Discussion:
he shall surely pay ox {For} ox
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Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-04-07 14:14:53 UTC
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-------------------------------------------------------------
<<{O}r spunne out Riddles, or weav'd fifty Tomes
__{O}f *LOGOGRIPHES*, or curious Palindromes;
__{O}r pump'd for those hard trifles, Anagrams,
__{O}r Ecrosticks, or your finer flames
__{O}f EGGES , and Halbards, Cradles, and a Herse,
__[A] paire of Sizers, and *a COMBE in verse* ;
__[A]crosticks, and *TELLESTICKS*, or jumpe names,>> - B. Jonson
-----------------------------------------------------------------
2 *TELLESTICKS* found by Jones Harris & John Rollett:
.........................................................
The Names of the *26* Principall Actors
in all these Playes.

[William Shakespeare]
Richard B(ū)rba(D)ge.
John Hemmings.
Augusti(ñ)e Phillip [S].
William Kemp [T].
Thom(ā)s Poop (e).
George Brya (N).
Henry C(O)n[D]el [L].
W(I)l(L)iam S(L) (Y|E).
{R}ichard Cowl [Y].
John Low(I)ne.
Samuell Crosse.
A(L|E]xander Co(O)k{E}.
............................
Samuel Gilburn{E}.
[R]obert Armi(N).
Will(I)am Ostl(E)r.
(N)athan Field.
............................
John Underwoo [D].
{N}icholas T(O)ole {Y}.
William Eccl[E]ston {E}.
Joseph Taylo {R}.
Robert Be[N]fiel {D}.
Robe(R)t Gough {E}.
Richar{D} Robinso {N}.
John Shancke.
John Rice.
.........................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. [W i l l i a m S h a k e s p e a r e]R i c h a r d B
. (U) r b a D g e.J o h n H e m m i n g s.A u g u s t i
. (N) e P h i l l i p S W i l l i a m K e m p T T h o m
. (A) s P o o p e G e o r g e B r y a N H e n r y C o n
. [D] e l l.W i l L i a m S l Y E R i c h a r d C o w l
. [Y] J o h n L o w I n e.S a m u e l l C r o s s e.A l
. [E] x a n d e r C o O k E S a m u e l G i l b u r n E
. [R] o b e r t A r m i N W i l l i a m O s t l E r N a
. t h a n F i e l d.J o h n U n d e r w o o [D] N i c h
. o l a s T o o l e Y W i l l i a m E c c l [E] s t o n
. e. J o s e p h T a y l o r.R o b e r t B e [N] f i e l
. d.
.
(UNA) 26 : personification of "True Church" in Spenser's FQ
........................
[DYER] 26
[NED] -26
-------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/26_%28number%29
.
*26* is the gematric number, being the sum of the Hebrew characters
(Hebrew: יהוה‎) being the name of the god of Israel – YHWH (Yehweh).
------------------------------------------------------
Sir Philippe [SIDNEI] died of gangrene *26* days later
......................................................
<<[Sir PHILIP SIDNEI (30 November 1554 - 17 October 1586)] joined Sir John Norris in the Battle of Zutphen, fighting for the Protestant cause against the Spanish. During the battle, he was shot in the thigh and died of gangrene *26* days later. According to the story, while lying wounded he gave his water to another wounded soldier, saying, "Thy necessity is yet greater than mine". As he lay dying, Sidney composed a song to be sung by his deathbed..>>
--------------------------------------------------------
. The Original 1590 quarto edition!
...............................................
http://tinyurl.com/pma5gmz
http://tinyurl.com/nsvfzdm
.
The Covntesse of Pembrokes Arcadia,
. written by Sir Philippe [SIDNEI].
.
London, Printed {For} William Ponsonbie, Anno Domini, 1590.
----------------------------------------------------------------
*125* is the gematric number, being the sum of the English
characters for PHILIP SIDNEI = [(15+8+9+11+9+15)+(18+9+4+13+5+9)]

The "intentionally concealed message" in Sonnet 125 is
that Fulke Greville: Recorder of Stratford (1606-1628)
And [NED] [DYER] (b. October 1543 – d. May 1607)
*both* "bore the canopy" {For}[SIDNEI]:

http://tinyurl.com/ptpxsdu
-------------------------------------------------------------
{Ned}[DYER] then "bore the canopy" for PHILIP SIDNEI
..............................................................
Sonnet *125*

. WEr't ought to me I "bore the canopy",
. With my extern the outward honoring,
. Or layd great bases {For} eternity,
. Which proues more [S]hort then wast or ruining?
. Haue [I] not seene dwellers on forme an[D] fauor
. Lose all,and more by payi[N]g too much rent
. For compound sw[E]et;Forgoing simple sauor,
. Pitt[I]full thriuors in their gazing spent.
. Noe,let me be obsequious in thy heart,
. And take thou my oblacion,poore but free,
. Which is not mixt with seconds,knows no art,
. But mutuall render onely me for thee.
. Hence,thou subbornd Informer, a trew soule
. When most impeacht,stands least in thy controule.
.......................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} e t e r n i t y,W h i c h p r o u e s m o r e
. [S] h o r t t h e n w a s t o r r u i n i n g?H a u e
. [I] n o t s e e n e d w e l l e r s o n f o r m e a n
. [D] f a u o r L o s e a l l,a n d m o r e b y p a y i
. [N] g t o o m u c h r e n t F o r c o m p o u n d s w
. [E] e t;F o r g o i n g s i m p l e s a u o r,P i t t
. [I] f u l l t h r i u o r s i n t h e i r g a z i n g
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
------------------------------------------------
Four years later:

The Covntesse of Pembrokes Arcadia,
. written by Sir Philippe SIDNEI.
.
London, Printed For William Ponsonbie,
. Anno Domini, 1590.
---------------------------------------
{For}[SIDNEI] can also be found coincidentally as Bible Code
in the KJV bible...but only with a very large ELS skip:
.................................................
My "CodeFinder Bible Code Software"
http://www.research-systems.com/codes/codefind.html

Shows me that the shortest ELS skip in _Moby Dick_
for {For}[SIDNEI] or {For}[SIDNEY] = 2818 skip

And the shortest ELS skip in (a modern) KJV
for {For}[SIDNEI] or {For}[SIDNEY] = 869 skip:
.................................................
. Exodus
.
21:36 he shall surely pay ox {For} ox.......
22:8 the master of the house [S]hall be brought unto the judges...
22:15 it came for h[I]s hire.......
22:27 an[D] it shall come to pass.......
23:6 Thou shalt not wrest the judgment of thy poor i[N] his cause..
23:15 Thou shalt keep the feast of unleaven[E]d bread.......
23:23 For m[I]ne Angel shall go before thee,.......
.
https://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/Exodus-Chapter-21/
------------------------------------------------------------
Now, in spite of all this, one might still consider the Sonnet 125
{For}[SIDNEI] Equidistant Letter Sequence a random fluke...
... except for the fact that it occurs again in Sonnet 47:
----------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 47 (= 125 - 3 x 26)

. BEtwixt mine eye and heart a league is tooke,
. And each doth good turnes now vnto the other,
. When that mine eye is famisht {For} a looke,
. Or heart in loue with [S]ighes himselfe doth smother;
. W[I]th my loues picture then my eye [D]oth feast,
. And to the painted ba[N]quet bids my heart:
. An other tim[E] mine eye is my hearts guest,
. And [I]n his thoughts of loue doth share a part.
. So either by thy picture or my loue,
. Thy seife away,are present still with me,
. For thou nor farther then my thoughts canst moue,
. And I am still with them,and they with thee.
. Or if they sleepe, thy picture in my sight
. Awakes my heart,to hearts and eyes delight.
.......................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} a l o o k e,O r h e a r t i n l o u e w i t h
. [S] i g h e s h i m s e l f e d o t h s m o t h e r;W
. [I] t h m y l o u e s p i c t u r e t h e n m y e y e
. [D] o t h f e a s t,A n d t o t h e p a i n t e d b a
. [N] q u e t b i d s m y h e a r t:A n o t h e r t i m
. [E] m i n e e y e i s m y h e a r t s g u e s t,A n d
. [I] n h i s t h o u g h t s
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
...............................................
I calculate the probability of yet another Sonnet
skip *26* ELS {For}[SIDNEI] at around 1 chance in 150,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note that Thomas Lant's: http://tinyurl.com/ptpxsdu
.
_The Procession at the Obsequies of Sir Philip Sidney_
features exactly 344 engraved figures (mostly in pairs).
.
. 344 = 2 x [(Sonnet *125* + Sonnet 47)]
--------------------------------------------------------------
Ergo:

1) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet *125* provides an excellent story
that Fulke Greville: Recorder of Stratford (1606-1628)
probably honored his deceased good friends:
Ned Dyer & Philip Sidnei in the Sonnets

2) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet 47 verifies that story mathematically.
-------------------------------------------------------
The KJV title page to the 1611
http://tinyurl.com/yafpyqk

At the top, is:

1) the Tetragrammaton "יהוה" ("YHWH"/*26*) over
2) the holy spirit in a form of a dove over
3) a grotesque *St.THOMAS* with a *carpenter's square* in *SHADOW*
--------------------------------------------------------------
The KJV (1611) Epistle Dedicatory
Loading Image...
.......................................................
. TO THE MOST HIGH AND MIGHTIE
. (P)rince, (I)AMES by the grace of (G)od
. King of Great Britaine,{FRANC}e, and Irela[n]d,
. Defender [o]f the Faith, &[c].
. THE TRANSL[A]TORS OF THE [B]IBLE,
. wish Grace, Mercie, and Peace, through IESVS
. Christ our Lord.
............................................
Masonic *carpenter's square* :

___ <= 10 =>
.
. {F R A N C.}E A N D I
. R E L A[N] D,D E F E
. N D E R[O] F T H E F
. A I T H[C] T h e T r
. a n s l[A] t o r s o
. f t h e[B] i b l e w
. i s h G r a c e,M e
. r c i e,a n d P e a
. c e,t h r o u g h I
. E S V S C h r i s t
. o u r L o r d.
.
[BACON] -10 : Prob. ~ 1 in 750
..........................................................
[BACON] skip < 11 occurs only 8 times in the rest of KJV
--------------------------------------------------------
_____ {UT} [MASTER M-A-S-ONS]
..............................................
___ <= (Ezra?) 21 = 3 x 7 =>
.
. {U} P o n t h e L i n e s a n d L i f e o f
. {T} H e F a m o u s S c e n i c k e P o e t
.
. [M A S T E R] W I L L I A M S H A K E S P E
. [A] R E T h o s e h a n d s w h i c h y o u
. [S] O c l a p t g o n o w a n d w r i n g Y
. [O] u B r i t a i n e s b r a v e f o r d o
. [N] e a r e S h a k e s p e a r e s d a y e
. [S]

[MASONS] 21 : Prob. at start of poem ~ 1 in 9460
---------------------------------------------------------
Terry Ross wrote: <<The emblematic device at the head
of the [*MINERVA* Britanna] title page with its motto:
........................................................
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
. ("as you burn I consume myself")
. and its picture of *TWO (Masonic?) LIGHTED CANDLES*.>>
.
Loading Image...
. (3rd Masonic candle = arm + feather)
.
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
......................................................
_______ [M-A-S-ONS]: (cui e mel {TU}i)
_______________ (and from your honey)
------------------------------------------------------------------
[Hamlet (Quarto 2) 2.2]
Enter the Players (MAISTER MASONS).

