Discussion:
The buskind Muse, the Com[M]icke Queene
(too old to reply)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-03-26 03:47:43 UTC
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Raw Message
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http://internetshakespeare.uvic.ca/doc/Pref_F3/complete/
Prefatory Materials (Folio 3, 1664)
............................................
On worthy Mr. SHAKESPEARE, and his Poems.
.
A Mind reflecting ages past, whose clear
And equal surface can make things appear
Distant a Thousand years, and represent
Them in their lively colours just extent.
To out-run hasty Time, retrive the Fates,
Rowle back the Heavens, blow ope the Iron Gates
Of Death and Lethe, where (confused) lie
Great heaps of ruinous Mortality.
In that deep du{S}k{I}e {D}u{N}g{E}on of discern
A Royal Ghost from Churles; By art to learn
The Physiognomie of shades, and give
Them suddain birth, wondring how oft they live.
.
{SIDNE} 2
................................................
This and much more which cannot be exprest,
But by himself, his tongue and his own brest, [brain
Was Shak[E]speares freehold, which his cunning
Improv'd by favour of the [N]i[N|E}-fold train.
The Buskin'd Muse, the Comick Quee{N}, the grand
An[D] low[D]er tone of *CLIO*; nimble han{D},
And nimbler foot of the melod[I]ous pa[I]r,
The S{I}lver voiced Lady; the most fair
Calliope, who{S}e [S]peaking [S]ilence daunts.
.................................................................
. <= 52 =>
.
. W a s S h a k[E]s p e a resf r eeholdwhichhis c unningImprovdb y favou
. r o f t h e[N]i[N|E}f o ldtr a inTheBuskindMu s etheComickQuee{N}thegr
. a n d A n[D]l o w[D]e r tone o fCLIOnimblehan{D}Andnimblerfoot o fthem
. e l o d[I]o u s p a[I]r TheS{I}lvervoicedLady t hemostfairCall i opewh
. o{S}e [S]p e a k i n g[S] ilen c edaunts
.
[SIDNE] -51,-53
.................................................................
. <= 36 =>
.
. I m p r o v'd b y f a v o u r o f t h e[N]i[N|E}f o l d t r a i n.T h e
. B u s k i n'd M u s e,t h e C o m i c k Q u e e{N}t h e g r a n d A n[D]
. l o w[D]e r t o n e o f*C L I O*n i m b l e h a n{D}A n d n i m b l e r
. f o o t o f t h e m e l o d[I]o u s p a[I]r T h e S{I}l v e r v o i c e
. d L a d y;t h e m o s t f a i r C a l l i o p e,w h o{S}e[S]p e a k i n
. g[S]i l e n c e d a u n t s.
.
{SIDNE} -37 : Prob. of 3 close [SIDNE]s in poem ~ 1 in 45,000
...............................................................
The friendly admirer of his Endowments, J. M. S.
------------------------------------------------------------
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/eulogies.html

The Second Folio of Shakespeare's works (1632), in addition to the
eulogies from the First Folio, contains three additional ones. The
first of these, "An Epitaph on the admirable Dramaticke Poet, W.
Shakespeare," was unsigned in the Folio, but later appeared in John
Milton's 1645 Poems with the date 1630. The second eulogy, also
unsigned, is entitled "Upon the Effigies of my *WORTHy* Friend,
the Author Maister William Shakespeare, and his Workes." The 3rd,
signed only with the initials "I.M.S.," is a well-written 77-line
poem called "On *WORTHy* Master Shakespeare and his Poems."
.....................................
http://blog.iloveshakespeare.com/?page_id=49

On *WORTHy* Master Shakespeare and his Poems.

