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Philip Sidney's Astrophel and Stella, another form of The Defence of Poesie
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Jim F.
2013-01-03 04:04:14 UTC
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Subject of this book (Sidney's passions to establish his ideal poetry)
is in its title:

SIR P. S. HIS ASTROPHEL AND STELLA.
Wherein the excellence of sweete *Poesie is concluded*.

- Astrophel and Stella: anagram of plethoras and astell, to establish
(astell) with morbid passions (plethoras).
- conclude: to include; to demonstrate, prove (OED).
- Poesie is concluded: poetry is included and concluded in this book.

Passions (Astrophel=plethoras) and Establishment (Stella=astell) are
personified and projected to Philip and Mary Sidney. It's not an incest
but another form of The Defence of Poesie. Passionate lines can be
transferred from lover to poetry. Its 108 sonnets show Sidney's faith
in poetry like Penelope in Odysseus.

This explains why Stella's husband is called a rich fool with foul abuse
in sonnet 24, and a devil and monster in sonnet 78. It borrows Mary's
husband Henry Herbert to reflect the style of poetry Sidney disdained.

To treat Stella as Penelope Rich means Philip would curse Robert Rich
openly. It's also odd for a man to riddle and praise his lover by using
her husband's name (sonnet 37).

In _Astrophel_, an elegy included in Colin Clouts Come Home Again (1595),
Stella would die with Astrophel. Some think Edmund Spenser was careless
for unlikely Penelope Rich would do that, but it's logical if the author
knew Stella being Mary Sidney.

Spenser's Gloriana, also spelt Gloriane, praises Anne Boleyn by playing
Glory-Anne with Belphoebe. The two names can spell "Glory Anne Boleyn."
(Spenser hinted the combination of names in a letter to Walter Raleigh.)
To praise the mother artfully worked fine. The Queen paid Spenser well.
Spenser achieved something Philip Sidney had failed.

Philip Sidney's failure is in sonnet 93. His letter to the Queen angered
her and harmed Stella (his ideal poetry and sister). He cared too much
the Queen's marriage with no manner and confused his wit with care:
From carelessness did in no manner grow;
But wit, confus'd with too much care, did miss. (sonnet 93)

Astrophel to Astrophil

This change from -el to -il fails a perfect anagram. Sidney played names
with care: "As for my name it shall be Cleophila, turning Philoclea to
myself, as my mind is wholly turned and transformed into her." This guide
in the old Arcadia was removed, but more name plays were added after:

- Philisides and Mira may spell and refer to Philip Sidney and Mary.
(Philisides didn't win Mira just like Astrophel and Stella.)
- Pyrocles and Daiphantus (=daut phansy) to Philip Sidney.
daut: to pet, fondle, caress, make much of (OED 1500...1853).
- Musidorus and Zelmane (=zeel man) to Mary Sidney, with a man's zeal
or with the zeal to be a man. Mary's wish is fulfilled in her Arcadia.
- Pyrocles (P__s) and Musidorus (M__s), the two protagonists reflect
Philip Sidney (P. S.) and Mary Sidney (M. S.).

Mucedorus (=decorum us) and Amadine (=a maiden) to spell Mary Sidney
plays for "Mary Sidney's maiden decorum for us poets." This author of
_Mucedorus_ tried to please Pembroke by adapting Sidney's name play.
Jim F.
2013-01-23 03:47:03 UTC
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If Belphoebe is Queen Elizabeth in The Faerie Queene, then Belphoebe's
twin sister Amoretta should be someone important to Spenser too.

She bore Belphoebe, she bore in like case
Fair Amoretta in the second place:
These two were twins,

Amoretta (Amoret) was taken by Venus and raised in the Garden of Adonis.
"Amoret Adonis" (Am_re_ _d_nis) spells Mary Sidney. Later Amoret is
confined in The House of Busirane. "The Busirane" spells Henry Herbert,
Mary's husband. This links Mary Sidney with Shakespeare's Venus and
Adonis. Philip Sidney and Adonis both died young in an adventure.

Spenser played these names again in his _Amoretti_ (1595). In sonnet-74
and -75 he asked readers to do the anagram ("letters framed") by trading
Amoretti with Belphoebe (for they are twins) to "immortalize" his wife's
name Elizabeth Boyle.

Most happy *letters framed* by skillful trade,
with which that happy name was first defined:
. . .
Ye three Elizabeths forever live, (sonnet-74, Amoretti)

- letters framed: to do anagram is to frame letters.
- name was first defined: Belphoebe was first defined as Elizabeth.
- skillful trade with (first defined): to trade Amoretti with Belphoebe.
- three Elizabeths: the one in Spenser's book, the Queen, and his wife.
Jim F.
2013-01-26 03:43:31 UTC
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Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser and some poets called their poetry land
Areopagus. If they would play names like Amoretti and Astrophel, then
Areopagus should mean something more. Similar to kingdom of Gloriane for
Glory Anne Boleyn, Areopagus' anagram "Ours Agape" tells their high
judgement and love (agape) to poetry.

