Discussion:
Dear *LORD IN GENTLE GREE*
Add Reply
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-04-07 17:23:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
----------------------------------------------------
Thomas Nashe in Lenten Stuffe:
.
. "Let me see, hath any bodie in Yarmouth heard of
. Leander and Hero, of whom divine MUSAEUS sung,
. and a diviner MUSE than him, *KIT MARLOW*
. Two faithfull lovers they were, a EVERy
. apprentis in Paules *CHURCHYARD* will tell
. you for your love and sel you for your mony"
......................................................
Marston: "Kinde *KIT MARLOWE*"
......................................................
Heywood: " *MARLO* renown'd for his rare Art and wit
. Could nE'ER attaine *beyond the name of KIT* "
-------------------------------------------------------
Ben Jonson from the First Folio, 1623
http://shakespeare.palomar.edu/Folio1.htm#Beloved

To the [M]emory of my beloved,
The Author MR. WI(LLI)AM SHAKESPE[A]RE :
AND what he hath left us.

To draw no en(V)y (Shakespea[R]e) on thy name,
Am I thus ample to thy Book(E), and Fame;
Whi[L]e I confesse thy writings to be such,
As (N)either Man, n[O]r Muse, can praise too much.

'Tis *TRUE* , and all men's suffrage.
...................................................
______ <= 43 =>

. Tothe [M] emoryofmybelovedTheAuthorMRWI (LLI) AMSHA
. KESPE [A] REANDwhathehathleftusTodrawnoen (V) yShak
. espea [R] eonthynameAmIthusampletothyBook (E) andFa
. meWhi [L] eIconfessethywritingstobesuchAs (N) eithe
. rMann [O] rMusecanpraisetoomuchTisTRUEand a llmen
. ssuff r age.

[MARLO] 43 (Prob. ~ 1 in 550)
(NEVI/LL) -43
---------------------------------------------------
___ Hero and Leander by G.Chapman
......................................
And thereof springs the painted *BEAST*,
That EVER since taints EVERy breast.
---------------------------------------------------
___ Hero and Leander by [K.MARLO]
......................................
Her vaile was artificiall flowers and leaves,
Whose workmanship both man and *BEAST* deceaves.
-----------------------------------------------------
http://hollowaypages.com/jonson1692epigrams.htm

Jonson's Epigrams: # 26. On the same *BEAST*.

TAn his Chast Wife, though *BEAST* now [K]now no [M]ore,
He '[A]dulte[R]s stil[L]: his th[O]ughts lye with a Whore.
.......................
. <= 6 =>
.
. h i s C h a
. s t W i f e,
. t h o u g h
. *B E A S T* n
. o w [K] n o w
. n o [M] o r e,
. H e'[A] d u l
. t e [R] s s t
. i l [L]:h i s
. t h [O] u g h
. t s l y e w
. i t h a W h
. o r e.
.
[K.MARLO] 6 : Prob. for #26 any skip ~ 1 in 555,000
Prob. for all of Jonson's EPIGRAMS ~ 1 in 1200
---------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.wjray.net/shakespeare_papers/hamlet.htm

<<Edward De Vere's protector, the Earl of Sussex, Thomas Radcliffe,
had died, warning him about "*the BEAST*", Leicester, who
had poisoned his rivals, including perhaps De Vere's father,
and whose wife was found dead at the foot of a stone stairs.>>
........................................................
http://www.sirbacon.org/harneroxford.htm

<<Charles Arundel accused De Vere of being "a buggerer of a boy that
is his cook." And added, "I have gone to the back door to satisfy
myself : at the which the boy hath come out all in a sweat, and I
have gone in and found "*the BEAST*" [De Vere] in the same plight.">>
---------------------------------------------------------
__ Doctor Faustus. Scene XIV by [K.MARLO]
.
Faustus: Ah, *PYTHOGORAS'* metempsychosis! were that *TRUE*,.
. This soul should fly from me, and I be chang'd.
. Unto some brutish *BEAST*! *All BEASTS* are happy,
. For when they die,.
. Their *souls are soon DISSOLV'D* in elements;.
. But mine must live, still to be plagu'd in hell.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
http://tei.it.ox.ac.uk/tcp/Texts-HTML/free/A18/A18762.html

Thomas *CHURCHYARD*: The Epitaph of the right honourable,

(Lor[D]) Ambrose (DUDLE[Y]) Erle of (WARWIC[K]e).

