
MALVOLIO: 'Some achieve greatness,'--
.
OLIVIA: What sayest thou?
.
MALVOLIO: 'And some have greatness thrust upon them.'
.
OLIVIA: Heaven restore thee!
.
MALVOLIO: 'Remember who commended thy *YELLOW STOCKINGS*,'--
.
OLIVIA: Thy *YELLOW STOCKINGS*!
.
MALVOLIO: 'And wished to see thee *CROSS-GARTERED*.'
.
OLIVIA: *CROSS-GARTERED*!
.
MALVOLIO: 'Go to thou art made, if thou desirest to be so;'--
.
OLIVIA: Am I made?
.
MALVOLIO: 'If not, let me see thee a SERVANT still.'
.
OLIVIA: Why, this is VERy midsummer madness.
-------------------------------------------------
Christian Lanciai: [Queen Elizabeth] detested [*YELLOW*],
perhaps because it was the colour of the flag of Spain.
It was also the colour of the traitor the Duke of Norfolk,
who was executed in 1572. But above all, *YELLOW* was the
symbolic colour of jealous-foolish husbands,
the English by-word for jealousy being:
"to wear *YELLOW STOCKINGS* & *CROSS-GARTERS* ."
That fashion was totally out-of-date by 1600 when
the play was written, that style only being favoured
still by old men, Puritans, pedants, footmen and
rustic bride-grooms - but above all by Queen Elizabeth's
own Mr Controller Knollys, of whom the figure of Malvolio
most probably is a caricature, - according to Leslie
Hotson's and A.D.Wraight's explanations, at your service,
..........................................
. Twelfth Night Act V, scene I
.
OLIVIA: Have I, Malvolio? no.
.
MALVOLIO: Lady, you have. Pray you, peruse that letter.
. You must not now deny it is your hand:
. Write from it, if you can, in hand or phrase;
. Or say 'tis not your seal, nor your *INVENTION* :
. You can say none of this: well, grant it then
. And tell me, in the modesty of honour,
. Why you have given me such clear lights of favour,
. Bade me come smiling and *CROSS-GARTER'D* to you,
. To put on *YELLOW STOCKINGS* and to frown
. Upon Sir Toby and the lighter people;
. And, acting this in an obedient hope,
. Why have you suffer'd me to be imprison'd,
. Kept in a dark house, visited by the priest,
. And made the most notorious geck and *GULL*
. *That E'ER *INVENTION* play'd on* ? tell me why.
.........................................................
Cardenio offered himself to prosecute the adventure, and Lucinda
should represent Dorothea's person. ' No,' quoth Don Fernando, 'it shall
not be so ; for I will have Dorothea to prosecute her own *INVENTION* :
for so that the village of this good gentleman be not VERy far off from
hence, I will be VERy glad to procure his remedy.' * It is no more
than two days' journey from hence,' said the curate. ' Well, though it
were more,' replied Don Fernando, ' I would be pleased to travel them,
in exchange of doing so good a work.' Don Quixote sallied out at this
time completely armed with Mambrino's helmet (although with a great hole
in it) on his head, his target on his arm, and leaned on his trunk or
javelin. His STRANGE countenance and gait amazed Don Fernando and his
companions VERy much, seeing his ill-favoured visage so withered and
*YELLOW* , the inequality and unsuitability of his arms, and
his grave manner of proceeding ;
-------------------------------------------------
. Twelfth Night Act III, scene II
.
SIR TOBY BELCH: Look, where the youngest *WREN* of nine comes.
.
MARIA: If you desire the spleen, and will laugh yourself
. into stitches, follow me. Yond *GULL* Malvolio is
. turned heathen, a VERy renegado; for there is no
. Christian, that means to be saved by believing
. rightly, can EVER believe such impossible passages
. of grossness. He's in *YELLOW STOCKINGS*.
.
SIR TOBY BELCH: And *CROSS-GARTERED*?
..................................................
*GUL* : *YELLOW* (Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
*VERDh* : *make YELLOW* (Albanian)
-----------------------------------------------------
*MALVOLIO* : *ILL WILL* , *BAD FLIGHT* (Italian)
---------------------------------------------------------------
. Twelfth Night (Folio 1, 1623) II, v
.
Mal. I may command where I adore, but silence like a Lucresse knife:
. With bloodlesse stroke my heart doth gore,
. [M.O.A.I.] d[O]th sw[A]y my l[I]fe.
.
Fa. A fustian *RIDDLE*.
.
To. Excellent Wench, say I.
.
Mal. [M.O.A.I.] d[O]th sw[A]y my l[I]fe.
. Nay but first let me see, let me see, let me see.
.........................................................
. <= 4 =>
.
. [M. O. A. I.]
. d [O] t h
. s w [A] y
. m y l [I]
. f e.
.
[MOAI] : Prob. ELS in repeated nonsense phrase ~ 1 in 1092
...........................................................
Fab. What dish a poyson has she drest him?