Hamlet: You are welcome *MAISTERS* , welcome all, I am glad to see
thee well, welcome good friends, oh old friend, why thy face is
valanct since I saw thee last, com'st thou to beard me in Denmark?
what my young Lady and mistris, by lady your Ladishippe is
nerer to heauen, then when I saw you last by the altitude of a
chopine, pray God your voyce like a peece of vncurrant *GOLD* ,
BEE NOT CRACKT WITHIN THE RING: *MAISTERS* you are all welcome...
---------------------------------------------------------------
. (E)DW(E)ED [DYER/DEVERE]
...............................................
. Sonnet 76 (1609)

WHy is my verse so barren of new pride?
So far from variation or quicke change?
Why with the time do I not glance aside
To new found methods, and to compounds *STRANGE* ?

Why write I still all one, [EVER] the same,
And keepe inuention in a *NOTED WEED*,
That *[EVER]y WORD* doth almost fel {MY NAME},
Shewing their birth, and where they did proceed?

O know sweet love I alwaies write of you,
And you and love are still my argument:
..................................................
____ <= 14 =>
.
. A*N O T[(E) D W (E) E D] T h {A}{T}
. E V E R y w o r <D>[D] O t h a
. l m o {S}{T} F E L m [Y] N a m {E}
. S h e w i n g t {H}[E]<I> r b i
. r t h a n d w h e [R] e t h {E}
. y(D) i d p r o c e [E] d O <K> n
. o w s w e {E} t l o [V] e I a l
. w a i e s w r i t [E] o f y o
. u A n d y o u a n [D] l (O) v (E)
..................................................
[DYER] 14 {Found by A.W.Burgstahler}
.
[DEVERE] -14 {Found by James Ferris}
.
[DYEREVED] 14 Prob. in any sonnet ~ 1 in 9375
..................................................
Edward de Vere & Edward Dyer:
.
1) Only two Shakespeare authorship candidates
. named Edward: http://tinyurl.com/6yqvqwz
.
2) Only two Shakespeare authorship candidates
. sharing yet another authorship controversy:
--------------------------------------------------------------
_ Sonnet 76 : 4 X 19 (Metonic Cycle)
.
Why write I still all one, euer
.........................................
___________ <= 19 =>
.
. {T}h e s a m e[A]n d k(E|E)p e i n u(E)
. {N|T}i o n i n a*N O T(E)D W(E)E D*T h
. {A|T}E V E R y w o r(D|D]o t h a l m o
. {S|T}F E L m[Y]n a m<E>S h e w i n g t
. {H|E]i r b i r t h a n d w h e[R]e t h
. {E}y(D)i d p r o c e[E]d O k n o w s w
. -e<E>t l o[V]e I a l w a i e s w r i t
. [E]o f y o u
.
And you an[D] loue are still my argument:
.
{TNASHE} [only *TNASHE* in Sonnets!]

{TNASHE} 19 Prob. in Sonnet 76 ~ 1 in 450
------------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Walsingham_%28literary_patron%29

<<Sir Thomas Walsingham (c. 1561 – August 11, 1630) was a courtier to
Elizabeth I and literary patron to such poets as [T(homas) WATSO\n\],
{T(homas) NASHE}, George Chapman & Christopher {MARLEY}. He was related
to Elizabeth's spymaster Francis Walsingham and the employer of Marlowe's
murderer Ingram Frizer. This connection is one of the reasons offered for
suggesting that Marlowe's death may have been linked with intelligence
work, and not a dispute over a bill for food & accommodation.>>
------------------------------------------------------
"*EVERy* wor<D> [D]oth almo{S|T} (FEL) m[Y] nam{E}"
................................................
_______ Sonnet 76
.
Why is my verse so barren of new pride?
So far from variation or quic<K>e *CHANGE*?
Why with the time do <I> not glance aside
[T]o new foun(D) methods, and to compounds *ST{R}ANGE*
[W]hy write I still all one, *EVER* {T}he same,
[A]nd k(E|E)pe inv(E|N|T}ion in a *NOT (E)D W(E)ED* ,
[T]h{A|T} *EVERy* wor<D> [D]oth almo{S|T} (FEL) m[Y] nam{E},
[S]hewing t{H|E|I>r birth, and whe[R]e th{E}y did proce[E]d
[O] <K>now swe{E}t lo[V]e I alwaies writ[E] of you,
A\n\d you an[D] l(O)ve are still m[Y] a{R|G|U)ment:
So all my b<E>st <I>s (D)ressing o<L>d wor(D)s new,
Spe[N|D>ing a{G}ain(E) what is alrea[D]y sp(E)nt:
. For as the Sun is (D)a[I]ly new and old,
. So is my love [S]till telling what is told,

[T.WATSO.] Acrostic Prob. in Sonnet 76 ~ 1 in 688
-------------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 110
.
ALas 'tis *TRUE* , I haue gone here and there,
And made my selfe a *MOTLEY to the VIEW* ,
Gor'd mine ow/N/ th[O]ugh[T]s, so[L]d ch[E]ap w[H]at i[S] mos[T] deare,
Made ol(D) off(E)nce(S) of affections {N}ew.
.
M{O}s(T) t{R}u(E) i{T} i(S), t{H}a(T) I haue lookt on truth
Asconce and STRANGEly: But by all aboue,
These blenches gaue my heart an other youth,
And worse essaies prou'd thee my best of love,
........................................
. <= 4 =>
.
. G o r' d
. m i n e
. o w/n/ t
. h [O]u g
. h [T]s, s
. o [L]d c
. h [E]a p
. w [H]a t
. i [S]m o
. s [T]d e
. a r e, M
. a d e o
. l (D)o f
. f (E)n c
. e (S)o f
. a f f e
. c t i o
. n s{N} e
. w. M{O} s
. (T) t{R} u
. (E) i{T} i
. (S),t{H} a
. (T)
.
[T.SHELTO/n/] -4 : Prob. in any Sonnet ~ 1 in 642
{NORTH} 4 : Prob. here ~ 1 in 440
(S.E.D.) -4
------------------------------------------------------
‎George Steevens corrected spelling (1766)
http://tinyurl.com/kouzqma
.................................................
. Sonnet 110

