Discussion:
POMPEY
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Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-12-22 23:31:01 UTC
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The [following] inscription appears in ST. PAUL's Cathedral,
on the tomb of Sir Francis Walsingham, which the poem
itself (as an acrostic) in fact tells us.
...............................................
. S hall Honor, Fame and Titles of Renowne
. I n Clods of Clay be thus inclosed still?
. R ather will I, though wiser Wits may frown,

. F or to inlarge his Fame, extend my Skill.
. R ight gentle Reader, be it known to thee
. A famous Knight doth here interred lie,
. N oble by Birth, renowned by Policie,
. C onfounding Foes which wrought our Jeopardie.
. I foreign Countries their intents he knew;
. S uch was his Zeale to do his Country Good,

. W hen Dangers would by Enemies ensue
. A s well as they themselves he understood.
. L aunch forth, ye Muses, into Streams of Praise,
. S ing and sound forth praiseworthy Harmony:
. I n England, Death cut off his dismal Days,
. N ot wronged by Death, but by false Treachery.
. G rudge not at this unperfect Epitaph,
. H erein I have exprest my simple Skill,
. A s the first Fruits proceeding from a graffe;
. M ake them a better whosoever WILL.
---------------------------------------------------------------
. April 6

1590 Francis Walsingham, English secretary of state, dies
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648 -BC- Earliest total solar eclipse; chronicled by Greeks
6 -BC- Historical birth of Jesus Christ?
610 night the Koran descended to Earth [Monday before Palm S.]
1199 Richard I, the Lion-hearted, King of England (1189-99), dies
1327 Petrarch first sets eyes on Laura [Monday after Palm S.]
1348 Italian poet Petrarch's Laura, dies of plague
1483 Italian Raphael, [Raffaello Sanzio], born/christened?
1520 Italian Raphael, dies on his 37th birthday [Good Friday]
1528 German painter Albrecht Durer dies [Monday after Palm S.]
1580 6+ Kent earthquake badly damaged St Paul's in London

"to cassay the earthcrust at all of hours"

1584 Caravaggio apprenticed to Simone Peterzano of Milan
1584 Bridget de Vere's born. [Monday before Palm S.]
1588 Caravaggio ends apprenticeship to Simone Peterzano

1614 El Greco (Domeniko Theotokopoulos) dies
1722 Adm. Roggeveen discovers EASTER ISLAND on day before EASTER
1789 GEORGE WASHINGTON elected President [Monday after Palm S.]
1830 Mormons Founders Day
1843 Wordsworth as Poet Laureate
--------------------------------------------------------------
April 6, 1327, Petrarch first sets eyes on Laura
April 6, 1348, Petrarch's Laura, dies of plague

April 6, 1483, RAPHAEL born/christened?
April 6, 1520, RAPHAEL dies on his 37th birthday.

April 6, 1528, DURER dies in Nürnberg

April 6, 1584, CARAVAGGIO apprenticed to painter Simone Peterzano
April 6, 1584, BRIDGET VERE is born.
April 6, 1588, CARAVAGGIO ends apprenticeship to Peterzano
-------------------------------------------------------------
Measure for Measure Act 3, Scene 2

LUCIO: Does BRIDGET paint still, Pompey, ha?
-----------------------------------------------------

------------------------------------------------------------
. Antony and Cleopatra: I, v

CLEOPATRA: O Charmian,
. Where think'st thou he is now? Stands he, or sits he?
. Or does he walk? or is he on his horse?
. O happy horse, to bear the weight of Antony!
. Do bravely, horse! for wot'st thou whom thou movest?
. The demi-Atlas of this earth, the arm
. And burgonet of men. He's speaking now,
. Or murmuring 'Where's my serpent of old Nile?'
. For so he calls me: now I feed myself
. With most delicious poison. Think on me,
. That am with Phoebus' amorous pinches black,
. And wrinkled deep in time? Broad-fronted Caesar,
. When thou wast here above the ground, I was
. A morsel for a monarch: and great Pompey
. Would stand and make his eyes grow in my brow;
. There would he anchor his aspect and die
. With looking on his life.
................................................
. Antony and Cleopatra: II, i
.
POMPEY: He dreams: I know they are in Rome together,
. Looking for Antony. But all the charms of love,
. Salt Cleopatra, soften thy waned lip!
. Let witchcraft join with beauty, lust with both!
. Tie up the libertine in a field of feasts,
. Keep his brain fuming; Epicurean cooks
. Sharpen with cloyless sauce his appetite;
. That sleep and feeding may prorogue his honour
. Even till *A LETHE'd DULNESS*!

