Discussion:
HENRY [CONST]Able
(too old to reply)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-01-03 20:36:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
--------------------------------------------------------------
Daniel Kahneman:

"We know that people can maintain an unshakable faith
in any proposition, however absurd, when they are
sustained by a community of like-minded believers."
--------------------------------------------------------------
Thomas Lodge: Rosalynde p.34: or Euphues golden legacie (1590)
..........................................................
CORIDON: Ah Lorrell lad, what makes thee Herry lov[E]?
. A sugred harme, a poyson ful[L] of pleasure,
. A painted shri[N]e full-fild with rotten tre[A]sure,
. A heaven in shew, a hell [T]o them that prove.
.
. A gaine, in [S]eeming shadowed stil with [W]ant,
. A broken staffe which f(O)llie doth upholde,
. A flower (T)hat fades with everie fros(T)ie colde,
. An orient Rose spr(O)ng from a withred plant.
.
. A mi(N)utes joy to gaine a world of griefe,
. A subtil net to snare the idle minde,
. A seeing Scorpion, yet in seeming blinde,
. A poore rejoice, a plague without reliefe.
...............................................
. <= 23 =>
.
. A h L o r r e l l l a d,w h a t m a k e s t h
. e e H e r r y l o v [E] A s u g r e d h a r m e,
. a p o y s o n f u l [L] o f p l e a s u r e,A p
. a i n t e d s h r i [N] e f u l l-f i l d w i t
. h r o t t e n t r e [A] s u r e,A h e a v e n i
. n s h e w,a h e l l [T] o t h e m t h a t p r o
. v e.A g a i n e,i n [S] e e m i n g s h a d o w
. e d s t i l w i t h [W] a n t,A b r o k e n s t
.
. a f f e w h i c h f (O) l l i e d o t h u p h o
. l d e,A f l o w e r (T) h a t f a d e s w i t h
.
. e v e r i e f r o s (T) i e c o l d e,A n o r i
. e n t R o s e s p r (O) n g f r o m a w i t h r
. e d p l a n t.A m i (N) u t e s j o y t o g a i
.
. n e a w o r l d o f g r i e f e,

(NOT TO) [W.STANLE.] -23
-------------------------------------------------------
Thomas Lodge: Rosalynde p.48: or Euphues golden legacie (1590)
................................
It chaunced that day, that Gerismond the lawfull King of France
banished by Torismond, who with a lustie crue of Outlawes lived
in that Forrest, that day in honour of his birth made a feast
to all his bolde yeomen, and frolickt it with store of wine and
venison, sitting all at a long table under the shadow of Lymon
trees. To that place by chance Fortune conducted Rosader,
who seeing such a crue of brave men, having store of that
for want of which hee and Adam perished, hee stept boldly
to the boords end, and saluted the company thus :

WhatsoEVER thou be that art maister of these lustie squiers,
I salute thee as graciously as a man in extreame distresse
may : know that I and a fellow friend of mine are here
famished in the Forrest for want of food :
perish wee must unlesse relieved by thy favours.
Therefore if thou be a Gentleman, give meate to men,
and to such as are EVERiE way woorthie of
(L)if(E) : le(T) th{E} pr{O}ud{E}st (S)qu(I)re (T)ha(T)
si(T)s a(T) th[Y] ta[B]le, [R]IS[E] an[D] in[C]OUNTer
with mee in any honorable point of activitie
whatsoEVER, and if hee and thou prove me not a man,
send me away comfortlesse.
.................................
. <= 3 =>
.
. (L) i f
. (E): l e
. (T) t h
.
. {E} p r
. {O} u d
. {E} s t
.
. (S) q u
. (I) r e
. (T) h a
.
. (T) s i
. (T) s a
. (T) t h
.
. [Y] t a
. [B] l e,
. [R] I S
. [E] a n
. [D] i n
. [C] O U N T E r
..............................................
[C.DERBY] -3 : Prob. in Rosalynde ~ 1 in 640
-------------------------------------------------------
Thomas Lodge: Rosalynde p.52: or Euphues golden legacie (1590)