To. And with what wing the stallion checkes at it?

Mal. I may command, where I adore: Why shee may
command me: I serue her, she is my Ladie. Why this is
euident to any formall capacitie. There is no obstruction
in this, and the end: What should that Alphabeticall po-
sition portend, if I could make that resemble something
in me? Softly, [M.O.A.I.]
-------------------------------------------------------
Mal. M,O,A,I. This simulation is not as the former:
and yet to crush this a little, it would bow to mee, for *EVERy*
one of these Letters are in my name. Soft, here followes
prose: If this fall into thy hand, revolve. In my stars
I am above thee, but be not affraid of greatnesse: Some
are become great, some atcheeves greatnesse, and some
have greatnesse thrust uppon em. Thy fates open theyr
hands, let thy blood and spirit embrace them, and to inure
thy selfe to what thou art like to be: cast thy humble
slough, and appeare fresh. Be opposite with a kinsman,
surly with servants: Let thy tongue tang arguments of
state; put thy selfe into the tricke of singularitie.
Shee thus advises thee, that sighes for thee.
.......................................................
Remember who commended thy yellow stockings, and wi{S}h'd
to see thee *EVER* cros(S)e garter'd: I say remember,

goe [T]oo, tho[U] art ma[D]e if th[O]u desi[R]'st to be so:

