Discussion:
WILTON 42
(too old to reply)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-11-25 04:11:37 UTC
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SYLVIE AND BRUNO

“And I don’t believe the Goat sang it at all!”

“It did, though!” said Bruno. “It singed it right froo. I sa[W]ed it
singing with its long beard--”

“It couldn’t sing w[I]th its beard,” I said, hoping to puzzle the little
fel[L]ow: “a beard isn’t a voice.”

“Well then, oo couldn’t walk wi[T]h Sylvie!” Bruno cried triumphantly.
“Sylvie isn’t a f[O]ot!”

I thought I had better follow Sylvie’s example, a[N]d be silent for a
while. Bruno was too sharp for us.
...............................
[WILTON] 42
-------------------------------------------------------------------
SYLVIE AND BRUNO CONCLUDED

“The sun is setting,” said Lady Muriel, rising and leading the way to
the open windo[W]. “Just look at the western sky! What lovely crimson
t[I]nts! We shall have a glorious day to-morrow——” We had fo[L]lowed her
across the room, and were standing in a li[T]tle group, talking in low
tones in the gathering gl[O]om, when we were startled by the voice of
the sick ma[N], murmuring words too indistinct for the ear to catch.
...............................
[WILTON] 42
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2017-11-25 19:20:00 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
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SYLVIE AND BRUNO
“And I don’t believe the Goat sang it at all!”
“It did, though!” said Bruno. “It singed it right froo. I sa[W]ed it
singing with its long beard--”
“It couldn’t sing w[I]th its beard,” I said, hoping to puzzle the little
fel[L]ow: “a beard isn’t a voice.”
“Well then, oo couldn’t walk wi[T]h Sylvie!” Bruno cried triumphantly.
“Sylvie isn’t a f[O]ot!”
I thought I had better follow Sylvie’s example, a[N]d be silent for a
while. Bruno was too sharp for us.
...............................
[WILTON] 42
-------------------------------------------------------------------
SYLVIE AND BRUNO CONCLUDED
“The sun is setting,” said Lady Muriel, rising and leading the way to
the open windo[W]. “Just look at the western sky! What lovely crimson
t[I]nts! We shall have a glorious day to-morrow——” We had fo[L]lowed her
across the room, and were standing in a li[T]tle group, talking in low
tones in the gathering gl[O]om, when we were startled by the voice of
the sick ma[N], murmuring words too indistinct for the ear to catch.
...............................
[WILTON] 42
Was there supposed to have been any point to the above effusion of crackpot cryptography, Art? If so, could you explain what it was?

Are you aware that this is supposed to be a *Shakespeare* newsgroup, Art? Or are you not observant enough to have caught on to that fact yet?

You desperately need a hobby, Art! I would recommend that you take up playing the piano -- it can be a very gratifying pastime. MoreoVER, playing pianos is a much less expensive hobby than defenestrating them.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
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Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-11-25 23:15:06 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
-------------------------------------------------------------------
SYLVIE AND BRUNO
“And I don’t believe the Goat sang it at all!”
“It did, though!” said Bruno. “It singed it right froo. I sa[W]ed it
singing with its long beard--”
“It couldn’t sing w[I]th its beard,” I said, hoping to puzzle the little
fel[L]ow: “a beard isn’t a voice.”
“Well then, oo couldn’t walk wi[T]h Sylvie!” Bruno cried triumphantly.
“Sylvie isn’t a f[O]ot!”
I thought I had better follow Sylvie’s example, a[N]d be silent for a
while. Bruno was too sharp for us.
...............................
[WILTON] 42
-------------------------------------------------------------------
SYLVIE AND BRUNO CONCLUDED
“The sun is setting,” said Lady Muriel, rising and leading the way to
the open windo[W]. “Just look at the western sky! What lovely crimson
t[I]nts! We shall have a glorious day to-morrow——” We had fo[L]lowed her
across the room, and were standing in a li[T]tle group, talking in low
tones in the gathering gl[O]om, when we were startled by the voice of
the sick ma[N], murmuring words too indistinct for the ear to catch.
...............................
[WILTON] 42
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Lea wrote:

<<Was there supposed to have been any point to the above effusion of
crackpot cryptography, Art? If so, could you explain what it was?>>
--------------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/42_(number)#Works_of_Lewis_Carroll
...............................................
Examples of Lewis Carroll's use of 42:

1) Alice's Adventures in Wonderland has 42 illustrations.