Agape is the mother of Priamond, Diamond, and Triamond in The Faerie
Queene. The three brothers have the magic of passing one's soul after his
death to the next alive. So after Priamond's death his soul passes to
Diamond, and Diamond's death joins the three souls in Triamond, who has
"a long and happy life." The use of -mond (world) shows Ed-mund's
intention to join the soul of Philip Sidney, his Areopagus brother.

Agape has a daughter "Cambina with true friendship's bond." Cambina is
the personification of Friendship who could combine (as the name Cambina)
Knights of Friendship (Agape's sons and Cambell). Cambina has a rod like
"Maia's son doth wield." Spenser wrote "Caduceus the rod of Mercury" in
Book II but here he used Maia to link Cambina with Arcadia (Maia's
birthplace). Cambina marries Cambell later. Cambell-friendship spells
Philip Sidney, and Cambina-friendship spells Mary Sidney.

This explains why Mary Sidney appears as Clorinda in the so-called
Lay of Clorinda (Colin Clouts Come Home Again). Its 108 lines remind
readers of Sidney's Astrophel and Stella (108 sonnets). The book CCCHA
has 78 pages, but more than half are elegies for Philip Sidney. Spenser's
trip and return in CCCHA also reflects Philip's return to Pembroke's
Arcadia. Clorinda can spell "Colin Arcadia"; Lay of Clorinda is Mary
Sidney's wish of her brother's rebirth in another Paradise (and via
Spenser's Colin). "Clorinda" is Colin in Arcadia with Mary Sidney as
Clorinda. They appear later in the paintings of Et in Arcadia Ego.

Ah no: it is not dead, ne can it die,
But lives for aye, in blissful *Paradise*:
Where like a *new-born babe* it soft doth lie.
. . .
And with vain vows do often call him back.
But live thou there still happy, happy spirit,
. . .
Whom Astrophel full dear did entertain, (Lay of Clorinda)

This is valid if Colin reflects Philip Sidney in The Shepheardes
Calender, so that after Philip's death, Spenser could join Philip's
spirit like Agape's sons and inherit the name Colin.

Sidney and Spenser played one-way anagram since the Calender:
- Shepheard Colin (Shep____d __lin) spells Philip Sidney.
- Colin's mistress M. Rosalinde (M R_sa_inde) spells Mary Sidney.
- Menalcas (=manacles) as Rosalinde's choice reflects Mary's marriage.
- Cuddie the "unhappy Heardman's boy" spells Edmund Spenser. Cuddie as
Spenser is shown in August and October, "In Cuddie is set out the
perfect pattern of a Poet."
Jim F.
2017-04-10 02:51:44 UTC
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Jim F.於 2013年1月26日星期六 UTC+8上午11時43分31秒寫道:
Post by Jim F.
Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser and some poets called their poetry land
Areopagus. If they would play names like Amoretti and Astrophel, then
Areopagus should mean something more. Similar to kingdom of Gloriane for
Glory Anne Boleyn, Areopagus' anagram "Ours Agape" tells their high
judgement and love (agape) to poetry.
Agape is the mother of Priamond, Diamond, and Triamond in The Faerie
Queene. The three brothers have the magic of passing one's soul after his
death to the next alive. So after Priamond's death his soul passes to
Diamond, and Diamond's death joins the three souls in Triamond, who has
"a long and happy life." The use of -mond (world) shows Ed-mund's
intention to join the soul of Philip Sidney, his Areopagus brother.
Agape has a daughter "Cambina with true friendship's bond." Cambina is
the personification of Friendship who could combine (as the name Cambina)
Knights of Friendship (Agape's sons and Cambell). Cambina has a rod like
"Maia's son doth wield." Spenser wrote "Caduceus the rod of Mercury" in
Book II but here he used Maia to link Cambina with Arcadia (Maia's
birthplace). Cambina marries Cambell later. Cambell-friendship spells
Philip Sidney, and Cambina-friendship spells Mary Sidney.
This explains why Mary Sidney appears as Clorinda in the so-called
Lay of Clorinda (Colin Clouts Come Home Again). Its 108 lines remind
readers of Sidney's Astrophel and Stella (108 sonnets). The book CCCHA
has 78 pages, but more than half are elegies for Philip Sidney. Spenser's
trip and return in CCCHA also reflects Philip's return to Pembroke's
Arcadia. Clorinda can spell "Colin Arcadia"; Lay of Clorinda is Mary
Sidney's wish of her brother's rebirth in another Paradise (and via
Spenser's Colin). "Clorinda" is Colin in Arcadia with Mary Sidney as
Clorinda. They appear later in the paintings of Et in Arcadia Ego.
Ah no: it is not dead, ne can it die,
Where like a *new-born babe* it soft doth lie.
. . .
And with vain vows do often call him back.
But live thou there still happy, happy spirit,
. . .
Whom Astrophel full dear did entertain, (Lay of Clorinda)
This is valid if Colin reflects Philip Sidney in The Shepheardes
Calender, so that after Philip's death, Spenser could join Philip's
spirit like Agape's sons and inherit the name Colin.
- Shepheard Colin (Shep____d __lin) spells Philip Sidney.
- Colin's mistress M. Rosalinde (M R_sa_inde) spells Mary Sidney.
- Menalcas (=manacles) as Rosalinde's choice reflects Mary's marriage.
- Cuddie the "unhappy Heardman's boy" spells Edmund Spenser. Cuddie as
Spenser is shown in August and October, "In Cuddie is set out the
perfect pattern of a Poet."
"Colin Clouts come home again" or
"Colin Clout's come home again"?

