Discussion:
FOR PIETIE
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Arthur Neuendorffer
2016-12-27 11:13:05 UTC
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*GROS(S)ER NAME* : *ENVIOU(S) SLIVER*
*ROGE(R) MANERS* : *NIL VE(R)O VERIUS*
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. . Hamlet (Quarto 2, 1604) Act 4, Scene 7
.
Queen: There is a Willow growes ascaunt the Brooke
. That showes his horry leaues in the glassy streame,
. Therewith FANTASTIQUE gaRLANDs did she make
. Of Crowflowers, Nettles, Daises, and long Purples
. That liberall Shepheards giue a *GROS(S)ER NAME* ,
. But our cull-cold maydes doe dead mens fingers call them.
. There on the pendant boughes her cronet weedes
. Clambring to hang, an *ENVIOU(S) SLIVER* broke,
. When downe her weedy trophies and her selfe
. Fell in the weeping Brooke, her clothes spred wide,
. And Marmaide like awhile they bore her vp,
. Which time she chaunted snatches of old laudes,
. As one incapable of her owne distresse,
. Or like a creature natiue and indewed
. Vnto that elament, but long it could not be
. Till that her garments heauy with theyr drinke,
. Puld the poore wretch from her melodious lay
. To *MUDDy death*.
------------------------------------------------------
https://litimag.oxfordjournals.org/content/11/3/254.full

“Loe, here in one line is his name twice writ”: Anagrams,
Shakespeare's Sonnets, and the Identity of the Fair Friend

R. H. Winnick*

Sonnet 81, uniquely in Q, explicitly assures the Fair Friend that
“Your {NAME} from hence immortall life shall haue,
Though {I} (once gone) to all t[he worl(d mu)st (d)ye].”

Perhaps not by accident, “the world must dye” contains all
the letters needed to form Wriothesley except the first-person
pronoun I, which, once gone, muGraphict cause that word to dye.
..............................................................
[he worl(d mu)st (d)ye]
mu(dd) Wr{I}othesley
----------------------------------------------------
1590 *Faerie Queene* dedication to Queen Elizabeth
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~rbear/fqintro.html
...............................................
______ T{O}
___ THE MOST HIG{H},
_____ MIGHTI{E}
______ an{d}
____ MAGNIFICEN{T}
___ EMPRESSE RENO{W-}
___ MED FOR PIETIE, VE{R-}
___ TUE, AND ALL GRATIOU{S}
___ GOVERNMENT ELIZABETH B{Y}
___ THE GRACE OF GOD QUEEN{E}
___ OF ENGLAND FRAUNCE an{d}
___ {IRELAND} AND OF VIRG{I-}
..............................................
(dd)(*W-R-I-OTHES(L)EY*) Prob. at top ~ 1 in 600
. {Ed.DYER} (H *I STOW*)
. Prob. ~ 1 in 27,000
...............................................
(HISTORI)an (*Iohn STOW*) (1525 - 6 April 1605)
Sir {Ed}Ward {DYER} (1543 - May 1607)
...............................................
___ NIA, DEFENDOUR OF THE
___ FAITH, &. HER MOST
____ HUMBLE SERVANT
____ EDMUND SPENSER
____ DOTH IN ALL HU-
____ MILITIE DEDI-
_____ CATE, PRE-
______ SENT
___ AND CONSECRATE THESE
___ HIS LABOURS TO LIV{É}
___ WITH THE ETERN{I}-
_____ TIE OF HE{R}
______ FAM{E}.
...............................................
{ÉIRE} telestick : Prob. ~ 1 in 1,350
...............................................
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Spenser

<<Edmund Spenser (1553 - 13 January 1599) served under Arthur Grey, 14th Baron Grey de Wilton with Walter Raleigh at the Siege of Smerwick massacre (October 1580). Spenser stayed on in Ireland {i.e., ÉIRE}, having acquired other official posts & lands in the Munster Plantation. Around 1588 Spenser acquired his main estate at Kilcolman in North Cork. He later bought a second holding to the south on a rock overlooking the river Blackwater near a tree, known locally as "Spenser's Oak;" legend has it that he penned some of The Faerie Queene under this tree. In 1590, Spenser travelled to London to publish the first three books of The Faerie Queene. He was successful enough to obtain a life pension of £50 a year from the Queen. His next significant publication boldly antagonised Lord Burghley (William Cecil), through its inclusion of the satirical Mother Hubberd's Tale. He returned to {ÉIRE}.>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 17

