Discussion:
HLAS FAQ
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g***@gmail.com
2020-08-01 11:04:54 UTC
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It is a bawdy planet, that will strike
Where 'tis predominant; and 'tis powerful, think it,
From east, west, north and south: be it concluded,
No barricado for a belly; know't;
It will let in and out the enemy
With bag and baggage: many thousand on's
Have the disease, and feel't not. How now, boy!
      - WT I, ii

http://www.shakespeare.handshake.de/
      - HLAS FAQ
Donald Cameron
2020-08-01 19:34:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by g***@gmail.com
It is a bawdy planet, that will strike
Where 'tis predominant; and 'tis powerful, think it,
From east, west, north and south: be it concluded,
No barricado for a belly; know't;
It will let in and out the enemy
With bag and baggage: many thousand on's
Have the disease, and feel't not. How now, boy!
      - WT I, ii
http://www.shakespeare.handshake.de/
      - HLAS FAQ
https://www.sparknotes.com/nofear/shakespeare/winterstale/page_22/

Spark Notes No Fear version in modern English:

WT, I, ii, Leontes:
. . . .
There’s no remedy for it, since it is a world full of lust,
from east to west and north and south. There’s no
barricade you can build around the womb, and one’s
enemy will go in and out as he pleases. Thousands
of us have the disease and don’t know it. What now,
boy?

Metaphor of warfare shows in imagery of "barricade" and defensive
walls. "Disease" could be "lust" and/or some STD, maybe like virus in
the world's body, extending the universality of the plot. "Bawdy
planet" says a lot.
f***@gmail.com
2020-10-29 14:12:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Donald Cameron
Post by g***@gmail.com
It is a bawdy planet, that will strike
Where 'tis predominant; and 'tis powerful, think it,
From east, west, north and south: be it concluded,
No barricado for a belly; know't;
It will let in and out the enemy
With bag and baggage: many thousand on's
Have the disease, and feel't not. How now, boy!
      - WT I, ii
http://www.shakespeare.handshake.de/
      - HLAS FAQ
https://www.sparknotes.com/nofear/shakespeare/winterstale/page_22/
. . . .
There’s no remedy for it, since it is a world full of lust,
from east to west and north and south. There’s no
barricade you can build around the womb, and one’s
enemy will go in and out as he pleases. Thousands
of us have the disease and don’t know it. What now,
boy?
Metaphor of warfare shows in imagery of "barricade" and defensive
walls. "Disease" could be "lust" and/or some STD, maybe like virus in
the world's body, extending the universality of the plot. "Bawdy
planet" says a lot..
John W Kennedy
2020-10-29 19:37:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Donald Cameron
Post by g***@gmail.com
It is a bawdy planet, that will strike
Where 'tis predominant; and 'tis powerful, think it,
From east, west, north and south: be it concluded,
No barricado for a belly; know't;
It will let in and out the enemy
With bag and baggage: many thousand on's
Have the disease, and feel't not. How now, boy!
      - WT I, ii
http://www.shakespeare.handshake.de/
      - HLAS FAQ
https://www.sparknotes.com/nofear/shakespeare/winterstale/page_22/
. . . .
There’s no remedy for it, since it is a world full of lust,
from east to west and north and south. There’s no
barricade you can build around the womb, and one’s
enemy will go in and out as he pleases. Thousands
of us have the disease and don’t know it. What now,
boy?
Metaphor of warfare shows in imagery of "barricade" and defensive
walls. "Disease" could be "lust" and/or some STD, maybe like virus in
the world's body, extending the universality of the plot. "Bawdy
planet" says a lot.
Everything I know about both Early Modern English and Renaissance
astronomy screams that the “planet” here is Venus.
--
John W. Kennedy
"The blind rulers of Logres
Nourished the land on a fallacy of rational virtue."
-- Charles Williams. "Taliessin through Logres: Prelude"
f***@gmail.com
2020-10-30 21:06:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by John W Kennedy
Post by Donald Cameron
Post by g***@gmail.com
It is a bawdy planet, that will strike
Where 'tis predominant; and 'tis powerful, think it,
From east, west, north and south: be it concluded,
No barricado for a belly; know't;
It will let in and out the enemy
With bag and baggage: many thousand on's
Have the disease, and feel't not. How now, boy!
      - WT I, ii
http://www.shakespeare.handshake.de/
      - HLAS FAQ
https://www.sparknotes.com/nofear/shakespeare/winterstale/page_22/
. . . .
There’s no remedy for it, since it is a world full of lust,
from east to west and north and south. There’s no
barricade you can build around the womb, and one’s
enemy will go in and out as he pleases. Thousands
of us have the disease and don’t know it. What now,
boy?
Metaphor of warfare shows in imagery of "barricade" and defensive
walls. "Disease" could be "lust" and/or some STD, maybe like virus in
the world's body, extending the universality of the plot. "Bawdy
planet" says a lot.
Everything I know about both Early Modern English and Renaissance
astronomy screams that the “planet” here is Venus.
--
John W. Kennedy
"The blind rulers of Logres
Nourished the land on a fallacy of rational virtue."
-- Charles Williams. "Taliessin through Logres: Prelude".
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