ALas 'tis *TRUE* , I haue gone here and there,
And made my selfe a *MOTLEY to the VIEW* ,
Gor'd mine ow[N](e) th[O]ugh[T]s, so[L]d ch[E]ap w[H]at i[S] mos[T] deare,
Made old offences of affections new.
........................................
. <= 4 =>
.
. G o r' d
. m i n e
. o w {N}(e)
. t h [O] u
. g h [T] s,
. s o [L] d
. c h [E] a
. p w [H] a
. t i [S] m
. o s [T] d
. e a r e,

[T.SHELTO{N}] -4 : Prob. in all Sonnets ~ 1 in 1927
................................................
Most *TRUE* it is, that I haue lookt on *TRUTH*
Asconce and *STRANGELY* : But by all aboue,
These blenches gaue my heart an other youth,
And worse essaies prou'd thee my best of love,

Now all is done, haue what shall haue no end,
Mine appetite I neuer more will grin'de
On newer proofe, to trie an older friend,
A God in love, to whom I am confin'd.

Then giue me welcome, next my heauen the best,
Euen to thy pure and most most louing brest.
---------------------------------------------------
THE FAMOVS VICTORIES of HENRY THE FIFTH
CONTAINING THE HONOURABLE BATTELL OF AGIN-COURT:
AS IT WAS PLAIDE BY THE QUEENES MAIESTIES PLAYERS
LONDON: Printed by Thomas Creede, 1598<1>
http://www.elizabethanauthors.com/famvic101.htm
-----------------------------------------------------
Scene 14 [Enters the king of England and his Lords.]
.
HENRY 5: My Lord of Northumberland on the left wing,
Then I wil, that EUERy archer prouide him a stake of
A tree, and sharpe it at both endes,
And at the first encounter of the horsemen,
To pitch their stakes downe into the ground before them,
That they may *GORE* themselues vpon them,
And then to recoyle backe, and shoote wholly altogither,
And so discomfit them. ... =
..
OXFORD: And it please your Maiestie,
I wil take that in charge, if your grace be therwith content.
.
HENRY 5: With all my heart, my good Lord of Oxford:
And go and prouide quickly.
.
OXFORD: I thanke your highnesse. [Exit]
-------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Shelton_%28translator%29

<<[T]homas [SHELTO{N}] (fl. 1612–1620) was the English translator of Don Quixote. Shelton's was the first translation of the novel into any language.

Light was thrown on Thomas Shelton's personal history by the researches of Alexander T. Wright in a paper published in October 1898. Among the kinsfolk of the Earl of Suffolk were three persons bearing the name Thomas Shelton, and though all died before 1600 he was probably a member of the same family. He has been identified with the Thomas Shelton who wrote a sonnet prefixed to the Restitution of Decayed Intelligence (1605) of Richard Verstegan, who was most likely the friend referred to in Shelton's preface, for there is reason to believe that both of them were then involved in the intrigues of the Roman Catholics in England.

He seems to have been employed in carrying letters to persons in England from Lord Deputy Fitzwilliam at Dublin Castle. But in 1599 he apparently acted as agent for Florence McCarthy to offer his service to the king of Spain, a commission for which his knowledge of Spanish especially fitted him. Soon afterwards an official précis of the facts was drawn up, in which Shelton was implicated by name. A second version of this document in 1617 is actually signed by him, but all reference to his share in the matter is omitted. Lady Suffolk, the wife of his patron, received yearly £1000 in secret service money from the Spanish king, and Shelton may have been her accomplice. If the "many affairs of his preface were official he would not wish to call attention to his antecedents by owning friendship with Verstegan".>>
------------------------------------------------------------------
*THOMAS SHELTON* and Hamet Benengeli by Francis Carr
http://www.sirbacon.org/links/carrq.html

<<It is natural to doubt whether one is justified in looking for the
real author in a foreign country, that is, not in Spain, the country
of Cervantes. It is at this point that the title page of the first
Spanish edition of Don Quixote can shed some light. An examination
of this page confirms to us that a foreign hand is indeed at work.

We see a hooded falcon resting on the gloved hand of a man who is
hidden from view. Swirling shapes, possibly mist, on one side only,
stress the fact that the falconer is hidden, just out of sight. Around
the arm and the bird is the inscription: POST TENEBRAS SPERO LUCEM
after darkness I hope for light. Beneath the falcon a lion is keeping
his eye on the bird. It could be said that both the lion and the
falcon hope for light after the darkness, for the clear light of day
after the dark night, or a time of impaired vision. The lion could
symbolise England; the falcon could be Cervantes. Who is the falconer?

The inscription takes us to Chapter 68 of the Second Part
of Don Quixote, in which the knight tells Sancho Panza
that he too hopes for light:

O hard heart! oh ungodly Squire! oh ill given bread, and favours ill
placed which I bestowed, and thought to have more and more conferred
upon thee . . . for I post tenebras spero lucem. I understand not
that, said Sancho, only I know that whitest I am sleeping,
I neither feare nor hope, have neither paine nor pleasure.

In Cervantes' text, Quixote follows the words in Latin with a
translation into the vernacular: "after darkness I expect light".
Sancho, however, still says "I don't understand that".

