Discussion:
"The profundity of Shakespeare’s play lies in the awareness that injured merit can be self-consuming..."
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gggg gggg
2021-02-05 21:52:14 UTC
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https://theamericanscholar.org/injured-merit/
Donald Cameron
2021-02-06 04:04:28 UTC
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On Fri, 5 Feb 2021 13:52:14 -0800 (PST), gggg gggg
Post by gggg gggg
https://theamericanscholar.org/injured-merit/
I like the idea of coming around on literature to see motives and
purposes, but would argue also that "injured merit" in the Bible and
Milton could be about a function of evil, in that Satan represents G-d
in the human predicament.

So we see examples in Genesis, where the Serpent seduces Eve and Adam;
in Job, where Satan is allowed by G-d to deny Job's fortunes, then
also inflict him physically; and even in Cain's slaying of Able, which
seems unjust.

So it seems we see evil manifest by G-d through Satan, in order to
carry out a divine plan about the human predicament, Covenant or not.

Suggest that Shakespeare takes up the theme of "injured merit" in
"Merchant of Venice," concerning the motives of Shylock and his sense
of injury about the Jewish Covenant protecting him
and his revenge against Antonio and Jessica. It seems Shakespeare
equivocates about whether it's tragedy or comedy when Portia argues
the case in favor of the state law against usury, while Shylock's
daughter marries Lorenzo, outside of Jewish custom, and is left
saying, "When you prick us, do we not bleed?".

It seems that "evil" is analyzed in several of Shakespeare's plays,
without especially labeling it so. Like in "Othello," what else is
Iago but something evil?; "Hamlet," where we analyze "Something is
rotten in the state of Denmark"; "Lear," which seems especially bad
about discovering evil blindly on the edge of a cliff.
marc hanson
2021-02-21 22:29:12 UTC
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Post by Donald Cameron
On Fri, 5 Feb 2021 13:52:14 -0800 (PST), gggg gggg
Post by gggg gggg
https://theamericanscholar.org/injured-merit/
I like the idea of coming around on literature to see motives and
purposes, but would argue also that "injured merit" in the Bible and
Milton could be about a function of evil, in that Satan represents G-d
in the human predicament.
So we see examples in Genesis, where the Serpent seduces Eve and Adam;
in Job, where Satan is allowed by G-d to deny Job's fortunes, then
also inflict him physically; and even in Cain's slaying of Able, which
seems unjust.
So it seems we see evil manifest by G-d through Satan, in order to
carry out a divine plan about the human predicament, Covenant or not.
Suggest that Shakespeare takes up the theme of "injured merit" in
"Merchant of Venice," concerning the motives of Shylock and his sense
of injury about the Jewish Covenant protecting him
and his revenge against Antonio and Jessica. It seems Shakespeare
equivocates about whether it's tragedy or comedy when Portia argues
the case in favor of the state law against usury, while Shylock's
daughter marries Lorenzo, outside of Jewish custom, and is left
saying, "When you prick us, do we not bleed?".
It seems that "evil" is analyzed in several of Shakespeare's plays,
without especially labeling it so. Like in "Othello," what else is
Iago but something evil?; "Hamlet," where we analyze "Something is
rotten in the state of Denmark"; "Lear," which seems especially bad
about discovering evil blindly on the edge of a cliff..
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