2) Alice's attempts at multiplication (chapter two of Alice in Wonderland) work if one uses base 18 to write the first answer, and increases the base by threes to 21, 24, etc. (the answers working up to 4 × 12 = "19" in base 39), but "breaks" precisely when one attempts the answer to 4 × 13 in base 42, leading Alice to declare "oh dear! I shall never get to twenty at that rate!"

3) Rule Forty-two in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
("All persons more than a mile high to leave the court").

4) Rule 42 of the Code in the preface to The Hunting of the Snark
("No one shall speak to the Man at the Helm").

5) In "fit the first" of The Hunting of the Snark the Baker had
"forty-two boxes, all carefully packed, With his name painted clearly on each."

6) The White Queen announces her age as "one hundred and one, five months and a day", which—if the best possible date is assumed for the action of Through the Looking-Glass (e.g., a date is chosen such that the rollover from February to March is excluded from what would otherwise be an imprecise measurement of "five months and a day")—gives a total of 37,044 days. If the Red Queen, as part of the same chess set, is regarded as the same age, their combined age is 74,088 days, or 42 × 42 × 42.
---------------------------------------------
. <= 42 =>
.
. ItsingeditrightfrooIsa [W] editsingingwithitsl
. ongbeardItcouldntsingw [I] thitsbeardIsaidhopi
. ngtopuzzlethelittlefel [L] owabeardisntavoiceW
. ellthenoocouldntwalkwi [T] hSylvieBrunocriedtr
. iumphantlySylvieisntaf [O] otIthoughtIhadbette
. rfollowSylviesexamplea [N] dbesilentforawhileB
. runowastoosharpforus
.
[WILTON] 42
---------------------------------------------
. <= 42 =>
.
. ThesunissettingsaidLady M urielrisingandlead
. ingthewaytotheopenwindo [W] Justlookattheweste
. rnskyWhatlovelycrimsont [I] ntsWeshallhaveaglo
. riousdaytomorrowWehadfo [L] lowedheracrossther
. oomandwerestandinginali [T] tlegrouptalkinginl
. owtonesinthegatheringgl [O] omwhenwewerestartl
. edbythevoiceofthesickma [N] murmuringwordstooi
. ndistinctfortheeartocat c h
.
[WILTON] 42
--------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/42_(number)#Works_of_Lewis_Carroll
...............................................
In 1966, mathematician Paul Cooper theorized that the fastest, most efficient way to travel across continents would be to bore a straight hollow tube directly through the Earth, connecting a set of antipodes, remove the air from the tube and fall through. The first half of the journey consists of free-fall acceleration, while the second half consists of an exactly equal deceleration. The time for such a journey works out to be 42 minutes. Even if the tube does not pass through the exact center of the Earth, the time for a journey powered entirely by gravity (known as a gravity train) always works out to be 42 minutes, so long as the tube remains friction-free, as while the force of gravity would be lessened, the distance traveled is reduced at an equal rate.

The same idea was proposed, without calculation by
Lewis Carroll in 1893 in Sylvie and Bruno Concluded:
...............................................
The Earl was listening with a slightly incredulous smile.
“Why cannot you _explain_ the process?” he enquired.

Mein Herr was ready with a quite unanswerable reason. “Because you
have no _words_, in _your_ language, to convey the ideas which are
needed. I could explain it in—in—but you would not understand it!”

“No indeed!” said Lady Muriel, graciously dispensing with the _name_
of the unknown language. “I never learnt it—at least, not to speak it
_fluently_, you know. _Please_ tell us some more wonderful things!”

“They run their railway-trains without any engines—nothing is needed
but machinery to _stop_ them with. Is _that_ wonderful enough, Miladi?”

“But where does the _force_ come from?” I ventured to ask.

Mein Herr turned quickly round, to look at the new speaker. Then he
took off his spectacles, and polished them, and looked at me again,
in evident bewilderment. I could see he was thinking—as indeed
_I_ was also—that we _must_ have met before.

“They use the force of _gravity_,” he said.
“It is a force known also in _your_ country, I believe?”

“But that would need a railway going _down-hill_,” the Earl
remarked. “You ca’n’t have _all_ your railways going down-hill?”

“They _all_ do,” said Mein Herr.

“Not from _both_ ends?”

“From _both_ ends.”

“Then I give it up!” said the Earl.

“Can you explain the process?” said Lady Muriel.
“Without using that language, that I ca’n’t speak fluently?”