Shelton's version makes sense. It seems that Cervantes' explanation
has been added to help the reader, but it is a mistake, as it
makes Sancho's reply incomprehensible. Was Cervantes' text,
in fact, a translation of Shelton?>>
------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare_authorship_question
.
In a verse letter to B.J. [*Ben Jonson*]
dated to about 1608, (and only just discovered in 1921)
F.B. alludes to ... Shakespeare, about whom he wrote:

...here I would let slip[P]e
(If I had any in mee) sc(H)ollersh[I]ppe,
And f(R)om all Learn(I)ng keep[E] th(E|S){E LIN}es
as cl(E)ere a{S} [S]hakesp{E}a(R)e's (B)est are,
{W}h(I)ch ou{R} heire(S) shall h{E}ar(E)
Pr{E}acher(S) apt(E) to t{H}e(I)r a{U|D]i(T)ors
(T)o (S)howe (H)ow farr[E] somet(I)mes a mortall ma[N]
may go(E) by the dimme light of Nature...,"
............................................
. <= 20 =>
.
. a{S}S h a k e s p{E}a(R)e's(B)e s t a r
. e{W}h(I)c h o u{R}h e i r e(S)s h a l l
. h{E}a r(E)P r{E}a c h e r(S)a p t(E)t o
. t{H}e(I)r a{U|D]i(T)o r s(T)o(S)h o w e
.(H)o w f a r r[E]s o m e t(I)m e s a m o
. r t a l l m a[N]m a y g o(E)b y t h e d
. i m m e l i g h t o f N a t u r e...,"
......................................
{NILE} -1
(RISE) 11, 12 : Prob. ~ 1 in 77
{UERE} -19
[NED] -20
{HEWS} -20
(STIE) 20, -6
[PIES] 26
(HEBE) 30,-33
..........................................
Modern? :
.
. ... Here I would let slip
. (If I had any in me) scholarship
. And from all learning keep the[S]e lines as clear
. As S[H]akespeare's best ar[E], which our heirs sha[L]l hear
. Preachers ap[T] to their auditors t[O] show
. How far sometimes a mortal man may go
. By the dim light of Nature.
.........................................
. <= 17 =>
.
. A n d f r o m a l l l e a r n i n
. g k e e p t h e [S] e l i n e s a s
. c l e a r A s S [H] a k e s p e a r
. e's b e s t a r [E],w h i c h o u r
. h e i r s s h a [L] l h e a r P r e
. a c h e r s a p [T] t o t h e i r a
. u d i t o r s t [O] s h o w

[SHELTO.] 17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1700
.....................................
<<Ralph SHELTON knighted at Theobald's, Warwickshire, England in 1607. According to records in the British Museum, he was Minister to Spain, Secretary to the Prince of Wales and one of the entourage of the Earl of Carlisle on the trip to France in 1612 to arrange for the marriage of Charles I with the sister of the French King. It was this Sir Ralph who held the Norfolk and Sufolk estates in 1606 (succeeding his brother John) prior to the sale of Shelton. In an account of his marriage to Jane West he is given as Ralph Sheldon, Esquire of Beoley, Worcestershire. Sir Ralph was a member of the Second and Third London Companies. In all the Colonial records of the Second Charter granted to the London Companies, 23 May 1609, the names of Sir Ralph Shelton of Norfolk England, a Captain Shelton and a James Shelton, Gentleman, appear. The Second London Company sailed under Lord De La Warr with nine ships and 500 people. The admiral's ship named "Sea Venture". They landed in America in 1610. A charter was granted to the Third London Company in 1611. As a member of Parliment, Sir Ralph signed the petition circulated there by the Company in 1610. There is nothing to indicate that Sir Ralph ever came to America to live. If so, he returned to England; but his son James Shelton, Gentlman, came with Lord De La Warr in Jun 1610, remained and founded the Shelton family of America and Virginia.>>
.................................................
Married 1: Jane WEST 1591, Norfolk, England

Children:

1. James SHELTON
2. Thomas SHELTON (b. 1601 - d. BEF Oct 1650)
-------------------------------------------
. Ben Jonson's EPIGRAM 119
.................................................
To Sir Ralph Shelton.

NOt he that fl{I}es the Court for wa{N}t of Cloths,
At Hunt{I}ng rails, having no {G}ift in Oaths,
Cries {O}ut 'gain[S]t, Cocking since he cannot bet,
Shuns Pr[E]ase,obsolete form of 'Press'
for two mai[N] Causes, Pox, and Debt,
With me can merit m[O]re, than that good Man,
Whose Dice not do[I]ng well, t{O} 'a Pulpit ran.
No, Shelton, give me thee, canst want all these,
But dost it out of Jud{G}ment, not Disease;
Dar'st breath in any Air; and with safe Skill,
Till thou canst f{I}nd the best, chuse the least ill.
That to the Vulgar can'st thy self apply,
Treadi{N}g a better path, not contrary;
And, in their Errors maze, thine own way know:
Which {I}s to live to conscience, not to show.
He, that, but living half his Age, dyes such;
Makes the whole longer, than 'twas given him, much.
......................................................
. <= 16 =>
.
. N O t h e t h a t f l {I} e s t h
. e C o u r t f o r w a {N} t o f C
. l o t h s,A t H u n t {I} n g r a
. i l s, h a v i n g n o {G} i f t i
. n O a t h s,C r i e s {O} u t'g a
. i n [S] t,C o c k i n g s i n c e
. h e c a n n o t b e t, S h u n s
. P r [E] a s e,o b s o l e t e f o
. r m o f'P r e s s'f o r t w o m
. a i [N] C a u s e s,P o x, a n d D
. e b t, W i t h m e c a n m e r i
. t m [O] r e,t h a n t h a t g o o
. d M a n,W h o s e D i c e n o t
. d o [I] n g w e l l,t {O}'a P u l p
. i t r a n.N o,S h e l t o n,g i
. v e m e t h e e, c a n s t w a n
. t a l l t h e s e,B u t d o s t
. i t o u t o f J u d {G} m e n t,n
. o t D i s e a s e;D a r' s t b r
. e a t h i n a n y A i r; a n d w
. i t h s a f e S k i l l, T i l l
. t h o u c a n s t f {I} n d t h e
. b e s t,c h u s e t h e l e a s
. t i l l.T h a t t o t h e V u l
. g a r c a n's t t h y s e l f a
. p p l y,T r e a d i {N} g a b e t
. t e r p a t h,n o t c o n t r a
. r y; A n d,i n t h e i r E r r o
. r s m a z e,t h i n e o w n w a
. y k n o w:W h i c h {I} s t o l i
. v e t o c o n s c i e n c e,n o
. t t o s h o w.