LEave off to write, spare speech a space, be [M]ute O muse of mine:
Let blubring teares bede[A]w thy face, O waile with weeping eyne:
The cou[R]se of life that drawes but breth, in dollor a[L]l his dayes:
Till hart stringes burst, till h[OWE]r of death, til pilgrim goes his wayes.
..............................................................
. <= 36 =>
.
.(L o r[D])A m b r o s e(D U D L E[Y])Erle o f(W A R W I C[K]e)L E a v e
. o f f t o w r i t e s p a r e s p eech a s p a c e b e[M]u t e O m u
. s e o f m i n e L e t b l u b r i ngte a r e s b e d e[A]w t h y f a
. c e O w a i l e w i t h w e e p i ngey n e T h e c o u[R]s e o f l i
. f e t h a t d r a w e s b u t b r ethi n d o l l o r a[L]l h i s d a
. y e s T i l l h a r t s t r i n g esbu r s t t i l l h[O W E]r o f d
. e a t h t i l p i l g r i m g o e shis w a y e s.
..............................................................
[K.MARLO/WE] 36 : Prob. in first sentence ~ 1 in 1,900,000
[KYD] -13 : Prob. in first sentence ~ 1 in 81
..............................................................
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Kyd

<<In October 1565 Thomas [KYD] (6 November 1558 - 15 August 1594) was enrolled with Thomas Lodge (1558 – Sept. 1625) & Edmund Spenser (1552 – Jan. 13, 1599) in the Merchant Taylors' School. From 1587 to 1593 he was in the service of an unidentified noble, since, after his imprisonment in 1593, he wrote of having lost "the favours of my (Lor[D]), whom I haue servd almost theis vi yeres nowe". Around 1591 [KIT MARLOWE] also joined this patron's service, and for a while [KIT MARLOWE] and [KYD] shared lodgings.>>
..............................................................
<<On 11 November 1565 Ambrose Dudley married for the third time. His bride was the 16-year-old Anne Russell, daughter of Francis Russell, 2nd Earl of Bedford. Robert Dudley, meanwhile Earl of Leicester, had arranged the match. It was an extraordinary court event [in which Edward de Vere & Edward Manners were pages]. In between tournaments and banquets [and cannon exploding killing the Queen's master gunner Robert Thomas], the bride was given away by the Earl of Leicester; she later became one of Elizabeth's closest friends.>>
......................................................................
Vaine pomp is but a puffe or toy, so is both rule and raigne:
For all that heere we do enioy, is nought but woe and paine:
Hast thou not seene the highest tree, receive his falling blowe?
Death hath respect to no degree, when life from hence must goe.
Satte Leyster not in Senate seate, as hye as man might clime?
Was never heere, none halfe so great, nor happy in our time.
Yet loe, a so daine leave he tooke, and went where God assignd:
His Brother that like Mars did looke, a man of noble minde.
Who all good men (D)id praise and love, is packt from us in poste:
Thus when of force men m(U)st remoove, and world desires hi[M] most.
His glasse is run, his date is (D)oone, [A]nd he must bid farwell:
to all the pleasu[R]es under {S}unne, and a(L)l that heere do dwe[L]l.
B{U}t Warwick that won great good wil{L}, t[O]o soone was hastned hence:
For W{A}rwick was *MOST WARLIKE* still, to s{T}and in r(I)ghtes defence.
......................................................................
. <= 28 =>
.
. g o o d m e n(D)i d p r a i s e a n d l o v e i s p a c
. k t f r o m u s i n p o s t e T h u s w h e n o f f o r
. c e m e n m(U)s t r e m o o v e a n d w o r l d d e s i
. r e s h i[M]m o s t H i s g l a s s e i s r u n h i s d
. a t e i s(D)o o n e[A]n d h e m u s t b i d f a r w e l
. l t o a l l t h e p l e a s u[R]e s u n d e r{S}u n n e
. a n d a(L)l t h a t h e e r e d o d w e[L]l B{U}t W a r
. w i c k t h a t w o n g r e a t g o o d w i l{L}t[O]o s
. o o n(E)w a s h a s t n e d h e n c e F o r W{A}r w i c
. k w a s*M O S T W A R L I K E*s t i l l t o s{T}a n d i
. n r(I)g h t e s d e f e n c e
..................................................
. *MOST WARLIKE*
. *KIT MARLOWE'S*
...................................................
{TALUS} -28
[MARLO] 33
(DUDLEI) 55 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1150
-------------------------------------------------------
. *AM(b)RO(s)E*
. *MAR(l)O(w)E*
-------------------------------------------------------
Don Quixote, The First Part

