Discussion:
"EKPHRASIS": A presentation to the mind's eye.
(too old to reply)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-03-25 18:40:12 UTC
Permalink
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. "EKPHRASIS": A presentation to the mind's eye.
...........................................................
. *EKPHRASIS*
. *I SHAKSPER*
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http://www.courses.rochester.edu/kraus/Ekphrasis.htm

<<The Oxford Classical Dictionary, states that EKPHRASIS is,
"an extended and detailed literary description of any object, real or
imaginary". This allows EKPHRASIS to be ascribed to many different
images or real visuals that occur in life. Early rhetoricians
organized this term into a rhetorical exercise, which was derived from
Aphthonius's Progymnasmata. Another description of the term comes
from the teachers of ancient rhetoric. They defined it as, "a vivid
description intended to bring the subject before the mind's eye of the
listener" ("EKPHRASIS"). In order to compose an ekphrastic piece, an
incredible amount of skill and rhetorical knowledge was needed. They
were the most advanced "graded preparatory exercises (progymnasmata)
designed to teach basic rhetorical skills to school boys" ("EKPHRASIS").>>
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. Last speech in the First Folio (1623):
. http://tinyurl.com/q7mtmcg
. http://tinyurl.com/q3588wk
........................................
Cymbeline: *LAUD WE THE GODS* ,
. And let our crooked SMOAKES
. climbe to their Nostrils
. From our blest Altars.
. *PUBLISH* we
.
. {T}his Pe{A}ce [T]o [A]{L}[L] o[U]r [S]{U}biect{S}.
........................................
. <= 6 =>
.
. P U B L I S
. H w e {T} h i
. s P e {A} c e
. [T] o [A]{L}[L] o
. [U] r [S]{U} b i
. e c t {S}.
.
[TALUS] 2
{TALUS} 6

Prob. of 2[TALUS]'s with skip < 7
in Last FF Speech: ~ 1 in 830,000

Prob. of a Royal Flush = 1 in 649,739
........................................
. Set we forward:
. Let A Roman, and a Brittish Ensigne wave
. Friendly toge(T)h(E)r: (S|O) (T)hrough Luds-Towne march,
. And in the Temple of great *IUPITER*
. Our Peace wee'l ratifie: Seale it with Feasts.
. Set on there: NEVER was a Warre did cease
. (Ere bloodie hands were wash'd) with such a Peace.
....................................................
. 1 of 2 skip 2 [TALUS]s in KJV
.
Samuel 1:19 ... we have added un[T]o [A]l[L] o[U]r [S]innes,
....................................................
. King John (Folio 1, 1623) Act 4, Scene 2
.
*PEMBROKE*: Stay yet (Lord Salisbury) Ile go with thee,
. And finde th'inheritance of this poore childe,
. His little kingdome of a forced grave.
. That blood which ow'd the bredth of all this Ile,
. Three foot of it doth hold; bad world the while:
. This must not be thus borne, this will breake out
. [T]o [A]l[L] o[U]r [S]orrowes, and ere long I doubt.
-----------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Marshal,_1st_Earl_of_Pembroke

<<*William Marshal*, 1st Earl of *PEMBROKE* (1146 – 14 May 1219), was an Anglo-Norman soldier and statesman. He served five English kings – The "Young King" Henry, Henry II, Richard I, John, and Henry III. Knighted in 1166, he spent his younger years as a knight errant and a successful tournament fighter; Stephen Langton eulogized him as the "best knight that ever lived." In 1189, he received the title of Earl of Pembroke through marriage during the second creation of the Pembroke Earldom. In 1216, he was appointed protector for the nine-year-old Henry III, and regent of the kingdom.>>
------------------------------------------------
. Richard the Third (Quarto 1, 1597)
.
. Act 4, Scene 5: Entee Darbie, Sir Christopher.
.
Darbie: Sir Christapher, tell Richmond this from me,
. That in the stie of this most bloudie bore,
. My sonne George Stanlie is franckt vp in hold,
. If I reuolt, off goes young Georges head,
. The feare of that, with holdes my present aide,
. But tell me, where is princelie Richmond now?
.
Christopher: At Pembroke, or at Harford-west in Wales.
.
Darbie: What men of name resort to him.
.
Sir Christopher: Sir Walter Herbert, a renowned souldier,
. Sir Gilbert Talbot, *Sir WILLIAM STANLIE*,
. *OXFORD*, redoubted *PEMBROKE*, Sir Iames Blunt,
. Rice vp Thomas, with a valiant crew,
. With many moe of noble fame and worth,
. And towardes London they doe bend their course,
. If by the way, they be not fought withall.
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Dedicatory Verse to Oxford in {SPENSER's} The Faerie Queene:
...................................................
To the right Honourable the Earle
of Oxenford, Lord high Chamberlayne of
England. &c.
.
REc(E)ive most Noble Lord in gentle gree,
The unripe fruit of an u(N)ready wit:
Which BY THY COUNT{E|N}aunc[E| D}oth cra[V|e} to bee
D[E]f(E)nded f[R]om foule [E]n{V|I}es poisnous bit.
Which so to doe may th(E)e right w{E|L}l befit,
Sith th'antique glory of thine auncest{R}y
*Under a SHADY VELE* is therein writ,
And eke thin{E} owne lon(G) living memory,
Succeeding them in TRUE nobility:
And also for the love, which thou doest beare
To *th'Heliconian YMPS* , and they to thee,
They unto thee, and thou to them most dear[E]:
Deare as thou a[R]t unto thy self[E], so love
{T}h{A}t {L}o[V]e{S} & honours the[E], as doth behove.
..........................................
[EVERE] 8,-13, 40
{TALVS} 2
.
Prob. 3[E.VERE]s skip < 41 ~ 1 in 2,250)
Prob. {TALVS}/{TALUS}/{TALOS} skip 2 ~ 1 in 2,000
--------------------------------------------------------------
{SPENSER's} The Faerie Queene: Book V, the Book of Justice.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Faerie_Queene

<<Artegal is the personification and champion of Justice. Artegal has
a companion in [TALUS], a metal man who wields a flail & never sleeps
or tires but will mercilessly pursue and kill any number of villains.
[TALUS] obeys Artegal's command, and serves to represent justice
without mercy (hence, Artegal is the more human face of justice).
Later, [TALUS] does not rescue Artegal from enslavement by the wicked
Radigund, because Artegal is bound by a legal contract to serve her.>>
-------------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/ykugrfq