Therefore, in justice to punish thee, I spare thy life
for thy fathers sake, but banish thee for ever from the
court and countrey of France, and see thy departure be
within tenne dayes, els trust me thou shalt loose thy head,
and with that the King flew away in a rage, and left poore
Saladyne greatly perplexed. Who grieving at his exile,
yet determined to bear it with patience, and in penaunce
of his former folies to travaile abroade in eve[R]y coast
till he found out his br[O]ther Rosader. With whom now
I be[G]inne. Rosader beeing thus pref[E]rred to the place
of a Forreste[R] by Gerismond, rooted out the re[M]embrance
of his brothers unkindnes by continuall exercise,
traversing the groves and wilde Forrests, partly to
heare the melody of the sweete birds which recorded,
and partly to shew his diligent indeavour
in his MASTERS behalfe.
.....................................................
. <= 26 =>
.
. a n d i n p e n a u n c e o f h i s f o r m e r f o
. l i e s t o t r a v a i l e a b r o a d e i n e v e
. [R] y c o a s t t i l l h e f o u n d o u t h i s b r
. [O] t h e r R o s a d e r.W i t h w h o m n o w I b e
. [G] i n n e.R o s a d e r b e e i n g t h u s p r e f
. [E] r r e d t o t h e p l a c e o f a F o r r e s t e
. [R] b y G e r i s m o n d,r o o t e d o u t t h e r e
. [M] e m b r a n c e o f h i s b r o t h e r s u n k i
. n d n e s b y c o n t i n u a l l e x e r c i s e,

[ROGER M.] 26
-------------------------------------------------------
Thomas Lodge: Rosalynde p.98: or Euphues golden legacie (1590)
................................
Aliena having read over his Sonnet, began thus
pleasantly to descant upon it. I see, Saladyne (quoth
she) that as the Sun is no Sun without his brightnesse,
nor the Diamond accounted for precious unlesse it be
hard : so [M]en are not men unles[S]e they be [I]n love ;
an[D] their ho[N]ors are m[E]asured b[Y] their amours
not their labors, counting it more commendable for a
Gentleman to be ful of fancy, than full of vertue.
...............................................
. <= 8 =>
.
. s o m e n a r e
. n o t [M] e n u n
. l e s [S] e t h e
. y b e [I] n l o v
. e;a n [D] t h e i
. r h o [N] o r s a
. r e m [E] a s u r
. e d b [Y] t h e i
. r a m o u r s
.
[M.SIDNEY] 8 : Prob. in Rosalynde ~ 1 in 860
---------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Lodge

<<At sea with Captain Clarke in his expedition to Terceira and the Canaries, Thomas Lodge (c.1558 - September 1625), to beguile the tedium of his voyage, he composed his prose tale of Rosalynde, Euphues Golden Legacie, which afterwards furnished the story of Shakespeare's As You Like It. The novel, which in its turn owes some, though no very considerable, debt to the medieval Tale of Gamelyn (unwarrantably appended to the fragmentary Cookes Tale in certain manuscripts of Geoffrey Chaucer's works), is written in the euphuistic manner, but decidedly attractive both by its plot and by the situations arising from it. It has been frequently reprinted.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Stanley,_Countess_of_Derby

<<Margaret Stanley, COUNTEss of Derby (1540 - 28 September 1596) was the only surviving daughter of Henry Clifford, 2nd Earl of Cumberland. According to the will of Henry VIII, Margaret was in line to inherit the throne of England, but she died prior to the death of Elizabeth I. In 1579 she was arrested after she had been heard discussing a proposed marriage of Queen Elizabeth to the Duke d'Alençon. She was opposed to it as it threatened her own possible accession to the crown. She was then accused of using sorcery to predict when Elizabeth would die, and even of planning to poison Elizabeth. The countess was put under house arrest. She wrote to Francis Walsingham insisting on her innocence. No charges were brought against the countess, but *SHE WAS BANISHED FROM COURT*. She wrote repeatedly to the queen complaining that she was in a "black dungeon of sorrow and despair....overwhelmed with heaviness through the loss of your majesty's favor and gracious countenance."

Margaret married Henry Stanley (September 1531 - 25 September 1593), 4th Earl of Derby on 7 February 1554. They had something of a stormy relationship. Margaret wrote that there were several "breaches and reconciliations", but that her husband finally left her leaving serious debt IN 1593.

She died in 1596 without having recovered royal favour, and having outlived her eldest son, *Ferdinando (1559 - 16 April 1594)*. Her granddaughter, Lady Anne Stanley, Ferdinando's oldest daughter, took her place as heiress presumptive. Anne, her two younger sisters, and their children were passed over for James VI of Scotland, who had a better claim by birth.>>
.....................................................
The Tempest (Folio 1, 1623) Act 1, Scene 1

Enter Alonso, Sebastian, Anthonio, *Ferdinando* ,
Gonzalo, and others.
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Thomas Lodge: Rosalynde p.60: or Euphues golden legacie (1590)