I. Wherein Is Rehearsed the Calling and Exercise
of the Renowned Gentleman, Don Quixote of the Mancha

THERE lived not long since, in a certain village of the Mancha, the name
whereof I purposely omit, a gentleman of their calling that use to pile up in
their halls old lances, halberds, morions, and such other armours and weapons.
He was, besides, master of an ancient target, a lean stallion, and a swift
greyhound. His pot consisted daily of somewhat more beef than mutton: a
gallimaufry each night, collops and eggs on Saturdays, lentils on Fridays, and
now and then a lean pigeon on Sundays, did consume three parts of his rents; the
rest and remnant thereof was spent on a jerkin of fine puce, a pair of velvet
hose, with pantofles of the same for the holy-days, and one suit of the finest
vesture; for ther[E]withal he honoured and set out his person on the work[D]ays.
He had in his house a woman-servant of about fort[Y] years old, and a niece not
yet twenty, and a man that serv[E]d him both in field and at home, and could
saddle his ho[R]se, and likewise manage a pruning-hook. The master himself was
about fifty years old, of a strong complexion, dry flesh, and a withered face.
He was an early riser, and a great friend of hunting. Some affirm that his
surname was Quixada, or Quesada (for in this there is some variance among the
authors that write his life), although it may be gathered, by very probable
conjectures, that he was called Quixana. Yet all this concerns our historical
relation but little: let it then suffice, that in the narration thereof
we will not vary a jot from the truth.

[E.DYER] 44 : Prob. at start ~ 1 in 35

You shall therefore wit, that this gentleman above named, the spurts that he
was idle (which was the longer part of the year), did apply himself wholly to
the reading of books of knighthood, and that with such gusts and delights, as he
almost wholly neglected the exercise of hunting; yea, and the very administration
of his household affairs. And his curiosity and folly came to that pass, that he
made away many acres of arable land to buy him books of that kind, and therefore
he brought to his house as many as ever he could get of that subject. And among
them all, none pleased him better than those which famous Felician of Silva
composed. For the smoothness of his prose, with now and then some intricate
sentence meddled, seemed to him peerless; and principally when he did read the
courtings, or letters of challenge, that knights sent to ladies, or one to
another; where, in many places, he found written: ‘The reason of the
unreasonableness which against my reason is wrought, doth so weaken my reason, as
with all reason I do justly complain on your beauty.’ And also when he read: ‘The
high heavens, which with your divinity do fortify you divinely with the stars,
and make you deserveress of the deserts which your greatness deserves,’ etc.
With these and other such passages the poor gentleman grew distracted, and was
breaking his brains day and night, to understand and unbowel their sense, an
endless labour; for even Aristotle himself would not understand them, though he
were again resuscitated only for that purpose. He did not like so much the
unproportionate blows that Don Belianis gave and took in fight; for, as he
imagin{E}d, were the surgeo{N}s never so cunnin{G} that cured them, y{E}t was it
impossib{L}e but that the pat{I}ent his face and all his body must remain full
of scars and tokens. Yet did he praise, notwithstanding, in the author of that
history, the conclusion of his book, with the promise of the Endless Adventure;
and many times he himself had a desire to take pen and finish it exactly, as it
is there promised; and would doubtless have performed it, and that certes with
happy success, if other more urgent and continual thoughts had not disturbed him.

{ENGELI} 15 : Prob. at start ~ 1 in 455

Many times did he fall at variance with the curate of his village (who was a
learned man, graduated in Ciguenca) touching who was the better knight, Palmerin
of England, or Amadis de Gaul. But Master Nicholas, the barber of the same town,
would affirm that none of both arrived in worth to the Knight of the Sun; and
if any one knight might paragon with him, it was infallibly Don Galaor, Amadis
de Gaul’s brother, whose nature might fitly be accommodated to anything; for
he was not so coy and whining a knight as his brother, and that in matters
of valour he did not bate him an ace.