Edward (De Vere) Earl of Oxford poetry:
IV. COELUM NON SOLUM. (not only heaven)

If care or skill could conquer vaine desire,
Or Reason's raignes, my strong affection stay:
Their should my sighes, to quiet brest retire,
And shun such sighes as secret thoughts bewray.
Uncomely Loue, which now lurks in my brest,
Should cease my griefe, though Wisdome's power opprest.
But who can leaue to looke on Venus face,
Or yeeldeth not to Juno's high estate?
What wit so wise, as giues not *PALLAS* place?
These VER(tu)Es rare, ech Gods, did yeelde a mate.
Saue her alone, who yet on earth dooth raigne,
Whose beautie's string, no God can well destraine.
What worldly wight, can hope for heauenly hire,
When onelie sighes must make his secret mone?
A silent sute, doth seeld to grace aspire.
My haplesse hap, dooth roule the restlesse STONE.
yet Phæbe faire, dirdainde the heauens aboue,
To ioye on earth, her poore Endimion's loue.
Rare is reward, where none can iustlie craue,
For chaunce is choyce, where Reason makes no claime,
Yet luck sometimes, disparing soules dooth saue,
A happie starre made Giges ioy attaine.

A slauish Smi[T]h, of rude [A]nd rasca[L]l race,
Fo[U]nd meane[S] in time to gaine a Goddesse' grace.
.............................................
. <= 8 =>
.
. A s l a u i s h
. S m i [T] h o f r
. u d e [A] n d r a
. s c a [L] l r a c
. e F O [U] n d m e
. a n E [S] i n t i
. m e t o g a i n
. e a G o d d e s
. s e'g r a c e.
.
[TALUS] 8 : Prob. ~ 1 in 242
.............................................
Then loftie Loue thy sacred sailes aduance,
My sighing seas shall flow with streams of teares:
Amidst disdains, driue foorth thy dolefull chaunce,
A valiant minde no deadly danger feares.
Who loues aloft, and sets his harte on hie,
Deserues no paine, though he do pine and die.
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Loading Image...
...........................................................
_The MINERVA BRITANNA_ Banner Folding clearly demonstrates
how the Equidistant Linear Sequence decoding is to be performed:
............................................................
Loading Image...
..........................................................
"all thinges perish and come to theyr last end, but workes
of learned WITS & monuments of Poetry abide *for EVER* ."
..........................................................
_______ <= 7 =>
.
. [V]I __\V\ (I)\T\ U R
. [I]N G __\E\ (N)\I\ O
. [C]Æ|T| E \R\ (A)\M\
. [O]R|T| I S __\E\ (R)
. [U N T]
.
{VERE} 8 : Prob. ~ 1 in 140
..........................................................
1579: Dedication to Oxford in the only edition of
. Geoffrey Gates' The Defence of Militarie profession.
.
. TO THE RIGHT honorable, Edward de \VERE\, Earle of
. Oxenford, [VICOUNT] Bulbecke, Lod of Escales
. and Baldesmere, and Lord great Chamberlaine of England.
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The MINERVA BRITANNA example makes clever use of
a classical Latin phrase from VIRGIL (_Elegiae in Maecenatem_):
that was discovered to coincidentally contain:
Edward de \VERE\,[VICOUNT] Bulbecke
in the form of an ELS *SCYTALE*:
-----------------------------------------------------------
. Compare the posture of the Vesalius'
. "VIVITUR IN GENIO" skeleton:
.
http://www.clinicalanatomy.com/vesalius1.htm
http://www.zol.be/Vesalius/Start_Andreas_Vesalius/body_start_andreas_...
.
.with the posture of the 1740 Westminster Shakespeare statue:
. http://www.sirbacon.org/gallery/west.htm
.
. Westminster: "And like the baseless *FNBRICK* of a Vision"
____ Vesalius: " De humani corporis *FABRICA* "
......................................................
. Vesalius' *FABRICA* published May 26, 1543
. Witty SUSAN VERE was 'born' on May 26, 1587
. Witty SUSANna Shak. was 'born' on May 26, 1583
. Esmé Stewart dies on May 26, 1583
-----------------------------------------------------
http://spenserians.cath.vt.edu/TextRecord.php?action=GET&textsid=32973
.
The Transformed Metamorphosis (1600). By Cyril Tourneur
.
<<In one of the first full-blown imitations of the Faerie Queene, Cyril Tourneur pursues the political project associated with Sidney and {SPENS}er in an apocalyptic celebration of the Earl of Essex. The first half of the poem, rather in the manner of Spenser's Visions, describes the corruption of the world in a vision of Hell that seems to have supplied Milton with some hints for Paradise Lost. The second half describes the reforming efforts of Mavortio — the Earl of Essex — beginning with a passage modeled on the Cave of Error episode in the first book of the Faerie Queene.>>
.................................................
Whi[L]e Mars himselfe goes wandring up and downe,
Associated w[I]th the sacred brood,
That hand in hand (like an enchaining [R]o{W}ne)
Encompasse him: ev'n dead with want of food;
({I}f want ma[Y] heaven hurt with deadly bood)
Much {T}een they bide in search for su[C]h an one:
Whom t{H}ey may make their nurs'ries paragon.

A pitchi{E} night en curtained with clowdes
(That kept f{R}om it heav'ns star-bright comforture)
Is the sole Theater that them enshrowdes;
Fogs, damps, trees, stones, their sole encompassure,
To whom they mone, black todes give responsure:
Their woe is like unto that wretches paine,
Whom (s'parents dead) no man will entertaine.
.................................................
. <= 37 =>
.
. Tha t handinhandlikean e nchaining[R]o {W} neEn
. com p assehimevndeadwi t hwantoffo o d {I} fwan
. tma[Y]heavenhurtwithde a dlyboodMu c h {T} eent
. hey b ideinsearchforsu[C]hanoneWho m t {H} eyma
. yma k etheirnursriespa r agonApitc h i {E} nigh
. ten c urtainedwithclow d esThatkep t f {R} omit
. hea v nsstarbrightcomf o rture
.
[CYRIL] -47: Prob. in last 12 stanzas ~ 1 in 150
{WITHER} 37: Prob. in last 12 stanzas ~ 1 in 90
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Local colour. Wo[R]k in all you know. Mak[E] them accomplices.