There are two Colin Clouts, Philip Sidney and Edmund Spenser.
marco
2017-04-12 06:04:05 UTC
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Post by Jim F.
Jim F.於 2013年1月26日星期六 UTC+8上午11時43分31秒寫道:
Post by Jim F.
Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser and some poets called their poetry land
Areopagus. If they would play names like Amoretti and Astrophel, then
Areopagus should mean something more. Similar to kingdom of Gloriane for
Glory Anne Boleyn, Areopagus' anagram "Ours Agape" tells their high
judgement and love (agape) to poetry.
Agape is the mother of Priamond, Diamond, and Triamond in The Faerie
Queene. The three brothers have the magic of passing one's soul after his
death to the next alive. So after Priamond's death his soul passes to
Diamond, and Diamond's death joins the three souls in Triamond, who has
"a long and happy life." The use of -mond (world) shows Ed-mund's
intention to join the soul of Philip Sidney, his Areopagus brother.
Agape has a daughter "Cambina with true friendship's bond." Cambina is
the personification of Friendship who could combine (as the name Cambina)
Knights of Friendship (Agape's sons and Cambell). Cambina has a rod like
"Maia's son doth wield." Spenser wrote "Caduceus the rod of Mercury" in
Book II but here he used Maia to link Cambina with Arcadia (Maia's
birthplace). Cambina marries Cambell later. Cambell-friendship spells
Philip Sidney, and Cambina-friendship spells Mary Sidney.
This explains why Mary Sidney appears as Clorinda in the so-called
Lay of Clorinda (Colin Clouts Come Home Again). Its 108 lines remind
readers of Sidney's Astrophel and Stella (108 sonnets). The book CCCHA
has 78 pages, but more than half are elegies for Philip Sidney. Spenser's
trip and return in CCCHA also reflects Philip's return to Pembroke's
Arcadia. Clorinda can spell "Colin Arcadia"; Lay of Clorinda is Mary
Sidney's wish of her brother's rebirth in another Paradise (and via
Spenser's Colin). "Clorinda" is Colin in Arcadia with Mary Sidney as
Clorinda. They appear later in the paintings of Et in Arcadia Ego.
Ah no: it is not dead, ne can it die,
Where like a *new-born babe* it soft doth lie.
. . .
And with vain vows do often call him back.
But live thou there still happy, happy spirit,
. . .
Whom Astrophel full dear did entertain, (Lay of Clorinda)
This is valid if Colin reflects Philip Sidney in The Shepheardes
Calender, so that after Philip's death, Spenser could join Philip's
spirit like Agape's sons and inherit the name Colin.
- Shepheard Colin (Shep____d __lin) spells Philip Sidney.
- Colin's mistress M. Rosalinde (M R_sa_inde) spells Mary Sidney.
- Menalcas (=manacles) as Rosalinde's choice reflects Mary's marriage.
- Cuddie the "unhappy Heardman's boy" spells Edmund Spenser. Cuddie as
Spenser is shown in August and October, "In Cuddie is set out the
perfect pattern of a Poet."
"Colin Clouts come home again" or
"Colin Clout's come home again"?
There are two Colin Clouts, Philip Sidney and Edmund Spenser.
.
b***@yahoo.com
2013-01-26 05:42:09 UTC
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Post by Jim F.
Subject of this book (Sidney's passions to establish his ideal poetry)
SIR P. S. HIS ASTROPHEL AND STELLA.
Wherein the excellence of sweete *Poesie is concluded*.
- Astrophel and Stella: anagram of plethoras and astell, to establish
(astell) with morbid passions (plethoras).
- conclude: to include; to demonstrate, prove (OED).
- Poesie is concluded: poetry is included and concluded in this book.
Passions (Astrophel=plethoras) and Establishment (Stella=astell) are
personified and projected to Philip and Mary Sidney. It's not an incest
but another form of The Defence of Poesie. Passionate lines can be
transferred from lover to poetry. Its 108 sonnets show Sidney's faith
in poetry like Penelope in Odysseus.
This explains why Stella's husband is called a rich fool with foul abuse
in sonnet 24, and a devil and monster in sonnet 78. It borrows Mary's
husband Henry Herbert to reflect the style of poetry Sidney disdained.
To treat Stella as Penelope Rich means Philip would curse Robert Rich
openly. It's also odd for a man to riddle and praise his lover by using
her husband's name (sonnet 37).
In _Astrophel_, an elegy included in Colin Clouts Come Home Again (1595),
Stella would die with Astrophel. Some think Edmund Spenser was careless
for unlikely Penelope Rich would do that, but it's logical if the author
knew Stella being Mary Sidney.
Spenser's Gloriana, also spelt Gloriane, praises Anne Boleyn by playing
Glory-Anne with Belphoebe. The two names can spell "Glory Anne Boleyn."
(Spenser hinted the combination of names in a letter to Walter Raleigh.)
To praise the mother artfully worked fine. The Queen paid Spenser well.
Spenser achieved something Philip Sidney had failed.
Philip Sidney's failure is in sonnet 93. His letter to the Queen angered
her and harmed Stella (his ideal poetry and sister). He cared too much
From carelessness did in no manner grow;
But wit, confus'd with too much care, did miss. (sonnet 93)
Astrophel to Astrophil
This change from -el to -il fails a perfect anagram. Sidney played names
with care: "As for my name it shall be Cleophila, turning Philoclea to
myself, as my mind is wholly turned and transformed into her." This guide
- Philisides and Mira may spell and refer to Philip Sidney and Mary.
(Philisides didn't win Mira just like Astrophel and Stella.)
- Pyrocles and Daiphantus (=daut phansy) to Philip Sidney.
daut: to pet, fondle, caress, make much of (OED 1500...1853).
- Musidorus and Zelmane (=zeel man) to Mary Sidney, with a man's zeal
or with the zeal to be a man. Mary's wish is fulfilled in her Arcadia.
- Pyrocles (P__s) and Musidorus (M__s), the two protagonists reflect
Philip Sidney (P. S.) and Mary Sidney (M. S.).
Mucedorus (=decorum us) and Amadine (=a maiden) to spell Mary Sidney
plays for "Mary Sidney's maiden decorum for us poets." This author of
_Mucedorus_ tried to please Pembroke by adapting Sidney's name play.
I see that Wikipedia has