If not, let me see th{E}e a *{STEWA}RD* s(T)ill,

the fellow of servants, and not {W}oorthie to touch
Fortunes fingers Farewell, Shee th{A}t would alt(E)r
services with thee, the fortunate unhappy daylight and
champian discovers not more: This is open, I (W)ill bee
proud, I will reade politicke Authours, I will baffle
Sir Toby, I will wash off grosse acqu(A)int{A}nce,
I {W}ill b{E} poin{T} devi{S}e, the VERy man.
.......................................................
{STEWA} -5, 44, 83 : Prob. in full speech ~ 1 in 3450
[TUDOR] 6 : Prob. in center of 3{STEWA}s ~ 1 in 1000
.......................................................
I do not now foole my selfe, to let imagination iade mee;
for *EVERy* reason excites to this, that my Lady loves me.
She did commend my yellow stockings of late,
shee did praise my legge being crosse-garter'd,
and in this she manifests her selfe to my love, &
with a kinde of iniunction drives mee to these habites of
her liking. I thanke my starres, I am happy: I will bee
strange, stout, in yellow stockings, and crosse Garter'd,
even with the swiftnesse of putting on. Iove, and my
starres be praised. Heere is yet a postscript. Thou canst
not choose but know who I am. If thou entertainst my love, let
it appeare in thy smiling, thy smiles become thee well. Therefore
in my presence still smile, deero my sweete, I prethee. Iove
I thanke thee, I will smile, I wil do *EVERy* thing that thou
wilt have me.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
[MA]LVOL[IO]: *M, O, A, I* ; this simulation is not as the former;
. and yet, to crush this a little, it would bow to me,
. for EVERy one of these letters are in my name.
................................................................
*VOLL* : full, fraught, plenteous, replete (German)
.
*MOAI* : *BEAUTIFUL* (Frisian: A West Germanic language spoken
in the *NORTHWESTERN NETHERLANDS* ; a near relative of English.)
................................................................
OLIVIA: O, what a deal of scorn looks *BEAUTIFUL*
_____ In the contempt and anger of his lip!
.
<< *MOAI* are monolithic human figures carved from rock on
Easter Island, between 1250 & 1500 CE. Easter Island was
found and named by its first recorded European visitor,
the *DUTCH* explorer Jacob Roggeveen in 1722.>>
---------------------------------------------------
Metamorphoses, by Ovid, , tr John Dryden, [1717]
.
*A PARTRIDGE* , from a neighb'ring stump, beheld
The sire his monumental marble build;
Who, with peculiar call, and flutt'ring wing,
Chirpt joyful, and malicious seem'd to sing:
The only bird of all its kind, and late
.*TRANSFORM'd in pity to a FEATHER'd state* :
From whence, O Daedalus, thy guilt we date.
His sister's son, when now twelve years were past,
Was, with his uncle, as a scholar plac'd;
The unsuspecting mother saw his parts,
And genius fitted for the finest arts.
This soon appear'd; for when the spiny bone
In fishes' backs was by the stripling known,
A rare *INVENTION* thence he learnt to draw,
*FIL'D TEETH* in ir'n, and made the grating SAW.
He was the first, that from a knob of brass
Made two strait arms with widening stretch to pass;
That, while one stood upon the center's place,
The other round it drew a circling space.
*Daedalus *ENVY'd this* , and from the top
Of fair MINERVA's TEMPLE let him drop;
Feigning, that, as he lean'd upon the tow'r,
Careless he stoop'd too much, and tumbled o'er.
The Goddess, who th' ingenious still befriends,
On this occasion her asssistance lends;
His arms with FEATHERs, as he fell, she *VEILS* ,
And in the air a new made bird he sails.
The QUICKness of his GENIUS, once so fleet,
Still in his wings remains, and in his feet:
Still, tho' *TRANSFORM'd* , his ancient name he keeps,
And with low flight the new-shorn stubble sweeps,
Declines the lofty trees, and thinks it best
To brood in HEDGE-rows o'er its humble nest;
And, in remembrance of the former ill,
Avoids the heights, and precipices still.
------------------------------------------------------------
*VERANDEREN* : *TO CHANGE* , *TO ALTER*, *TO TRANSFORM* (Dutch)
*VERANDERDE* : *CHANGED* , *ALTERED*, *TRANSFORMED* (Dutch)
--------------------------------------------------------
POvidius Naso, Metamorphoses Book 8
.
Hunc miseri tumulo ponentem corpora nati
garrula limoso prospexit ab elice *PERDIX*
et plausit pennis testataque gaudia cantu est,
unica tunc volucris nec visa prioribus annis,
factaque nuper avis longum tibi, Daedale, crimen.
namque huic tradiderat, fatorum ignara, docendam
progeniem germana suam, natalibus actis
bis puerum senis, animi ad praecepta capacis;
ille etiam medio spinas in pisce notatas
traxit in exemplum ferroque incidit acuto
perpetuos dentes et serrae repperit usum;
primus et ex uno duo ferrea bracchia nodo
vinxit, ut aequali spatio distantibus illis
altera pars staret, pars altera duceret orbem.
Daedalus invidit sacraque ex arce MINERVAE
praecipitem misit, lapsum mentitus; at illum,
quae favet ingeniis, excepit *PALLAS* avemque
reddidit et medio velavit in aere pennis,
sed vigor ingenii quondam velocis in alas
inque pedes abiit; nomen, quod et ante, remansit.
non tamen haec alte volucris sua corpora tollit,
nec facit in ramis altoque cacumine nidos:
propter humum volitat ponitque in saepibus ova
antiquique memor metuit sublimia casus.
--------------------------------------------------------
POvidius Naso, Metamorphoses Book 8 (ed Arthur Golding)
.
And as he of his wretched sonne the corse in ground did hide,
The cackling *PARTRICH* from a thicke and leavie thorne him spide,
And clapping with his wings for joy aloud to call began.
There was of that same kinde of Birde no mo but he as than
In times forepast had none bene seeneIt was but late anew
Since he was made a bird: and that thou, Daedalus, mayst rew:
For whyle the world doth last thy SHAME shall thereupon ensew.
For why thy sister, *IGNORANT* of that which after hapt,
Did put him to thee to be taught full twelve yeares old and apt
To take instructionHe did marke the middle bone that goes
Through fishes, and according to the paterne tane of those
He *FILED* teeth upon a piece of yron one by one
And so devised first the SAW where erst was nEVER none.
Moreover he two yron shankes so joynde in one round head,
That opening an indifferent space, the one point downe shall tread,
And tother draw a circle round The finding of these things,
The spightfull HEART of DaEDALUS with such a malice stings,
That headlong from the holy towre of *PALLAS* downe he thrue
His Nephew, feyning him to fall by chaunce, which was *NOT TRUE* .
But PALLAS (WHO DOTH FAVOUR WITS) did stay him in his fall
And *CHAUNGING* him into a Bird did clad him over all
With FETHERS soft amid the Aire The QUICKnesse of his WIT
(Which erst was SWift) did shed it selfe among his wings and feete.
And as he *PARTRICH* hight before, so hights he *PARTRICH* still.
Yet mounteth not this Bird aloft ne seemes to have a will
To build hir nest in tops of trees among the boughes on hie
But flecketh nere the ground and layes hir egges in HEDGES drie.
And forbicause hir former fall she ay in minde doth beare,
She EVER since all lofty things doth warely shun for *FEARE* .
-------------------------------------------
http://shakespeare.palomar.edu/life.htm

