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nomwic
2017-11-13 16:03:35 UTC
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Alexander Waugh found a cipher that uses the quotation "Courte deare verse" Art Neuendorfer noticed this some years before, can anyone remember when?
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-11-13 17:24:27 UTC
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Post by nomwic
Alexander Waugh found a cipher that uses the quotation "Courte deare verse"
Art Neuendorfer noticed this some years before, can anyone remember when?
----------------------------------------------------------
So far as I know Volker Multhopp of Essex, Maryland

https://www.mylife.com/volker-multhopp/volkermulthopp

was the first person to emphasis this thing back in the early days of HLAS:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
On Wed, 12 May 1999, Terry Ross <***@bcpl.net> wrote HLAS:

<<What we have is a marginal note to a passage of praise
for *Spenser & Daniel* . Here's the main passage
(taken from *The Shakespeare Allusion Book* 1:23):

[Polimanteia 1595]

Let divine Bartasse, eternally praise-worthie for his weeks worke, say
the best thinges were made first: Let other countries (sweet Cambridge)
envie, (yet admire) my Virgil, thy petrarch, divine Spenser. And
unlesse I erre, (a thing easie in such simplicitie) deluded by dearly
beloved Delia, and fortunatelie fortunate Cleopatra; Oxford thou maist
extoll thy courte-deare-verse happie Daniell, whose sweete refined muse,
in contracted shape, were sufficient amongst men, to gaine pardon of
the sinne to Rosemond, pittie to distressed Cleopatra, and
everliving praise to her loving Delia:

This passage has baffled some other anti-Stratfordians. Some, including
Volker (who has perhaps never seen the words in context), imagine that
"Oxford thou maist extoll thy courte-deare-verse" is meant as praise of
Edward de Vere, but the passage clearly shows that Samuel Daniel (a man
of whom his alma mater, Oxford, could be justly proud, just as Cambridge
could brag on Spenser) and not Vere (who is not even mentioned) is
being praised here. [Slightly off-topic: note that Covell's use
of "everliving" contains no suggestion that Delia is dead.]

The marginal note accompanying this passage reads,

. All praiseworthy. Lucrecia Sweet Shakspeare.
. Eloquent Gaveston. Wanton Adonis. Watsons heyre.
. So well graced Anthonie deserveth immortall
. praise from the hand of that divine Lady who like
. Corrina contending with Pindarus was oft victorious.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

My own interest has been rather in ELS ciphers rather than "codes."
.............................................................
The marginal note accompanying this passage reads,

. Al[L] prais[E]worth[Y]. Lucre[C]ia Swe[E]t Shak[S]peare.
. Eloquent Gaveston. Wanton Adonis. Watsons heyre.
. So well graced Anthonie deserveth immortall
. praise from the hand of that divine Lady who like
. Corrina contending with Pindarus was oft victorious.

[LEYCES] 6 : Prob. in marginal note ~ 1 in 58,000
................................................
[LEYCES] shortest pos. skip in KJV: 24

1 Peter 2:20 : For what glory is it, if, when ye be buffeted for your faults, ye sha[L]l take it patiently? but if, wh[E]n ye do well, and suffer for it, [Y]e take it patiently, this is a[C]ceptable with God. For even h[E]reunto were ye called: becau[S]e Christ also suffered for us,
..........................................................
The Polimanteia was dedicated to the [E]arle of [LEYCES]ter's
step-son & protege: Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex (1566-1601)
.
Spenser & Daniel both wrote dedications to Mary *SIDNEY* wife of
[LEYCES]ter's best friend: Henry Herbert Earl of Pembroke (1534-1601)

Robert Dudley, 1st [E]arle of [LEYCES]ter,
(24 June 1532 - 4 Sept. 1588) in 1565 knighted
Sir Thomas Lucy (24 April 1532 - 7 July 1600)

[LEYCES]ter is said to have disuaded Lucy from
prosecuting Shakspere for his deer poaching.
-----------------------------------------------------------
. http://tinyurl.com/p3la9rz
. P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses, (Golding)
.
. Too the Right Honourable and his singular good Lorde
. [R]obert [E]arle of [LEYCES]ter, Baron of Denbygyh,
. Knyght of the moste noble order of the Garter etc.,
. Arthur Goldyng gent, wisheth continuance of health,
. with prosperous estate and fcelicitie.
...........................................................
. Book 3 : Actaeon & Diana = [R.E.LEYCES.] & Elizabeth?
.
As soone a{S} with h{I}r scar{L}et whe{E}les ne{X}t morning bringeth light,
We will about our worke againe. But now Hiperion bright
Is in the middes of Heaven, and sear[E]s the fiel[D]es with fi[R]ie rayes.
T[A]ke up your toyles, and cease your worke, and let us go our wayes.
.
{SILEX-} 6
[EDRA] 9
.
Prob. of {SILEX-}[EDRA] in Metamorphoses ~ 1 in 1,250,000