In resolution, he plu{N}ged himself so deeply in his reading of these books,
{A|S|HE} spent many times in the lecture of them whole days [A]nd nights;
and in the end, through his little sleep and [M]uch reading, he dried up his
brains in such sort as he l[O]st wholly his judgment. His fantasy was filled
with t[H]ose things that he read, of enchantments, quarrels, ba[T]tles,
challenges, wounds, wooings, loves, tempests, and other impossible follies.
And these toys did so firmly possess his imagination with an infallible
opinion that all that machina of dreamed inventions which he read was true,
as he accounted no history in the world to be so certain and sincere as they
were. He was wont to say, that the Cid Ruy Diaz was a very good knight, but
not to be compared to the Knight of the Burning Sword, which, with one thwart
blow, cut asunder two fierce and mighty giants. He agreed better with Bernardo
del Carpio, because he slew the enchanted Roland in Roncesvalles. He likewise
liked of the shift Hercule[S] used when he smothered Anteon, the son of the
earth, between [H]is arms. He praised the giant Morgant marvellously,
becaus[E], though he was of that monstrous progeny, who are commonly a[L]l
of them proud and rude, yet he was affable and courteous. Bu[T] he agreed
best of all with Reinauld of Mount Alban; and most [O]f all then, when he
saw hi{M} sally out of his castle to rob as ma[N]y {A}s ever he could meet;
and when, moreove{R}, he robbed the idol of Mahomet, made al{L} of gold, as
his history recounts, and w{O}uld be content to give his old woman, y{E}a,
and his niece also, for a good opportunity on the traitor Galalon,
that he might lamb-skin and trample him into powder.

[SHELTON] 49 : Prob. at start ~ 1 in 363
......................................................
. <= 44 =>
.
. Inresolutionhepl u{N}ge dhimselfsodeeplyinhisrea
. dingofthesebooks {A|S|HE} spentmanytimesinthelectu
. reofthemwholeday s[A]nd nightsandintheendthrough
. hislittlesleepan d[M]uc hreadinghedrieduphisbrai
. nsinsuchsortashe l[O]st whollyhisjudgmentHisfant
. asywasfilledwith t[H]os ethingsthathereadofencha
. ntmentsquarrelsb a[T]tl eschallengeswoundswooing
. slovestempestsan d o th erimpossiblefollies


[THOMAS] -44 : Prob. in same paragraph ~ 1 in 112
{N.A[S]HE}
{MARLOE} 31 : Prob. in same paragraph ~ 1 in 500
..........................................................
<<In _Have with you to Saffron-Walden_ (1596),
[THOMAS] {N}ashe exclaims, "I nEVER abusd {MARLOE},
Greene, Chettle, in my life, or anie of my friends that
usde me like a friend; which both {MARLOE} and Greene
(if they were alive) under their hands would testifie,
even as Harry Chettle hath in a short note here;">>

- The Works of Christopher Marlowe, (John C. Nimmo, 1885)
--------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Nashe

<<[THOMAS] {N}ashe (baptised November 1567 – c. 1601) is considered the
greatest of the English Elizabethan pamphleteers. He was a playwright, poet,
& satirist. He is best known for his novel The [U]nfortunate [T]raveller.>>
..........................................................
THE [U]NFORTVNATE [T]RAVELLER. (1594)
The Life of Iacke Wilton. by [THOMAS] {N}ashe

THE INDVCTION TO THE DAPPER MOVNSIER PAGES OF THE COVRT.

Gallant squires, haue amongst you: at mumchance I meane not, for
so I might chaunc[E] come to short commons, but at _n[O]uus, noua,
no{v}um_, which is in Eng[L]ish, newes of th{E} maker. A prope[R]
fellow Page of you{R}s called _I[A]cke Wilton_, by mee comm{E}nds
hi[M] vnto you, and hath bequeathed for wast paper heere
amongst you certaine pages of his misfortunes.
...................................................
_________ <= 25 =>

. f o r s o I m i g h t c h a u n c [E](C O M E)t o(S)
. h o r t c o m m o n s b u t a t n [O] u u s n o u a
. n o{v}u m w h i c h i s i n E n g [L] i s h n e w e
. s o f t h{E}m a k e r A p r o p e [R] f e l l o w P
. a g e o f y o u{R}s c a l l e d I [A] c k e W i l t
. o n b y m e e c o m m{E}n d s h i [M] v n t o y o u

[MARLOE] -25
{VERE} 28
--------------------------------------------------
_The Choice of Valentines_ by Thomas Nashe (159?)
.........................................
http://sicttasd.tripod.com/choise.html

The choise of valentines
To the right Honorable the lord S.