<<DrSchoenbaum, in his famous Shakespeare's Lives, described
the section of his book devoted to anti-Stratfordian authorship
("Part VI: Deviations") as " ...the cruelest *ENDEAVOR* I have
*EVER CONFRONTED* ....The voluminousness of output is matched
only by the intrinsic insubstantiality of most of it,
two characteristics which together produce an
*OVERPOWERING* effect." (Oxford UPress, 1991, p449).>>
.
___ *ENDEAVOR*
___ *ON A DE VER*
.
___ *EVER CONFRONTED*
___ *CONFRONT DE VERE*

___ *OVERPOWERING*
___ *VERE : POOR WING*
-------------------------------------------------------------
POvidius Naso, Metamorphoses Book 8 (edArthur Golding)
.
The finding of these things,
The spightfull HEART of DaEDALUS with such a malice stings,
That headlong from the holy towre of *PALLAS* downe he thrue
His Nephew, feyning him to fall by chaunce, which was *NOT TRUE* .
But PALLAS (WHO DOTH FAVOUR WITS) did stay him in his fall
And *CHAUNGING* him into a Bird did clad him over all
With *FETHERS soft amid the Aire* The QUICKnesse of his WIT
(Which erst was SWift) did shed it selfe among his wings and feete.
......................................................
*FLEDGE* , afurnished with FEATHERS or wings; able to fly.
--------------------------------------------------------------
_ TOTH [E] O [N] LIEB[E]GETTEROFTHESEIN
__ SVIN [G] S [O] NNET[ß]MRWHALLHAPPINES
_ SEAN [D] T [H] ATET[E]RNITIEPROMISEDB
_ YOVR [E] V [E] RLIV(I)NGPOETWISHETHTH
_ EWEL [L] W (I) SHIN[G]ADVENTURERINSET
___ TING [F] O [R] TH
.
probability of *FLEDGE* : 1 / 25,500
http://www.stromsborg.com/swanmyths/greeks.htm
-------------------------------------------------------
http://www.webcom.com/shownet/medea/bulfinch/bull20.html
.
<<DaEDALUS was so proud of his achievements that he could not bear
the idea of a rivalHis sister had placed her son *TALOS* under
his charge to be taught the mechanical arts*TALOS* was an apt
scholar & gave striking evidences of ingenuityWALKING ON THE
SEASHORE he picked up the spine of a fishImitating it,
he took a piece of iron and notched it on the edge,
and thus invented the *HANDSAW*
.
He, put two pieces of IRON together, connecting them at
one end with a rivet, and sharpening the other ends, and made
a pair of *COMPASSES* DaEDALUS was so ENVIOUS of his nephew's
performances that he took an opportunity, when they were
together one day on the top of a high tower to push him off.
But *MINERVA* , who favours ingenuity, saw him falling, and
arrested his FATE by changing him into a bird called after
his name, the *PARTRIDGE* This bird does not build
his nest in the trees, nor take lofty flights,
but nestles in the HEDGES, and avoids high places.>>
------------------------------------------------------------
probability of *TALOS* (Greek: *SUFFERER* ) acrostic~ 1/1,235
..........................................
[T]o draw no *ENVY* (Shakespeare) on thy name,
[A]m I thus ample to thy Booke, and Fame;
[W]hile I confesse thy writings to be such,
[A]s neither Man, nor Muse, can PRAISE too much.
[T]is *TRUE* , and all men's *SUFFRAGE* But these wayes
Were not the paths I meant unto thy PRAISE;
For SEEliest *IGNORANCE* on these may light,
Which, when it sounds at best, but *ECCHO's right* ;
.........
[T]o life againe, to heare thy Buskin tread,
[A]nd SHAKE a stage : Or, when thy sockes were on,
[L]eave thee alone, for the comparison
[O]f all, that insolent GREECE, or haughtie Rome
[S]ent FORTH, or since did from their ASHES come.
.........
And such wert thouLooke how the fathers face
Lives in his issue, even so, the race
Of Shakespeares minde, and manners brightly shines
In his well toned, and *TRUE-filed lines*:
In each of which, he seemes to *SHAKE a LANCE* ,
As brandish't at the eyes of *IGNORANCE* -- Ben Jonson
---------------------------------------------------------
HAMLET: I know a HAWK from a HANDSAW.
______ *HANDSAW* = *TRUE-filed Lance*
--------------------------------------------------------------
Telling a HAWK ("DaEDALUS/Arthur Golding's" Ovid translation)
from a HANDSAW (nephew TALOS/Vere 's Ovid translation)
-----------------------------------------------------------
. Francis Meres *Palladis Tamia* (1598).
. http://daphne.palomar.edu/shakespeare/meres.htm
.
"so the sweet wittie soule of *OVID* lives
in MELLIFLUOUS & honytongued Shakespeare,
witnes his Venus and Adonis, his Lucrece,
his sugred Sonnets among his private frinds, &c.
.
I say that the Muses would speak with Shakespeares
*FINE FILED phrase* , if they would speake English."
...........................................................
POvidius Naso, Metamorphoses Book 8
edArthur Golding (i.e., nephew Edward de Vere)
.
Did put [ *TALOS* ] to thee to be taught full twelve yeares old
and apt To take instructionHe did marke the middle bone that
goes Through fishes, and according to the paterne tane of
those He *FILED teeth* upon a piece of yron one by one
And so devised first the SAW where erst was nEVER none.
----------------------------------------------------------
_____________ <= 19 =>
........................................................
. TOTHEO_ [N] liE _ BE (G) ____ ETTERO
. FTHESE__- [I] nS - UIN (G) ____ SONNET
. SMrWha__- [L] LH_ [a] P <P> I_ [N] ESSEA
. NDthat____[E] T _ [E|r] - N <I> T__ [I] EPROM
. ISEDB Y O u ___ [R|e] V <E> R- [L] IVING
. POEtW I s h ____ [E|t] _ H [T] H__ [E] WELLW
. IShIN-(G)a ____ [d V e] N [T] u ______ ReRINS
. EtTIN (G)fort----______ H [T] t
............................................................
*ARETE*, n[F., lit., a sharp fish bone, ridge, sharp edge.]
-----------------------------------------------------------
*the Turtle an[d Phoenix]* Version II
......................................
. Let the bird of loudest lay,
. On the sole Arabian tree,
. Herald sad and trumpet be,
. To whose sound cha(S)te wings obey.
. But tho(U) shrieking harbinge(R),
. Foul precurrer of th(E) fiend,
. Augur of the fe(V)er's end,
. To this troup(E) come thou not near!
......................................
___ <= 18 =>
.
. L e t t h e b i r d o f l o u d e s
. t l a y,O n t h e s o l e A r a b i
. a n t r e e, H e r a l d s a d a n d
. t r u m p e t b e,T o w h o s e s o
. u n d c h a (S) t e w i n g s o b e y.
. B u t t h o (U) s h r i e k i n g h a
. r b i n g e (R),F o u l p r e c u r r
. e r o f t h (E) f i e n d,A u g u r o
. f t h e f e (V) e r's e n d,T o t h i
. s t r o u p (E) c o m e t h o u n o t
. n e a r!

