Discussion:
Signifigance of writer's occupation
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Don
2018-02-22 18:09:49 UTC
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After surveying all the evidence surrounding the alternate Shakespeare authorships in question, one can notice that Stratman at his public theatre has an ideal position for an author of his genius.

He has his free hand at doing up plays in the several categories, he makes his contribution toward a national literature, the poetry that emerges in the plays is supplemented by sonnet writing, and he circulates among the leading players of the London scene. Yes, and there are a few royal names that come into play. Not many of the contenders are at the center of so much, it seems.

Would such a central position and iron in so many fires make Stratman a candidate for Secret Service?, I say yes, at least to the extent that Ben Jonson was. To what extent he was a mere operator, controller, a co-conspirator, or even director or station chief, one doesn't know from the evidence; but there does seem to be a strange lack of evidence about his logical connection with the Wilton Group and Mary Sidney's literary circle. And a main question about lack of censorship of the plays seems to be, including Shakespeare's part in the Essex Rebellion with a Henry II production. So I suppose once could assume a working hypothesis that Stratman was on the inside of various agendas.

Compare Stratman's opportunity for involving foreign courtiers at theatres and after theatre carousels, with what Hollywood actors are capable of these days, and we are aware of how liable our politicians are to blackmail, and would have been then. Could the "horse holder" have been engaged in libertine behaviors on behalf of the Queen?, who can tell? Might be another Shakespeare film in the works about some of this, if you could make such a film and still leave Stratman with most of his clothes on.

bookburn
Don
2018-02-28 12:45:14 UTC
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Post by Don
After surveying all the evidence surrounding the alternate Shakespeare authorships in question, one can notice that Stratman at his public theatre has an ideal position for an author of his genius.
He has his free hand at doing up plays in the several categories, he makes his contribution toward a national literature, the poetry that emerges in the plays is supplemented by sonnet writing, and he circulates among the leading players of the London scene. Yes, and there are a few royal names that come into play. Not many of the contenders are at the center of so much, it seems.
Would such a central position and iron in so many fires make Stratman a candidate for Secret Service?, I say yes, at least to the extent that Ben Jonson was. To what extent he was a mere operator, controller, a co-conspirator, or even director or station chief, one doesn't know from the evidence; but there does seem to be a strange lack of evidence about his logical connection with the Wilton Group and Mary Sidney's literary circle. And a main question about lack of censorship of the plays seems to be, including Shakespeare's part in the Essex Rebellion with a Henry II production. So I suppose once could assume a working hypothesis that Stratman was on the inside of various agendas.
Compare Stratman's opportunity for involving foreign courtiers at theatres and after theatre carousels, with what Hollywood actors are capable of these days, and we are aware of how liable our politicians are to blackmail, and would have been then. Could the "horse holder" have been engaged in libertine behaviors on behalf of the Queen?, who can tell? Might be another Shakespeare film in the works about some of this, if you could make such a film and still leave Stratman with most of his clothes on.
bookburn
In the context of the above speculations, the figure of Marlowe seems relevant, because he is not only a possible Shakespeare alternative candidate [see, for instance, the extensive descriptions at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare_authorship_question#Alternative_candidates], but especially that Marlowe was no doubt in the employ of Walsingham, the "spy master," and the Secret Service. Parallels between Stratman and Marlowe are uncanny, and no doubt their familiarity and capability of managing intelligence operations was similar.

The Shakespeare movie I'm anticipating might be partly based on Marlowe's career and controversial death at a Secret Services safe house and postmortem. Could be that Marlowe made strange friends in higher circles, and Shakespeare, too, was involved with powerful benefactors and admirers; all of which would be very colorful to portray? Not sure the BBC is up to that.
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