Discussion:
Of onelie hi(S) n(O)b(L)e (A)n(T)iquitie.
(too old to reply)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2016-12-19 22:13:30 UTC
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http://www.sourcetext.com/sourcebook/etexts/pandora/01.htm
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PANDORA, The Musyque of the beautie of his Mistresse Diana.
Composed by John Soowthern / Gentleman,
and dedicated to the right / Honorable,
Edward Deuer, Earle / of Oxenford, & c. 1584.
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To the ryght honourable the Earle of Oxenford. & c.
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Epode #1

No, no, the finger is his
Alone : that in the ende must bee
Made proude, with a garland lyke this,
and not ev'rie ryming novice,
That writes with small wit, and much paine:
And the (Gods knowe) idiot in vaine,
For it's not the way to Parnasse,
Nor it wyll neither come to passe,
If it be not in some wise fiction,
And of an ingenious invension :
And infanted with pleasant travaill,
For it alone must win the Laurell.
And onelie the Poet well borne,
Must be he that goes to Parnassus :
And not these companies of Asses,
That have brought verce almost to scorne.
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Epode #2

Amongst our well renowned men,
Dever merits a sylver pen,
Eternally to write his honour,
And I in a well polisht verse,
Can set up in our Universe,
A Fame, to endure for ever.
And fylde with a Furiae extreme,
Upon a well superbus ryme :
(On a ryme, and both strong and true)

I wyll (Dever) pushe thy lovanges,
.
[T]o the [E|A)r{E}s [O]f (P)eo[P]le (E)str{A}unges:
......................................................
. <= 6 =>
.
. [T]
. o t h e [E](A)
. r {E} s [O] f (P)
. e o [P] l e (E)
. s t r {A} u n
. g e s:

[POET] -5
(APE) 6
{APE} -7
..........................................
And ravishe them with thy vertue.
But in trueth I use but to sing,
After the well intuned string,
Of eyther of the great Prophets,
Or Thebain, or Calaborois:
Of whether of whome yet the voice,
Hath not beene knowne to our {POETS}.
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Strophe #3

But what shall I beginne to touch :
O Muses what have I begunne,
But speake wantons, what have I donne :
Take it of the charge is too much .
No, no, if I would there were made,
I could take an entyre Iliade,
Of onelie hi(S) n(O)b(L)e (A)n(T)iquitie.
But his vertues would blushe with sha[M]e :
If I should not by his owne name,
Give him [A] laude to our posteritie .
But if I will thu[S] like Pindar,
In many discourses Egar,
Bef[O]re I wyll come to my point :
Or, or touch his i[N]finitie
Of vertues, in this Poiesie,
Our song wyll never be conioint.
...............
(TALOS) -2
[MASON] 34
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Epode #3

In this Ode, but it's veritae :
And heere I sweare Dever tis thee,
That art ornament of England.
Vaunting me againe of this thing :
Which is, that I shall never sing,
A man so much honoured as thee,
And both of the Muses and mee .
And when I gette the spoyle of Thebes,
Having charged it on my shoulders.
In verses exempts fro the webbes,
Of the ruinous Filandinge systers:
I promise to builde thee a glorie,
That shall ever live in memorie .
In means while, take this lyttle thing :
But as small as it is : Devere.

Taunt us that never man before,
Now in England, knewe Pindars string.
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Non careo patria , Me caret Illa margis.
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Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2016-12-20 00:28:37 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
http://www.sourcetext.com/sourcebook/etexts/pandora/01.htm
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PANDORA, The Musyque of the beautie of his Mistresse Diana.
Here's a fact that your Petulant Paranoid persona should relish, Art: "diana" is Spanish for the bull's eye of a target, and "target" is an anagram of "Get Art!".

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]

Incidentally, Art, you neVER answerED the question that I asked you:

Do you know why both the Earl of Oxford and guests at Chernobyl hotels are pariahs?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
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Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2016-12-20 01:03:03 UTC
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You bore me, Dave
nordicskiv2
2016-12-20 17:05:28 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
You bore me, Dave
I VERy much doubt that, Art. You are obsessed with the Craft -- and, as a cowan, fascinated by anyone who actually knows something about it.