{E.VERUS} 18 : (Oxford's Latin name)
. Prob. at start ~ 1 in 6,860
......................................
. Fro{M} this se{S}sion in{T}erdict
. {E}very fo{W}l of ty{RA}nt wing,
. Save the eagle, feather'd king:
. Keep the obsequy so strict.
. Let the priest in surplice white,
. That defunctive music can,
. Be the death-divining swan,
. Lest the requ[I]em lack {H}i[S] righ{T}.
. And [T]ho{U} trebl[E]-{D}ated c{RO|W],
. That thy s[A]ble gende[R] makest
. Wi[T]h the breath thou givest and takest,
. 'Mongst our mourners shalt thou go.
......................................
. <= 8 =>
.
. F r o{M}t
. h i s s e{S}s i
. o n i n{T}e r d
. i c t{E}v e r y
. f o{W}l o f t y
. {R A}n t w i n g,
. S a v e t h e e
. a g l e,f e a t
. h e r'd k i n g:
. K e e p t h e o
. b s e q u y s o
. s t r i c t.L e
. t t h e p r i e
. s t i n s u r p
. l i c e w h i t
. e,T h a t d e f
. u n c t i v e m
. u s i c c a n,B
. e t h e d e a t
. h-d i v i n i n
. g s w a n,L e s
. t t h e r e q u
. [I]e m l a c k{H}
. i[S]r i g h{T}A
. n d[T]h o{U}t r
. e b l[E|D}a t e
. d c{R O|W]T h a
. t t h y s[A]b l
. e g e n d e[R]m
. a k e s t W i[T]
. h t h e b r e a
. t h t h o u g i
. v e s t a n d t
. a k e s t,
.
[I.STEWART] 9 Prob. ~ 1 in 137,000
{M.STEWA/R} 7
{H.TUDO/R} 7