A mind reflecting ages past,whose cleere
And equall surface can make things appeare
Distant a Thousand yeares,and represent
Them in their lively colours,just extent.
To out-run hasty Time, retrive {THE FATES},
Rowle backe the heavens,blow ope the i[R]on gates
Of death and Leth[E]. where (confused) ly[E]
Great heapes of ruino[U]s mortalitie.
In that d[E]epe du{S}k{I}e {D}u{N}g{E}on to [D]iscerne
A royal Ghost[E] from Churles; By art to learne
The Physiognomie of shades, and give
Them suddaine birth, wondring how oft they live.
..............................................
__________ <= 19 =>
.
. r u n h a s t y T i m e,r e t r i v e
. {T H E F A T E S} R o w l e b a c k e t
. h E h e a v e n s b l o w o p e t h e
. i [R] o n g a t e s O f d e a t h a n d
. L [E] t h e w h e r e c o n f u s e d l
. y [E] G r e a t h e a p e s o f r u i n
. o [U] s m o r t a l i t i e I n t h a t
. d [E] e p e d u{S} k{I}e{D}u{N}g{E}o n t
. o [D] i s c e r n e A r o y a l G h o s
. t [E] f r o m C h u r l e s B y a r t t
. t o l e a r n e
..................................
[E.DE UEER] -19
{SIDNE} 2
--------------------------------------------------
What story coldly tells, what {POETS} faine
At second hand, and picture without braine,
Senselesse and soullesse showes. To give a Stage
(Ample and *TRUE* with life ) voice, action, age,
As Plato`s yeare and new Scene of the world
Them unto us, or us to them had hurld:
To *RAISE* our auncient Soveraignes from their *HERSE* ,
Make Kings his subjects; by exchanging *VERSE*
[E]nli[V]e th[E]ir p[A]le t[R]unk[E]s, that the present ag{E}
Joyes in their joy, and trembles at thei{R} rage:
Yet so to temper passion, that our e{A}res
Take pleasure in their paine: And ey{E}s in teares
Both weepe and smile: fearef{U}ll at plots so sad,
Then, laughing at our f{E}are; abus`d and glad
To be abus`d; affected *WITH THAT TRUTH*
Which we perceive is false; pleas`d in that ruth
..........................................
. <= 33 =>
.
. M a k e K i n g s h i s s u b j e c t s;b y e x c h a n g i n g*V
. E R S E[E]n l i[V] e t h[E]i r p[A]l e t[R]u n k[E]s,t h a t t h e
. p r e s e n t a g {E} J o y e s i n t h e i r j o y,a n d t r e m b
. l e s a t t h e i {R} r a g e:Y e t s o t o t e m p e r p a s s i o
. n,t h a t o u r e {A} r e s T a k e p l e a s u r e i n t h e i r p
. a i n e:A n d e y {E} s i n t e a r e s B o t h w e e p e a n d s m
. i l e:f e a r e f {U} l l a t p l o t s s o s a d,T h e n,l a u g h
. i n g a t o u r f {E} a r e;a b u s`d a n d g l a d T o b e a b u s`
. d;a f f e c t e d *W I T H T H A T T R U T H*

[E.VEARE] 4 : Prob. ~ 1 in 640
{E.UEARE} 33
..........................................
At which we start; and by elaborate play
Tortur`d and tickled; by a crablike way
Time made pastime, and in ugly sort
Disgorging up his ravaine for our sport-
-While the Plebeian *IMPE*, from lofty throne,
Creates and rules a world, and workes upon
Mankind by secret engines; Now to move
A chilling pitty, then a rigorous love:
To strike up and stroake down, both joy and ire;
To steere th'affections; and by heavenly fire
Mould us anew. Stolne from ourselves-
This, and much more which cannot be express`d
But by himself[E], his [T]ong[U]e, an[D] his [O]wn b[R]est,
Was Shakespeare`s freehold; which his cunning braine
Improv`d by favour of the nine-fold traine,
.......................................................
[E.TUDOR] 4
..................................................
The buskind Muse, the Com[M]icke Queene, the grand
And lowder tone of Clio; nimble h[A]nd,
And nimbler foote of the melodious paire,
The silve[R]-voyced Lady the most faire
Calliope, whose speaking s[I]lence daunts,
And she whose prayse the heavenly body c[H]ants.
.....................................................
__________ <= 45 =>

ThebuskindMusetheCom [M] ickeQueenethegrandAndlow
dertoneofClionimbleh_____ [A] ndAndnimblerfooteoftheme
lodiouspaireThesilve______-[R] voycedLadythemostfaireCa
lliopewhosespeakings____ [I] lencedauntsAndshewhosepr
aysetheheavenlybodyc____ [H] ants

MARIH: (Prob. with skip ≤ 45 ~ 1 in 16)
.....................................................
These gently woo`d him, *ENVYING one another* ,
(Obey`d by all as Spouse, but lov`d as brother),
And wrought a curious robe of *SABL[E] GRA[V]E* ,
Fr[E]sh g[R]een[E], and pleasant yellow, red most brave,
.......................................................
[E.VERE] 4 : Prob. with skip ≤ 4 ~ 1 in 59
..................................................
And constant blew, rich purple, guiltlesse white,
The lowly Russet, and the Scarlet bright;
Branch`d and embroidred like the painted Spring,
Each leafe match`d with a flower, and each string
Of golden wire, each line of silke; there run
Italian workes whose thred the Sisters spun;
And there did sing, or seeme to sing, the choyce
Birdes o{F} a forr{A}ine no{T}e and v{A}rious voyce.
.......................................................
{FATA} 6
..................................................
Here hangs a mossey rocke; there playes a faire
But chiding fountaine, purled. Not the ayre,
Nor cloudes nor thunder, but were living drawne,
Not out of common Tiffany or Lawne,
But fine materialls, which the Muses know,
And onely know the countries where they grow.
Now, when they no longer him enjoy,
In mortall garments pent, ` Death may destroy,`
They say, `his body, but his verse shall live,
And more than nature takes, our hands shall give.
In a lesse volume, but more strongly bound,
Shakespeare shall breathe and speak, with Laurell crown`d
Which never fades. Fed with Ambrosian meate
In a well-lyned vesture, *rich and NEATE*.
` So with this robe they cloath him, bid him weare it,
For time shall never staine, nor envy teare it.