{INIGO} 16,-64
[IONES] -32
------------------------------------------------------------------
The Eastern Orthodox & Byzantine Catholic churches
celebrate the feast day of St. Thomas on October 6.

October 6, 1101 => St. Bruno dies. [Feastday: October 6]
Founder of the *Carthusian* Order, Bruno is usually represented
with a death's head in his hands, a book and a cross, or crowned
with seven stars; or with a roll bearing the device O Bonitas.
.
October 6, 1542 => Thomas Wyatt dies (father's Tower CAT: ACATAR)
October 6, 1573 => [H]enry [W]riothesley born (Tower CAT: BeATRiCe)
.
October 6, 1576 => Roger *Manners* (5th Earl of Rutland) born
October 6, 1586 => Edward *Manners* (3rd Earl) Fotheringhay juror
.
October 6, 1592 => Registration Kyd's _The Spanishe tragedie_
.
October 6, 1600 => Shakspere in the Clink
.
October 6, 1621 => Registration of Othello
October 6, 1630 => Sir Thomas Walsingham buried at 69
.
October 6, 1891 => Baconian [W]illiam [H]enry Smith dies at 66
October 6, 1892 => Alfred Lord TENNYSON dies at 83
----------------------------------------------------------
Thomas Nashe's (1592) dedication in
_ *STRANGE* Newes, or Foure Letters Confuted_
.........................................................
. An honest man of *Saffron-Walden* kept three sonnes at
the Vniuersitie together a long time ; and you kept three
maides together in your house a long time. A charitable
deed, & worthie to be registred in red letters.
.........................................................
Notable *Saffron-Walden* residents:

Sir Thomas Smith, scholar & diplomatist, born 1513
mentor to Gabriel Harvey, scholar & writer, b.1552/3
.
William Strachey, historian, born 1572
------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saffron_Walden

<<Saffron Walden is a market town in the Uttlesford district
of Essex, England. The 12th-century Walden Castle, built or
expanded by Geoffrey de Mandeville, the first Earl of Essex
is now in ruins. After the medieval period, the castle fell
slowly into disuse and much of the flint was taken and used
in the construction of the wall surrounding the Audley End
estate. All that remains today is the ruined basement.>>
------------------------------------------------------------
<<*SAMUEL PEPYS* (pronounced *PEEPS* , was born
in London February 23, 1633, the son of a *TAILOR.*
He was educated at *Magdalene* College, Cambridge.

On January 1, 1660 he started his diary. The same year he
became Clerk of the Acts to the Navy Board. In May 1669
his diary was brought to a sudden conclusion, owing to the
weak state *of Pepys' eyes* . His wife died the same year.

When Pepys died, May 26, 1703, his diaries were bequeathed
to Magdalene College. The six volumes were written
IN A CIPHER based on *THOMAS SHELTON's* system of shorthand.
............................................................
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Shelton_%28stenographer%29

<<The 1647 edition of Thomas Shelton's Tachygraphie contains
a portrait giving his age as 46, implying that he was born in
1600/01. Nothing sure is known about his origin and education.
In the English Civil War (1642–49), Shelton stood on the side
of the Parliament. Thomas Shelton made his living from shorthand,
teaching the subject in London over a period of thirty years
while he developed his stenographical systems. Shelton knew
the stenography of John Willis and took over its geometrical
basic principle for his own shorthand. He published several
books about shorthand which he sold from his house. Shelton's
shorthand was used, amongst others, by Samuel Pepys, Sir
Isaac Newton and US-President Thomas Jefferson. In the year
of his death, 1650, Shelton published "Zeiglographia">>
----------------------------------------------------------
Start of last 13 couplets of Chapman's _Hero and Leander_

_____ <= 20 =>

. B u r s t, d {Y} e,b l e e d e,A n d l e a
. v e p o o r {E} p l a i n t s t o u s t h
. a t s h a (L){L} s u c c e e d e.S h e f e
. l l o n h (E){R} l o v e s b o s o m e,h u
. g g'd i t (F){A} s t,A n d w i t h L e a n
. d e r s n a {M} e s h e b r e a t h'd h e
. r l a s t.

(FEL) -20
{MARLEY} -20 : Prob. ~1 in 10,000
. [Skip < 21 near end of either part]
------------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Walsingham_%28literary_patron%29

<<Sir Thomas Walsingham (c. 1561 – August 11, 1630) was the 3rd son of
Sir Thomas Walsingham (1526-1584), an important landowner in Kent, and
grandson to Sir Edmund Walsingham, courtier to Henry VIII and later
Lieutenant of the Tower of London. He was first cousin once removed
to Sir Francis Walsingham, Ambassador to France and head of secret
intelligence. In November 1589, on the death of his older brother,
Edmund, Thomas Walsingham inherited the manor of Scadbury, Kent. The
inheritance came as Thomas's debts were mounting but it was not in
time to prevent a short spell in the Fleet debtors' prison early in
1590, before he was able to take up residence at Scadbury. By 1593
he was settled in Scadbury and employing Ingram Frizer as his business
agent, advancing money to needy heirs against the security of their
inheritance. Frizer may have had a further role: he may have acted
as a messenger between Walsingham and his former contacts in the
intelligence world, entrusted with keeping them at arm's length from
his employer's new life as landed gentleman and courtier. One of these
agents was Robert Poley, also present at Marlowe's death. Poley later
became an important, secret intermediary in clandestine arrangements
for installing Elizabeth's putative successor, King James.