(quote)
John Lyly published the works Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit (1578) and
Euphues and his England (1580). Both works illustrated the
intellectual fashions and favourite themes of Renaissance society — in
a highly artificial and mannered style.
(unquote)

Would you care to comment on whether Sydney's poetics disparages
Lyly's style of euphuism and if Shakespeare's style reflects it or
not?

Inquiring minds want to know, bookburn
ignoto
2013-01-26 06:10:55 UTC
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Post by b***@yahoo.com
Post by Jim F.
Subject of this book (Sidney's passions to establish his ideal poetry)
SIR P. S. HIS ASTROPHEL AND STELLA.
Wherein the excellence of sweete *Poesie is concluded*.
- Astrophel and Stella: anagram of plethoras and astell, to establish
(astell) with morbid passions (plethoras).
- conclude: to include; to demonstrate, prove (OED).
- Poesie is concluded: poetry is included and concluded in this book.
Passions (Astrophel=plethoras) and Establishment (Stella=astell) are
personified and projected to Philip and Mary Sidney. It's not an incest
but another form of The Defence of Poesie. Passionate lines can be
transferred from lover to poetry. Its 108 sonnets show Sidney's faith
in poetry like Penelope in Odysseus.
This explains why Stella's husband is called a rich fool with foul abuse
in sonnet 24, and a devil and monster in sonnet 78. It borrows Mary's
husband Henry Herbert to reflect the style of poetry Sidney disdained.
To treat Stella as Penelope Rich means Philip would curse Robert Rich
openly. It's also odd for a man to riddle and praise his lover by using
her husband's name (sonnet 37).
In _Astrophel_, an elegy included in Colin Clouts Come Home Again (1595),
Stella would die with Astrophel. Some think Edmund Spenser was careless
for unlikely Penelope Rich would do that, but it's logical if the author
knew Stella being Mary Sidney.
Spenser's Gloriana, also spelt Gloriane, praises Anne Boleyn by playing
Glory-Anne with Belphoebe. The two names can spell "Glory Anne Boleyn."
(Spenser hinted the combination of names in a letter to Walter Raleigh.)
To praise the mother artfully worked fine. The Queen paid Spenser well.
Spenser achieved something Philip Sidney had failed.
Philip Sidney's failure is in sonnet 93. His letter to the Queen angered
her and harmed Stella (his ideal poetry and sister). He cared too much
From carelessness did in no manner grow;
But wit, confus'd with too much care, did miss. (sonnet 93)
Astrophel to Astrophil
This change from -el to -il fails a perfect anagram. Sidney played names
with care: "As for my name it shall be Cleophila, turning Philoclea to
myself, as my mind is wholly turned and transformed into her." This guide
- Philisides and Mira may spell and refer to Philip Sidney and Mary.
(Philisides didn't win Mira just like Astrophel and Stella.)
- Pyrocles and Daiphantus (=daut phansy) to Philip Sidney.
daut: to pet, fondle, caress, make much of (OED 1500...1853).
- Musidorus and Zelmane (=zeel man) to Mary Sidney, with a man's zeal
or with the zeal to be a man. Mary's wish is fulfilled in her Arcadia.
- Pyrocles (P__s) and Musidorus (M__s), the two protagonists reflect
Philip Sidney (P. S.) and Mary Sidney (M. S.).
Mucedorus (=decorum us) and Amadine (=a maiden) to spell Mary Sidney
plays for "Mary Sidney's maiden decorum for us poets." This author of
_Mucedorus_ tried to please Pembroke by adapting Sidney's name play.
I see that Wikipedia has
(quote)
John Lyly published the works Euphues: The Anatomy of Wit (1578) and
Euphues and his England (1580). Both works illustrated the
intellectual fashions and favourite themes of Renaissance society — in
a highly artificial and mannered style.
(unquote)
Would you care to comment on whether Sydney's poetics disparages
Lyly's style of euphuism
Yes, read his Arcadia.