The friendly admirer of his *ENDOWMENTS*, -I.M.S.
.......................................................
<< Edward de Vere, only son of John, born the twelfth day of April, Anno 1550,
Earle of Oxenford, High Chamberlain, Lord Bolebec, Sandford and Badlesmere,
Steward of the Forest in Essex, and of the Privy Council to the King Majesty
that now is. Of whom I will only speak what all men's voices confirm: He
was a man in mind and body absolutely accomplished with honorable *ENDOWMENTS*.
He died at his house at Hackney in the month of June, Anno 1604, and
lieth buried at Westminster.>> - Percival Golding's _Arms, honours,
matches, and issues of the antient and illustrious family of *VEER*_
-------------------------------------------------------
. In the court of [E]lizabeth [TUDOR] (July, 1578)
. GABRIEL HARVEY (ROPEMAKER) addresses Edward deVere:
.
<<O great-hearted one, strong in thy mind and thy fiery WILL,
thou wilt conquer thyself, thou wilt conquer others; thy glory
will spread out IN ALL DIRECTIONS BEYOND THE ARCTIC OCEAN>>
.................................................................
<<...as also for the special good favour I bear to Master Frobisher,
. to offer unto you to be an *ADVENTURER* therein for the sum of
. ONE THOUSAND POUNDS or more, if you like to admit thereof,
. which sum or sums upon your certificate of admittance,
. I will enter into bond, From the Court, the 21st of May 1578.
. *Your loving friend* , Edward Oxenford>>
.......................................................................
DON PEDRO: *The sixth of July* : *Your loving friend* , Benedick.
.
. - Much Ado About Nothing Act 1, Scene 1
---------------------------------------------------------
. '[E]dward [VEARE] earl of Oxford',
.
Burial registry: July 6th 1604 (St. GodeliEVE's Day)
................................................
July 6, 1070 - St. GodeliEVE murdered by
. *DROWNING IN A POND* after being strangled into
. unconciousness by her mother-in-law's servants.
--------------------------------------------------------
Rosicrucian/Freemason Checkerboard Arms of Esmé Stewart:
http://tinyurl.com/jzc6t8v
......................................................
.
__ \_*_/
__ _\_/
__ * - X * Edward de Vere, Erle of Oxenford was buryed
__ _/_\ __________ the 6th daye of Julye Å 1604
__ _/ *_\ ____________ [ *St. Godelieve's day* ]
.
<<The strange, large 'X' type symbol appears to have been put there
much later. According to Paul Altrocchi, this must have happened a
many decades later "...since pencils with such a sharp point did
not appear until the late 1600's." It really is anybody's guess
who put it there - perhaps an over-enthusiastic Oxfordian?>>
.
- _The Death of Edward de Vere_ by Michael Llewellyn
----------------------------------------------------------
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/monrefs.html
.
17th-century References to Shakespeare's Stratford Monument
by David Kathman
.
In 1658, two years after the publication of Dugdale's Antiquities of Warwickshire,
Sir Aston Cokain's collection _Small Poems of DI-VERS Sorts_ contained a poem
to Dugdale. It was entitled "To my worthy, and learned Friend Mr. William Dugdale,
upon his Warwickshire Illustrated," and it goes as follows:
.
Now Stratfor[D] upon Avon, we would choose
Thy gentle and ing[E]nious Shakespeare Muse,
(Were he among the li[V]ing yet) to *RAISE*
T' our Antiquaries merit som[E] just *PRAISE*:
And sweet-tongu'd Drayton (that h[A]th given renown
Unto a poor (before) and obscu[R]e town,
Harsull) were he not fal'n into his tomb[E],
Would crown this work with an Encomium.
Our Warwick-shire the Heart of England is,
As you most evidently have proved by this;
Having it with more spirit dignifi'd,
Then all our English Counties are beside.
................................................
[DE VEARE] skip 37 : Prob. ~ 1 in 23,200
-----------------------------------------------------
Decimu{m} Novembr{is} 1590