Francis Walsingham made use of his young relative as early as October
1580, when he appointed him as one of the trusted couriers between
the English court and the queen's ambassador in France. In August
1581 Thomas accompanied Sir Francis to Paris on a delicate diplomatic
mission connected with the proposed marriage between Elizabeth and
the French king's brother, Francis, Duke of Anjou. In 1584, he was
given a trusted position in the state's intelligence operation against
Catholic plots, operating from his own office in Sir Francis's house
in Seething Lane, next door to the Tower. He was allowed to relinquish
this post in 1590, when he came into his inheritance. In 1596 he was
appointed Justice of the Peace for the Kent hundred of Rokesley and
he organised the local defences against the Armada. He was knighted
soon afterwards, on a royal progress to Scadbury, a visit probably
resulting from family connections at Court of Audrey Shelton, his wife.
Audrey became a favourite of the queen and the couple were thereafter
regular attenders at Court. In the following year he was elected
Member of Parliament for Rochester. In 1614 he was returned
to parliament as knight of the shire for Kent.

The first poet to seek Walsingham's patronage was Thomas Watson, an
old acquaintance from the time when both men had been engaged on Sir
Francis's secret business in France. His timely dedication to Thomas
Walsingham, newly come into money through his inheritance, prefaced
A Lament for Meliboeus, an elegy on the death of Sir Francis. Watson's
venture was based on the family relationship between the dedicatee and
the dead statesman, but Thomas Walsingham proved to be a genuine patron
of literary endeavour and other poets followed the example. It is
probable that Watson introduced Marlowe, a friend from the London
literary circle with whom he was arrested for brawling in September
1589, to Thomas Walsingham (although their paths may have crossed
earlier, during Marlowe's own service to the late Sir Francis).
Walsingham appreciated the dedication, and the introduction,
with Marlowe becoming a frequent house-guest at Scadbury.
Later dedications from other poets imply familiarity & affection,
rather than the subservience and duty more common at the time.
Walsingham was a mourner at Marlowe's funeral.

The Walsinghams continued in royal esteem when James succeeded
Elizabeth. Indeed Audrey, who may have been a more influential
figure at court than her husband, was in part instrumental in
securing James's succession, and they were appointed "keepers
of the queen's wardrobe" when Queen Anne joined her husband in
London. Wealth & royal honours rained on the family as a result
of Anne's favour and, in defiance his unpromising beginnings as
an impoverished third son, when Walsingham died at Scadbury on
11 August 1630 he was a wealthy landowner. He was buried in
the family chapel at St Nicholas's Church, Chislehurst.
Audrey *SHELTON* had predeceased *THOMAS* , in 1624.>>
-------------------------------------------------------
Marlowe's 1598 poem:

To the Right Worshipfull, Sir Thomas Walsingham, Knight

Sir, wee thinke not our selves discharged of the dutie wee owe to our
friend, when wee have brought the breathlesse bodie to the earth: for
albeit the eye there taketh his EVER farwell of that beloved object,
yet the impression of the man, that hath beene deare unto us, living
an after life in our memory, there putteth us in mind of farther
obsequies due unto the deceased. And namely of the performance of
whatsoEVER we may judge shal make to his living credit, and to the
effecting of his determinatio[N]s prevented by the stroke of death.
By these medit[A]tions (as by an intellectuall will) I suppose my
se[L]fe executor to the unhappily deceased author of [T]his Poem, upon
who knowing that in his lift time yo[U] bestowed many kind favours,
entertaining the pa[R]ts of reckoning and woorth which you found in
him, with good countenance and liberall affection: I cannot but see
so far into the will of him dead, but what-soEVER issue of his brain
should chance to come abroad, that the first breath it should take
might be the gentle aire of your liking: for since his selfe had ben
accustomed therunto, it would proove more agreeable and thriving to
his right children, than any other foster countenance whatsoEVER. At
this time seeing that this unfinished Tragedy happens under my hands
to be imprinted; of a double duty, the one to your selfe, the other
to the deceased, I present the same to your most favourable
allowance, offring my utmost selfe now and EVER to bee readie,

At your Worships disposing:
*EDWARD* Blunt.

[RUTLAN] -41
-------------------------------------------------------
. Chronology of NASHE's works

. 1589 The Anatomy of Absurdity
. 1589 Preface to Greene's Menaphon
. 1590 An Almond for a Parrot
. 1591 Preface to Sir Philip Sidney's Astrophel and Stella
. 1592 Pierce Penniless
. 1592 Summer's Last Will and Testament (published 1600)
. 1592 Strange News
. 1593 Christ's Tears over Jerusalem
. 1594 Terrors of the Night
. 1594 The [U]nfortunate [T]raveller
. 1596 Have with You to *Saffron-Walden*
. 1597 Isle of Dogs (Lost)
. 1599 NASHE's Lenten Stuffe
.
He is also credited with the erotic poem The Choice of Valentines
& his name appears on the title page of Christopher Marlowe's Dido,
Queen of Carthage, though there is uncertainty as to what NASHE's
contribution was. Some editions of this play, still extant
in the 18th century but now unfortunately lost, contained
memorial verses on Marlowe by NASHE, who was his friend.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
Thomas Shelton, The History of the Valorous and Witty
Knight-Errant Don Quixote of the Mancha, 1612-20.