<<Come on (quoth Ganimede)
this sermon of yours is but a subtiltie to lie stil
a bed, because either you think the morning cold,
or els I being gone, you would steal a nappe :
this shift carries no paulme, and therefore up and away.
And for Love, let me alone, ile whip him away with nettles,
and set disdaine as a charme to withstand his forces ;
a[N]d therefore looke you to y[O]ur selfe : be not too
bold, fo[R] Venus can make you bend : no[R] too coy, for
Cupid hath a pi[E]rcing dart, that will make [Y]ou crie
Peccavi. And that i[S] it (quoth Aliena) that hath
*RAISED* you so earlie this morning. And with that she
slipt on her peticoat, and start up ; and assoone as she
had made her ready, a{N}d taken her breakfast, aw{A}y goe
these two with thei{R} bagge and bottles to the {F}ield,
in more pleasant content of mynd, then EVER they were
in the court of Torismond.>>
.....................................................
. <= 21 =>
.
. a[N]d t h e r e f o r e l o o k e y o u t
. o y[O]u r s e l f e:b e n o t t o o b o l
. d,f o[R]V e n u s c a n m a k e y o u b e
. n d:n o[R]t o o c o y,f o r C u p i d h a
. t{H}a p i[E]r c i{N}g d a{R}t,t h a t w i
. l l m a k e[Y]o u c r i e P e c c a v i.A
. n d t h a t i[S]i t(q u o t h A l i e n a)
. t h a t h a t h*R A{I}S E D*y o u s{O}e a
. r l i e(T|H}i s m o r n i{N}g.A n d w i t
. h t h a(T)s h e s l i p t o n h e r p e t
. i c o a(T)a n d s t a r t u p;a n d a s s
. o o n e a s s h e h a d m a d e h e r r e
. a d y,a{N}d t a k e n h e r b r e a k f a
. s t,a w{A}y g o e t h e s e t w o w i t h
. t h e i{R}b a g g e a n d b o t t l e s t
. o t h e{F}i e l d,
.
{HENR.} 4
{IOHN} 8
{FRAN.} -21
[NORREYS] 22 : Prob. in Rosalynde ~ 1 in 400
--------------------------------------------------
JULY 6, 1604 - Edward de Vere buried
. on St. GodeliEVE's Day
................................................
July 6, 1070 - St. Godelieve murdered by
. *DROWNING IN A POND* after being strangled into
. unconciousness by her mother-in-law's servants.
------------------------------------------------------
http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/NORREYS.htm
.
Francis [NORREYS] (1° E. Berkshire)
Born: 1578 / *July 6* 1582
Acceded: 28 Jan 1620
Died: 29 Jan 1621
.
Succeeded to his grandfather's barony as 2° B. Norreys of
Rycote and also to the estates of his uncle Sir Edward Norreys.
.
In 1621 Francis was created Earl of Berkshire.
.
_ He left no sons and the earldom became extinct,
.
but the BARONY descended to his daughter Elizabeth (d. 1645),
- the wife of Edward Wray (d. 1658).
.
Their daughter Bridget (b. 1627 -- d. 1657) married as his 2nd wife
Montagu Bertie, 2nd Earl of Lindsey, and their son James Bertie
(1654--1699) became Baron Norris (or Norreys) in 1657, and
was created *EARL of ABINGDON* ifl 1682. His descendants
the Berties, *EARLs of ABINGDON*, still hold this barony,
and are the present representatives of the family of Norris.
.
Married: Bridget De VERE 1598
.
Children: Elizabeth NORREYS (Baroness)
.
Buried: 28 Nov 1645, Westminster Abbey, London, England
.................................................
The name Norreys has at least 2 potential derivations: one who came from the north or who lived in the north (there was a word "norreis" meaning a northerner), or from one who cared for others (the word "norrice" for nurse).
------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Norris,_1st_Baron_Norreys

<<Henry [NORREYS], Baron [NORREYS] (1525 - 27 June 1601) belonged to an old Berkshire family, many members of which had held positions at the English court. The early years of Henry's life are obscure. His mother had died in 1531, and his father was beheaded in 1536, leaving him and his younger sister Mary orphans.

