Discussion:
Authentic Shakespeare
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marco
2017-05-05 21:53:44 UTC
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Don-John Dugas's recent Shakespeare for Everyman offers a revisionist account
of the rise of “authentic” stagings of Shakespeare in the twentieth century.
The very meaning of “authentic” changed, as Sally Barnden explains in her
TLS review of Dugas's book: “Authentic Shakespeare performance was no
longer understood to be that which staged, for instance, The Merchant of
Venice in a grand reproduction of sixteenth-century Venice, but that
which replicated the conditions of the play's first performance, with
limited set, early modern costume, and full (or nearly full) texts.”


https://www.firstthings.com/blogs/leithart/2017/05/authentic-shakespeare

marc
marco
2017-05-06 13:24:57 UTC
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Of all the learned and authentic fellows,-- All's Well that Ends Well: II, iii

Discourse, of great admittance, authentic in your Merry Wives of Windsor: II, ii

But by degree, stand in authentic place? Toilus and Cressida: I, iii

As truth's authentic author to be cited, Toilus and Cressida: III, ii

William Shakespeare, authentic
A***@germanymail.com
2017-05-08 16:09:27 UTC
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Post by marco
Of all the learned and authentic fellows,-- All's Well that Ends Well: II, iii
Discourse, of great admittance, authentic in your Merry Wives of Windsor: II, ii
But by degree, stand in authentic place? Toilus and Cressida: I, iii
As truth's authentic author to be cited, Toilus and Cressida: III, ii
William Shakespeare, authentic
Art N

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