Discussion:
Who goes down the pub?
(too old to reply)
v***@gmail.com
2016-12-22 22:17:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Morgan espoused:—
Stratfordian Response: Shakspere could have met a sailor in his local pub.
The list of observation and response goes on and on. Ironically, the Stratfordians constantly claim that the anti-Stratfordians are crackpots. I think the Stratfordians need to take a look in the mirror.
Merlin's mirror, presumably.

I merely say here about the odds of Shakespeare having 'met a sailor in his local pub'.

What are the odds of not meeting a sailor in the Port of London?

On this fact alone, requiring no special knowledge, but a liberal understanding of how London is situated upon the River Thames and its national import thereby since the time of Claudius, dothed Morgan's point propose itself.

True he has other 'points' though for similar reason, let them be 'blunts' for the moment, while we make discourse in a 'hello sailor' interim, supposing along a line whereas a bloke could meet a sailor.

[I know this may be controversial to mention, but I sought in vain in this newsgroup for further mention of Elizabeth's rescue-dwarf collection, or dwarves as some say, so switched to sailors.]

At least one could agree with Morgan's observation, possibly original, that a list will go on.

Even on and on, being the very nature of a list, or lists in plural.

Though my main inquiry is this matter of the extancy of sailors in pubs, specially since The Stratfordian was in Town for quite a while, and changing the emphasis from the unlikeliness of The Author meeting them, to the very high likelihood of meeting them in pubs — even if the Stratfordian wrote nought of the work, a subtle deviance, though notable from the logics.

Phil Innes
marco
2016-12-24 04:25:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by v***@gmail.com
Morgan espoused:—
Stratfordian Response: Shakspere could have met a sailor in his local pub.
The list of observation and response goes on and on. Ironically, the Stratfordians constantly claim that the anti-Stratfordians are crackpots. I think the Stratfordians need to take a look in the mirror.
Merlin's mirror, presumably.
I merely say here about the odds of Shakespeare having 'met a sailor in his local pub'.
What are the odds of not meeting a sailor in the Port of London?
On this fact alone, requiring no special knowledge, but a liberal understanding of how London is situated upon the River Thames and its national import thereby since the time of Claudius, dothed Morgan's point propose itself.
True he has other 'points' though for similar reason, let them be 'blunts' for the moment, while we make discourse in a 'hello sailor' interim, supposing along a line whereas a bloke could meet a sailor.
[I know this may be controversial to mention, but I sought in vain in this newsgroup for further mention of Elizabeth's rescue-dwarf collection, or dwarves as some say, so switched to sailors.]
At least one could agree with Morgan's observation, possibly original, that a list will go on.
Even on and on, being the very nature of a list, or lists in plural.
Though my main inquiry is this matter of the extancy of sailors in pubs, specially since The Stratfordian was in Town for quite a while, and changing the emphasis from the unlikeliness of The Author meeting them, to the very high likelihood of meeting them in pubs — even if the Stratfordian wrote nought of the work, a subtle deviance, though notable from the logics.
Phil Innes
.
A***@germanymail.com
2016-12-28 18:22:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by v***@gmail.com
Morgan espoused:—
Stratfordian Response: Shakspere could have met a sailor in his local pub.
The list of observation and response goes on and on. Ironically, the Stratfordians constantly claim that the anti-Stratfordians are crackpots. I think the Stratfordians need to take a look in the mirror.
Merlin's mirror, presumably.
I merely say here about the odds of Shakespeare having 'met a sailor in his local pub'.
What are the odds of not meeting a sailor in the Port of London?
On this fact alone, requiring no special knowledge, but a liberal understanding of how London is situated upon the River Thames and its national import thereby since the time of Claudius, dothed Morgan's point propose itself.
True he has other 'points' though for similar reason, let them be 'blunts' for the moment, while we make discourse in a 'hello sailor' interim, supposing along a line whereas a bloke could meet a sailor.
[I know this may be controversial to mention, but I sought in vain in this newsgroup for further mention of Elizabeth's rescue-dwarf collection, or dwarves as some say, so switched to sailors.]
At least one could agree with Morgan's observation, possibly original, that a list will go on.
Even on and on, being the very nature of a list, or lists in plural.
Though my main inquiry is this matter of the extancy of sailors in pubs, specially since The Stratfordian was in Town for quite a while, and changing the emphasis from the unlikeliness of The Author meeting them, to the very high likelihood of meeting them in pubs — even if the Stratfordian wrote nought of the work, a subtle deviance, though notable from the logics.
Phil Innes
.
Art N
marco
2016-12-30 17:37:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
drinks

This is the news: he fishes, drinks, and wastes Antony and Cleopatra: I, iv
Troubles the silver spring where england drinks. King Henry VI, part II: IV, i
Dry sorrow drinks our blood. adieu, adieu! Romeo and Juliet: III, v

And my great mind most kingly drinks it up: Sonnets: CXIV
Why, he drinks you, with facility, your dane dead Othello: II, iii
The ditch-dog; drinks the green mantle of the King Lear: III, iv

She says she drinks no other drink but tears, Titus Andronicus: III, ii
O, the better, sir; for he that drinks all night, Measure for Measure: IV, iii
Not what to say. we will give you sleepy drinks, The Winter's Tale: I, i

No jocund health that denmark drinks to-day, Hamlet: I, ii
Him laugh; but that's no marvel, he drinks no wine. King Henry IV, part II: IV, iii
Has paid his men their wages: he ne'er drinks, Timon of Athens: III, ii

Blessed fig's-end! the wine she drinks is made of Othello: II, i
And when she drinks, against her lips I bob A Midsummer Night's Dream: II, i
And drinks off candles' ends for flap-dragons, and King Henry IV, part II: II, iv


William Shakespeare, drinker

Loading...