-- S[H]akespeare has left [T]he huguenot's house [I]n Silver
street and [W]alks by the swanmews along the riverbank.
..........................................
[WITHER] -17
..........................................
that which I was is that [W]hich I [A]m and t[H]at whi[C]h in po[S]sibility
I may come to be. So in the future, the sister of the past, I may see
myself as I sit here now but by reflection from that which then I shall be.

Drummond of Hawthornden helped you at that stile.
..........................................
[SCHAW] -6
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1635 George [WITHER] Collection of Emblemes
....................................................
William Marshall's frontispiece to
Geo. Wither's Emblemes. http://tinyurl.com/ntnzddb
...........................................
The Authors Meditation upon sight of his {P}ICTURE.
...........................................
When I beho(L)d *MY {P}ICTURE* , and perceive,
How vaine it is, our Portraitu(R)es to leave
In Lines, and *SHADOWES* , (which make shewes, tod(A|Y),
Of that which will, to morrow, fade away)
And, thinke, what (M|E)ane [R]ese(M)bl(A)nc(E)s a(T) be(S)t,
Are by Mechanike Instruments expr[E]st;
I thought it better, much, to leave behind me,
Some Draug[H]t, *IN WHICH my living friends might find me*
The same I am; in [T]hat, whic(H) will remaine,
Till all is ruin'd, and repair'd aga[I]n(E) :
And, which, in absence, *WILL more TRUEly show me* ,
Tha(N), out[W]ard Formes, to those, who think they know me.
...........................................
READ IF THOV CANST, WHOM ENVIOVS DEATH HATH {PLAST}
http://tinyurl.com/bqe5gwl
...........................................
Published 1635 (when Wither was age *47*)
.
. <= *47* =>
.
WhenIbeho (L) d M Y {P}ICTUREandperceiveHowvaineitisourP
ortraitu (R) es t o {L}eaveInLinesandSHADOWESwhichmakesh
ewestod (A|Y)Of t h {A}twhichwilltomorrowfadeawayAndthin
kewhat (M|E)ane [R] e {S}emblancesatbestArebyMechanikeInst
rument sexpr [E] s {T}Ithoughtitbettermuchtoleavebehind
meSome Draug [H] t i nwhichmylivingfriendsmightfindmeT
hesame Iamin [T] h a twhichwillremaineTillallisruindan
drepair daga [I] n {E}Andwhichinabsencewillmoretruelysh
owmeThan out [W] a {R}dFormestothosewhothinktheyknowme
.
{PLAST} skip 47 : Prob. in array ~ 1 in 13,250
[WITHER] skip -47 : Prob. in array ~ 1 in 14,875
(MARL|EY) skip -46
...................................................
READ IF THOV CANST, WHOM ENVIOVS DEATH HATH {PLAST}

http://tinyurl.com/bqe5gwl

Was George [WITHER] the model for the Stratford monument?