and if Shakespeare's style reflects it or
Post by b***@yahoo.com
not?
only as a neophyte, or in jest.

Ign.
Post by b***@yahoo.com
Inquiring minds want to know, bookburn
Jim F.
2013-01-29 04:16:39 UTC
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Rosalinde never appears in The Shepheardes Calender; instead, Mary Sidney
as the E. K., the personification of Eke, eked glosses to the Calender
(for she was only 18 then) including the line "the Lady disdeigning,
shaked her speare at him."

Years later "shaked her speare" became Shakespeare spelled from
"K. Shepheard" (K Shep__ar_) as King of Shepherds (poets). It was
"E. K.'s shepheard" and Pembroke eked her resources to Wilton poets.
Mary Sidney Herbert gave birth to William (Herbert) and Shakespeare.

Wilton poets pleased Mary Sidney by following her (maiden) view and
nameplay. With Pembroke's resources, poets wrote hidden stories of
the nobles. With poets' various backgrounds a literary monster was
enriched. They called their band Mr. Wilton House, Mr. W. H.

Mary Sidney died in 1621. Wilton House commemorated her by the 1623
Folio and paintings of Et in Arcadia Ego.

Style of Shakespeare

is hard to tell when multiple authors are involved; perhaps they knew
that for three names were left in the monument to describe three peculiar
arts of Shakespeare. "Ivdicio Pylivm" says Nestor's words shall be
judged, a hint to check Shakespeare's words deeper than usual, or treat
them as riddles. Euphuism-like lines exist in Shakespeare, but they often
carry extra missions, building riddles and anagrams.

The Old Arcadia was truly for a lady and not to be published. There I
don't see playing of words like Euphuism. John Lyly had a different goal.
He told ladies "Euphues had rather lie shut in a Lady's casket, than open
in a Scholar's study." However, in the next page he asked gentlemen to
do more, "that if anything be amiss, you pardon it: if well, you defend
it: and how-soever it be, you accept it."

Shakespeare only adapted some plots from Arcadia and its nameplay, e.g.
the first word "Bote-swaine" (Bo_e-s__in_) spelled Ben Jonson who acted
as an officer in Wilton House's Shakespeare like a boatswain in a ship.
I cannot find where Sidney disparaged Lyly directly. Jonson did mock Lyly
via the amateur dramatist "John Little-wit" as John [Ly]Lyttle [Anatomy
of] Wit. Jonson used similar skill in "To My Mere English Censurer":

Thou saist, that cannot be: for thou hast seen
*Davis, and Weever*, and the best have been,
And mine come *nothing like*. I hope so.