Pardon sweete flower of matchless Poetrie,
. And fairest bud the red rose euer bare ;
. Although my Muse deuor'st from deeper care
. Presents thee with a wanton Elegie.
Ne blame my verse of loose unchastitie
. For painting forth the things that hidden are,
. Since all men acte what I in speache declare,
. Onelie induced by varietie.
Complaints and praises euerie one can write,
. And passion-out their pangu's in statelie rimes,
. But of loues pleasure's none did euer write
. That hath succeeded in theis latter times.
Accept of it Dear *LORD IN GENTLE GREE* ,
. And better lynes ere long shall honor thee.
....................................................
*PARDON SWEETE* flower of [M]atchless Poetrie,
[A]n{D} fair{E}st b{U}d th{E} [R]ed {R}ose {E}VER bare ;
A[L]though my Muse deu[O]r'st from deeper ca(r\E\
....................................................
. <= 16 =>
.
. P A R D O N S W E E T E f l o w
. e r o f [M] a t c h l e s s P o e
. t r i e [A] n D f a i r{E}s t b{U}
. d t h{E} [R] e d{R}o s e{E}V E R b
. a r e A [L] t h o u g h m y M u s
. e d e u [O] r s t f r o m d e e p
. e r c a r E
.............................................
[MARLO(r)] 16

Prob of [MARLO] in first sentence: ~ 1 in 800
............................................
. <= 4 =>
.
. [A] n D f
. a i r {E}
. s t b {U}
. d t h {E}
. [R] e d {R}
. o s e {E}
. u e

Prob of {EUERE} in first sentence: ~ 1 in 67
--------------------------------------------------------
Dedicatory Verse to Oxford in Spenser's Fairie Queene.
..........................................
To the right Honourable the Earle of Oxenford,
Lord high Chamberlayne of England. &c.
.
REc(E)ive most Noble *LORD IN GENTLE GREE*,
The unripe fruit of an u(N)ready wit:
Which BY THY COUNT{E|N}aunc[E| D}oth cra[V|e} to bee
D[E]f(E)nded f[R]om foule [E]n{V|I}es poisnous bit.
Which so to doe may th(E)e right w{E|L}l befit,
Sith th'antique glory of thine auncest{R}y
Under a *SHADY VELE* is therein writ,
And eke thin{E} owne lon(G) living memory,
Succeeding them in TRUE nobility:
And also for the love, which thou doest beare
To *th'Heliconian YMPS* , and they to thee,
<T>hey unto thee, and <T>hou to them most d<E>ar[E]:
Deare a<S> thou a[R]t unto thy self[E], <S>o lov<E>
{T}h{A}t {L}o[V]e{S} & honours the[E], as do<T>h behove.
.........................................................
[EVERE] 8,-13, 40 : Prob. 3[E.VERE]s ~ 1 in 2,250)
<TEST> -25,30
{TALVS} 2
-----------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-04-07 18:15:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Saturday, April 7, 2018 at 1:23:37 PM UTC-4, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
______ <= 43 =>
. Tothe [M] emoryofmybelovedTheAuthorMRWI (LLI) AMSHA
. KESPE [A] REANDwhathehathleftusTodrawnoen (V) yShak
. espea [R] eonthynameAmIthusampletothyBook (E) andFa
. meWhi [L] eIconfessethywritingstobesuchAs (N) eithe
. rMann [O] rMusecanpraisetoomuchTisTRUEand a llmen
. ssuff r age.
[MARLO] 43 (Prob. ~ 1 in 550)
(NEVI/LL) -43
The string "NEVILL" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip -43 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
http://www.sirbacon.org/harneroxford.htm
<<Charles Arundel accused De Vere of being "a buggerer of a boy that
is his cook." And added, "I have gone to the back door to satisfy
myself : at the which the boy hath come out all in a sweat, and I
have gone in and found "*the BEAST*" [De Vere] in the same plight.">>
I know, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 36 =>
.
.(L o r[D])A m b r o s e(D U D L E[Y])Erle o f(W A R W I C[K]e)L E a v e
. o f f t o w r i t e s p a r e s p eech a s p a c e b e[M]u t e O m u
. s e o f m i n e L e t b l u b r i ngte a r e s b e d e[A]w t h y f a
. c e O w a i l e w i t h w e e p i ngey n e T h e c o u[R]s e o f l i
. f e t h a t d r a w e s b u t b r ethi n d o l l o r a[L]l h i s d a
. y e s T i l l h a r t s t r i n g esbu r s t t i l l h[O W E]r o f d
. e a t h t i l p i l g r i m g o e shis w a y e s.
..............................................................
[K.MARLO/WE] 3
The string "KMARLOWE" does not occur as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 36 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.

It is really remarkable that, after all these years, you *still* do not know what an equidistant letter sequence is!

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. *AM(b)RO(s)E*
. *MAR(l)O(w)E*
That's not an anagram, Art. In fact, it isn't even close.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
-----------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
Loading...