(Is that the joke:
"in which, my living friends might find me." ?)
...........................................
Fo(R), though my gratious Maker made me such,
That where (I) love, belov'd I am as much
As I desire; yet, Forme, nor F(E)atures are
Those Ornaments, *IN WHICH* I would appeare
To future Times, Though they were found in me
Farre better than I can beleeve they be.
............................................
(HENRIE) 41 : Prob. ~ 1 in 42 [Taunton?]
.............................................
Much lesse, affect I that which each man knowes,
To be no more, but Counterfeits of those,
Wherein, the Painters, or the Gravers toole,
Befriends alike the Wiseman, and the Foole;
And, (when they please) can give him, by their Art,
The fairest Face, that had the falsest-Heart.
................................................
A Picture, though with most exactnesse made,
Is nothing, but the *SHADOW of a SHADE* .
For, ev'n our living Bodies, (though they seeme
To others more, or more in our esteeme)
Are but the Shadowes of that Reall-being,
Which doth extend beyond the Fleshly-seeing
And, cannot be discerned, till we rise
Immortall-Objects, for Immortall-eyes.
Our Everlasting-Substance lies unseene,
Behinde the Fouldings,of a C(h)arnal-Screene,
Which is, but, Vapours thickned into Blood,
(By due concoction of our daily food)
And,still supplied, out of other Creatures,
To keepe us living, by their *WASTED* natures ;
Renewing, and decaying, ev'ry Day,
Untill that Vaile must be remov'd away.
For, this lov'd Flesh, wherewith, yet cloth'd we go,
Is not the same, Wee had sev'n yeares ago ;
'But, rather, something which is taken-in,
To serve insteed of what *HATH WASTED* bin,
In Wounds, in Sicknesses, in Colds, and Heates,
In all Excrescions,and in Fumes,and Sweates.
Nor shall, this present Flesh, long stay with us :
And, wee may well be pleas' d, it should be Thus.
For, as I view, those Townes, and Fields, that be
In Landskip drawne; Even so, me thinks, I see
A Glimpes, farre off, (through Faith's Prospective
Of that, which after Death, will come to passe;
And likewise gained have such meanes of seeing glasse,
Some things. which were,before my Life had being,
That, in my Soule, if should be discontent,
If, this my Body were, more permanent ;
Since, Wee, and all God's other Creatures, here,
Are but the Pictures, of what shall appeare.
Yet, whilst they are, I thankfully would make
That use of them, for {T}heir Creator's sake,
To which bee m(A)de them; {A}nd, (P)reserve the T(A)ble,
Still, Fa(I)re and Ful{L}, a(S) much as I wer(E) able,
By finishing, (in my al{O}tted place)
Those Workes, for Which, beefit{S} me by his Grace.
And, if a Wrenne, a Wrenn's just height shall soare,
No Ægle, for an Ægle, can doe more.
.............................................
(ARAISE) 11
{TALOS} 35
.............................................
If, therefore, of my Labours, or of Mee,
Ought shall remaine, when I remov'd must be,
Let it be that, wherein it may be view'd
My Makers Image (W)as in me renew'd;
And so declare a dutifull intent,
To doe th(E) Worke I ca{M}e for, e're I went;
That I to others may some Patte(R)ne be,
Of D{O}ing-well, as other men to mee,
Have beene, whilst I (H)ad life: {A}nd let my daies
Be summed up to my Redeemer's prai(S)e.
So th{I}s be gained, I regard it not,
Though all that I am else be quite forgot.
-------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/zxletgh
...............................................
1635 George [WITHER] Embleme I:
..............................................
How Fond are they, who spend their pretious Time
In still pursuing their deceiving Pleasu[R]es?
And they, that unto ayery Titles clime
Or tyr[E] themselves in hoording up of Treasures?
For, th[E]se are Death's, who, when wi(T)h wearinesse
They ha[V]e (A)cquited most, sweepes a(L)l away;
And leaves th[E]m, f(O)r their Labors, to posse(S)se
Nought but a raw-bon'd Carcasse lapt in clay.
Of twenty hundred thousands, who, this houre
Vaunt much, of those Possessions they have got;
Of their new purchac'd Honours, or, the Power,
..............................................
[E.VEER] -39
(TALOS) 20: Prob. of 2(TAL{O/U}S)s ~ 1 in 350
..............................................
By which, they seeme to have advanc't their Lott:
Of thi(S) great Multit(U)de, there shal(L) not Three
Rem(A)ine, for any Fu(T)ure-age to know;
But perish quite, and quite forgotten bee,
As Beasts, devoured twice ten yeares agoe.
Thou, the{R}efore, who d{E}sir'st for a{Y}e to li[V]e,
An{D} to possess[E] thy Labors maug[R]e Death,
To needf[U]ll Arts and hone[S]t Actions, give
Thy Spanne of Time, and thy short blast of Breath.
.......................................
. <= 12 =>
.
. B y w h i c h,t h e y s
. e e m e t o h a v e a d
. v a n c't t h e i r L o
. t t:O f t h i(S)g r e a
. t M u l t i t(U)d e,t h
. e r e s h a l(L)n o t T
. h r e e R e m(A)i n e,f
. o r a n y F u(T)u r e-a
. g e t o k n o w;B u t p
. e r i s h q u i t e,a n
. d q u i t e f o r g o t
. t e n b e e,A s B e a s
. t s,d e v o u r e d t w
. i c e t e n y e a r e s
. a g o e.T h o u,t h e{R}
. e f o r e,w h o d{E}s i
. r's t f o r a{Y}e t o l
. i[V]e,A n{D}t o p o s s
. e s s[E]t h y L a b o r
. s m a u g[R]e D e a t h,
. T o n e e d f[U]l l A r
. t s a n d h o n e[S]t A
. c t i o n s
.
(TALUS) -12
[VERUS] 14: Prob. ~ 1 in 250
{E.DYER} -10: Prob. ~ 1 in 46
.......................................
In holy Studies, exercise thy Mind;
In workes of Charity, thy Hands imploy;
That Knowledge, and that Treasure, seeke to find,
Which may enrich thy Heart with perfect Ioy.
So, though obscured thou appeare, awhile,
Despised, poore, or borne to Fortunes low,
Thy Vertue shall acquire a nobler stile,
Then greatest Kings are able to bestow:
And, gaine thee those Possessions, which, nor They,
Nor Time, nor Death, have power to take away.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Upon the Death of the Right Honourable Lady Anne, Countess of Oxford
..........................................
And friendly *DIDO*, poor Æneas' friend,
Could find of death ne love nor courtesy.
A thousand more there be of stately dames
Whom merciless, without regard at all,
Death hath compelled in{S}tead of princely robes
To put on meaner weeds {O}f *DUST* & clay,
Too base attire for such sweet sou{L}s as they.
Amongst the rest, nor can I without te{A}rs
Recount the sequel of this tragedy,
Amongs{T} the rest, I say, untimely death
..............................................
{TALOS} -38
..............................................
Hath caused virtue, love & honour die
And you sweet dames, whose passing virtues shine
Like Phoebus when he mounting from the east
In royal sort displays his golden beams,
Which giving light unto th' inferior souls
Brings wished life to all he shines upon;
And you sweet dames, whose firm & loyal love
Like precious balm hath healed the cureless wound
And cured the scars of your affectionates;
And you sweet dames, sprung forth of princely blood,
Bedecked with honour & with greatest fame,
Bred from the loins of high & mighty Jove,
And worthy therefore to be honoured,
Now may you mourn, & clothe yourselves in woe,
Scarce worthy of your wonted dignity,
Sith they [B]y whom you[R] dignity w[E]re bred,
Bo[T]h virtue, l[O]ve & honour [N]ow be dead.
..............................................
. <= 14 =>
.
. S i t h t h e y [B]
. y w h o m y o u [R]
. d i g n i t y w [E]
. r e b r e d,B o [T]
. h v i r t u e,l [O]
. v e&h o n o u r [N]
. o w b e d e a d.
.
[BRETON] 9 : Prob. in full poem ~ 1 in 692
..............................................
Virgil amongst his learned Æniads
Recounting of the false & traitorous wrong
Used by Æneas to the Carthage Queen,
Commendeth Anne, the sister of the Queen,
For many virtues worthy of account,
But had he lived with our virtuous Anne,
And seen her dealings every way upright,
For modesty a chaste Penelope,
Another Grissel for her patience,
Such patience as few but she can use.
Her Christian zeal unto the highest God,
Her humble duty to her worthy Queen,
Her reverence unto her aged sire,
Her faithful love unto her noble Lord,
Her friendliness to those of equal state,
Her readiness to help the needy soul,
.
His worthy volume had been altered
And filled with the praises of our Anne,
.
Who as she lived an angel on the earth,
So like an angel she doth sit on high
On his right hand who gave her angel's shape.
Thrice happy womb wherein such seed was bred,
And happy father of so good a child,
And happy husband of so true a wife,
And happy earth for such a virtuous wight,
But happy she thus happily to die.
And now, fair dames, cast off your mourning weeds;
Lament no more as though that she were dead,
For like a star she shineth in the skies,
And lends you light to follow her in life
Whose holy life, if so you imitate,
As she is now, so shall you angels be.
------------------------------------------------------
Epistle Dedicatory To The First Folio, 1623
. To the great Variety of Readers.
.
. FROM the most able, to him that can but spell:
. There you are num[B]er'd. We had rathe[R] you were weighd.
. [E]specially, when [T]he fate of all Bo[O]kes depends
. vpo[N] your capacities: and not of your heads alone,
. but of your purses.
.....................................
. <= 14 =>
.
. T h e r e y o u a r e n u m
. [B] e r'd.W e h a d r a t h e
. [R] y o u w e r e w e i g h d.
. [E] s p e c i a l l y,w h e n
. [T] h e f a t e o f a l l B o
. [O] k e s d e p e n d s v p o
. [N] y o u r c a p a c i t i e
. s