To the Right honorable S{i}r Christopher Hatton of the moste
noble order of the Garter Knight Lord Chancello{ur} of England

Moste humbly Complayninge Sheweth vnto yo{ur} hono{ur}able Lordship yo{ur}
dayly Orato{ur} Christopher Marshall of Blewlery in the County of Bark'
Esquier executor of the last will & testament of William Marshall Esquier
deceased, That whereas the Right hono{ur}able Edward [DE VEARE] Earle of
Oxford was lawfully seysed in the demesne as of fee or fee tayle of and
in all that Castell of Campes w{i}th all houses edyfic{es} & buylding{es}..
...............................................
Earl of Oxford Documents

http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~ahnelson/DOCS/marsh90.html
-------------------­-----------------------­---------
20 May, 1857: Release of Hans Christian Andersen's
_AT VÆRE ELLER IKKE VÆRE_, 1857 - "To Be or Not to Be"
..............................................
. *VAERE* = "to be" (Danish)
. *VEARE* = edward earl of Oxford'
------------------------------------------------------
http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/NORREYS.htm
.
Francis [NORREYS] Born: *July 6* 1582
.
Acceded (1° E. Berkshire): 28 Jan 1620
Died: 29 Jan 1621/2
.
Married: Bridget De VERE 1598
.
Children: Elizabeth NORREYS (Baroness)
.
Notes: by 1621, Elizabeth [NORREYS] was being courted by Edward Wray of the king’s household. The couple were said to be in love. But her father, who had just been created Earl of Berkshire, was making difficulties. For one thing, he was contemplating divorce, which would make Elizabeth illegitimate. For another, Berkshire had elbowed Lord Scrope out of his way when Scrope tried to push in front of him in the House of Lords. Unfortunately, since Prince Charles was in attendance, this was a crime. Berkshire was sent to the Fleet. When he was released, he went home to Rycote and killed himself with a crossbow. As his death was a suicide, his estate was forfeit to the Crown and Elizabeth became the king’s ward. Fearful that she would be forced into a marriage with Christopher Villiers, brother of the king’s favorite, Elizabeth resolved to elope. She was apparently living in, or at least visiting, Phillip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery, who was married to her aunt, Susan de Vere —the likely source of the story that she was his mistress— on 27 Mar 1622 when she crept out and walked three miles to St. Mary Aldermary’s Church to marry Wray. After the ceremony, she went to the Fleet Street house of her uncle, Henry de Vere, Earl of Oxford, for protection. When news of the secret marriage got out, Wray was put under house arrest until Feb of 1623 and lost his post at court. Oxford was sent to the Tower. It is said that the story of the elopement inspired Orlando Gibbons’s Fantazies. It is not clear where Elizabeth was while her new husband was confined to his house, but they were eventually reunited and had a daughter, Bridget.
------------------------------------------------
July 6, 1189 - King Henry II dies
July 6, 1415 - Jan Hus, Bohemian reformer (burned at the stake)
July 6, 1483 - Richard III is crowned king of England.
July 6, 1533 - Ludovico Ariosto dies
July 6, 1535 - Sir Thomas More executed
July 6, 1553 - King Edward VI of England dies
July 6, 1560 - The Treaty of Edinburgh
_______________ is signed by Scotland & England.
July 6, 1609 - Bohemia is granted freedom of religion.
July 6, 1932 - Kenneth Grahame dies
-------------------------------------------------------
<<The Reluctant Dragon is an 1898 children's story by Kenneth Grahame
(originally published as a chapter in his book Dream Days), which
served as the key element to the 1941 feature film with the same name
from Walt Disney Productions. In Grahame's story, a young boy
discovers an erudite, mushroom-loving dragon living in the Downs above
his home. The two become friends, but soon afterwards the dragon is
discovered by the townsfolk, who send for St George to rid them of it.
St George, by this time, is quite elderly and has little interest in
slaying dragons, though he resolves to do it as it is his duty. The
boy introduces St George to the dragon, and the two decide that it
would be better for them not to fight. Eventually, they decide to
stage a fake joust between the two combatants. The dragon appears
to have died, and the townsfolk rejoice (though not all of them, as
some had placed bets on the dragon winning). St George then reveals
that the dragon had not died, and assures the townsfolk that
he is not dangerous. The dragon is then accepted by the people.>>
------------------------------------
Shaksper & Cervantes died on St. George Day 1616
..................................
St. George and the Dragon (Raphael, 1504-1506)
Oil on wood 28,5 × 21,5 cm
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._George_and_the_Dragon_%28Raphael%29
.
<<The St. Michael and St. George and the Dragon in the Louvre, and
this St. George of the National Gallery of Washington, are bound
together both by their subject - an armed youth fighting a dragon -
and by stylistic elements. All three are assigned to the Florentine
period of Raphael and echo those stimuli which the Urbinate received
from the great masters who worked in Florence or whose paintings were
visible there. The influence of Leonardo - whose fighting warriors
from the Battle of Anghiari (1505) in the Palazzo della Signoria
provided an extraordinary example of martial art (the painting
deteriorated very rapidly because of shortcomings in Leonardo's
experimental technique and so is no longer visible) - predominates
in these works. But references to Flemish painting - particularly
that of Hieronymus Bosch (the glaring light and humanoid monsters
which populate the St. Michael are characteristic of Bosch) -
suggest the environment of Urbino,
where Northern influences were still quite vivid.
.
These small panels are indicative of a moment in which
the painter gathers the stylistic fruits of what he
has assimilated so far and, at the same time, poses
pictorial problems which will be developed in the future.
.
The painting used to be a highlight of the Pierre Crozat collection
which was acquired through Diderot's mediation by Catherine II of
Russia in 1772. For a century and a half, the panel hang in the
Imperial Hermitage Museum. It was one of the most popular
paintings in the entire collection of the Tsars. In March 1931
the Bolsheviks sold the painting to Andrew Mellon,
who ceded it to the Washington gallery.>>
-------------------------------------------------------
Gustave Doré's 'tilting at windmills'
.
http://tinyurl.com/2vkaw6
.
may borrow from both Raphael's:
----------------------------
Oxford's son-in-law and probable co-author
of Shakespeare/Quixote died on
St. Michael's day 1642,
(Cervantes 95th birthday?)
..................................
St. Michael (Raphael, c. 1505)
Louvre, Paris : Oil on wood 31 × 27 cm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Michael_(Raphael)