Henry was made a Knight of the Shire for Berkshire in 1547. His wife, Margery, was the coheir of her wealthy father. The deaths of Henry's uncle (1563) and father-in-law (1559) greatly increased Henry's already considerable wealth. Elizabeth believed his father had died for his loyalty to her mother, Queen Anne, and brought him and his wife into her trusted circle, where he would stay for the remainder of his life. Elizabeth visited the couple at their estate Rycote, Oxfordshire, on numerous occasions; in September 1566 on her return from Oxford, during which she knighted Henry. He was summoned to the House of Lords, as Baron Norreys of Rycote, on 8 May 1572. Life-size effigies of Lord and Lady Norreys lie beneath an elaborate canopy supported by marble pillars and they are surrounded by kneeling figures of their children in St. Andrew's Chapel in Westminster Abbey.>>
---------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Norreys

<<Sir John [NORREYS] (ca. 1547 - 3 July 1597), was the most acclaimed English soldier of his day, Norreys participated in every Elizabethan theatre of war: in the Wars of Religion in France, in Flanders during the Eighty Years' War of Dutch liberation from Spain, in the Anglo-Spanish War, and above all in the Tudor conquest of Ireland.

The eldest son of Henry Norreys by his marriage to Marjorie Williams, Norreys was born at Yattendon Castle. His paternal grandfather Henry Norreys (c. 1482 - 17 May 1536) had been executed after being found guilty of adultery with Queen Anne Boleyn. Norreys's great uncle had been a guardian of the young Elizabeth. The future Queen was a great friend of Norreys's mother, whom she nicknamed "Black Crow" on account of her jet black hair. Norreys inherited his mother's hair colour, so that he was known as "Black Jack" by his troops.

In 1566, Norreys's father was posted as English ambassador to France, and in 1567, when he was about nineteen, Norreys and his elder brother William were present at the Battle of Saint Denis. When his father was recalled from France in January 1571, Norreys stayed behind and developed a friendship with the new ambassador, Francis Walsingham. In 1571, Norreys served as a volunteer under Admiral Coligny, fighting on the Huguenot side during the French Wars of Religion.

Two years later, Norreys served as a captain under Sir Walter Devereux, recently created first Earl of Essex, who was attempting to establish a plantation in the Irish province of Ulster. He supported his elder brother William, who was in command of a troop of a hundred horse which had been recruited by their father, then serving as Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire.

When Essex entered Antrim to attack Sorley Boy MacDonnell, it was to Rathlin Island that Sorley Boy and the other Scots sent their wives and children, their aged and sick, for safety. Lord Essex, knowing that the refugees were still on the island, sent orders to Norreys, who was in command at Carrickfergus, to take a company of soldiers with him, cross over to Rathlin, and kill what he could find. Norreys had brought cannon with him, so that the weak defences were speedily destroyed, and after a fierce assault, in which several of the garrison were killed. The Scots were obliged to yield at discretion and all were killed, except the chief and his family, who were reserved for ransom. The death toll was two hundred. Then it was discovered that several hundred more, chiefly women and children, were hidden in the caves about the shore: they too were attacked and all massacred. A fort was erected on the island, but was evacuated by Norreys, and he was recalled with his troops to Dublin within 3 months, when it was clear that the colonisation would fail.>>
-------------------------------------------------------
HUGH HOLLAND: First Folio (1623)

Upon the Lines and Life of the Famous
Scenicke Poet, [MASTER] WILLIAM SHAKESPE[A]RE

Those hands, which you [S]o clapt, go {N}ow, and wring
Y[O]u Britaines b{R}ave; for do[N]e a{R}e Shakespear{E|S) daye[S]:
Hi(S) da{Y}es are don(E), that made the (D)ainty Playes,
...............................................
. <= 12 =>
.
. T h o s e h a n d s,w h
. i c h y o u[S]o c l a p
. t, g o {N} o w,a n d w r i
. n g Y {O} u B r i t a i n
. e s b {R} a v e,f o r d o
. [N] e a {R} e S h a k e s p
. e a r {E}(S)d a y e[S]H i
. (S) d a {Y} e s a r e d o n
. (E),t h a t m a d e t h e
. (D) a i n t y P l a y e s,

{NORREY} 12
(S.E.D.) 12
.................................................
Which made the Globe of heav'n and earth to ring.
Dry'de is that vei[NE, D]ry'd is the Thespian Spring,
Turn'd all to teares, and Phoebus clouds his rayes :
That corp's, that coffin now besticke those bayes,
Which crown'd him Poet first, t{H}en Po{E}ts Ki{N}g.
If T{R}aged{IE}s might any Prologue have,
All those he made, would s[C]arse make a one t[O] this:
Where Fame, [N]ow that he gone i[S] to the grave
(Dea[T]hs publique tyring-house) the Nuncius is,
.........................
. <= 5 =>
.
. t {H} e n P
. o {E} t s K
. i {N} g. I f
. T {R} a g e
. d {I E} s m
. i g h t a
. n y P r o
. l o g u e
. h a v e, A
. l l t h o
. s e h e m
. a d e, w o
. u l d s [C]
. a r s e m
. a k e a o
. n e t [O] t
. h i s: W h
. e r e F a
. m e,[N] o w
. t h a t h
. e g o n e
. i [S] t o t
. h e g r a
. v e (D e a
. [T] h s