[BRETON] 14 : Prob. at start ~ 1 in 6525
----------------------------------------------------------
It had bene a thing, we confesse, worthie to haue bene wished, that the Author himselfe had liu'd to haue set forth, and ouerseen his owne writings; But since it hath bin ordain'd otherwise, and he by death departed from that right, we pray you do not envie his Friends, the office of their care, and paine, to haue collected & publish'd them; and so to haue publish'd them, as where (before) you were abus'd with diuerse stolne, and surreptitious copies, maimed, and deformed by the frauds and stealthes of iniurious impostors that expos'd them: euen those, are now offer'd to your view cur'd, and perfect of their limbes , and all the rest, absolute in their number{S}, as he conceiued them. Wh{O}, as he was a happie imita{T}or of Nature, was a most g{E}ntle expresser of it. Hi{S} mind and hand went toge{T}her: And what he thought, he vttered with that easinesse, that wee haue scarce receiued from him a blot in his papers. But it is not our prouince, who onely gather his works, and giue them you, to praise him. It is yours that reade him . .And there we hope, to your diuers capacities, you will finde enough, both to draw, and hold you: for his wit can no more lie hid, then it could be lost. Reade him, therefore; and againe, and againe: And if then you doe not like him, surely you are in some manifest danger, not to vnderstand him. And so we leaue you to other of his Friends, whom if you need, can bee your guides: if you neede them not, you can leade your selues, and others. And such Readers we wish him.
..................................................
. <= 20 =>
.
. a b s o l u t e i n t h e i r n u m b e
. r {S} a s h e c o n c e i u e d t h e m.W
. h {O},a s h e w a s a h a p p i e i m i t
. a {T} o r o f N a t u r e,w a s a m o s t
. g {E} n t l e e x p r e s s e r o f i t.H
. i {S} m i n d a n d h a n d w e n t t o g
. e {T} h e r

{SO TEST} 20
.............................................................
We have but collected them, and done an office to the dead, to procure
his Orphanes, Guardians; without ambition either of selfe-profit,
or fame: onely to keepe the memory of so worthy a Friend,
& Fellow alive, as was our S H A K E S P E A R E ,
by humble offer of his playes, to your most noble patronage.
--------------------------------------------------
Faire-Virtue, the Mistresse of PHIL'ARETE.
Written by Him-Selfe. 1622 George Wither
..........................................
This, was that contenting Grace,
Which affection made me place,
With so deare respect, that never
Can it faile; but, last for ever.
This; a Servant made me sworne,
Who before time, held in scorne,
To yeeld Vassilage, or Duty,
Though, unto the Queene of [B]eauty.
Yet, that I her Se[R]vant am,
It shall more b[E] to my fame;
Then to owne [T]hese Woods and Downes:
[O]r be Lord of fiftie Tow[N]es.
And my Mistresse to be deem'd,
Shall more honor be esteem'd;
Then those Titles to acquire,
Which most women, most desire.
Yea, when you a woman shall,
Countesse, or a Duchesse call;
That respect it shall not move,
Neither gaine her halfe such love,
As to say, Loe, this is she,
That supposed is to be,
Mistresse to PHIL'ARETE.
And, that lovelie Nymph, which he,
In a Pastorall Poem fam'd,
And FAIRE-VIRTUE, there hath named.
Yea, some Ladies (tenne to one)
If not many (now unknowne)
Will be very well apaid,
When by chance, She heares it said
Shee, that Faire-one is; whom I,
Here have prais'd, concealedly.
...........................................
. <= 19 =>
.
. T h o u g h,u n t o t h e Q u e e n e
. o f [B] e a u t y.Y e t,t h a t I h e r
. S e [R] v a n t a m,I t s h a l l m o r
. e b [E] t o m y f a m e;T h e n t o o w
. n e [T] h e s e W o o d s a n d D o w n
. e s:[O] r b e L o r d o f f i f t i e T
. o w [N] e s.
.
[BRETON] 19
-----------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palinode

<<A *PALINODE* is an ode in which the writer retracts a view or sentiment expressed in an earlier poem. The word comes from the Greek πάλιν (palin, meaning 'back') and ᾠδή ("song"); the Latin-derived equivalent "recantation" is an exact calque (re- meaning 'again' and cant- meaning 'sing').>>
.............................................
http://spenserians.cath.vt.edu/TextRecord.php?&textsid=19

<<John Hughes: "*PALINODE*, inviting Piers to join with the Youths and Shepherds in Mirth, and the Pleasures of the Season, and in celebrating the Festival of May, is reprov'd by him; and told that a Life of Vanity and Luxury, while their Flocks are neglected, does not become good Shepherds. Piers describes the Pastoral Life, at first simple and frugal, without Wealth, yet free from Want, and from Vice; but corrupted afterwards by Licentiousness, and by the Ambition of Power and Command: which expos'd both the Shepherds and their Flocks to be destroy'd by the Wolves. And to shew how dangerous it is to have any Communication with bad Company, he relates a Fable, of the Kid and her Dam. This Æglogue is purely Allegorical, and seems to be design'd as a moral Lesson on the Life of Christians, and particularly of the Clergy, and on the Difference between those of the Reform'd, and those of the Romish Persuasion; and appears further by a Passage in the Seventh Æglogue, in which Palinode is again mention'd, as giving an account of the lordly Lives of the Shepherds at Rome" Works of Spenser.>>
.............................................
http://extra.shu.ac.uk/emls/iemls/resour/mirrors/rbearold/maye.html
. The Shepheardes Calender (1579) Maye
(Dedicated to Philip Sidney)
.
*PALINODE*: For pittied is mishappe that [N]as remedie,
. But scorned [B]ene dedes of fond foole[R]ie.
. What shoulden sheph[E]ards other things tend,
. [T]hen, sith their God his g[O]od does them send,
. Reape[N] the fruite thereof, that is pleasure, 65
..............................................
. <= 20 =>
.
. F o r p (I) t t i e d i s m i s h a p p e
. t h a t [N] a s r e m e d i e,B u t s c o
. r n e d [B] e n e d e d e s o f f o n d f
. o o l e [R] i e.W h a t s h o u l d e n s
. h e p h [E] a r d s o t h e r t h i n g s
. t e n d,[T] h e n,s i t h t h e i r G o d
. h i s g [O] o d d o e s t h e m s e n d,R
. e a p e [N] t h e f r u i t e t h e r e o
. f,t h a t i s p l e a s u r e,
.
[N.BRETON] 20 : Prob. in first 65 lines of any month ~ 1 in 130
-----------------------------------------------
Syncopation Glosse

*NAS* is a syncope, for N(e h)AS, or has not: as nould for would not.