I(ames) STEWART (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625)
M(ary) STEWART, Queen of Scots (8 Dec. 1542 – 8 Feb. 1587) mom
H(enry) TUDOR (28 Jan. 1457 – 21 Apr. 1509) great-grandfather
......................................
. Whereupon it made this threne
. To the phoenix and the dove,
. Co-su(P)remes (A)nd sta(R)s of lo(V)e,
. As ch(O)rus to their tragic scene.
......................................
___ <= 6 =>
.
. C o- s u (P) r
. e m e s (A) n
. d s t a (R) s
. o f l o (V) e,
. A s c h (O) r
. u s t o t h
. e i r t r a
. g i c s c e
. n e.
.
(PARVO) 6 : (Rutland/Manners' motto)
. Prob. at end ~ 1 in 15,000
.......................................
the Phoenix [and Turtle]

[and Turtle]
[et rutland]
--------------------------------------------
. KJV EZEKIEL 41
.
4-6 So he measured the length thereof, twenty cubit[S]; and the

breadth, twenty cubits, before [T]he temple: and he said unto me,

This is th[E] most holy place. After he measured the [W]all of
the house, six cubits; and the breadth of every side chamber,
four cubits, [R]ound about the house on every side. And [T]he
side chambers were three, one over another, and thirty in order;

[STEWART] 32 : shortest positive skip in modern KJV
---------------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/zv93mdf
.
_The MINERVA BRITANNA_ Banner Folding clearly demonstrates
how the Equidistant Linear Sequence decoding is to be performed:
..........................................................
"all thinges perish and come to theyr last end, but workes
of learned WITS & monuments of Poetry abide *for EVER* ."
......................................................
_______ <= 7 =>
.
. [V] I {V} I T U R
. [I] N G {E} N I O
. [C] Æ (T) E {R} A M
. [O] R (T) I S {E} R
. [U N T]
.
{VERE} 8
[VICOU/NT] 7
.
Key?: Triple (T)AU & first word
......................................................
1579: Dedication to Oxford in the only edition of
. Geoffrey Gates' The Defence of Militarie profession.
.
. TO THE RIGHT honorable, Edward de \VERE\, Earle of
. Oxenford, [VICOUNT] Bulbecke, Lord of Escales
. and Baldesmere, and Lord great Chamberlaine of England.
----------------------------------------------------------
Shakespearean tragedies based on Plutarch:
......................................
Antony and Cleopatra
Timon of Athens
Iulius Caesar
Coriolanus
................................................
Plutarch's Lives Englished by Sir THOMAS NORTH
in Ten Volumes, Vol. 5 *LYSANDER* (1595)

http://tinyurl.com/qal8ahq

To him selfe they sent immediately that which they call Scytala...
The Scytala is in this sort. When the Ephori doe send a Generall,
or an Admirall to the warres, they cause two litle round staues
to be made [etc.]... These two litle staues they call Scytales.
Ibid., This litle scrowle of parchment also is called
as the rowle of wodde, Scytala.
...........................................................
<<The *SCYTALE* is the oldest known military ciphering method.
In the year 404 B.C. only one of five messengers survived the
grueling march from Persia back to the Spartan general *LYSANDER*.
The messenger gave *LYSANDER* his belt and *LYSANDER* winded his
belt around the so-called *SCYTALE*. Thus he was informed that
the Persians planned an attack, he prepared for this attack
and was able to fend it successfully.>> - Simon Singh