“Easily,” said Mein Herr. “Each railway is in a long tunnel, perfectly
straight: so of course the _middle_ of it is nearer the centre of the
globe than the two ends: so every train runs half-way _down_-hill,
and that gives it force enough to run the _other_ half _up_-hill.”
--------------------------------------------------
Lea wrote:

<<Are you aware that this is supposed to be a *Shakespeare* newsgroup, Art?
Or are you not observant enough to have caught on to that fact yet?
..........................................................
One can't understand *Shakespeare* without first understanding [WILTON].
--------------------------------------------------
Lea wrote: <<You desperately need a hobby, Art!>>
..........................................................
Isn't this already an "activity that doesn't go anywhere?"
..........................................................
*ROBIN* : Up and down, up and down,
. I will lead them up and down:
. I am fear'd in field and town:
. Goblin, lead them up and down.
--------------------------------------------------
https://www.etymonline.com/word/hobby

<<*HOBBY* (n.) c. 1400, hobi, "small, active horse," short for hobyn (mid-14c.; late 13c. in Anglo-Latin), probably originally a proper name for a horse (compare dobbin), a diminutive of Robert or *ROBIN*. The modern sense of "a favorite pursuit, object, or topic" is from 1816, a shortening of hobbyhorse (q.v.) in this sense, which is attested from 1670s. Earlier it meant "a wooden or wickerwork figure of a horse," as a child's toy or a costume in the morris dance, the connecting notion being "activity that doesn't go anywhere." Hobby as a shortening of hobbyhorse also was used in the "morris horse" sense (1760) and the "child's toy horse" sense (1680s).>>
--------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2017-11-27 01:14:22 UTC
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[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
[WILTON] 42
-------------------------------------------------------------------
<<Was there supposed to have been any point to the above effusion of
crackpot cryptography, Art? If so, could you explain what it was?>>
--------------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/42_(number)#Works_of_Lewis_Carroll
...............................................
1) Alice's Adventures in Wonderland has 42 illustrations.
2) Alice's attempts at multiplication (chapter two of Alice in Wonderland)
work if one uses base 18 to write the first answer, and increases the base
by threes to 21, 24, etc. (the answers working up to 4 × 12 = "19" in base
39), but "breaks" precisely when one attempts the answer to 4 × 13 in base
42, leading Alice to declare "oh dear! I shall never get to twenty at that
rate!"
3) Rule Forty-two in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
("All persons more than a mile high to leave the court").
4) Rule 42 of the Code in the preface to The Hunting of the Snark
("No one shall speak to the Man at the Helm").
5) In "fit the first" of The Hunting of the Snark the Baker had
"forty-two boxes, all carefully packed, With his name painted clearly on each."
6) The White Queen announces her age as "one hundred and one, five months
and a day", which—if the best possible date is assumed for the action of
Through the Looking-Glass (e.g., a date is chosen such that the rollover
RolloVER? Pay attention, Art!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
from February to March is excluded from what would otherwise be an imprecise
measurement of "five months and a day")—gives a total of 37,044 days. If the
Red Queen, as part of the same chess set, is regarded as the same age, their
combined age is 74,088 days, or 42 × 42 × 42.
*SO WHAT*, Art?! What does any of the above nutcase numerology have to do with Shakespeare? Nothing? That's what I suspected.

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<Are you aware that this is supposed to be a *Shakespeare* newsgroup, Art?
Or are you not observant enough to have caught on to that fact yet?
..........................................................
One can't understand *Shakespeare* without first understanding [WILTON].
Shakespeare has nothing to do with Wilton, Art. The importance of Wilton is one of Elizabeth Weird's many delusions.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Lea wrote: <<You desperately need a hobby, Art!>>
Isn't this already an "activity that doesn't go anywhere?"
I'll grant you that it hasn't so far. Why, then, do you continue, Art?