<<Syncope (Greek: syn- + koptein "to strike, cut off") is
the loss of one or more sounds from the interior of a word,
especially the loss of an unstressed vowel.>>
-----------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Breton
.
[N]icholas [BRETON] (1545–1626), English poet and novelist.
Breton found a patron in Mary Sidney, countess of Pembroke.
.
. The Workes of a Young Wit (1577)
. A Floorish upon Fancie (1577)
. ['Epitaph on Spenser'] in Melancholike Humours (1600)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
1612: Prince {HENRIES} Obsequies or Mournefull Elegies upon his death:
with a supposed Inter-locution betweene the Ghost of Prince {HENRIE}
and Great *BRITTAINE*. [ELEG. 13.] By George Wyther.
.....................................
*BRETON* (1545-1626) = *BRITTAINE*
.....................................
Seeke how to RAISE dejected *BRITTAINEs* head,
So shee shall study how to *RAISE* up thine:
And now leave off thy teares in vaine to shed,
For why? to spare them I have powr'd out mine.
Pitty thy selfe, and us, and mournefull Rhine,
That hides his faire banke under flouds of griefe,
Th{Y} P{R}i{N}c{E}, t{H}y Duke, thy brave Count Palatine:
Tis time his sorrowes should have some reliefe.
He's come to [B]e another b[R]other to th[E]e,
And helpe [T]hy father t[O] another so[N]ne:
.....................................
. <= 14 =>
.
. H e's c o m e t o [B]
. e a n o t h e r b [R]
. o t h e r t o t h [E]
. e,A n d h e l p e [T]
. h y f a t h e r t [O]
. a n o t h e r s o [N]
. n e:

{HENRY} -2 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1035
[BRETON] 1O : Prob. ~ 1 in 3575
................................................
He vowes thee all the service love can doe thee;
And though acquaintance hath with griefe begunne,
Tis but to make you have the better tast
Of the true blisse you shall enjoy at last.
----------------------------------------------------------
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/monrefs.html
.
17th-century References to Shakespeare's Stratford Monument
by David Kathman
.
In 1658, 2 years after the publication of Dugdale's Antiquities of Warwickshire,
Sir Aston Cokain's collection _Small Poems of DI-VERS Sorts_ contained a poem
to Dugdale. It was entitled "To my worthy, and learned Friend Mr. William
Dugdale, upon his Warwickshire Illustrated," and it goes as follows:
.
Now Stratfor[D] upon Avon, we would choose
Thy gentle and i{N}g[E]nious Shakespeare Muse,
(Were he among the li[V]ing yet) to *RAISE*
T' {O}ur Antiquaries merit som[E] just *PRAISE*:
And sweet-tongu'd Drayton ({T}hat h[A]th given renown
Unto a poor (before) and obscu[R]e town,
Harsull) were h{E} (N)ot fal'n into h(I)s tomb[E],
Would (C)rown this wor(K) with an Encom(I)um.
Ou{R} Warwick-shire the Heart of England is,
As you most evidently have proved {B}y this;
Having it with more spirit dignifi'd,
Then all our English Counties are beside.
................................................
[DE VEARE] skip 37 : Prob. ~ 1 in 23,200
{BRETON} skip -57 : Prob. ~ 1 in 545
(NICKI) skip 12
-----------------------------------------------
. O what a tricksy learnèd (NICKI)ng strain
. Is this applauded, senseless, modern vein!
. When late I heard it from sage Mutius lips
. How ill me thought such wanton, jigging skips
. Beseemed his *GRAVER* speech. Far fly thy *FAME*,
. Most, most of me beloved,
...............................................
. {whose silent name One letter bounds.}
...............................................
. Thy TRUE judicial style
. I EVER honour, and if my love beguile
. Not much my hopes, then thy unvalued WORTH
. Shall mount fair place, when Apes are turnèd FORTH.
------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Breton,_Nicholas_%28DNB00%29
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Breton

<<[N]icholas Breto[N] (1545-1626), (also Britton or *Brittaine*) English poet and novelist, belonged to an old family settled at Layer Breton, Essex. His father, William Breton, a London merchant who had made a considerable fortune, died in 1559, and the widow (née Elizabeth Bacon) married the poet George Gascoigne before her sons had attained their majority. Nicholas Breton was probably born at the "capitall mansion house" in Red Cross Street, in the parish of St Giles without Cripplegate.

{BRETON} found a patron in Mary, countess of Pembroke, and wrote much in her honour until 1601.

It is probably safe to supplement the meagre record of his life by accepting as autobiographical some of the letters signed N.B. in A Poste with a Packet of Mad Letters (1603, enlarged 1637); the 19th letter of the second part contains a general complaint of many griefs, and proceeds as follows: "Hath another been wounded in the warres, fared hard, lain in a cold bed many a bitter storme, and beene at many a hard banquet? all these have I; another imprisoned? so have I; another long been sicke? so have I; another plagued with an unquiet life? so have I; another indebted to his hearts griefe, and fame would pay and cannot? so am I."

Breton was a prolific author of considerable versatility and gift, popular with his contemporaries, and forgotten by the next generation. His work consists of religious and pastoral poems, satires, and a number of miscellaneous prose tracts. His lyrics are pure and fresh, and his romances, though full of conceits, are pleasant reading, remarkably free from grossness. His praise of the Virgin and his references to Mary Magdalene have suggested that he was a Roman Catholic, but his prose writings abundantly prove that he was an ardent Anglican.

Breton's best work is to be found in his pastoral poetry. His Passionate Shepheard (1604) is full of sunshine and fresh air, and of unaffected gaiety. The third pastoral in this book--"Who can live in heart so glad As the merrie country lad"--is well known; with some other of Breton's daintiest poems, among them the lullaby, "Come little babe, come silly soule." His keen observation of country life appears also in his prose idyll, Wits Trenckrnour, "a conference betwixt a scholler and an angler," and in his Fantastickes, a series of short prose pictures of the months, the Christian festivals and the hours, which throw much light on the customs of the times. He is supposed to have died shortly after the publication of his Fantastickes (1626).>>
...........................................
. A briefe of sorrowe
. Muse of sadness, neere deaths fashion,
. Too neere madnesse, write my passion.
. Paines possesse mee, sorrows spill me,
. Cares distress me, all would kill mee.
. Hopes have faild me, Fortune foild mee,
. Feares have quaild me, all have spoild mee.
. Woes have worne mee, sighes have soakt mee,
. Thoughts have torne mee, all have broke mee.
. Beauty strooke me, love hath catcht mee,
. Death hath tooke mee, all dispatcht mee.