http://www.nps.gov/features/yell/tours/fountainpaint/silexspring.htm
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140827.html
..............................................................
He wist not whither (having staid his pastime till the morrow)
Comes Cadmus Nephew to this thicke: and entring in with sorrow
(Such was his cursed cruell fate) saw Phebe where she washt.
The Damsels at the sight of man quite out of countnance dasht,
(Bicause they EVERichone were BARE and naked to the quicke)
Did beate their handes against their breasts, and cast out such a shricke,
That all the wood did ring thereof: and clinging to their dame
Did all they could to hide both hir and eke them[S]elves fro shame.
But Ph[E]be was of personage so [C]omly and so tall,
That b[Y] the middle of hir neck[E] she overpeerd them al[L].
Such colour as appear[E]s in Heaven by Phebus b[R]oken rayes
Directly shining on the Cloudes, or such as is alwayes
The colour of the Morning Cloudes before the Sunne doth show,
Such sanguine colour in the face of Phoebe gan to glowe
There standing naked in his sight. Who though she had hir gard
Of Nymphes about hir: yet she turnde hir bodie from him ward.
.............................................
___ <= 19 =>
.
. D i d a l l t h e y c o u l d t o h i
. d e b o t h h i r a n d e k e t h e m
. [S] e l v e s f r o s h a m e B u t P h
. [E] b e w a s o f p e r s o n a g e s o
. [C] o m l y a n d s o t a l l,T h a t b
. [Y] t h e m i d d l e o f h i r n e c k
. [E] s h e o v e r p e e r d t h e m a l
. [L].S u c h c o l o u r a s a p p e a r
. [E] s i n H e a v e n b y P h e b u s b
. [R] o k e n r a y e s
.
[R.E.LEYCES.] -19 : Prob. in Metamorphoses ~ 1 in 275
(Dedicated to [R]obert [E]arle of [LEYCES]ter!)
................................................
[R.E.LEYCES.] shortest skip in KJV: 1491
---------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.luminarium.org/renascence-editions/lodge/lodge1.html
.
. THOMAS LODGE: Rosalynde. Euphues golden Legacie,
. found after his death in his Cell at {SILEX}[EDRA],
.
Did not Rosalinde content her Rosader? The
Forrest[E]r at this smiling, {S}hooke his head,
an[D] folding h{I}s armes made this merrie [R]ep{L}y.
*TRUTH gentle Swaine*, Rosad{E}r h[A]th his Rosalynde,
but as I{X}ion had Juno, who thinking to possesse a
goddesse, only imbraced a clowd : in these imaginary
fruitions of fancie, I resemble the birds that
fed them selves with *ZEUXIS painted GRAPES* ;
...........................................................
. <= 28 =>
.
. T h e F o r r e s t[E]r a t t h i s s m i l i n g{S}h
. o o k e h i s h e a d,a n[D]f o l d i n g h{I}s a r m
. e s m a d e t h i s m e r r i e[R]e p{L}y*T R U T H g
. e n t l e S w a i n e*R o s a d{E}r h[A]t h h i s R o
. s a l y n d e,b u t a s I{X}i o n h a d J u[N]o,w h o
. t h i n k i n g t o p o s s e s s e a g o d d e s[S]e,
. o n l y i m b r a c e d a c l o w d
.
{SILEX-} 26
[EDRANS] 30 :
...........................................................
. Rosalynde: SALADYNES SONNET.
.
. If it be *TRUE* that heavens eternall course
. With [R]est[L]ess[E] swa[Y] and [C]eas[E]les[S] turning glides,
. If aire inconstant be, and swelling sourse
. Turne and returns with many fluent tides,
. If earth in winter summers pride *eSTRANGE* ,
. And Nature seemeth onely faire in change.
...................................................
[R.LEYCES] 4 : Prob. in Sonnet ~ 1 in 200,000
................................................
[R.LEYCES] shortest pos. skip in KJV: 392
...................................................
. If it be *TRUE* that our immortall spright,
. Derivde from heavenly pure, in wandring still
. In noveltie and *STRANGEnesse* doth delight,
. And by discoVEREnt power discerneth ill,
. And if the body for to worke his best
. Doth with the seasons change his place of rest.
.
. Whence *COMES* it that (inforst by furious Skies)
. I change both place and soyle, but not my hart ?
. Yet salve not in this change my maladies ?
. Whence growes it that each object workes my smart ?
. Alas I see my faith procures my misse,
. And change in love against my nature is.
------------------------------------------------------
(end of) Satire 2 - by John Marston

But I am vext, when swarmes of Iulians
Are still manur'd by lewd Precisians.
Who scorning Church rites, take the simbole vp
As s[L]ou[E]nl[Y], as [C]ar[E]le[S]se Courtiers slup
.............................................
. A s s
. [L] o u
. [E] n l
. [Y],a s
. [C] a r
. [E] l e
. [S] s e
.
[LEYCES] 3 : Prob. at end ~ 1 in 1990
-----------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer

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