{HEN(RIE)} 5
[CONST.] 14
---------------------------------------------------
(Deaths publique *TYRing-house* ) the *NUNCIUS* is,
For though his line of life went soone about,

The life yet of his lines shall nEVER *OUT*
.................................................
*OUT*, adv. [OE. *UT* , Sw. *UT* , Goth. *UT*]
.
*NUNCIUS* : *MESSENGER*
.................................................
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidereus_Nuncius

<<Sidereus *Nuncius* ( *Starry Messenger* ) is a short treatise
published by Galileo in March 1610. It's the first scientific
treatise based on observations made through a telescope.>>
-------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 64
.
WHen I haue seene by times fell hand defa[C]ed
The rich proud cost of outworne buried age,
When sometime *loftie t[O]wers* I see downe rased,
And *brasse eternall* slaue to mortall rage.
.
Whe[N] I haue seene t{H}e hungry Ocean gaine
Aduantag{E} on the Kingdome of the [S]hoare,
A{N}d the firme soile win of the wat{RY} maine,
Increasing store wi[T]h losse, and losse with store.
.
When I haue seene such interchange of st[A]te,
....................................................
. <= 27 =>
.
. W H e n I h a u e s e e n e b y t i m e s f e l l h a
. n d d e f a[C]e d T h e r i c h p r o u d c o s t o f
. o u t w o r n e b u r i e d a g e,W h e n s o m e t i
. m e*l o f t i e t[O]w e r s*I s e e d o w n e r a s e
. d,A n d*b r a s s e e t e r n a l l*s l a u e t o m o
. r t a l l(R)a g e.W h e[N]I h a u e s(E)e n e t{H}e(H)
. u n g r y O c e a n g a i n e A d u a n t a g{E}o n t
. h e K i n g d o m e o f t h e[S]h o a r e,A{N}d t h e
. f i r m e s o i l e w i n o f t h e w a t{R Y}m a i n
. e,I n c r e a s i n g s t o r e w i[T]h l o s s e,a n
. d l o s s e w i t h s t o r e.W h e n I h a u e s e e
. n e s u c h i n t e r c h a n g e o f s t[A]t e,
.
(HENR.) -7
{HEN(RY)} 26
[CONSTA.] 57
....................................................
Or state it selfe confounded, to decay,
Ruine hath taught me thus to ruminate
That Time will come and take my love away.
.
This thought is as a death, which cannot choose
But weepe to haue, that which it feares to loose.
---------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Constable

<<{HEN(RY)} [CONSTA]ble (1562 – 9 October 1613) was an English poet, known particularly for Diana, one of the first English sonnet sequences. In 1591 he converted to Catholicism, and lived in exile on the continent for some years. He returned to England at the accession of King James, but was soon a prisoner in the Tower and in the Fleet. He died an exile at Liege in 1613.

He was sent to Edinburgh in 1589 on the occasion of King James's marriage, and by this time was a member of the circle of Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex. His religious convictions were still to outward appearances Protestant. About this time he is credited with having written the anonymous tract Examen pacifique de la doctrine des Huguenots, published in September 1589, in which, according to Sullivan, he wrote as a Roman Catholic urging his countrymen to support Henri IV, who had just been crowned King.

In 1591 Constable went to Normandy with the English forces under Essex who laid siege to Rouen. At some time between his arrival in France and the death of his father on 12 November 1591 Constable openly embraced Roman Catholicism.

In 1592 Diana, a sequence of twenty-three sonnets by Constable, was published in London by Richard Smith, one of the first sonnets sequences in English. A second edition, containing five new sonnets by Constable with additions by Sir Philip Sidney and other poets followed in 1594. Sullivan considers that the 1594 publication was undertaken on Richard Smith's initiative. There were two further editions in 1597 and 1604. Four poems by Constable were included in England's Helicon in 1600, among them Damelus Song to his Diaphenia and Venus and Adonis. According to Hazlitt, 'A more beautiful specimen of early English lyric poetry than The Sheepheard's Song of Venus and Adonis could hardly be found in the whole circle of Elizabethan poetry'. Of the numerous sonnets he wrote, the twenty-eight of the sonnet sequence Diana, and the four prefixed to Sir Philip Sidney's An Apology for Poetry, contain his best work. In My lady's presence makes the roses red, he is able to capture Spenser's charm. His rhyme scheme is mixed Italian and English, like Sidney's, the octave being Italian and the sestet English.

