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To th' trunk again, and shut the spring of it.
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v***@gmail.com
2017-05-06 20:59:34 UTC
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Does anyone know the origin of the word 'trunk'?

Its meaning seems to be used variously by the Author

Coriolanus Cor V.iii.23 Wherein this trunk was framed, and in her hand
Cymbeline Cym I.vii.196.2 They are in a trunk,
Cymbeline Cym I.vii.209 Send your trunk to me, it shall safe be kept,
Cymbeline Cym II.ii.11 Sleeps. Iachimo comes from the trunk
Cymbeline Cym II.ii.47 To th' trunk again, and shut the spring of it.
Cymbeline Cym II.ii.51 Goes into the trunk. The scene closes
Cymbeline Cym IV.ii.353 And never false. Soft ho, what trunk is here?
Henry IV Part 1 1H4 II.iv.437 thy companion. Why dost thou converse with that trunk of
Henry IV Part 2 2H4 IV.v.228 From this bare withered trunk. Upon thy sight
Henry V H5 III.vi.152 My ransom is this frail and worthless trunk;

I happened upon this when considering British terms 'boot' and American 'trunk' for the arse of a car, though on-line etymologies did not explain what a trunk was, except to illustrate 'steamer-trunk' and so on. It does not appear to be a very old word — eg, not Saxon, nor even Anglo-Norman.

Anyone have an idea?

Phil Innes
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-05-06 22:35:14 UTC
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http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=trunk

trunk (n.1) mid-15c., "box, case," from Old French tronc "alms box in a church," also "trunk of a tree, trunk of the human body, wooden block" (12c.), from Latin truncus "trunk of a tree, trunk of the body," of uncertain origin, perhaps originally "mutilated, cut off." The meaning "box, case" is likely to be from the notion of the body as the "case" of the organs. English acquired the "main stem of a tree" and "torso of the body" senses from Old French in late 15c. The sense of "luggage compartment of a motor vehicle" is from 1930. Railroad trunk line is attested from 1843; telephone version is from 1889.
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trunk (n.2) "elephant's snout," 1560s, apparently from trunk (n.1), perhaps from confusion with trump (n.2), short for trumpet.
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marco
2017-05-08 13:09:54 UTC
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trunks

To lie like pawns lock'd up in chests and trunks, King John: V, ii

Of wreakful heaven, whose bare unhoused trunks, Timon of Athens: IV, iii

Into the trunks of men: thy currish spirit Merchant of Venice: IV, i

Are empty trunks o'erflourish'd by the devil. Twelfth Night: III, iv

William Shakespeare, paperback writer
A***@germanymail.com
2017-05-09 15:53:20 UTC
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Post by marco
trunks
To lie like pawns lock'd up in chests and trunks, King John: V, ii
Of wreakful heaven, whose bare unhoused trunks, Timon of Athens: IV, iii
Into the trunks of men: thy currish spirit Merchant of Venice: IV, i
Are empty trunks o'erflourish'd by the devil. Twelfth Night: III, iv
William Shakespeare, paperback writer
Art N

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