<<In a bleak landscape with the silhouette of a burning city in the
distance, St. Michael has just forced the Devil to the ground and is
about to kill him with a blow from his sword. The monsters crawling
out from all sides are reminiscent of those created by Hieronymus
Bosch, while the figures in the centre recall those from the Inferno
of Dante's epic poem the Divine Comedy. On the left are the
hypocrites in leaden coats, condemned to follow their torturous
path, while on the right are the thieves being tormented by serpents.
.
Raphael's imagination which is particularly developed in the details
of the St. Michael, is more balanced in the figure of the Archangel,
the focus of the entire composition. This sense of balance and
composure is developed further in the other two panels, where the
landscape, still of Umbrian derivation, accentuates the serenity of
the figures, notwithstanding the dramatic character of the subject.>>
-------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-03-26 15:12:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, March 25, 2018 at 11:47:45 PM UTC-4, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
But by himself[E], his [T]ong[U]e, an[D] his [O]wn b[R]est,
Was Shakespeare`s freehold; which his cunning braine
Improv`d by favour of the nine-fold traine,
.......................................................
[E.TUDOR] 4
So now you think (usual disclaimer) that Queen Elizabeth was the author, Art?!

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
July 6, 1070 - St. GodeliEVE murdered by
. *DROWNING IN A POND* after being strangled into
. unconciousness [sic]
Is English your native tongue, Art?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
by her mother-in-law's servants.
--------------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/jzc6t8v
Huh?! What on earth makes you think (usual disclaimer) that those arms are Masonic or Rosicrucian, Art?! There is no Masonic iconography present. MoreoVER, when Rosicrucians use the rose, there is a superimposed cross, which is *not* the case of Esmé Stewart's arms. In fact, *all* the heraldic devices in Esmé Stewart's arms (the roses, the checkerboard, the fleurs de lys, etc.) were *already* present in the arms of the of the Dukes of LennOX (the Stewart/Darnley branch of the family):

http://www.europeanheraldry.org/united-kingdom/families/families-s/house-stuart-darnley/

The date of 1424 given predates the Rosicrucian manifestos by nearly two centuries! Your Chronologically Clueless Cretin persona must not have been satisfied by your Virgil/Herodotus or Aleksandr Nevskii pratfalls, Art.

You would do better to focus on the fleurs de lys, Art -- those are symbols of the Priory of Sion, and the Bloodline. And don't say that I neVER tell you anything useful!