By far the more likely explanation is that you do not know the answer to the simple riddle that I posed. HoweVER, being a magnanimous soul, I will give you one more chance to work it out before REVealing the answer, Art:

Why are the Earl of Oxford and Chernobyl hotel guests pariahs?
Dennis
2016-12-20 18:58:44 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
http://www.sourcetext.com/sourcebook/etexts/pandora/01.htm
--------------------------------------------------------
PANDORA, The Musyque of the beautie of his Mistresse Diana.
Composed by John Soowthern / Gentleman,
and dedicated to the right / Honorable,
Edward Deuer, Earle / of Oxenford, & c. 1584.
--------------------------------------------------------
To the ryght honourable the Earle of Oxenford. & c.
...................................................
Epode #1
No, no, the finger is his
Alone : that in the ende must bee
Made proude, with a garland lyke this,
and not ev'rie ryming novice,
And the (Gods knowe) idiot in vaine,
For it's not the way to Parnasse,
Nor it wyll neither come to passe,
If it be not in some wise fiction,
And infanted with pleasant travaill,
For it alone must win the Laurell.
And onelie the Poet well borne,
And not these companies of Asses,
That have brought verce almost to scorne.
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"And of an ingenious INVENTION, INFANTED WITH PLEASANT TRAVAILE."

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A phrase selected by Puttenham as an example of an 'intollerable vice' in writing had been associated with the Earl of Oxford. This phrase was subsequently spoken by the affected courtier Amorphus in Jonson's _Cynthia's Revels_. Curiously, the phrase does not appear in full in the 1601 Quarto (while Oxford was alive) - but does appear in the 1616 and 1640 editions of Jonson's 'Works'.

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Jonson, _Cynthia's Revels_.

AMORPHUS. And there's her minion, Crites: why his advice more than

Amorphus? Have I not invention afore him? Learning to better

that INVENTION above him? and INFANTED with PLEASANT TRAVEL --

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Puttenham, Arte of English Poesie (1589)

CHAP. XXII.

Some vices in speaches and {w}riting are alwayes intollerable, some others now and then borne {w}ithall by licence of approued authors and custome. (snip)

Another of your intollerable vices is that which the Greekes call SORAISMUS, & we may call the [mingle mangle] as when we make our speach or writinges of sundry languages vsing some Italian word, or French, or Spanish, or Dutch, or Scottish, not for the nonce or for any purpose (which were in part excusable) but ignorantly and affectedly as one that said vsing this French word Roy, to make ryme with another verse, thus.

O mightie Lord or ioue, dame Venus onely ioy,

Whose Princely power exceedes ech other heauenly roy.

The verse is good but the terme peeuishly affected Another of reasonable good facilitie in translation finding certaine of the hymnes of Pyndarus and of Anacreons odes, and other Lirickes among the Greekes very well translated by Rounsard the French Poet,
&
applied to the honour of a great Prince in France, comes our minion and translates the same out of French into English, and applieth them to the honour of a GREAT NOBLE MAN in ENGLAND (wherein I commend his reuerent minde and duetie) but doth so impudently robbe the French Poet both of his prayse and also of his French termes, that I cannot so much pitie him as be angry with him for his iniurious dealing (our sayd maker not being ashamed to vse these French wordes freddon, egar, superbous, filanding, celest, calabrois, thebanois and a number of others, for English wordes, which haue no maner of conformitie with our language either by custome or deriuation which may make them tollerable. And in the end (which is worst of all) makes his vaunt that neuer English finger but his hath toucht Pindars string which was neuerthelesse word by word as Rounsard had said before by like braggery. These be his verses.

And of an ingenious INVENTION, INFANTED WITH PLEASANT TRAVAILE.

¶3.22.7 Whereas the French word is enfante as much to say borne as a child, in another verse he saith.

I {w}ill freddon in thine honour.

¶3.22.8 For I will shake or quiuer my fingers, for so in French is freddon, and in another verse.

But if I {w}ill thus like pindar, In many discourses egar.

¶3.22.9 This word egar is as much to say as to wander or stray out of

the way, which in our English is not receiued, not these wordes calabrois, thebanois, but rather calabrian, theban [filanding sisters] for the spinning sisters: this man deserves to be endited of pety larceny for pilfring other mens devises from them
&
converting them to his owne use, for in deede as I would wish every inventour which is the very Poet to receave the prayses of his invention, so would I not have a translatour be ashamed to be acknowen of his translation.

1601 Quarto - Cynthia's Revels, Jonson

Act IV, Sc. V

Amorphus

And there’s her Minion Criticus; why his advise more then Amorphus? Have I not Invention, afore him? Learning, to better that Invention, above him? And Travaile.

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1616 Folio, Jonson

Act IV, Sc V

Amorphus

And there’s her minion Crites! Why his advice more then Amorphus? Have not I invention, afore him? Learning, to better that invention, above him? And infanted, with pleasant travaile ----

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1640 Folio, 'Works' Jonson

Amorphus

And there’s her minion Crites! Why his advice more then Amorphus? Have not I invention afore him? Learning, to better that invention, above him? And infanted, with pleasant travaile ----

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Jenny C. Mann in 'Outlaw Rhetoric' discusses soraismus as a form of linguistic abuse, quoting from Quintilian's Institutio oratoria:

There is also what is called Sardismos, a style made up of a mixture of several kinds of language, for example a confusion of Attick with Doric, Aeolic with Ionic. We Romans commit a similar fault, if we combine the sublime with the mean, the ancient with the modern, the poetic with the vulgar, for this produces a monster like the one Horace invents at the beginning of the Ars Poetica:

Suppose a painter chose to put together
a man's head and a horse's neck,
and then added other limbs from different creatures.