Constable was highly reputed as a poet in his own day. In the censure of contemporary poets in Act I, Scene ii, of the anonymous Elizabethan play, The Return From Parnassus, Iudicio passes judgment favourably on Constable, saying that:

Sweete Constable doth take the wondring eare
And layes it up in willing prisonment.
................................................................
Ben Jonson also pays tribute to Constable's verse in Underwood:

Hath our great Sydney Stella set,
Where nEVER STAR shone brighter yet?
Or *CONSTABLE's* ambrosiac muse
Made Diana not his notes refuse>>
--------------------------------------------------------
. Cymbeline (F.F. 1623) Act V scene v
.
Iach.: Your daughters Chastity, (there it beginnes)
. He spake of her, as Dian had hot dreames,
. And she alone, were cold: Whereat, I wretch
. Made scruple of his praise, and wager'd with him
. Pee{C}es of G{O}ld, 'gai{N}st thi{S}, whic[H] {T}hen he wor[E]
. Vpon his ho[N]our'd finge[R]) to attaine
. [I]n suite the place of's bed, and winne this Ring
..............................
. <= 5 =>
.
. P e e
. {C} e s o f
. G {O} l d,'g
. a i {N S T}
. t h i {S},w
. h i c [H]{T}
. h e n h e
. w o r [E] V
. p o n h i
. s h o [N] o
. u r' d f i
. n g e [R])t
. o a t t a
. i n e [I] n
. s u i t e

[HENRI.] 10
{CONST.} 6
---------------------------------------------------
http://fly.hiwaay.net/~paul/jonson/discshake.html

Jonson, Timber: or, Discoveries:

Poetry, in this latter Age, hath prov'd but a meane Mistresse, [T]o such
as have wholly addicted themselves to her, or given their name[S] up to her
family. They who have but saluted her on the by, and now and the[N] tendred
their visits, shee hath done much for, and {A}dvanced in the way [O]f their
owne professions ({B}oth the Law, and the Gospel) beyond all they [C]ou{L}d
have hoped, or done for themselves, without h{E}r favour. Wherein s(He) doth
emulate the judicious, but perposterous bounty of the times Grandes :
who accumulate all they can upon the Parasite, or Fresh-man in their
friendship; but thinke an old Client, or honest servant, boundby
his place to write, and starve.
..................................................
. <= 19 =>
.
. [T] o s u c h a s h a v e w h o l l y a
. d d i c t e d t h e m s e l v e s t o
. h e r, o r g i v e n t h e i r n a m e
. [S] u p t o h e r f a m i l y.T h e y w
. h o h a v e b u t s a l u t e d h e r
. o n t h e b y,a n d n o w a n d t h e
. [N] t e n d r e d t h e i r v i s i t s,
. s h e e h a t h d o n e m u c h f o r,
. a n d {A} d v a n c e d i n t h e w a y
. [O] f t h e i r o w n e p r o f e s s i
. o n s({B} o t h t h e L a w,a n d t h e
. G o s p e l)b e y o n d a l l t h e y
. [C] o u {L} d h a v e h o p e d,o r d o n
. e f o r t h e m s e l v e s,w i t h o
. u t h {E} r f a v o u r.W h e r e i n s
. (H e) d o t h e m u l a t e t h e j u d
. i c i o u s,b u t p e r p o s t e r o
. u s b o u n t y o f t h e t i m e s G
. r a n d e s
.................................
[(He.) CONST-] -57
{-ABLE} 38
.....................................................
...I remember, the Players have often mentioned it as an honour to Shakespeare, that in his writing, (whatsoever he penn'd) hee never blotted out line. My answer hath beene, Would he had blotted a thousand. Which they thought a malevolent speech. I had not told posterity this, but for their ignorance, who choose that circumstance to commend their friend by, wherein he most faulted. And to justifie mine owne candor, (for I lov'd the man, and doe honour his memory (on this side Idolatry) as much as any.) Hee was (indeed) honest, and of an open, and free nature : had an excellent Phantsie ; brave notions, and gentle expressions : wherein hee flow'd with that facility, that sometime it was necessary he should be stop'd : Sufflaminandus erat ; as Augustus said of Haterius. His wit was in his owne power ; would the rule of it had beene so too. Many times hee fell into those things, could not escape laughter : As when hee said in the person of Caesar, one speaking to him ; Caesar, thou dost me wrong. Hee replyed : Caesar did never wrong, but with just cause : and such like ; which were ridiculous. But hee redeemed his vices, with his vertues. There was ever more in him to be praysed, then to be pardoned.
---------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 99
.
. THe forward violet thus did I chide,
. Sweet theefe whence didst thou steale thy sweet that smels
. If not from my loues breath,the purple pride,
. Which on thy soft cheeke for complexion dwells?
. In my loues veines thou hast too grosely died,
.
. The Lillie I conde[M]ned for thy hand,
. [A]nd buds of {MARIE}[R]o(M) h(A)d (S)t(O)l(N)e th[Y] haire,
. The Roses [F]earefully on thornes did stand,
. {O(NE)} blushing shame,an other white dispaire:
.
. A third nor red, nor white,had stolne of both,
. And to his robbry had annext thy breath,
. But {FOR} his theft in pride of {ALL} his growth
. A vengfull canker eate him vp to death.
.
. More flowers I noted,yet I none could see,
. But sweet,or culler it had stolne from thee.
..................................................
. <= 14 =>
.
. L i l l i e I c o n d e [M] n
. e d f o r t h y h a n d,[A] n
. d b u d s o f{M A R I E}[R] o
. (M)h(A)d(S)t(O)l(N)e t h [Y] h
. a i r e,T h e R o s e s [F] e
. a r e f u l l y o n t h o r
. n e s d i d s t a n d,