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<The strange, large 'X' type symbol appears to have been put there
much later. According to Paul Altrocchi, this must have happened a
many decades later "...since pencils with such a sharp point did
not appear until the late 1600's." It really is anybody's guess
who put it there - perhaps an over-enthusiastic Oxfordian?>>
Is there any other kind of Oxfordian?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
July 6, 1189 - King Henry II dies
July 6, 1415 - Jan Hus, Bohemian reformer (burned at the stake)
July 6, 1483 - Richard III is crowned king of England.
July 6, 1533 - Ludovico Ariosto dies
July 6, 1535 - Sir Thomas More executed
July 6, 1553 - King Edward VI of England dies
July 6, 1560 - The Treaty of Edinburgh
_______________ is signed by Scotland & England.
July 6, 1609 - Bohemia is granted freedom of religion.
July 6, 1932 - Kenneth Grahame dies
Was there supposed to have been any point to the above effusion of nutcase numerology, Art? If so, what was it?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Gustave Doré's 'tilting at windmills'
.
http://tinyurl.com/2vkaw6
That link doesn't work -- as usual. Don't you eVER check these things prior to your core dumps, Art?!

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
-------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-03-26 15:44:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
But by himself[E], his [T]ong[U]e, an[D] his [O]wn b[R]est,
Was Shakespeare`s freehold; which his cunning braine
Improv`d by favour of the nine-fold traine,
.......................................................
[E.TUDOR] 4
Lea wrote:

<<So now you think Queen Elizabeth was the author, Art?!>>

Ciphered names could be authors
or they could just be the folks being honored.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
July 6, 1070 - St. GodeliEVE murdered by
. *DROWNING IN A POND* after being strangled into
. unconciousness [sic]
Lea wrote: <<Is English your native tongue, Art?>>

O.K., unconsciousness.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
by her mother-in-law's servants.
--------------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/jzc6t8v
Lea wrote:

<<Huh?! What on earth makes you think that those arms are Masonic or Rosicrucian, Art?! There is no Masonic iconography present. MoreoVER, when Rosicrucians use the rose, there is a superimposed cross, which is *not* the case of Esmé Stewart's arms. In fact, *all* the heraldic devices in Esmé Stewart's arms (the roses, the checkerboard, the fleurs de lys, etc.) were *already* present in the arms of the of the Dukes of LennOX (the Stewart/Darnley branch of the family):

http://www.europeanheraldry.org/united-kingdom/families/families-s/house-stuart-darnley/

The date of 1424 given predates the Rosicrucian manifestos by nearly two centuries!>>

So?

Lea wrote:

<<You would do better to focus on the fleurs de lys, Art -- those are symbols of the Priory of Sion, and the Bloodline. And don't say that I neVER tell you anything useful!>>

John Lyly (c. 1553 or 1554 – November 1606) wrote the Canon?



(How can I tell the difference between euphues and effluents?)
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<The strange, large 'X' type symbol appears to have been put there
much later. According to Paul Altrocchi, this must have happened a
many decades later "...since pencils with such a sharp point did
not appear until the late 1600's." It really is anybody's guess
who put it there - perhaps an over-enthusiastic Oxfordian?>>
Is there any other kind of Oxfordian?



Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
July 6, 1189 - King Henry II dies
July 6, 1415 - Jan Hus, Bohemian reformer (burned at the stake)
July 6, 1483 - Richard III is crowned king of England.
July 6, 1533 - Ludovico Ariosto dies
July 6, 1535 - Sir Thomas More executed
July 6, 1553 - King Edward VI of England dies
July 6, 1560 - The Treaty of Edinburgh
_______________ is signed by Scotland & England.
July 6, 1609 - Bohemia is granted freedom of religion.
July 6, 1932 - Kenneth Grahame dies
Lea wrote: <<Was there supposed to have been any point to the
above effusion of nutcase numerology, Art? If so, what was it?>>

St. GodeliEVE's day was an interesting date.

(Are you trying to strangle me into unconsciousness?)
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Gustave Doré's 'tilting at windmills'
.
http://tinyurl.com/2vkaw6
Lea wrote: <<That link doesn't work -- as usual.
Don't you eVER check these things prior to your core dumps, Art?!>>