The First Part.

To the Right Honourable His Verie
Good Lord, The Lord of Walden, &C.

MINE Honourable Lord ; having Translated some five or
sixe yeares agoe, the Historie of Don Quixote, out of
the Spanish tongue into English, in the space of forty
daies; being therunto more then halfe enforced, through the im-
portunitie of a *VERY DEERE* friend, that was desirous to understand
the subject: After I had given him once a view thereof, I cast it
aside, where it lay long time neglected in a corner, and so little
regarded by me, as I never once set hand to review or correct the
same. Since when, at the intreatie of others my friends, I was
content to let it come to light, conditionally, that some one or
other, would peruse and amend the errours escaped; my many
affaires hindering mee from undergoing that labour. Now I
understand by the Printer, that the Copie was presented to your
Honour: which did at the first somewhat disgust mee, because as
it must passe, I feare much, it will prove farre unworthy, either
of your Noble view or protection. Yet since it is mine, though
abortive, I doe humbly intreate, that your Honour will lend it a
favourable countenance, thereby to animate the parent thereof to
produce in time some worthier subject, in your Honourable name,
whose many rare vertues have already rendred me so highly de-
voted to your service, as I will some day give very evident
tokens of the same, and till then I rest,

Your Honours most affectionate
servitor,

Thomas Shelton.
..............................
*REY DE VERE* : Kingly parts in sport
*VERY DEERE* friend:

Thomas Lodge fellow Catholic refugee in Spanish Flanders?
-------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-04-07 18:47:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<{O}r spunne out Riddles, or weav'd fifty Tomes
__{O}f *LOGOGRIPHES*, or curious Palindromes;
__{O}r pump'd for those hard trifles, Anagrams,
__{O}r Ecrosticks, or your finer flames
__{O}f EGGES , and Halbards, Cradles, and a Herse,
__[A] paire of Sizers, and *a COMBE in verse* ;
__[A]crosticks, and *TELLESTICKS*, or jumpe names,>> - B. Jonson
"OOOOAA"? What's that supposed to be, Art? Oxford's utterance upon...uh...withdrawing from the presence of Orazio Cogno?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} e t e r n i t y,W h i c h p r o u e s m o r e
. [S] h o r t t h e n w a s t o r r u i n i n g?H a u e
. [I] n o t s e e n e d w e l l e r s o n f o r m e a n
. [D] f a u o r L o s e a l l,a n d m o r e b y p a y i
. [N] g t o o m u c h r e n t F o r c o m p o u n d s w
. [E] e t;F o r g o i n g s i m p l e s a u o r,P i t t
. [I] f u l l t h r i u o r s i n t h e i r g a z i n g
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26*
The string "FORSIDNEI" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} a l o o k e,O r h e a r t i n l o u e w i t h
. [S] i g h e s h i m s e l f e d o t h s m o t h e r;W
. [I] t h m y l o u e s p i c t u r e t h e n m y e y e
. [D] o t h f e a s t,A n d t o t h e p a i n t e d b a
. [N] q u e t b i d s m y h e a r t:A n o t h e r t i m
. [E] m i n e e y e i s m y h e a r t s g u e s t,A n d
. [I] n h i s t h o u g h t s
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26*
The string "FORSIDNEI" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
1) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet *125* provides an excellent story
that Fulke Greville: Recorder of Stratford (1606-1628)
Ned Dyer & Philip Sidnei in the Sonnets
2) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet 47 verifies that story mathematically.
You plainly do not have the remotest idea what constitutes a mathematical verification -- indeed, you have even less idea than "Dr." Faker, if that is possible!

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_______ Sonnet 76
.
Why is my verse so barren of new pride?
So far from variation or quic<K>e *CHANGE*?
Why with the time do <I> not glance aside
[T]o new foun(D) methods, and to compounds *ST{R}ANGE*
[W]hy write I still all one, *EVER* {T}he same,
[A]nd k(E|E)pe inv(E|N|T}ion in a *NOT (E)D W(E)ED* ,
[T]h{A|T} *EVERy* wor<D> [D]oth almo{S|T} (FEL) m[Y] nam{E},
[S]hewing t{H|E|I>r birth, and whe[R]e th{E}y did proce[E]d
[O] <K>now swe{E}t lo[V]e I alwaies writ[E] of you,
So all my b<E>st <I>s (D)ressing o<L>d wor(D)s new,
. For as the Sun is (D)a[I]ly new and old,
. So is my love [S]till telling what is told,
[T.WATSO.] Acrostic
"TWATSO [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 4 =>
.
. G o r' d
. m i n e
. o w/n/ t
. h [O]u g
. h [T]s, s
. o [L]d c
. h [E]a p
. w [H]a t
. i [S]m o
. s [T]d e
. a r e, M
. a d e o
. l (D)o f
. f (E)n c
. e (S)o f
. a f f e
. c t i o
. n s{N} e
. w. M{O} s
. (T) t{R} u
. (E) i{T} i
. (S),t{H} a
. (T)
.
[T.SHELTO/n/] -
The string "TSHELTON" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 4 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 17 =>
.
. A n d f r o m a l l l e a r n i n
. g k e e p t h e [S] e l i n e s a s
. c l e a r A s S [H] a k e s p e a r
. e's b e s t a r [E],w h i c h o u r
. h e i r s s h a [L] l h e a r P r e
. a c h e r s a p [T] t o t h e i r a
. u d i t o r s t [O] s h o w
[SHELTO.] 17
"SHELTO [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
[RUTLAN] -41
"RUTLAN [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Thomas Lodge fellow Catholic refugee in Spanish Flanders [sic]?
Was the above supposed to have been an English sentence, Art? Hint: English sentences need *verbs* rather than Ver-BS.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
-------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
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