(MASON) 2 : Prob. in any sonnet ~ 1 in 38
[MARY F.] 14 : Prob. in any sonnet ~ 1 in 19
{MARIE} 1 : one of 2 {MARIE/MARY} sonnet "flowers."
.........................................................
http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/Archive/99comm.htm

<<Uniquely among the 154 Sonnets, Sonnet 99 alone has 15 lines instead of the usual 14. The young man appears to have stolen the poet's mistress. In this sonnet the guilty party is the various conventional beauties of nature, the violet, lily, marjoram [{MARIE}Rom] and rose, which have committed theft. One is tempted to conclude that theft is inherent in nature - the youth is stolen from, but he will steal, or has already stolen from others. All things steal from each other and the world is an amoral place to live in.>>
----------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Fitton

<<[MARY F]itton (Baptised 24 June 1578 - 1647) was a maid of honour to Queen Elizabeth. She is noted for her scandalous affairs with [W]illiam [H]erbert,
3rd Earl of Pembroke and others. She is considered by some to be
the "Dark Lady" of Shakespeare's sonnets.>>
.........................................................
http://literature.org/authors/kemp-william/nine-daies-morrice.html

William Kempe dedicated _Nine Daies Wonder_ (1600)
to "Mistress {ANNE??} [FITTON]"

<<Honorable (M)istris in the waine of my little wit, I (A)m forst to desire your
protection, else every B(A)llad-sing{E}r will proclaime me bankrupt of ho(N)esty
A sort o[F] mad fellows seei{N}g me me(R)rily dispos'd in a Morrice, have so
bepa[I]nted mee in pri(N)t si{N}c{E} my gambols began from (L)ondo{N} to Norwich,
[T]hat (h(A)ving but a{N} ill f{A}ce before) I shall app(E|A}re to the world
wi[T]h(O)ut a face, if your fayre hand wipe (N)ot away their foule colours.
[O]ne hath written K{E}mps farewell to the tu{N}e of Kery, merym Buffe:
a[N]other his desperate d{A}ungers in his late travaile: the third

his entertainement to New-Mark(E)t; which towne I came never
neere by the length of halfe the heath...>>
.......................................................................
. <= 53 =>
.
. Honorab l e(M)ist r isinthew a i n e o fmylittlewitIAmf o rsttodesi
. reyourp r o t ect i onelseev e r y B(A)lladsingErwillpr o claimemeb
. ankrupt o f h oNe s tyAsorto [F] m a d f ellowsseeiNgmeme(R)rilydispo
. sdinaMo r r i ceh a vesobepa [I] n t e d meeinpriNtsiNcEm y gambolsbe
. ganfrom(L)o n don t oNorwich [T] h a t h AvingbutaNillfAc e beforeIsh
. allappE A r e tot h eworldwi [T] h(O)u t afaceifyourfayre h andwipeNo
. tawayth e i r fou l ecolours [O] n e h a thwrittenKEmpsfa r ewelltoth
. etuNeof K e r yme r ymBuffea [N] o t h e rhisdesperatedAu n gersinhis
. latetra v a i let h ethirdhi s e n t e rtainementtoNewM a rkEtwhich
. towneIc a m e nev e rneereby t h e l e ngthofhalfethehe a th
.
[FITTON] 53 : Prob. at start ~ 1 in 500
(MARLO) 70 : Prob. at start ~ 1 in 48
(ANNE) 77,77
{ANNE} -55,-24,-19 : Prob. 5 {ANNE}s ~ 1 in 47
------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2017-01-04 01:43:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
"We know that people can maintain an unshakable faith
in any proposition, however absurd, when they are
sustained by a community of like-minded believers."
Absolutely, Art -- indeed, that fact explains the persistence of Velikovskians, belieVERs in a flat earth, and anti-Stratfordians.