You are the only reader of this stuff
and will occasionally tell me something useful!
------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-03-28 13:01:43 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
But by himself[E], his [T]ong[U]e, an[D] his [O]wn b[R]est,
Was Shakespeare`s freehold; which his cunning braine
Improv`d by favour of the nine-fold traine,
.......................................................
[E.TUDOR] 4
<<So now you think
Don't forget the usual disclaimer, Art!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Queen Elizabeth was the author, Art?!>>
Ciphered names could be authors
So you DO think (usual disclaimer) that Queen Elizabeth could have been the author, Art?!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
or they could just be the folks being honored.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
July 6, 1070 - St. GodeliEVE murdered by
. *DROWNING IN A POND* after being strangled into
. unconciousness [sic]
Lea wrote: <<Is English your native tongue, Art?>>
O.K., unconsciousness.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
by her mother-in-law's servants.
--------------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/jzc6t8v
<<Huh?! What on earth makes you think that those arms are Masonic or
Rosicrucian, Art?! There is no Masonic iconography present. MoreoVER,
when Rosicrucians use the rose, there is a superimposed cross, which is
*not* the case of Esmé Stewart's arms. In fact, *all* the heraldic
devices in Esmé Stewart's arms (the roses, the checkerboard, the fleurs
de lys, etc.) were *already* present in the arms of the of the Dukes of
http://www.europeanheraldry.org/united-kingdom/families/families-s/house-stuart-darnley/
The date of 1424 given predates the Rosicrucian manifestos by nearly two centuries!>>
So?
So heraldic devices that were in use long before the Rose Croix was can scarcely have been "Rosicrucian", Art! Surely even your Chronologically Clueless Cretin persona can work that out, with a little effort.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<You would do better to focus on the fleurs de lys, Art -- those are symbols of the Priory of Sion, and the Bloodline. And don't say that I neVER tell you anything useful!>>
John Lyly (c. 1553 or 1554 – November 1606) wrote the Canon?
No, Art. William Shakespeare, the actor and shareholder in the company that performed the plays, wrote the canon. You are a VERy slow learner!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
http://youtu.be/eLIUzUnoomY
(How can I tell the difference between euphues and effluents?)
You probably can't, Art; your English is not up to par. For eVERyone else, it's VERy easy.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<The strange, large 'X' type symbol appears to have been put there
much later. According to Paul Altrocchi, this must have happened a
many decades later "...since pencils with such a sharp point did
not appear until the late 1600's." It really is anybody's guess
who put it there - perhaps an over-enthusiastic Oxfordian?>>
Is there any other kind of Oxfordian?
http://youtu.be/wzseIwez8YA
http://youtu.be/zGiq_u48Rec
Enthusiasm and dementia are not mutually exclusive, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
July 6, 1189 - King Henry II dies
July 6, 1415 - Jan Hus, Bohemian reformer (burned at the stake)
July 6, 1483 - Richard III is crowned king of England.
July 6, 1533 - Ludovico Ariosto dies
July 6, 1535 - Sir Thomas More executed
July 6, 1553 - King Edward VI of England dies
July 6, 1560 - The Treaty of Edinburgh
_______________ is signed by Scotland & England.
July 6, 1609 - Bohemia is granted freedom of religion.
July 6, 1932 - Kenneth Grahame dies
Lea wrote: <<Was there supposed to have been any point to the
above effusion of nutcase numerology, Art? If so, what was it?>>
St. GodeliEVE's day was an interesting date.
But you would get comparable results for *ANY* date of the calendar, Art!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
(Are you trying to strangle me into unconsciousness?)
That would be like bringing coals to Newcastle, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Gustave Doré's 'tilting at windmills'
.
http://tinyurl.com/2vkaw6
Lea wrote: <<That link doesn't work -- as usual.
Don't you eVER check these things prior to your core dumps, Art?!>>
You are the only reader of this stuff
If that's the case, then why on earth do you bother, Art?!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
and will occasionally tell me something useful!
What do you mean by "occasionally", Art?! Absolutely *eVERything* that I tell you is useful! For example, because of me, you now know about the existence of branch banks, direct deposit, and the U. S. Postal Service. (One doubts that you have managed to figure out how to *use* any of these modern conveniences, but at least you are now aware of their existence.) Also, if you should eVER find yourself traveling from New Haven to New York City, you now know not to board a nonstop flight from Boston to Los Angeles.

Because of my concern for your linguistic betterment (the optimist in me hopes that you may one day attain modest proficiency in *some* natural language, English included), you now know that _vier_ is not Spanish for "four" (in fact, it isn't even Spanish at all), a datum that might prove useful should you eVER visit the Iberian Peninsula. And you now know that _тæрин_ is not Russian for "youth" (in fact, it isn't even Russian at all), a fact that might prove useful should you eVER cross the Urals.

Because of my concern for your historical education (a Sisyphean task!) you now know that Ann Hathaway was not Shakespeare's mother, that Herodotus flourished nearly half a millennium before Virgil rather than the other way around, and that Aleksandr Nevskii was neVER tsar. You also know now that neither Prince Albert nor Mary Wollstonecraft was born on May 26 -- nor was the Spanish Inquisition, for that matter.

Because of my efforts to help you attain at least a minimal level of scientific and mathematical literacy, you now know which natural numbers are both the sum of two consecutive integers and the difference of their squares. You also know that the expected value of a random variable is not the same things as a sample mean (one doubts that you understand what either of those things actually *is*, but at least you are now aware that they are not the same thing), and you now know that the watt is not a unit of energy.