- Mere English: having no greater value in English.
- nothing like: (no_hi__ li__) spells John Lyly like John Little-wit.
- Davis, Weever: John Davies and John Weever; the missing of "John"
hints at the disappearance of John Lyly's style.
b***@yahoo.com
2013-01-29 06:12:59 UTC
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On Mon, 28 Jan 2013 20:16:39 -0800 (PST), "Jim F."
Post by Jim F.
Rosalinde never appears in The Shepheardes Calender; instead, Mary Sidney
as the E. K., the personification of Eke, eked glosses to the Calender
(for she was only 18 then) including the line "the Lady disdeigning,
shaked her speare at him."
Years later "shaked her speare" became Shakespeare spelled from
"K. Shepheard" (K Shep__ar_) as King of Shepherds (poets). It was
"E. K.'s shepheard" and Pembroke eked her resources to Wilton poets.
Mary Sidney Herbert gave birth to William (Herbert) and Shakespeare.
Wilton poets pleased Mary Sidney by following her (maiden) view and
nameplay. With Pembroke's resources, poets wrote hidden stories of
the nobles. With poets' various backgrounds a literary monster was
enriched. They called their band Mr. Wilton House, Mr. W. H.
Mary Sidney died in 1621. Wilton House commemorated her by the 1623
Folio and paintings of Et in Arcadia Ego.
Shakespeare pavilion built at Wilton House, and he probably performed
with his company there, but he evidently may not have been active in
her Wilton literary circle? Yet the two famous sons function
importantly in the FF as sponsors/benefactors. Seems like he's there,
but he's not there.
Post by Jim F.
Style of Shakespeare
is hard to tell when multiple authors are involved; perhaps they knew
that for three names were left in the monument to describe three peculiar
arts of Shakespeare. "Ivdicio Pylivm" says Nestor's words shall be
judged, a hint to check Shakespeare's words deeper than usual, or treat
them as riddles. Euphuism-like lines exist in Shakespeare, but they often
carry extra missions, building riddles and anagrams.
The Old Arcadia was truly for a lady and not to be published. There I
don't see playing of words like Euphuism. John Lyly had a different goal.
He told ladies "Euphues had rather lie shut in a Lady's casket, than open
in a Scholar's study." However, in the next page he asked gentlemen to
do more, "that if anything be amiss, you pardon it: if well, you defend
it: and how-soever it be, you accept it."
Shakespeare only adapted some plots from Arcadia and its nameplay, e.g.
the first word "Bote-swaine" (Bo_e-s__in_) spelled Ben Jonson who acted
as an officer in Wilton House's Shakespeare like a boatswain in a ship.
I cannot find where Sidney disparaged Lyly directly. Jonson did mock Lyly
via the amateur dramatist "John Little-wit" as John [Ly]Lyttle [Anatomy
Thou saist, that cannot be: for thou hast seen
*Davis, and Weever*, and the best have been,
And mine come *nothing like*. I hope so.
- Mere English: having no greater value in English.
- nothing like: (no_hi__ li__) spells John Lyly like John Little-wit.
- Davis, Weever: John Davies and John Weever; the missing of "John"
hints at the disappearance of John Lyly's style.
neonprose @ gmail.com
2013-01-30 04:17:34 UTC
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Post by b***@yahoo.com
On Mon, 28 Jan 2013 20:16:39 -0800 (PST), "Jim F."
Post by Jim F.
Rosalinde never appears in The Shepheardes Calender; instead, Mary Sidney
as the E. K., the personification of Eke, eked glosses to the Calender
(for she was only 18 then) including the line "the Lady disdeigning,
shaked her speare at him."
Years later "shaked her speare" became Shakespeare spelled from
"K. Shepheard" (K Shep__ar_) as King of Shepherds (poets). It was
"E. K.'s shepheard" and Pembroke eked her resources to Wilton poets.
Mary Sidney Herbert gave birth to William (Herbert) and Shakespeare.
Wilton poets pleased Mary Sidney by following her (maiden) view and
nameplay. With Pembroke's resources, poets wrote hidden stories of
the nobles. With poets' various backgrounds a literary monster was
enriched. They called their band Mr. Wilton House, Mr. W. H.
Mary Sidney died in 1621. Wilton House commemorated her by the 1623
Folio and paintings of Et in Arcadia Ego.
Shakespeare pavilion built at Wilton House, and he probably performed
with his company there, but he evidently may not have been active in
her Wilton literary circle? Yet the two famous sons function
importantly in the FF as sponsors/benefactors. Seems like he's there,
but he's not there.
Post by Jim F.
Style of Shakespeare
is hard to tell when multiple authors are involved; perhaps they knew
that for three names were left in the monument to describe three peculiar
arts of Shakespeare. "Ivdicio Pylivm" says Nestor's words shall be
judged, a hint to check Shakespeare's words deeper than usual, or treat
them as riddles. Euphuism-like lines exist in Shakespeare, but they often
carry extra missions, building riddles and anagrams.
The Old Arcadia was truly for a lady and not to be published. There I
don't see playing of words like Euphuism. John Lyly had a different goal.
He told ladies "Euphues had rather lie shut in a Lady's casket, than open
in a Scholar's study." However, in the next page he asked gentlemen to
do more, "that if anything be amiss, you pardon it: if well, you defend
it: and how-soever it be, you accept it."
Shakespeare only adapted some plots from Arcadia and its nameplay, e.g.
the first word "Bote-swaine" (Bo_e-s__in_) spelled Ben Jonson who acted
as an officer in Wilton House's Shakespeare like a boatswain in a ship.
I cannot find where Sidney disparaged Lyly directly. Jonson did mock Lyly
via the amateur dramatist "John Little-wit" as John [Ly]Lyttle [Anatomy
Thou saist, that cannot be: for thou hast seen
*Davis, and Weever*, and the best have been,
And mine come *nothing like*. I hope so.
- Mere English: having no greater value in English.
- nothing like: (no_hi__ li__) spells John Lyly like John Little-wit.
- Davis, Weever: John Davies and John Weever; the missing of "John"
hints at the disappearance of John Lyly's style.
Jim F.
2013-01-31 05:38:12 UTC
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The man William Shakespeare did exist and was well-paid to keep quiet.
He should not be in the Wilton literary circle for his value was to keep
Pembroke clean, and to prison like Ben Jonson (The Isle of Dogs, 1597)
when needed. If he really did perform on the stage, he might know who was
his employer, but not the true author (Pembroke, Jonson, Middleton, etc.).

