Discussion:
new book Naming Thy Name: Cross Talk in WS's Sonnets
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marco
2016-12-09 22:07:10 UTC
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Elaine Scarry’s new book, Naming Thy Name: Cross Talk in Shakespeare’s Sonnets, is the latest attempt to illuminate this literary mystery. Scarry has made her name as a theorist, drawing together unconventional archives with the tools of literary criticism and philosophy to tackle questions of justice, beauty, and political action. In her first book, the chilling The Body In Pain (1985), she analyzes records of torture, personal injury lawsuits, and other accounts of violence in order to reckon with how and why literature expresses human suffering. Since then, she’s written on what cognitive science can teach us about the creative imagination, on the relation of beauty to justice, and on nuclear weapons’ implications for democracy. In all cases, her work alternates between scintillating attention to the particular detail of lived experience and a search for general principles.


review

https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/solving-shakespeares-sonnets-elaine-scarrys-naming-thy-name/#!


Amazon link

https://www.amazon.com/Naming-Thy-Name-Shakespeares-Sonnets-ebook/dp/B01FD9BG0K/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1481315589&sr=1-1&keywords=naming+thy+name

marc
A***@germanymail.com
2016-12-16 22:48:34 UTC
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Post by marco
Elaine Scarry’s new book, Naming Thy Name: Cross Talk in Shakespeare’s Sonnets, is the latest attempt to illuminate this literary mystery. Scarry has made her name as a theorist, drawing together unconventional archives with the tools of literary criticism and philosophy to tackle questions of justice, beauty, and political action. In her first book, the chilling The Body In Pain (1985), she analyzes records of torture, personal injury lawsuits, and other accounts of violence in order to reckon with how and why literature expresses human suffering. Since then, she’s written on what cognitive science can teach us about the creative imagination, on the relation of beauty to justice, and on nuclear weapons’ implications for democracy. In all cases, her work alternates between scintillating attention to the particular detail of lived experience and a search for general principles.
review
https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/solving-shakespeares-sonnets-elaine-scarrys-naming-thy-name/#!
Amazon link
https://www.amazon.com/Naming-Thy-Name-Shakespeares-Sonnets-ebook/dp/B01FD9BG0K/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1481315589&sr=1-1&keywords=naming+thy+name
marc
Art N
marco
2016-12-30 01:00:06 UTC
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writing

Writ, and can never find what names the writing Romeo and Juliet: I, ii
No boast of it; and for your writing and reading, Much Ado About Nothing: III, iii
He sent in writing after me; what he would not, Coriolanus: V, i

Boy, let me see the writing. King Richard II: V, ii
And there it is in writing, fairly drawn. The Taming of the Shrew: III, i
Alas, malvolio, this is not my writing, Twelfth Night: V, i

Yea, look'st thou pale? let me see the writing. King Richard II: V, ii
writing their own reproach, to whose soft seizure Toilus and Cressida: I, i
writing destruction on the enemy's castle? Titus Andronicus: III, i

Why, I was writing of my epitaph; Timon of Athens: V, i
Which she did use as she was writing of it, As You Like It: IV, iii
To greet your lord with writing, do't to-night: Cymbeline: I, vi

Think not, although in writing I preferr'd King Henry VI, part I: III, i
There is a written scroll! i'll read the writing. Merchant of Venice: II, vii
The letter, for the nomination of the party writing Love's Labour's Lost: IV, ii

The writing nor the tune. Love's Labour's Lost: I, ii
That took some pains in writing, he begg'd mine; Merchant of Venice: V, i
She thinks not so; peruse this writing else. Pericles, Prince of Tyre: II, v
Peruse this writing here, and thou shalt know King Richard II: V, iii

It is biron's writing, and here is his name. Love's Labour's Lost: IV, iii
I will be satisfied; let me see the writing. King Richard II: V, ii

I pray you, mar no more trees with writing As You Like It: III, ii
Have said and writ so, but your writing now The Winter's Tale: V, i


William Shakespeare, writer

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