Because of my tireless efforts to contribute to your literary education, you now know that Wordsworth's poem "The Idiot Boy" was not written by Samuel Taylor Coleridge -- although h.l.a.s.'s Idiot Boy, true to form, repeated that moronic misattribution oVER and oVER and oVER long after it was conclusively refuted. You also know now that _Don Quixote_ was not written in English (and that Shelton's inept English translation contains plenty of hilarious howlers, besides a blithe unawareness of the off-color wordplay in the original Spanish), although as usual h.l.a.s.'s Idiot Boy also repeated *that* moronic misattribution oVER and oVER and oVER long after it was conclusively refuted.

In short, eVERything that I've told you is useful, Art!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-03-28 13:21:02 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Lea wrote: <<That link doesn't work -- as usual.
Don't you eVER check these things prior to your core dumps, Art?!>>
You are the only reader of this stuff
Lea wrote:

<<If that's the case, then why on earth do you bother, Art?!>>

For the same reason that James Comey takes notes.

If you're not working for the Grand Master, then why on earth do you bother, Dave?!

Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-03-29 01:33:59 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Lea wrote: <<That link doesn't work -- as usual.
Don't you eVER check these things prior to your core dumps, Art?!>>
You are the only reader of this stuff
<<If that's the case, then why on earth do you bother, Art?!>>
For the same reason that James Comey takes notes.
James Comey took notes because he didn't trust the Liar-in-Chief, and wanted to be able to report accurately on the content of their meetings should the need arise. As far as I'm aware, Art, you've neVER had the pleasure of an intimate tête-à-tête with the Liar-in-Chief oVER dinner -- unless perhaps you've finally taken my advice and joined his administration! If so, congratulations, Art -- in what capacity? Just don't order too much exorbitantly expensive office furniture, or take any $40,000 flights to Miami at the taxpayers' expense.

Incidentally, Art, if you *do* travel to Miami on goVERnment business, don't board a nonstop flight from Boston to Los Angeles!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
If you're not working for the Grand Master, then why on earth do you bother, Dave?!
Because your Clueless Cretin persona is so VERy *entertaining*, Art -- when you're not posting the same old idiotic crap oVER and oVER and oVER, that is.

Besides, I am, among other things, an educator, and to an educator, you present a unique challenge, Art -- someone who could educate *you* should be able to educate virtually anyone! Lehigh wasn't up to confronting such a daunting challenge (probably wisely), but some of us are made of sterner stuff.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
BCD
2018-04-17 17:05:47 UTC
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Post by nordicskiv2
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Lea wrote: <<That link doesn't work -- as usual.
Don't you eVER check these things prior to your core dumps, Art?!>>
You are the only reader of this stuff
<<If that's the case, then why on earth do you bother, Art?!>>
For the same reason that James Comey takes notes.
James Comey took notes because he didn't trust the Liar-in-Chief, and wanted to be able to report accurately on the content of their meetings should the need arise. As far as I'm aware, Art, you've neVER had the pleasure of an intimate tête-à-tête with the Liar-in-Chief oVER dinner -- unless perhaps you've finally taken my advice and joined his administration! If so, congratulations, Art -- in what capacity? Just don't order too much exorbitantly expensive office furniture, or take any $40,000 flights to Miami at the taxpayers' expense.
Incidentally, Art, if you *do* travel to Miami on goVERnment business, don't board a nonstop flight from Boston to Los Angeles!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
If you're not working for the Grand Master, then why on earth do you bother, Dave?!
Because your Clueless Cretin persona is so VERy *entertaining*, Art -- when you're not posting the same old idiotic crap oVER and oVER and oVER, that is.
Besides, I am, among other things, an educator, and to an educator, you present a unique challenge, Art -- someone who could educate *you* should be able to educate virtually anyone! Lehigh wasn't up to confronting such a daunting challenge (probably wisely), but some of us are made of sterner stuff.
***While the Grand Master, in his care for the greater good, deeply
appreciates Dave's work, it is as gentleman to gentleman, not in any
official capacity. The latest organizational reassessment has brought
about cuts in our hlas-related expenses, leaving but one accredited
worker to gauge and report on the situation; but my interest in and
knowledge about this detail should not be regarded as indicative of
anything but the effect of a completely impersonal curiosity. Despite
the misguided, nay vicious, allegations of those clearly working for The
Other, it is nothing but pure happenstance that my new book

https://www.iuniverse.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-001183284

was published in the last few days; and, of absolutely completely
unrelated interest, Dave, I hope that you have studied with utmost care
the new Table of Ciphers issued recently by the emergency executive junta.

Best Wishes,

--BCD

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