. [Enter VARRIUS]
---------------------------------------------------------
The Feast of Saints Peter & Paul: June 29th

In Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus,
an invisible Dr. Faustus attends a St. Peter's Day feast
at the Vatican and plays havoc with the ceremony.
------------------------------------------------------------
Christian Lanciai wrote HLAS:
.
<<By a curious coincidence, two important events took place on
[29th June] which are relevant to any Shakespeare discussion. In
48 B.C. POMPEY the Great was defeated at PHARSALUS, which ended the
democracy of the Roman Empire, since POMPEY was the last to challenge
Caesar's autocracy. The tragedy was immotalized by Lucan, the
brilliant poet who was murdered by Nero. This work, "PHARSALia",
was translated by Christopher Marlowe, who translated
the brilliant rhetorical style of Lucan into English.
.
On the same day in 1613 the Globe burned down, marking the end
of that unique epoch. There was no more Shakespeare work
produced after that, as far as we know.>>
-------------------------------------------------------
September 29 : MICHAELmas
--------------------------------------------------------
Sept.29, 106BC, Pompey born
______ 63BC, Pompey views 'holy of holies'
Sept.28, 48BC, Pompey assassinated at age 2 x 29.

Sept.29, 1066, William the Conqueror invades England
Sept.29, 1187, Saladin marches into Jerusalem

Sept.29, 1399, King Richard II, the first English monarch to
abdicate, was replaced by (the Earl of Derby)
Henry Bolingbroke (Henry IV).
Sept.29, 1400, Last Chaucer record: He signs a receipt
for a tun of wine delivered to him.

Sept.29, 1402, Prince Ferdinand of Portugal born.
Sept.29, 1493, Christopher Columbus leaves Cadiz, Spain,
on his second voyage to the new world.
Sept.29, 1511, Unitarian MICHAEL SERVENTUS born in Spain.
Sept.29, 1513, Balboa discovers the Pacific Ocean.
Sept.29, 1530, John the Baptist painter Andrea del Sarto dies
Sept.29, 1547, Miguel(MICHAEL) de CERVANTES, born.
Sept.29, 1564, Robert Dudley becomes earl of Leicester
Sept.29, 1567, Huguenots try to kidnap king Charles IX
Sept.29, 1642, De Vere's son-in-law William Stanley (Derby) dies
Sept.29, 1829, Scotland Yard formed
------------------------------------------------------------
June 29, 1587,
Marlowe Privy Council dispensation Letter
allowing Marlowe to get his MA from Cambridge:

"Whereas it was reported that Christopher MORLEY was
determined to have gone BEYOND THE SEAS TO REAMES..."
------------------------------­------------------------------­----------
______________ "BEYOND THE SEAS" = OuT-REMEr

<<The First Crusade, which began in 1096, was successful in its aim
of freeing Jerusalem. The Crusaders called this area OUTREMER, French
for "BEYOND THE SEAS." The First Crusade attracted no European kings
& few major nobles, drawing mainly lesser barons and their followers.
They came primarily from the lands of French culture & language,
which is why Westerners in OUTREMER were referred to as Franks.

http://encarta.msn.com/encyclo­pedia_761561210/Crusades.html
------------------------------­------------------------------­-----
Shoemakers don't have to attend University (not even WITTENBERG)
------------------------------­------------------------------­-----
Hans Sachs, (Nov. 5 1494 - Jan. 19, 1576)

<<German poet, leading meistersinger of the Nuremberg school.
A shoemaker and guild master, he wrote more than
4,000 master songs in addition to some 2,000 fables,
tales in verse (Schwanke), morality plays, and farces.