- [N]icholas Breto[N], Melancholike Humours (1600)
-----------------------------------------------
http://sirbacon.org/wsaundersHallandMarston.htm

THE IDENTIFICATION OF 'LABEO' AND 'MUTIUS'AS FRANCIS BACON
IN HALL AND MARSTON'S SATIRES
By Walter Saunders 2011

<<In 1597 Joseph Hall, a Cambridge graduate of twenty-three, published a volume containing three 'books' of satires, entitled Virgidemiarum or 'of harvests of rods'. In 1598 he published a second volume of three further 'books'. A century later Alexander Pope described this work as the 'truest satire in the English language'. Hall's later writings were mainly in prose and they reveal his high principles on contentious religious subjects. As an Anglican he entered the church in 1601 and became a bishop in 1627.
...............................................
SATIRE IX. John Marston, Scourge of Villanie (1598)

. O what a tricksy learnèd (NICKI)ng strain
. Is this applauded, senseless, modern vein!
. When late I heard it from sage Mutius lips
. How ill me thought such wanton, jigging skips
. Beseemed his *GRAVER* speech. Far fly thy *FAME*,
. Most, most of me beloved,
...............................................
. {whose silent name One letter bounds.}
...............................................
. Thy TRUE judicial style
. I EVER honour, and if my love beguile
. Not much my hopes, then thy unvalued WORTH
. Shall mount fair place, when Apes are turnèd FORTH.

'Mutius' means 'silent one' and no-one seems to fit the name better than Francis Bacon. Marston provides a clue that it is so indeed, when he says that 'One letter bounds' (i.e, 'encloses') 'his silent name'. In simple cipher the letters of Francis Bacon add up to 100*. This is signified by one letter in Roman numerals: [C].

. ('LABEO' = 33 = 'BACON')

So the 'silent name' that 'one letter bounds' is Francis Bacon.>>
-----------------------------------------------
Sabrina wrote:

<<[Thomas Sackville] is an excellent match to the major hidden poet of the 1590s, and like Marston's most beloved poet (he of the silent name bounded by one letter), Thomas Buckhurst begins and ends with the single letter 't.'>>
-----------------------------------------------
http://www.whowasshakespeare.org/Who_Was_Shakespeare/Oxford_Was_Shakespeare.html

Ron Song Destro wrote:

<<[John Marston] gave us the clue that the secret writer's silent name
is bound by one letter: like the "e" for example, in "[E]dward Ver[E].">>
-----------------------------------------------
http://www.poetrynook.com/poem/satire-9-0

Satire 9 - by John Marston

Grim-fac'd Reproofe , sparkle with threatning eye
Bend thy sower browes in my tart po[E]sie.
A[V]ant y[E]e cur[R]es, ho[U]le in [S]ome cloudie mist,
Quake to behold a sharp-fang'd Satyrist.
...........................................
. <= 5 =>
.
. G r i m- f
. a c' d R e
. p r o o f
. e, s p a r
. k l e w i
. t h t h r
. e a t n i
. n g e y e
. B e n d t
. h y s o w
. e r b r o
. w e s i n
. m y t a r
. t p o [E] s
. i e. A [V] a
. n t y [E] e
. c u r [R] e
. s, h o [U] l
. e i n [S] o
. m e c l o
. u d i e m
. i s t, Q u
. a k e t o
. b e h o l
. d a s h a
. r p- f a n
. g' d S a t
. y r i s t.

[E.VERUS] 5: Prob. at start ~ 1 in 84,000
-----------------------------------------------
O how on tiptoes proudly mounts my Muse,
Stalking a loftier gate then Satyres vse.
Me thinkes some sacred rage warmes all my vaines,
Making my spright mount vp to higher straines
Then wel beseemes a rough-tongu'd Satyres part,
But Art curbs Nature, Nature guildeth Art.
Come downe yee Apes, or I will strip you quite,
Baring your bald tayles to the peoples sight.
Yee Mimick slaues, what are you percht so high?
Downe Iack an Apes from thy fain'd roialtie.
What furr'd with beard, cas'd in a Satin sute
Iudiciall Iack? how hast thou got repute
Of a sound censure? O ideot times,
When gawdy Monkeyes mowe ore sprightly rimes!
O world of fooles, when all mens iudgement's set
And rests vpon some mumping Marmuset!
Yon Athens Ape (that can but simperingly
Yaule auditores humanissimi ,
Bound to some seruile imitation,
Can with much sweat patch an Oration,)
Now vp he comes, and with his crooked eye
Presumes to squint on some faire Poesie;
And all as thanklesse as vngratefull Thames
He slinkes away, leauing but reeching steames
Of dungie slime behind, all as ingrate
He vseth it, as when I satiate
My spaniels paunch, who straight perfumes the roome,
With his tailes filth: so this vnciuill groome,
Ill-tutor'd pe[D]ant, Mortimers numb[E]rs
With muck-pit esc[U]line filth bescumb[E]rs.
Now th'Ape chatte[R]s, and is as malecont[E]nt
As a bill-patch'd doore, whose entrailes out haue sent
And spewd theyr tenant.
...........................................
. <= 17 =>
.
. I l l-t u t o r'd p e [D] a n t,M o
. r t i m e r s n u m b [E] r s W i t
. h m u c k-p i t e s c [U] l i n e f
. i l t h b e s c u m b [E] r s.N o w
. t h'A p e c h a t t e [R] s,a n d i
. s a s m a l e c o n t [E] n t

[DEUERE] 17: Prob. at start ~ 1 in 350
--------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Phaer