[...]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
https://www.etymonline.com/word/hobby
<<*HOBBY* (n.) c. 1400, hobi, "small, active horse," short for hobyn
(mid-14c.; late 13c. in Anglo-Latin), probably originally a proper name for
a horse (compare dobbin), a diminutive of Robert or *ROBIN*. The modern
sense of "a favorite pursuit, object, or topic" is from 1816, a shortening
of hobbyhorse (q.v.) in this sense, which is attested from 1670s. Earlier
it meant "a wooden or wickerwork figure of a horse,"
It would be the most natural thing in the world for a hobbyhorse to belong to a horse's hindquarters, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
as a child's toy or a costume in the morris dance, the connecting notion
being "activity that doesn't go anywhere." Hobby as a shortening of
hobbyhorse also was used in the "morris horse" sense (1760) and the
"child's toy horse" sense (1680s).>>
--------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
v***@gmail.com
2017-11-29 15:23:57 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<*HOBBY* (n.) c. 1400, hobi, "small, active horse," short for hobyn
(mid-14c.; late 13c. in Anglo-Latin), probably originally a proper name for
a horse (compare dobbin),
It is a small horse or pony, and coming originally from Ireland. See Harrison's England p.220 * Holinshed, Chron. Ireland p 83. and also HOBBY-HEADED, shag-headed. And also SIR POSTHUMOUS HOBBY is one of fantastical dress, a fop.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
a diminutive of Robert or *ROBIN*. The modern
sense of "a favorite pursuit, object, or topic" is from 1816, a shortening
of hobbyhorse (q.v.) in this sense, which is attested from 1670s.
HOBBY-HORSE is an important person in the Morris Dance

“The hobby-horse doth hither prance,
Maid Marrian and the Morris dance.”

MS Harl MS 1221

And the general sense of Hob~ was of foolishness, pretended or otherwise. HOBBIL, an idiot
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Earlier
it meant "a wooden or wickerwork figure of a horse,"
It would be the most natural thing in the world for a hobbyhorse to belong to a horse's hindquarters, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
as a child's toy or a costume in the morris dance, the connecting notion
being "activity that doesn't go anywhere." Hobby as a shortening of
hobbyhorse also was used in the "morris horse" sense (1760) and the
"child's toy horse" sense (1680s).>>
Though a far older sense of this activity comes from the Anglo Saxon HOBELEN 'to skip over'.

Latterly there is Tusser's HOBBETY-HOY and Sir HOBBARD DE HOY, being between a youth and a man, or 14 to 21. The Author of the work would have known it. Palsgrave Acolastus, 1540.

As to this stem HOB~ becoming ROB~ this is far less certain, since ROBIN-GOOD-FELLOW 'a merry sprite] seems of independent providence, early C13th recorded in Wright's Latin Stories, though The Author of the Work would have likely known it from Reginal Scott's 'Discoverie of Witchcraft' 1584 including the interesting commentary 'that it hath not pleased the translators of the Bible to have 'spirits' translated as Robin-Good-Fellow (or HOBGOBBLIN)

Phil Innes

Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-11-27 04:32:21 UTC
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Raw Message
------------------------------------------------------------
. Sylvie and Bruno by Lewis Carroll

“And I don’t believe the Goat sang it at all!”

“It did, though!” said Bruno. “It singed it right froo.
I sa[W]ed it singing with its long beard--”

“It couldn’t sing w[I]th its beard,” I said, hoping
to puzzle the little fel[L]ow: “a beard isn’t a voice.”

“Well then, oo couldn’t walk wi[T]h Sylvie!”
Bruno cried triumphantly. “Sylvie isn’t a f[O]ot!”