His Shrovetide plays, humorous and dramatically effective,
present an informative picture of life in 16th-century Nuremberg.

An ardent follower of Luther, Sachs wrote the poem
"The Nightingale of WITTENBERG" in Luther's honor.

Many of his melodies were later adapted as Protestant hymn tunes.
Hans Sachs is a principal character in several operas, notably
Richard Wagner's Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg.>>
http://www.bartleby.com/65/sa/­Sachs-Ha.html
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January 19, 1547, (DE VERE's uncle), Henry Howard,
earl of Surrey, beheaded at age 29.
(Surrey & Thomas Wyatt introduced the English sonnet.)

January 19, 1576, (meistersinger) Hans Sachs dies 29 yrs. later.

January 19, 1585, Vavasor challenges DE VERE to a DUEL
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The most tragic & mysterious prodigy in all of mathematics:

EVARISTE GALOIS

wrote his greatest work (at age 20!)
the night before his fatal DUEL on May 30, 1832
------------------------------­­-----------------------------­--
Thomas Thorpe: © 1996, Charles Michaels, Jr.
http://www.marlovian.com/essays/thorpe_cm.html

<<[The] book on which Thorpe cut his publishing teeth in 1600 was
Christopher Marlowe's THE FIRST BOOK OF LUCAN, Marlowe's translation
from the Latin concerning the war between Caesar and Pompey. He had
obtained it in a rather roundabout way. The work had originally been
entered in the Stationers' Register by publisher John Wolfe in September
1593. At some later date its copyright was assigned to Edward Blount who
sold it--or more likely gave it--to his young friend, Thorpe. Blount had
become friendly with the publisher and remained so throughout Thorpe's
career. When Thorpe published Marlowe's LUCAN in 1600, he took the
unprecedented step of dedicating in to his friend, Edward Blount.
Normally books were dedicated to nobility or men of proven distinction.

Did Thorpe know Marlowe personally? It seems unlikely that he would have
met Marlowe before 1594 up to which time Thorpe was an apprentice. So
what are wee to make of Thorpe's dedication wherein he refers to Marlowe
as "that pure elemental wit?" He goes on to say Marlowe's "ghost or
genius can be seen walking in the churchyard in (at the least) three
or four sheets." Are we seeing here...the 'reincarnated' Marlowe with
three or four manuscripts under his arm striding across St. Paul's
churchyard towards Blount's shop at the sign of the Black Bear?
------------------------------------------------------------------
Lucan's First Book (1593 (post. 1600))
Lisa Hopkins, Sheffield Hallam University
©The Literary Encyclopedia.

<<The work known as Lucan's First Book is Christopher Marlowe's
translation of the first book of the Pharsalia, by the Roman poet Marcus
Annaeus Lucanus (39-65 CE). The Pharsalia , which is also known by the
name Bellum Civile, treats of the civil war between Caesar and Pompey,
describes the battle of Pharsalia in Book 7 and breaks off when Caesar
reaches Egypt. Lucanus was the nephew of Seneca, the famous statesman
and tragedian whose work strongly influenced Elizabethan drama; he was
also one of the chosen poets of Nero, until he conspired against him and
was compelled to commit suicide at the age of 27. In Marlowe's work we
therefore find one wildly-gifted and short-lived poet translating
another, and when Marlowe announces at the beginning of his poem
'We sing', it is indeed easy to see this as a collaborative enterprise,
and to hear both poets' voices at work. It is also not difficult to see
why Marlowe was attracted to Lucan. They share an imagination fired by
exotic place-names and images of travel, vehement declamations, curious
knowledge and epigrammatic wit; the apocalyptic vision of the Pharsalia
chimes with the orgies of destruction in Marlowe's Tamburlaine.