Touchstone tells William, "To have, is to have" is a threat to take away
all William Shakespeare had already: (MAT 25:29) "he shall haue bundance,
and from him that hath not, euen that he hath, shalbe taken away."
Touchstone's "I will kill thee a hundred and fifty ways" is more direct
than Ben Jonson's Kate Arden.

To solve more Shakespeare words is more important than the pure
authorship question, I believe. My base is word's logic. Building the
entire Shakespeare canon on one printed name (any publisher can do)
restricts the reading, and will fail in many places, especially the 154
sonnets, a disaster from my view, e.g. sonnet-53 about the substance of
a player on the stage, which is unrelated to the so-called fair youth.

Most people ignore one-way anagram for it looks odd. If it looks great
the first sight like perfect anagram, then Shakespeare would be censored
at his time. So for some odd names and lines in Shakespeare, readers
must question and answer repeatedly until the conclusion fits all
Shakespeare's works (a hard job without computer, perhaps the reason
the secret can be kept so long). This process is similar to Socrates'
dialectical method. The second name in Shakespeare monument,
"genio Socratem" (g_ni_ S__rat_m) itself spells Anagrammatism.

Pylivm Socratem Maronem, the three names in the monument not only tell
three arts of Shakespeare, their initials P. S. M. also fit well
Philip Sidney and Mary, like Phili-Sides and Mira in Arcadia.
marco
2013-01-31 08:34:12 UTC
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Post by Jim F.
The man William Shakespeare did exist and was well-paid to keep quiet.
He should not be in the Wilton literary circle for his value was to keep
Pembroke clean, and to prison like Ben Jonson (The Isle of Dogs, 1597)
when needed. If he really did perform on the stage, he might know who was
his employer, but not the true author (Pembroke, Jonson, Middleton, etc.).
Touchstone tells William, "To have, is to have" is a threat to take away
all William Shakespeare had already: (MAT 25:29) "he shall haue bundance,
and from him that hath not, euen that he hath, shalbe taken away."
Touchstone's "I will kill thee a hundred and fifty ways" is more direct
than Ben Jonson's Kate Arden.
To solve more Shakespeare words is more important than the pure
authorship question, I believe. My base is word's logic. Building the
entire Shakespeare canon on one printed name (any publisher can do)
restricts the reading, and will fail in many places, especially the 154
sonnets, a disaster from my view, e.g. sonnet-53 about the substance of
a player on the stage, which is unrelated to the so-called fair youth.
Most people ignore one-way anagram for it looks odd. If it looks great
the first sight like perfect anagram, then Shakespeare would be censored
at his time. So for some odd names and lines in Shakespeare, readers
must question and answer repeatedly until the conclusion fits all
Shakespeare's works (a hard job without computer, perhaps the reason
the secret can be kept so long). This process is similar to Socrates'
dialectical method. The second name in Shakespeare monument,
"genio Socratem" (g_ni_ S__rat_m) itself spells Anagrammatism.
Pylivm Socratem Maronem, the three names in the monument not only tell
three arts of Shakespeare, their initials P. S. M. also fit well
Philip Sidney and Mary, like Phili-Sides and Mira in Arcadia.
you make as much sense as Paul Crowley

where do these people come from?

marc
Jim F.
2013-02-08 03:49:33 UTC
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Fi__n__al Times, is the headline of the final edition of German
Financial Times, the latest interesting one-way anagram.

Th_ma_ __son
Thomas Anson

The famous Shugborough inscription requires decoders to know "divan"
means a room facing a prospect, and to see that shepherd's monument
itself is a divan, or to find Thomas Anson was a member or cojuror of
the Divan Club (divan also means a council). His name (Th_ma_ __son)
is a one-way anagram of Th' Mason.

Crossword players could solve this code now since only few words may fit
to the sentence that tells Thomas Anson's relief:
"Divan _o_u_o_s_v_a_v_v_ Mason, Et in Arcadia Ego."
Anson played fair via a vive relief of a painting, a scene, and his name.

The same skill is used in "a tale of the Oake and the Bryer" to mock
friar in The Shepheardes Calender. "Foolish Brier" (F______ _rier)
says that frier (an obsolete form of friar) like brier is foolish.
"Good Oak" (Go_d ___) seals the word God.

One-way anagram is easy for poets and hard to be found by critics.
It appears also in Shakespeare to tell (hidden) stories, same as the
Calender, Shugborough code, and Financial Times.
Jim F.
2015-06-20 07:21:40 UTC
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. . .
Post by marco
Post by Jim F.
Philip Sidney and Mary, like Phili-Sides and Mira in Arcadia.
. . .
Post by marco
you make as much sense as Paul Crowley
where do these people come from?
marc
If you can't read the content, how do you know who is the true author?
The name Martin Marprelate is printed on the cover too.

Honesty is the quality of being honest.

***

From Purple Robes to Gayer Clothes

"and they put on him a purple robe (JHN 19:2)"
"when all is done and past ... gayer clothes shall be placed."