She continues...'Only by preserving a pure Roman expression uncontaminated by dialect forms can one avoid producing a monstrous style made up of "limbs from different creatures, " added to a man's head on a horse's neck. Quintilian thus turns the centaur and other monsters into tropes for language unrestrained by proper boundaries. (Jenny C. Mann, Outlaw Rhetoric)
(SNIP)

Outlaw Rhetoric, Jenny C. Mann (con't.)

Puttenham's English term for soraismus, the "mingle mangle," aptly expresses the problematic of neologizing: the borrowing of foreign words enriches the English vernacular while also alienating that vernacular from itself. Earlier English rhetorics also describe soraismus as a linguistic "mingling": Richard Sherry defines the figure as "a mynglyng and heapyng together of wordes of diverse languages into one speche," and Henry Peacham likewise describes the figure as "a mingling together of divers Languages." Puttenham's English term further identifies the figure's "heapyng" and "mingling" as a "mangling," a mixture that is also a mutilation or a disfigurement. The term "mingle mangle" also showcases English's unique ability to make compound words, what Sidney calls "happy...compositions of two or three words together." Peacham's Garden of Eloquence (1577) acknowledges the potential specificity of the figure to the English vernacular, observing that "some think wee speake but little English, and that our speech is for the most parte borrowed of other languages, but chiefely of the Latine, as to the Learned it is well knowne." This reference to how "some" might disparage the English vernacular as a mingled tongue indicated how linguistic mixing registers as a kind of disfigurement perpetuated by the English language in particular. It also suggests that soraismusc ould be construed as a figure for the mixed English vocabulary.

In fact, many sixteenth-century complaints about the growing impurity of the English vernacular draw on the language of the English soraismus. Sir John Cheke advocated the preservation of the vernacular from the "mingle mangle," explaining in a preface to Sir Thomas Hoby's translation of Castiglione's Courtier (1561) that "I am of this opinion that our own tung shold be written cleane and pure, unmixt and unmangled with borrowing of other tunges, wherein if we take not heed bi time, ever borowing and never paying, she shall be fain to keep her house as bankrupt." Ralph Lever's The Art of Reason (1573) criticizes those who "with inckhorne termes doe change and corrupt the [mother tongue] making a mingle-mangle of their native speache," while the preface to Edmund Spenser's Shepheardes Calendar (1579) similarly complains that writers who patch up "the holes [in our mother tongue] with peces and rags of other languages...have made our English tongue a gallimaufry or hodgepodge of al other speeches." Such comments often analogize a mingled English vocabulary to a mangled English nation, as we can see in the prologue to John Lyly's Midas (1592), which adopts the terms "mingle mangle" to deride the mixture of the native and the foreign in the English nation. The prologue explains that "Trafficke and travell hath woven the nature of all Nations into ours and made this land like a Arras, full of devise, which was Broadecloth...Time hath confounded our mindes, our mindes the matter; but all commeth to this passe, that what heretofore hath been served in severall dishes for a feast, is not minced in a charger for a Gallimaufrey. If wee present a mingle-mangle, our fault is to be excused, for the whole worlde is become a Hodge-podge." These passages liken the mingled stock of the English vernacular to a bankrupt borrower in debt to foreign tongues, a plain garment patched with foreign fabric, and a mishmash of food served in a single dish. Such formulations identify the English vernacular - and in Lyly's case, the nation and even the "whole worlde" - as soraismus, or the "mingle mangle."
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Jonson’s Amorphus – Shreds of Forms/Deformed/Oxford/Shakespeare/Poet-Ape

Cynthias Revels, Amorphus/Oxford:

He that is with him is Amorphus
a Traveller, one so made out of the mixture and shreds
of forms, that himself is truly deform'd. He walks
most commonly with a Clove or Pick-tooth in his
Mouth, he is the very mint of Complement, all his Be-
haviours are printed, his Face is another Volume of
Essayes; and his Beard an Aristrachus. He speaks all
Cream skim'd, and more affected than a dozen of wait-
ing Women. He is his own Promoter in every place.
The Wife of the Ordinary gives him his Diet to main-
tain her Table in discourse, which (indeed) is a meer
Tyranny over the other Guests, for he will usurp all
the talk: Ten Constables are not so tedious.

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The English ape, the Italian imitation, the footesteppes of Fraunce VVherein is explaned, the wilfull blindnesse of subtill mischiefe, the striuing for starres, the catching of mooneshine: and the secrete found of many hollow hearts. by W.R.
Rankins, William, fl. 1587.