I thought I had better follow Sylvie’s example,
a[N]d be silent for a while. Bruno was too sharp for us.
......................................................
. <= 42 =>
.
. ItsingeditrightfrooIsa [W] editsingingwithitsl
. ongbeardItcouldntsingw [I] thitsbeardIsaidhopi
. ngtopuzzlethelittlefel [L] owabeardisntavoiceW
. ellthenoocouldntwalkwi [T] hSylvieBrunocriedtr
. iumphantlySylvieisntaf [O] otIthoughtIhadbette
. rfollowSylviesexamplea [N] dbesilentforawhileB
. runowastoosharpforus
.
[WILTON] 42
-------------------------------------------------------------------
. SYLVIE AND BRUNO CONCLUDED by Lewis Carroll
.
“The sun is setting,” said Lady Muriel, rising and leading the way to
the open windo[W]. “Just look at the western sky! What lovely crimson
t[I]nts! We shall have a glorious day to-morrow——” We had fo[L]lowed her
across the room, and were standing in a li[T]tle group, talking in low
tones in the gathering gl[O]om, when we were startled by the voice of
the sick ma[N], murmuring words too indistinct for the ear to catch.
......................................................
. <= 42 =>
.
. ThesunissettingsaidLady M urielrisingandlead
. ingthewaytotheopenwindo [W] Justlookattheweste
. rnskyWhatlovelycrimsont [I] ntsWeshallhaveaglo
. riousdaytomorrowWehadfo [L] lowedheracrossther
. oomandwerestandinginali [T] tlegrouptalkinginl
. owtonesinthegatheringgl [O] omwhenwewerestartl
. edbythevoiceofthesickma [N] murmuringwordstooi
. ndistinctfortheeartocat c h
.
[WILTON] 42
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<Was there supposed to have been any point to the above effusion of
crackpot cryptography, Art? If so, could you explain what it was?>>
--------------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/42_(number)#Works_of_Lewis_Carroll
...............................................
1) Alice's Adventures in Wonderland has 42 illustrations.
2) Alice's attempts at multiplication (chapter two of Alice in Wonderland)
work if one uses base 18 to write the first answer, and increases the base
by threes to 21, 24, etc. (the answers working up to 4 × 12 = "19" in base
39), but "breaks" precisely when one attempts the answer to 4 × 13 in base
42, leading Alice to declare "oh dear! I shall never get to twenty at that
rate!"
3) Rule Forty-two in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
("All persons more than a mile high to leave the court").
4) Rule 42 of the Code in the preface to The Hunting of the Snark
("No one shall speak to the Man at the Helm").
5) In "fit the first" of The Hunting of the Snark the Baker had
"forty-two boxes, all carefully packed, With his name painted clearly on
each."
6) The White Queen announces her age as "one hundred and one, five months
and a day", which—if the best possible date is assumed for the action of
Through the Looking-Glass (e.g., a date is chosen such that the rollover
from February to March is excluded from what would otherwise be an imprecise
measurement of "five months and a day")—gives a total of 37,044 days. If the
Red Queen, as part of the same chess set, is regarded as the same age, their
combined age is 74,088 days, or 42 × 42 × 42.
-------------------------------------------------------------
Lea wrote:

<<*SO WHAT*, Art?! What does any of the above
nutcase numerology have to do with Shakespeare?
------------------------------------------------------
. The Tempest: Act IV, scene I
.
CALIBAN:
. Th{E} drop{S|I]e dro[W]ne th[I]s foo[L]e, wha[T] doe y[O]u mea[N]e
. To doate thus on such luggage? let's alone
. And doe the murther first: if he awake,
. From toe to crowne hee'l fill our skins with pinches,
. Make us *STRANGE* stuffe.

. T h {E} d r
. o p {S}[I] e
. d r o [W] n
. e t h [I]{S}
. f o o [L]{E},
. w h a [T]{D}
. o e y [O] u
. m e a [N] e
.
{E.S.} 5
[I.WILTON] 5
{S.E.D.} 5
--------------------------------------------------------
<<The {U}nfortunate {T}raveller (1594) by Thomas Nashe
is a picaresque novel about [I]ack [WILTON]'s adventures
through the European continent in which he finds himself
swept up in the currents of 16th-century history.>>
.
.

........................................................
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Unfortunate_Traveller

<<Henry Howard, {E}arl of {S}urrey (1516/1517 – 19 January 1547) functions as a sustained travel partner for [I]ack [WILTON], and the two journey to Italy to fulfill the Earl's pledge to defend the honor of his beloved Geraldine in a tournament. Although the poet was in truth married to Frances de Vere, Nashe fashions Geraldine into the beloved object of the poet's courtly affections. Surrey and Jack pass through Rotterdam, where they meet both Erasmus & Sir Thomas More. The pair reaches the university city of Wittenberg, which enables Nashe to mock the customs of Renaissance academia. Cornelius Agrippa reveals in an enchanted mirror the image of Surrey's beloved, "weeping on her bed" which causes Surrey to burst into poetry. Passing into Italy Jack and Surrey exchange identities as a security measure and because the earl means "to take more liberty of behaviour." The two engage in acts of deceit and trickery with pimps, prostitutes, and counterfeiters.>>
-------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<Are you aware that this is supposed to be a *Shakespeare* newsgroup, Art?
Or are you not observant enough to have caught on to that fact yet?
..........................................................
One can't understand *Shakespeare* without first understanding [WILTON].
-------------------------------------------------------------
Lea wrote: <<Shakespeare has nothing to do with Wilton, Art.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilton_House

<<[WILTON] House is an English country house situated at [WILTON] near Salisbury in Wiltshire. It has been the country seat of the Earls of Pembroke for over 400 years. The Front Hall is furnished with statuary; the dominating piece a larger than life statue of William Shakespeare designed by William Kent in 1743. It commemorates an unproved legend that Shakespeare came to [WILTON] and produced one of his plays in the courtyard.>>
---------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Lea wrote: <<You desperately need a hobby, Art!>>
Isn't this already an "activity that doesn't go anywhere?"
Lea wrote: <<Why, then, do you continue, Art?>>

Because, I'm quite content here at HLAS.