http://tinyurl.com/l4b4rvk
...........................................................
HERMIA: *LYSANDER RIDDLES VERy* prettily:
. Now much beshrew my MANNERS and my pride,
. If Hermia meant to say *LYSANDER LIED*.
---------------------------------------------------------
*LYSANDER RIDDLES VERy* prettily: A Midsummer Night's Dream: II, ii
...........................................................
Hoyday, a *RIDDLE*! neither good nor bad! King Richard III: IV, iv
His currish *RIDDLES* sort not with this place. King Henry VI, part III: V, v
Upon this *RIDDLE* runs the wisdom of the world. Measure for Measure: III, ii
Some enigma, some *RIDDLE*: Love's Labour's Lost: III, i
No enigma, no *RIDDLE*, no l'envoy; Love's Labour's Lost: III, i
But *RIDDLE-like* lives sweetly where she dies! All's Well that Ends Well: I, iii
So there's my *RIDDLE*: one that's dead is quick: All's Well that Ends Well: V, iii
You have not the book of *RIDDLES* Merry Wives of Windsor: I, i
Book of *RIDDLES*! why, did you not lend it to alice Merry Wives of Windsor: I, i
In *RIDDLES* and affairs of death; Macbeth: III, v
...........................................................
A fustian *RIDDLE*! Twelfth Night: II, v
-------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-03-03 00:51:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Don,
Are you taking oVER from liddle [sic]
Is English your native tongue, Art?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Marco so Lea can go back to school?
Your Petulant Paranoid persona is getting out of hand, Art!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
--------------------------------------------
<<We wait for your crypto-analysis of The Fairy Queen, rendering it
understandable to we who follow the VERE trail wherever it goes,
discovering his virtues in an ideal knight, that take him before QE.
That is, of course, unless you find Spenser has embedded a knight in
FQ with de Vere's dubious virtues in some disguise, like yellow
stockings.>>
[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. Don Quixote by Cervantes - Translated by John Ormsby
. ( PART 2 - CHAPTER 18 )
.
<<They led Don Quixote into a room, and Sancho removed his armour,
leaving him in loose [*YELLOW*] WALLOON
Huh? What you are talking about, Art? Ormsby's translation does *not* have the word "yellow" here, as you could easily check at

http://cervantes.tamu.edu/english/ctxt/DQ_Ormsby/part2_DQ_Ormsby.html

if you could read English.

MoreoVER, why have you emphasized "Walloon", Art? Ormsby's translation does not emphasize the word. Are you under the impression that the word "Walloon" has anything whateVER to do with the word "yellow"?!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
breeches and chamois-leather
doublet, all stained with the rust of his armour; his collar was a
falling one of scholastic cut, without starch or lace, his buskins
buff-coloured, and his shoes polished.>>
..........................................
Don Quixote beheld his opposite, and perceived that his helmet was on
and drawn, so that he could not see his face ; but he saw that he was
well set in his body, though not tall
: upon his armour he wore an upper garment or cassock, to see to, of
pure cloth of gold, with many moons of shining looking-glasses spread
about it, which made him appear VERy
brave and gorgeous ; a great plume of green feathers waved about his
helmet, with others white and *YELLOW* ; his lance, which he had
reared up against a tree, was VERy long and
thick, and with a steel pike above a handful long.
Huh? From what text do you purport to be quoting now, Art?