Most notably, the Pharsalia was famous as the only Latin poem which
did not feature divine intervention, lacking any of the 'machinery'
customarily associated with epic, and Marlowe was notorious for his own
alleged atheism. Translating it therefore gave him licence to suggest
material rather than providential causes for human history, and thus
propound views which might otherwise have been found dangerously
unacceptable in Elizabethan England. As with his translation of Ovid,
though, Marlowe works hard to give his work a contemporary as well as
a classical feel, including terms like 'church', 'France', 'nuns', and
'matron' which are all clearly of the 16th century rather than the 1st.

Marlowe did not finish the job, however. Lucan left ten and a half
books of his presumably proposed twelve at his premature death;
Marlowe translated only the first. This is usually (though not invariably)
taken to mean that Marlowe too was interrupted in his task by death.>>
--------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2017-12-23 15:03:00 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
The [following] inscription appears in ST. PAUL's Cathedral,
on the tomb of Sir Francis Walsingham, which the poem
itself (as an acrostic) in fact tells us.
...............................................
. S hall Honor, Fame and Titles of Renowne
. I n Clods of Clay be thus inclosed still?
. R ather will I, though wiser Wits may frown,
. F or to inlarge his Fame, extend my Skill.
. R ight gentle Reader, be it known to thee
. A famous Knight doth here interred lie,
. N oble by Birth, renowned by Policie,
. C onfounding Foes which wrought our Jeopardie.
. I foreign Countries their intents he knew;
. S uch was his Zeale to do his Country Good,
. W hen Dangers would by Enemies ensue
. A s well as they themselves he understood.
. L aunch forth, ye Muses, into Streams of Praise,
. I n England, Death cut off his dismal Days,
. N ot wronged by Death, but by false Treachery.
. G rudge not at this unperfect Epitaph,
. H erein I have exprest my simple Skill,
. A s the first Fruits proceeding from a graffe;
. M ake them a better whosoever WILL.
Don't you mean "whosoeVER WILL", Art?

Pay close attention, Art -- this is what a *real* acrostic looks like. Note that it bears no resemblance to the bogus non-acrostics that you keep trotting out for our delectation.

[Nutcase numerology snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Measure for Measure Act 3, Scene 2
LUCIO: Does BRIDGET paint still, Pompey, ha?
Now that you mention it, Art, Oxford was notorious for having a fondness for what in Spanish are called _pompis_ -- specifically, _pompis de niños de coro_.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Sept.29, 106BC, Pompey born
______ 63BC, Pompey views 'holy of holies'
I wouldn't bring up _pompis_ and holes in the same sentence if I were you, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Shoemakers don't have to attend University (not even WITTENBERG)
Huh? Why is surprising to you that shoemakers did not attend the uniVERsity, Art? Is that what you studied at trade school or something?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Hans Sachs, (Nov. 5 1494 - Jan. 19, 1576)
<<German poet, leading meistersinger of the Nuremberg school.
A shoemaker and guild master, he wrote more than
4,000 master songs in addition to some 2,000 fables,
tales in verse (Schwanke), morality plays, and farces.
His Shrovetide plays,
But Art -- "Shrovetide plays" is an anagram of "A stylish Ver dope" -- presumably, St. Carolyn must have succeeded in finding that shirt in the straitjacket model so that you could display such stylish sartorial elegance.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
January 19, 1585, Vavasor challenges DE VERE to a DUEL
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EVARISTE GALOIS
wrote his greatest work (at age 20!)
the night before his fatal DUEL on May 30, 1832
So? What do you think (usual disclaimer) Galois's duel has to do with Oxford's duel, Art? It's true that both Galois and Oxford got the worst of their respective affrays, but Oxford was not slain, as Galois was. There is no resemblance between the two -- Galois was a transcendent genius, while Oxford was a petulant pederast who abandoned his wife, squandered a large patrimony, and botched eVERything that he touched.

Incidentally, Art, "Evariste Galois" is an anagram of "Ver (egoist) alias".

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
--------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
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