WHo will beleeue my verse in time to come
If (IT) were fild with your most high deserts?
Though yet heauen knowes (IT) is but as a tombe

[WHI]ch {H}id[ES YO]u[R L]if[E], and
[SHE WE]s n[OT] {H}a[L]fe [Y]ou[R] parts:
.....................................................
https://litimag.oxfordjournals.org/content/11/3/254.full

{H}[WRIO(T)HESLEY]
{H}[WR(I)OTHESLEY]
.....................................................
If I could write the beauty of your eyes,
And in fresh numbers number all your graces,
The age to come would say this Poet lies,
Such heauenly touches nere toucht earthly faces.

So should my papers (yellowed with their age)
Be scorn'd, like old men of lesse *TRUTH* then <TONG>ue,
And your *TRUE* rights be termd a Poets rage,
And stretched miter of an Antique song.

{The age t[O] come would say this Poet lies,}

[S]uch hea[V]enly touches nere toucht (E)a(R)thly fac[E]s.
{S}o should my papers (yell(O)w(E)d with (T)h[E]ir age)
Be scorn'd, like old m(E)n (O)f less(E) (T[R]UTH) then tongue,
And your {T(R)U(E)} right(S) b[E] termd a Poets rage,
[A]nd stretched mi(T)e[R] of an Antique song.
But were some child[E] of yours aliue that time,

*You should li[V]e twise in it, and in my rime*
....................................................................
__________ <= 32 =>

.{T h e a g e t[O] c o m e\W O U|l d s a y t h i s P o e t l i e s}
. S u c h h e a[V] e n l y t\O U|c h e s n e r e t o u c h t(E)a(R)
. t h l{Y}f a c[E] s.S o s h o\U|l d m y p a p e r s(y e l l(O)w(E)
. d{W}i{T}h{T} h[E] i r a g e)B e s c o r n'd,l i k e o l d m(E)n(O)
. f l{e|S}s{E}(T[R] U T H)t h e n t(O)n g u e,A n d y o u r{T(R)U(E)}
. r i g{H}t{S} b[E] t e r m d a P o(E)t s r a g e,A n d s t r e t c
. h e d m i{T}[E|R] o f a n A n t i q u e s o n g.B u t w e r(E)s o
. m(E)c h i l [D|E](O)f y o u r s a l i v e t h a t t i m e,Y(O)u s
. h(O)u l d l I[V](E)t w i s e i n i t,a n d i n m y r i m e.
.
[DE/VERE] 32 : Prob. at end of Sonnet 17 ~ 1 in 456
[DE/VERE:REEV] 32 : James Ferris find
{TEST} 32
{STY} -32
{HeW} -33
..............................................
{2(E.O.E.R.)'s ? Oxford & Elizabeth Regina ?}
----------------------------------------------------------
_Sonnet 17: the Number 17_ by James Ferris
http://tinyurl.com/zg8nowe

<<The birth imagery in [Sonnet 17] is unmistakable. The fourteen lines are an argument written to someone, urging him (her) to have a child. The punning of Vere’s name in the plaintext is yet another form of echo haunting so much of Shakespeare’s work. The letter-string of “O. Veer, ereV” is a pictorial echo. This is a bit of a stretch, but if the “O” can represent a metaphorical mouth, then one can imagine shouting “Veer” and having it return as an echo would. Furthermore, the “O” can also represent the “O” in “O”xford. Oxford’s father, John, spelled his last name “VEER”. On Edward’s birth notice written by Burghley, the notice acknowledge’s the birth to John of a son, “Edward”. Oxford was born from his father (“VEER”) and lived his life often spelling his surname as “VERE”. If one allows for another way of looking at it, then the “O” can also represent the birth canal, where it then makes sense for “Vere” to be spelled in the direction of a child being born; i.e., born head first–thus “ereV”. The number of the sonnet is 17. 17 is the 17th in a sequence. Edward de Vere was born from the 16th Earl of Oxford, and the argument of de Vere being the 17th Earl, combined with the content of the ‘birth’ of the 17th sonnet, emphases the continuing of the House of Vere genaeology, that of providing an heir, as well as providing a ‘copy’ of oneself in the form of a child. Again, this interpretation is sort of like interpreting a Rorschach picture, or of finding symbolism in a da Vinci painting.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Thompson and Padover 1963) Appendix p.253.