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
{STEWA} -5,
"STEWA [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Metamorphoses, by Ovid, , tr John Dryden, [1717]
.
*A PARTRIDGE* , from a neighb'ring stump, beheld
The sire his monumental marble build;
Who, with peculiar call, and flutt'ring wing,
The only bird of all its kind, and late
From whence, O Daedalus, thy guilt we date.
His sister's son, when now twelve years were past,
Was, with his uncle, as a scholar plac'd;
The unsuspecting mother saw his parts,
And genius fitted for the finest arts.
This soon appear'd; for when the spiny bone
In fishes' backs was by the stripling known,
A rare *INVENTION* thence he learnt to draw,
*FIL'D TEETH* in ir'n, and made the grating SAW.
He was the first, that from a knob of brass
Made two strait arms with widening stretch to pass;
That, while one stood upon the center's place,
The other round it drew a circling space.
*Daedalus *ENVY'd this* , and from the top
Of fair MINERVA's TEMPLE let him drop;
Feigning, that, as he lean'd upon the tow'r,
Careless he stoop'd too much, and tumbled o'er.
The Goddess, who th' ingenious still befriends,
On this occasion her asssistance lends;
His arms with FEATHERs, as he fell, she *VEILS* ,
And in the air a new made bird he sails.
The QUICKness of his GENIUS, once so fleet,
Still, tho' *TRANSFORM'd* , his ancient name he keeps,
And with low flight the new-shorn stubble sweeps,
Declines the lofty trees, and thinks it best
To brood in HEDGE-rows o'er its humble nest;
And, in remembrance of the former ill,
Avoids the heights, and precipices still.
Was there supposed to have been any point to the above effusion of asinine anthologizing, Art? If so, what was it? Why do you emphasize randomly chosen words like "feather", "teeth", "invention", etc.? All are commonplace English words, although doubtless unfamiliar to you.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
POvidius [sic] Naso, Metamorphoses Book 8 (ed Arthur Golding)
.
And as he of his wretched sonne the corse in ground did hide,
The cackling *PARTRICH* from a thicke and leavie thorne him spide,
And clapping with his wings for joy aloud to call began.
There was of that same kinde of Birde no mo but he as than
In times forepast had none bene seeneIt was but late anew
For whyle the world doth last thy SHAME shall thereupon ensew.
For why thy sister, *IGNORANT* of that which after hapt,
Did put him to thee to be taught full twelve yeares old and apt
To take instructionHe did marke the middle bone that goes
Through fishes, and according to the paterne tane of those
He *FILED* teeth upon a piece of yron one by one
And so devised first the SAW where erst was nEVER none.
Moreover he two yron shankes so joynde in one round head,
That opening an indifferent space, the one point downe shall tread,
And tother draw a circle round The finding of these things,
The spightfull HEART of DaEDALUS with such a malice stings,
That headlong from the holy towre of *PALLAS* downe he thrue
His Nephew, feyning him to fall by chaunce, which was *NOT TRUE* .
But PALLAS (WHO DOTH FAVOUR WITS) did stay him in his fall
And *CHAUNGING* him into a Bird did clad him over all
With FETHERS soft amid the Aire The QUICKnesse of his WIT
(Which erst was SWift) did shed it selfe among his wings and feete.
And as he *PARTRICH* hight before, so hights he *PARTRICH* still.
Yet mounteth not this Bird aloft ne seemes to have a will
To build hir nest in tops of trees among the boughes on hie
But flecketh nere the ground and layes hir egges in HEDGES drie.
And forbicause hir former fall she ay in minde doth beare,
She EVER since all lofty things doth warely shun for *FEARE* .
Was there supposed to have been any point to the above effusion of asinine anthologizing, Art? If so, what was it? Why do you emphasize randomly chosen words like "saw", "heart", "partrich", etc.? All are commonplace English words, although doubtless unfamiliar to you.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<DrSchoenbaum [sic], in his famous Shakespeare's Lives, described
the section of his book devoted to anti-Stratfordian authorship
("Part VI: Deviations") as " ...the cruelest *ENDEAVOR* I have
*EVER CONFRONTED* ....The voluminousness of output is matched
only by the intrinsic insubstantiality of most of it,
two characteristics which together produce an
*OVERPOWERING* effect." (Oxford UPress, 1991, p449).>>
.
[...]
___ *EVER CONFRONTED*
___ *CONFRONT DE VERE*
INIPNC score 6/14, less than 50%, and hence inadmissible, by your own announced standards, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
___ *OVERPOWERING*
___ *VERE : POOR WING*
INIPNC score 4/12, less than 50%, and hence inadmissible, by your own announced standards, Art. Besides, "Vere: poor wing" is moronic nonsense.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
[T]o draw no *ENVY* (Shakespeare) on thy name,
[A]m I thus ample to thy Booke, and Fame;
[W]hile I confesse thy writings to be such,
[A]s neither Man, nor Muse, can PRAISE too much.
[T]is *TRUE* , and all men's *SUFFRAGE* But these wayes
"TAWAT [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 8 =>
.
. F r o{M}t
. h i s s e{S}s i
. o n i n{T}e r d
. i c t{E}v e r y
. f o{W}l o f t y
. {R A}n t w i n g,
. S a v e t h e e
. a g l e,f e a t
. K e e p t h e o
. b s e q u y s o
. s t r i c t.L e
. t t h e p r i e
. s t i n s u r p
. l i c e w h i t
. e,T h a t d e f
. u n c t i v e m
. u s i c c a n,B
. e t h e d e a t
. h-d i v i n i n
. g s w a n,L e s
. t t h e r e q u
. [I]e m l a c k{H}
. i[S]r i g h{T}A
. n d[T]h o{U}t r
. e b l[E|D}a t e
. d c{R O|W]T h a
. t t h y s[A]b l
. e g e n d e[R]m
. a k e s t W i[T]
. h t h e b r e a
. t h t h o u g i
. v e s t a n d t
. a k e s t,
.
[...]
{M.STEWA/R} 7
The string "MSTEWAR [sic]" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 7 -- or indeed, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip, for that matter -- in the above text, Art. Even if it did, it would be an idiotic observation, since "MSTEWAR [sic]" is moronic nonsense.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
{H.TUDO/R} 7
The string "HTUDOR" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 7 -- or indeed, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip, for that matter -- in the above text, Art.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_______ <= 7 =>
.
. [V] I {V} I T U R
. [I] N G {E} N I O
. [C] Æ (T) E {R} A M
. [O] R (T) I S {E} R
. [U N T]
.
{VERE} 8
[VICOU/NT] 7
The string "VICOUNT" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 7 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
-------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
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