The English Ape, the Italian imi∣tation, the footesteppes of Fraunce.
Mala clandestina, pessima.
HE whose capacitie hath caught things (al∣most impossible for humain reason to reach) whose wit hath wonne the perfection of ex∣cellent enterprises, and whose braines haue beéne busied about the haughtyest attempts, may scarce compasse to contriue the subtile secrecie of this impugnancie: which, so resisteth the proper operation of natures decreé: that it blindeth it selfe with the hidden humors of vnknowne enormities. How may it then be, that he whose weakenes (euery way wanteth the perse∣uerance of such importance) shoulde naturally apply his pen, to portray the right & formall proportion of so strange an Ape? Except in this, that things of thēselues composed prodigious, can hardly by the same course be brought from their pristinate shape and former frame. Rightly then may it be regarded, that reason may soone erect a thing, which yeéldeth of it selfe no reasonable conformitie, but rather a preposterous enormitie. To what iudgement may I then appeale the indifferencie of my intent? If to the generall sort, (without an exception) the dulnes of their silence hath already condemned me. If to some in particular (whose qualitie conteineth a iudiciall voyce) I trust I shall neither (with the Persean dogs) haue my legs broken for barking before I espye a theéfe, nor my indeuors infringed by the stinglesse tongues of the serpent Phisae, whose will is good to hurt (though they want teéth to byte) Relying my selfe then vpon the chalenged choyse of my friendly Interpretors, I must take a little leaue of my Countrymen (who for the most part haue trauailed to Affricke, to taste of the treé Lotos (thereby as strangers to forget their owne Country) to tell them what scornefull conceites, Nations of forreine condition harbour in the entrayles of their heart. What scorching infamie their tongues (with pleasaunt laughter) whisper in the vineyards of Venus: when (as sacrificing Priestes) they thither repaire to performe the rites of their auncient customes: To adorne their Idolatrie with their perelesse perfumes of their countrey condition, with the golden genimes of their vsuall ioyes, with the fine fatnesse of their fleshly desires. When their mindes are tickled with these dayntie deuises, their tongues vnrippe the secrete closure of their hollowe heartes. Then, tell they foorth the Englishmans endeuor: Then sound they foorth the TRUMPE OF DEFAME to giue an Alarum of our assaulted securitie. Some terme him then, an English Italian: Other some an Italian Englishman. Some harpe vpon the cunning conuey of his imitation in inward disposition, and externall habite, inuenting then to follow the footesteps of other Nations. A second displaies the hatred of his harmefull heart: that (growing in Odium with his natiue soyle) he seékes some other line wherby he may direct the course of his life. Thus (imitating the Ape) the Englishman killeth his owne with culling, and prefers the corruption of a forraine Nation, be∣fore the perfection of his owne profession. This secret mis∣chiefe (seéming but a stemme) in time intendeth to proue a sturdie stalke.* This stalke adorned with the beautie of such painted blossomes (which Art hath graft: not Nature sprung) shall be found (in effect) as the Figge treé, which is said to depriue a Bull (being thereunto bound) of his natu∣rall strength. Howe hatefull will it hereafter seéme to our selues, when the bowels of that place which brought vs foorth, our Countrey that nourisht vs (for which euery mē∣ber is borne to die) expecting helpe at our hands our con∣dition then to be so altered, our manners transformed, our estates so estranged, and our dueties so disguised with the spotted imitation of other Nations, that we shal cleane for∣gette to temper the proffered time, with the naturall bene∣fite of our owne common good. Then, may we mocke at our owne manners, and stand amazed at the difference of our former demeanors. Such is the contemptuous condition of these Imitators: that there is not any vice particularly noted in any Country,* but ye Englishman will be therein as exquisite, as if he had Nature at commaunde for euery en∣ormity. If it be in Creete, he can lye, if in Italy, flatter, if in Fraunce, boast, if in Scotland cloake the treachery of preten∣ded treason, which hauing gathered, and fraught himselfe ful of this wealthy treasure: He louingly bringeth his mer∣chandize into his natiue Country, and there storeth with in∣struction the false affectors of this tedious trash.
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Jonson, Timber

Decipimur specie. - There is a greater reverence had of things remote or strange to us than of much better if they be nearer and fall under our sense. Men, and almost all sorts of creatures, have their reputation by distance. Rivers, the farther they run, and more from their spring, the broader they are, and greater. And where our original is known, we are less the confident; among strangers we trust fortune. Yet a man may live as renowned at home, in his own country, or a private village, as in the whole world. For it is VIRTUE that gives glory; that will endenizen a man everywhere. It is only that can naturalise him. A NATIVE, if he be vicious, deserves to be a stranger, and cast out of the commonwealth as an ALIEN.

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Merry Christmas.
Nicole

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