"Authors of the Greek tragedies constructed the first 8 iambic lines
so that they not only made sense but also provided letters to make
eight other iambic lines, the first two giving the writer's {NAME}..."
....................................................................
____ Julius Caesar, Act I Scene 1 (Folio 1, 1623)

Flauius: Hence: h[O]me y[o]u id[L]e Cr[E]atu[R]es, g[E]t yo[U] hom[E]:
....................................................................
[E.UERE, Lo.O.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------
__ The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act I Scene 1 (Folio 1, 1623)

VALENTINE: Ceease to perswade, my louing Protheus;
____ Home-keeping youth, haue *EU[ER HO(m)ELY WITS]*
............................................................
[ER HO(m)ELY WITS]
[WRIOTHESLEY](m)
........................................................
. From fairest creatures we desire increase,
. That thereby BEAU(t)IES ROSE MI(g)HT N{EVER DIE},
....................................................
. {EVER DIE}
. {I DE VERE}
....................................................
. BeAU(t)IeS ROSE MI(g)HT NEVER DIE
. [MARI]e (S)IDNEI [He]RBE(r)T / VE(r)US [E.O.]
-----------------------------------------------------------
https://litimag.oxfordjournals.org/content/11/3/254.full

“Loe, here in one line is his {NAME} twice writ”: Anagrams,
Shakespeare's Sonnets, and the Identity of the Fair Friend

R. H. Winnick*
----------------------------------------------------------
. Two Gentlemen of Verona (Folio 1, 1623) I, ii

Iulia: Nay, would I were so angred with the same:
. Oh hatefull hands, to teare such louing words;
. Iniurious Waspes, to feede on such sweet hony,
. And kill the Bees that yeelde it, with your stings;
. Ile kisse each seuerall paper, for amends:
.
. Looke, h{E|R}e is writ, kin{D|E} Iulia: vnkin{D|E} Iulia,
. As in r{E|V}enge of thy i{N}gratitude,
. I throw thy {NAME} against the bruzing-stones,
. Trampling contemptuously on thy disdaine.
.........................................
. <= 12 =>
.
. L o o k e,h {E|R} e i s w
. r i t,k i n {D|E} I u l i
. a:v n k i n {D|E} I u l i
. a,A s i n r {E|V} e n g e
. o f t h y i {N}g r a t i
. t u d e,
.
{NED DE/VEER}
...........................................
. And here is writ, Loue wounded Proth(E)us.
. Poore wounded {NAME}: my bosome, as a bed,
. Shall lodge thee till thy wound be th(R)oughly heal'd;
. And thus I sea{R}ch it with a soueraigne kisse.
. But TWICE, or thrice, was Proth(E|U]s written down{E}:
. Be calm[E] (good winde) blow not a wo[R]d away,
. Till I haue found [E]ach letter, in the L{E}tter,
. Except mine own {NAME}: That, some whirle-win(DE) beare
. Vnto a ragged, fearef{U}ll, hanging Rocke,
. And throw it thence into the raging Sea.