And if Oxfordians start to buying into Waugh's
ELS analysis maybe there is still hope for them.

(Why do you continue, Dave?)
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
https://www.etymonline.com/word/hobby
<<*HOBBY* (n.) c. 1400, hobi, "small, active horse," short for hobyn
(mid-14c.; late 13c. in Anglo-Latin), probably originally a proper name for
a horse (compare dobbin), a diminutive of Robert or *ROBIN*. The modern
sense of "a favorite pursuit, object, or topic" is from 1816, a shortening
of hobbyhorse (q.v.) in this sense, which is attested from 1670s. Earlier
it meant "a wooden or wickerwork figure of a horse,"
as a child's toy or a costume in the morris dance, the connecting notion
being "activity that doesn't go anywhere." Hobby as a shortening of
hobbyhorse also was used in the "morris horse" sense (1760) and the
"child's toy horse" sense (1680s).>>
Lea wrote: <<It would be the most natural thing in the world
for a hobbyhorse to belong to a horse's hindquarters, Art.>>

Don't you have that assbackwards, Dave?
--------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2017-11-27 14:33:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sunday, November 26, 2017 at 11:32:22 PM UTC-5, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

[Nutcase numerology concerning the number 42 and much other lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<*SO WHAT*, Art?! What does any of the above
nutcase numerology have to do with Shakespeare?
------------------------------------------------------
. The Tempest: Act IV, scene I
.
. Th{E} drop{S|I]e dro[W]ne th[I]s foo[L]e, wha[T] doe y[O]u mea[N]e
. To doate thus on such luggage? let's alone
. And doe the murther first: if he awake,
. From toe to crowne hee'l fill our skins with pinches,
. Make us *STRANGE* stuffe.
. T h {E} d r
. o p {S}[I] e
. d r o [W] n
. e t h [I]{S}
. f o o [L]{E},
. w h a [T]{D}
. o e y [O] u
. m e a [N] e
.
{E.S.} 5
[I.WILTON] 5
{S.E.D.} 5
...none of which explains what any of the above nutcase numerology has to do with Shakespeare!

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Lea wrote: <<You desperately need a hobby, Art!>>
Isn't this already an "activity that doesn't go anywhere?"
Lea wrote: <<Why, then, do you continue, Art?>>
Because, I'm quite content here at HLAS.
And if Oxfordians start to buying [sic]
Is English your native tongue, Art?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
into Waugh's
ELS analysis maybe there is still hope [sic]
Did you misspell "dope", Art?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
for them.
(Why do you continue, Dave?)
At the Grand Master's orders, Art -- you should know that.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
https://www.etymonline.com/word/hobby
<<*HOBBY* (n.) c. 1400, hobi, "small, active horse," short for hobyn
(mid-14c.; late 13c. in Anglo-Latin), probably originally a proper name for
a horse (compare dobbin), a diminutive of Robert or *ROBIN*. The modern
sense of "a favorite pursuit, object, or topic" is from 1816, a shortening
of hobbyhorse (q.v.) in this sense, which is attested from 1670s. Earlier
it meant "a wooden or wickerwork figure of a horse,"
as a child's toy or a costume in the morris dance, the connecting notion
being "activity that doesn't go anywhere." Hobby as a shortening of
hobbyhorse also was used in the "morris horse" sense (1760) and the
"child's toy horse" sense (1680s).>>
Lea wrote: <<It would be the most natural thing in the world
for a hobbyhorse to belong to a horse's hindquarters, Art.>>
Don't you have that assbackwards, Dave?
No, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
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Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-11-27 15:12:09 UTC
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Post by nordicskiv2
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
(Why do you continue, Dave?)
At the Grand Master's orders, Art -- you should know that.
I figured.

Art
nordicskiv2
2017-11-27 23:58:50 UTC
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by nordicskiv2
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
(Why do you continue, Dave?)
At the Grand Master's orders, Art -- you should know that.
I figured.
I expected that you would "figure" that, Art. Your utter inability to detect a joke is one of the most amusing features of your Clueless Cretin and Petulant Paranoid personae!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Art
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