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 26 =>
.
. a n d i n p e n a u n c e o f h i s f o r m e r f o
. l i e s t o t r a v a i l e a b r o a d e i n e v e
. [R] y c o a s t t i l l h e f o u n d o u t h i s b r
. [O] t h e r R o s a d e r.W i t h w h o m n o w I b e
. [G] i n n e.R o s a d e r b e e i n g t h u s p r e f
. [E] r r e d t o t h e p l a c e o f a F o r r e s t e
. [R] b y G e r i s m o n d,r o o t e d o u t t h e r e
. [M] e m b r a n c e o f h i s b r o t h e r s u n k i
. n d n e s b y c o n t i n u a l l e x e r c i s e,
[ROGER M.] 26
"Roger'm"? Doesn't that express Oxford's attitude toward Oxford's boys, Art?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 5 =>
.
. t {H} e n P
. o {E} t s K
. i {N} g. I f
. T {R} a g e
. d {I E} s m
[More crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
{HEN(RIE)} 5
The string "HENRIE" does not occur in the above text as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 5, Art. Your incompetence in equidistant letter sequences is pretty incontroVERtible proof that you cannot count.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 27 =>
.
. W H e n I h a u e s e e n e b y t i m e s f e l l h a
. n d d e f a[C]e d T h e r i c h p r o u d c o s t o f
. o u t w o r n e b u r i e d a g e,W h e n s o m e t i
. m e*l o f t i e t[O]w e r s*I s e e d o w n e r a s e
. d,A n d*b r a s s e e t e r n a l l*s l a u e t o m o
. r t a l l(R)a g e.W h e[N]I h a u e s(E)e n e t{H}e(H)
. u n g r y O c e a n g a i n e A d u a n t a g{E}o n t
. h e K i n g d o m e o f t h e[S]h o a r e,A{N}d t h e
. f i r m e s o i l e w i n o f t h e w a t{R Y}m a i n
. e,I n c r e a s i n g s t o r e w i[T]h l o s s e,a n
. d l o s s e w i t h s t o r e.W h e n I h a u e s e e
. n e s u c h i n t e r c h a n g e o f s t[A]t e,
.
(HENR.) -7
{HEN(RY)} 26
The string "HENRY" does not occur in the above text as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26, Art. Your farcical incompetence in equidistant letter sequences is pretty incontroVERtible proof that you cannot count.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 19 =>
.
. [T] o s u c h a s h a v e w h o l l y a
. d d i c t e d t h e m s e l v e s t o
. h e r, o r g i v e n t h e i r n a m e
. [S] u p t o h e r f a m i l y.T h e y w
. h o h a v e b u t s a l u t e d h e r
. o n t h e b y,a n d n o w a n d t h e
. [N] t e n d r e d t h e i r v i s i t s,
. s h e e h a t h d o n e m u c h f o r,
. a n d {A} d v a n c e d i n t h e w a y
. [O] f t h e i r o w n e p r o f e s s i
. o n s({B} o t h t h e L a w,a n d t h e
. G o s p e l)b e y o n d a l l t h e y
. [C] o u {L} d h a v e h o p e d,o r d o n
. e f o r t h e m s e l v e s,w i t h o
. u t h {E} r f a v o u r.W h e r e i n s
. (H e) d o t h e m u l a t e t h e j u d
. i c i o u s,b u t p e r p o s t e r o
. u s b o u n t y o f t h e t i m e s G
. r a n d e s
.................................
[(He.) CONST-] -57
The string "HECONST [sic]" -- which is moronic nonsense in any case -- does not occur in the above text as an equidistant letter sequence of skip -57, Art. Your farcical incompetence in equidistant letter sequences is pretty incontroVERtible proof that you cannot count. MoreoVER, the string that does occur in an equidistant letter sequence of skip -57 (beginning with the initial "H" in the fourth line from the bottom) is "HCONST [sic]", which is also moronic nonsense.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-01-04 14:26:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
"We know that people can maintain an unSHAKablE faith
in any proposition, however absurd, when they are
sustained by a community of like-minded believers."
Lea wrote: <<Absolutely, Art>>

Art

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