. Loe, here in one line {I}s his {NAM[E]} twice writ:
.....................................................................................
. <= 63 =>

Andhere iswr itLou e woundedProt h(E) usPoor e w o u nded{NAME}mybo s omeasa b e dS
halllod geth eetil l thywoundbet h(R) oughly h e a l dAnd thus Isea{R}chitwi t h as
oueraig neki sseBu t TWICEorthri c(E) wasPro t h(E|U]swri tten down{E}Becalm[E]g oo
dwindeb lown otawo[R]dawayTillIh a(U) efound[E]a c h lett erin theL{E}tterEx c e pt
mineown{NAME}Thats o mewhirlewin (D E) beareV n t o a ragg edfe aref{U}llhang i n gR
ockeAnd thro witth e nceintother a g ingSea L o e h erei none line{I}shisna m[E]tw
icewrit

(D/E UERE) -63
{I.UEER} -63
.....................................................................................
. Poore forlo[R]ne Protheus, passionat[E] Protheus:
. To the swee(T) I[U]lia: that ile teare aw(A)y:
. And yet I will not, sith (S)o prettily
. He couples i(T), to his complaining {NAM(E)S};
. Thus will I fold them, one vpon another;
. Now kisse, embrace, contend, doe what you will.
..................................................
. <= 20 =>

. B u t T W I C E,o r t h r i c e, w a s P
. r o t h(E|U]s w r i t t e n d o w n{E}B
. e c a l m[E]g o o d w i n d e b l o w n
. o t a w o[R]d a w a y,T i l l I h a u e
. f o u n d[E]a c h l e t t e r,i n t h e
. L{E}t t e r,E x c e p t m i n e o w n{N
. A M E}T h a t,s o m e w h i r l e-w i n
. (D E)b e a r e V n t o a r a g g e d,f e
. a r e f{U}l l,h a n g i n g R o c k e,A
. n d t h r o w i t t h e n c e i n t o t
. h e r a g i n g S e a.L o e,h e r e i n
. o n e l i n e{I}s h i s{N A M[E]}t w i c
. e w r i t:P o o r e f o r l o[R] n e P r
. o t h e u s,p a s s i o n a t[E] P r o t
. h e u s:T o t h e s w e e(T)I[U] l i a:t
. h a t i l e t e a r e a w(A)y:A n d y e
. t I w i l l n o t,s i t h(S)o p r e t t
. i l y H e c o u p l e s i(T)t o h i s c
. o m p l a i n i n g {N A M(E)S};
.......................................
[UERE] 20,-20
(TASTE) 20
---------------------------------------------------------
. Sweet swan of Avon! what (A) sight it were
. To see thee in our waters yet appeare,
. And make tho{S}e flights u(P)on the bankes of Thames,
. That so did take Eliza, and our James !
. But s{T}ay, I see th(E)e in the Hemisphere
. Advanc'd, and made a Constellation there !
. Shin{E} forth, thou Starre of {POETS}, and with rage,
. Or influence, chide, or cheere the dr{O}oping Stage;
. Which, since thy flight fro' hence, hath mourn'd like night,
. And des{P}aires day, but for thy Volumes light.
...................................................
. <= 63 =>
.
Sweetswa n ofAvonwhat(A)sighti twere ToseetheeinourwatersyetappeareAn
dmaketho {S} eflightsu(P)ontheba nkeso fThamesThatsodidtakeElizaandourJ
amesButs {T} ayIseeth(E)eintheHe misph ereAdvancdandmadeaConstellationt
hereShin {E} forthth o uStarreof {POETS} andwithrageOrinfluencechideorche
erethedr {O} opingS t ageWhichsi nceth yflightfrohencehathmourndlikenig
htAnddes {P} aires d aybutforthy Volum eslight
.
{POETS} -63
(APE) 62 : Prob. both at end ~ 1 in 370
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Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2016-12-27 15:53:30 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
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*GROS(S)ER NAME* : *ENVIOU(S) SLIVER*
*ROGE(R) MANERS* : *NIL VE(R)O VERIUS*
Neither of the above is an anagram, Art -- but to a moson who thinkr (urual dirclaimes) that "weaves sleided silk" ir an anagsam of "I kill Edward de Vere", I ruppore it'r ar clore ar one could searonably expect. Ruch a moson, of cousre, cannot count, although that ir by no meanr hir role rhostcoming.

[Lunatic logosshea rnipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
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Art Neuendorffer (aka Ast Noonedaftes)
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