Discussion:
Happy News Year
(too old to reply)
Don
2017-01-05 07:46:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
We still have the Times Literary Supplement to peruse, now with
photographic enlargements and a format requiring subscription for
complete access.
http://www.the-tls.co.uk/

My understanding is that proprietary control of content is in effect,
except that reviews can be quoted.

See what I extract at
http://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/alls-well-that-spends-well/

All’s well that spends well
DAVID THROSBY
DECEMBER 14 2016

(quoting in part)
Shakespeare is an exemplar both of the influence of individual
economic circumstances on processes of literary production, and of the
effect of the wider economic context on the content and impact of
literary works. At a personal level, his career illustrates clearly
the ways in which the market for a writer’s output affects the
quantity and nature of the work produced. Perhaps the image of a great
artist as a genius oblivious to the financial realities of everyday
life persists in the popular imagination, but Shakespeare was far from
such a case. He lived at a time when the theatre was becoming more
professionalized and there was a growing market for plays. The theatre
industry in London was marked by competition between production
companies whose business models, in present-day management speak, were
attuned to the opportunities of the marketplace. Shakespeare rode the
wave with skill and determination such that at his death in 1616 he
was both the most famous and most financially successful playwright of
his time.
(unquote)

Another interesting review I find at TLS is

Shakespeare & co in the undiscovered country
MICHAEL CAINES
DECEMBER 13 2016

(quoting in part)
The Elizabethan theatre manager Philip Henslowe had many curious items
in his inventory, as his curious business required. There were fabrics
of damask and velvet, a jerkin for Doctor Faustus, “one pair of stairs
of Phaeton” and a cauldron for Barabas, Marlowe’s Jew of Malta,
to fall into. There were also two coffins.
(unquote)

Probably there are other reviews and discussions at TLS that someone
with a subscription there could comment on.
bookburn
marco
2017-01-06 02:54:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Don
We still have the Times Literary Supplement to peruse, now with
photographic enlargements and a format requiring subscription for
complete access.
http://www.the-tls.co.uk/
My understanding is that proprietary control of content is in effect,
except that reviews can be quoted.
See what I extract at
http://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/alls-well-that-spends-well/
All’s well that spends well
DAVID THROSBY
DECEMBER 14 2016
(quoting in part)
Shakespeare is an exemplar both of the influence of individual
economic circumstances on processes of literary production, and of the
effect of the wider economic context on the content and impact of
literary works. At a personal level, his career illustrates clearly
the ways in which the market for a writer’s output affects the
quantity and nature of the work produced. Perhaps the image of a great
artist as a genius oblivious to the financial realities of everyday
life persists in the popular imagination, but Shakespeare was far from
such a case. He lived at a time when the theatre was becoming more
professionalized and there was a growing market for plays. The theatre
industry in London was marked by competition between production
companies whose business models, in present-day management speak, were
attuned to the opportunities of the marketplace. Shakespeare rode the
wave with skill and determination such that at his death in 1616 he
was both the most famous and most financially successful playwright of
his time.
(unquote)
Another interesting review I find at TLS is
Shakespeare & co in the undiscovered country
MICHAEL CAINES
DECEMBER 13 2016
(quoting in part)
The Elizabethan theatre manager Philip Henslowe had many curious items
in his inventory, as his curious business required. There were fabrics
of damask and velvet, a jerkin for Doctor Faustus, “one pair of stairs
of Phaeton” and a cauldron for Barabas, Marlowe’s Jew of Malta,
to fall into. There were also two coffins.
(unquote)
Probably there are other reviews and discussions at TLS that someone
with a subscription there could comment on.
bookburn
happy new year to all

marc
A***@germanymail.com
2017-01-07 20:39:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by marco
Post by Don
We still have the Times Literary Supplement to peruse, now with
photographic enlargements and a format requiring subscription for
complete access.
http://www.the-tls.co.uk/
My understanding is that proprietary control of content is in effect,
except that reviews can be quoted.
See what I extract at
http://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/alls-well-that-spends-well/
All’s well that spends well
DAVID THROSBY
DECEMBER 14 2016
(quoting in part)
Shakespeare is an exemplar both of the influence of individual
economic circumstances on processes of literary production, and of the
effect of the wider economic context on the content and impact of
literary works. At a personal level, his career illustrates clearly
the ways in which the market for a writer’s output affects the
quantity and nature of the work produced. Perhaps the image of a great
artist as a genius oblivious to the financial realities of everyday
life persists in the popular imagination, but Shakespeare was far from
such a case. He lived at a time when the theatre was becoming more
professionalized and there was a growing market for plays. The theatre
industry in London was marked by competition between production
companies whose business models, in present-day management speak, were
attuned to the opportunities of the marketplace. Shakespeare rode the
wave with skill and determination such that at his death in 1616 he
was both the most famous and most financially successful playwright of
his time.
(unquote)
Another interesting review I find at TLS is
Shakespeare & co in the undiscovered country
MICHAEL CAINES
DECEMBER 13 2016
(quoting in part)
The Elizabethan theatre manager Philip Henslowe had many curious items
in his inventory, as his curious business required. There were fabrics
of damask and velvet, a jerkin for Doctor Faustus, “one pair of stairs
of Phaeton” and a cauldron for Barabas, Marlowe’s Jew of Malta,
to fall into. There were also two coffins.
(unquote)
Probably there are other reviews and discussions at TLS that someone
with a subscription there could comment on.
bookburn
happy new year to all
marc
Art N

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