"Adon" is the abbreviation of Adonis, "Eke" in the same place?

***

_Adon_ deafly masking thro, 43
Stately tropes rich conceited,
Shew'd he well deserved to,
Love's delight on him to gaze,
And had not love herself intreated,
Other nymphs had sent him bays.

*Eke* in purple robes distained, 49
Amid'st the Center of this clime,
I have heard say doth remain,
One whose power floweth far,
That should have been of our rime,
The only object and the star.
. . .
And when all is done and past, 79
Narcissus in another sort,
And *gayer clothes* shall be placed
*Eke* perhaps in good plight,
In mean while I'll make report,
Of your winnings that do write.

***

"Adon deafly masking thro"
- Adon: William Shakespeare. To a'don is to put on clothing, to cover.
- deafly: lonely, solitary and silent (OED). He must not discuss his work.
- masking: his face with a poet's mask.
- thro: throughly silenced and masked (or he might disappear like Marlowe).

"Eke in purple robes distained,"
- Eke: indicating E.K. in The Shepheardes Calender (1579).
E.K. is the personified eke that does the eking job in TSC.
E.K. wrote "the Lady disdeigning, shaked her speare at him," the
earliest link to Shakespeare. Lines about Eke are next to Adon.
- purple: brilliant, splendid, gay (OED).
- robe: a garment worn by both sexes (OED).
- distain: to deprive of its brightness or splendour; to dim (OED).
The above are hinted in later lines:

And when all is done and past,
Narcissus in another sort,
And *gayer clothes* shall be placed,
*Eke* perhaps in good plight,

Without being distained, purple robes become gayer clothes
when all is done and past (i.e., end of the Shakespeare game).
"Narcissus in another sort" is a fair maid who cares others.

"Amid'st the Center of this clime"
- These poets form a band of near-crime clime in literature.

"Although he differs much from men"
- A woman disguised as man "differs much" from men; men could
mean people, so friar (brother) is added to secure this riddle.

"Tilting under Friaries"
- To tilt is to cover with a tilt or awning (OED v2); or to contest.
E.K. is covering and contesting under fraternities.

"Yourselves know your lines have warrant"
- Poets know their works are being protected.

"I will talk of Robin Hood"
- This concept of heroic outlaw is similar to the "merry men" in AYLI.
"They say he is already in the Forest of _Arden_,
and a many merry men with him; and there they
live like the old _Robin Hood_ of England" (AYLI).

Edmund Spenser (Philip Sidney), Samuel Daniel, Christopher Marlowe,
Abraham Fraunce (who translated Amintas) are close to Mary Sidney.
She has the power to protect and "eke" them. Eke is the key in
this L'envoy.

E.K. in 1579 TSC was in learning stage still. This can be seen from
E.K.'s glossaries (quite basic sometimes). Mary Sidney was 18 then.

***
Jim F.
2017-04-16 16:07:44 UTC
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Origin of the name Shakespeare is from _The Shepheardes Calender_:
Bellona ... shaked her speares.

The name Bellona appears only once in the First Folio:
Till that *Bellona's Bridegroom*, lapped in proof,
Confronted him *with self-comparisons*. (Macbeth)

The author used "Bellona's Bridegroom," not Mars, because the term
can spell Mary Sidney; or Mary Sidney is a one-way anagram of
"Bellona's Bridegroom."
Quite rarely, "with self-comparisons" can spell Christopher Marlowe.

Areopagus (Ares Rock) is a literary circle led by Philip Sidney;
Shakespeare (Bellona's spear), by Mary Sidney.
Bellona is the consort of Ares (Mars).
marco
2017-04-17 15:09:10 UTC
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Post by Jim F.
Bellona ... shaked her speares.
Till that *Bellona's Bridegroom*, lapped in proof,
Confronted him *with self-comparisons*. (Macbeth)
The author used "Bellona's Bridegroom," not Mars, because the term
can spell Mary Sidney; or Mary Sidney is a one-way anagram of
"Bellona's Bridegroom."
Quite rarely, "with self-comparisons" can spell Christopher Marlowe.
Areopagus (Ares Rock) is a literary circle led by Philip Sidney;
Shakespeare (Bellona's spear), by Mary Sidney.
Bellona is the consort of Ares (Mars).
.
A***@germanymail.com
2017-05-12 17:53:07 UTC
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Post by Jim F.
Bellona ... shaked her speares.
Till that *Bellona's Bridegroom*, lapped in proof,
Confronted him *with self-comparisons*. (Macbeth)
The author used "Bellona's Bridegroom," not Mars, because the term
can spell Mary Sidney; or Mary Sidney is a one-way anagram of
"Bellona's Bridegroom."
Quite rarely, "with self-comparisons" can spell Christopher Marlowe.
Areopagus (Ares Rock) is a literary circle led by Philip Sidney;
Shakespeare (Bellona's spear), by Mary Sidney.
Bellona is the consort of Ares (Mars).
.
Art N

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