<<Thomas Phaer (c. 1510 – 12 August 1560) contributed to Sackville's Mirrour for Magistrates, "Howe Owen Glendower, being seduced by false prophecies, toke upon him to be Prince of Wales." His translation of Virgil's Æneid (_The Seven First Bookes of the Eneidos of Virgil_) converted into English Meter was published in 1558. He had completed two more books in April 1560 and had begun the tenth, but died in the autumn of that year, leaving his task incomplete. The translation was finished by Thomas Twyne in 1584. Phaer's translation, which was in rhymed fourteen-syllabled lines remained popular until John Dryden's translation was published in 1697.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
1584 [T]HOMAS Phayer & [T]HOMAS [T]WYNNE, _The Æneid_
.
*Æneas forcing [FORTH] a mighty SPEARE in hand doth SHAKE*
Of sturdy *TIMBER* framde, and with great courage thus he spake.
.
Whilst thus he doubtes, Æneas [FORTH] his *SPEARE doth SHAKE*
in sight, And vauntadge watcheth with his EIE, and strait with
all his might, Afar he flings it [FORTH]. (book 12, lines 986-988)
.
. http://www.clark.net/pub/tross/ws/spershak.html
------------------------------------------------
_____ Hamlet (Quarto 1, 1603) II,ii
.
Ham.: I hea[R]d thee sp[E]ake a spe[E]ch once,
. B[U]t it was n[E]uer acte[D]: or if it w[E]re,
.................................................
[E.DE UEER] -8
.................................................
. Neuer aboue twice, for as I remember,
. It *PLEASED NOT THE VULGAR* , it was cauiary
. To the million: but to me
. And others, that receiued it in the like kinde,
. Cried in the toppe of their iudgements, an excellent pla{Y},
. Set downe with as g{R}eat modestie as cu{N}ning:
. One said ther{E} was no sallets in t{H}e lines to make the sauory,
.................................................
{HENRY} -16
.................................................
. But called it an honest methode, as wholesome as sweete.
. Come, a speech in it I chiefly remember
. Was Æneas tale to [DIDO]
. And then especially where he talkes of Princes slaughter,
---------------------------------------------------------
. EVERy Man Out of His Humour Act I Scene 3
....................................
Sor[DIDO]: I, and the prints of them stick in my Flesh,
Deeper than i'their Letters: They have sent me
Pills wrapt in Paper here, that should I take 'em,
Would poyson all the sweetness of my Book,
And turn my Honey into Hemlock-juyce.
But I am wiser than to serve their Precepts,
Or follow their Prescriptions. Here's a device,
To charge me bring my Grain unto the Markets:
I, much, when I have neither Barn nor Garner,
Nor Earth to hide it in, I'll bring it; till then,
Each Corn I send shall be as big as Pauls.
O, [B]ut (say some) the poor a[R]e like to starve.
Why l[E]t 'em starve, what's tha[T] to me? are Bees
Bound t[O] keep life in Drones a[N]d idle Moths? no:
....................................................
. <= 18 =>
.
. O,[B] u t(s a y s o m e)t h e p o o r
. a [R] e l i k e t o s t a r v e.W h y
. l [E] t'e m s t a r v e,w h a t's t h
. a [T] t o m e?a r e B e e s B o u n d
. t [O] k e e p l i f e i n D r o n e s
. a [N] d i d l e M o t h s?

[BRETON] 18
....................................................
Why such are these (that term themselves the Poor,
Only because they would be pitied,
But are indeed a sort of lazy Beggars)
Licencious Rogues, and sturdy Vagabonds,
Bred (by the sloth of a fat plenteous Year)
Like Snakes in heat of Summer, out of Dung;
And this is all that these cheap times are good for:
Whereas a wholsom and penurious Dearth
Purges the Soil of such vile excrements,
And kills the Vipers up.
----------------------------------------------
<<F.B. wrote a letter in verse to Ben Jonson.
Chambers believes 1615 was its most likely date.>>:
........................................
To Mr. B: J:.

for: heere I would let slippe
(If I had any in mee) schollarshippe,
And from all Learninge keepe these lines as <cl>eere
as Shakespeares best are, which our heirs shall heare
Preachers apte to their auditors to showe
how farr sometimes a mortall man may goe
by the dimme light of Nature, tis to mee
an helpe to write of nothing; and as free
as hee, whose text was, god made all that is,
.
I meane to speake: what do you thinke of his
state, who hath now the last that hee could make
in white and Orrenge towny on his backe
at Windsor? is no this mans miserie more
then a fallen sharers, that now keepes a doore,
hath not his tate almost as wretched beene
as <h>is, that is ordainde to write the <grinne?
after the fawne, and fleere shall bee? as sure
some one there is allotted to endure
that Cross. there are some, I could wish to knowe
to loue, and keepe with, if they woulde not showe
their studdies to me; or I wish to see
their workes to laugh at; if they suffer mee
not to knowe them: And thus would I Commerse
with honest Poets that make scuruie verse.
by this time you perceiue you did a misse
to leaue your worthier studies to see this,
which is more tedious to you, then to walke
in a Jews Church, or [BRETON]s Comon talke.
but know I write not these lines to the end
to please Ben: Jonson but to please my frend:
---------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-03-25 19:52:57 UTC
Permalink
On Sunday, March 25, 2018 at 2:40:14 PM UTC-4, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

[Reams of crackpot cryptography and lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 20 =>
.
. a b s o l u t e i n t h e i r n u m b e
. r {S} a s h e c o n c e i u e d t h e m.W
. h {O},a s h e w a s a h a p p i e i m i t
. a {T} o r o f N a t u r e,w a s a m o s t
. g {E} n t l e e x p r e s s e r o f i t.H
. i {S} m i n d a n d h a n d w e n t t o g
. e {T} h e r
{SO TEST} 20
Huh?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palinode
But Art -- "Palin ode" might be an ode to Sarah Palin, of the sort that Mr. Streitz used to write (Neuendorffer disclaimer invoked) and post on various paranoid, anti-immigrant, right-wing web sites.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
SATIRE IX. John Marston
But Art -- "Iohn Marston's satire" is an anagram of "Art's insane shit room", which is a reasonable description of what h.l.a.s. has become because of your endlessly repetitive dumps of idiotic crap.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Satire 9 - by John Marston
But Art -- "Iohn Marston's ninth satire" is an anagram of "This: insane moron Art N.'s shit".

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-03-25 21:55:16 UTC
Permalink
--------------------------------------------------------------
. Ben Jonson's Epigrams 65

To my {MUSE}.
.
AWay, and leave me, thou thing most abhor'd
That hast betray'd me to a worthless Lord;
Made me commit most firce Idolatry
To a great Image through thy Luxury.
.
Be thy next Masters more unlucky {MUSE},
And, as thou'hast mine, his Hours, an[D] Youth abuse.
Get him the Times long gr[U]dg, the Courts ill will;
And Reconcil'd, [K]eep him Suspected still.
Make him los[E] all his Friends; and, which is worse,
Almost all ways, to any better course.
With me thou leav'{S}t an happier Muse than thee,
And which {T}hou brought'st me, welcome Poverty.
Sh{E} shall in(S)truct my Aft[E]r-thoughts t(O) {W}rite
Things [M]anly, and no(T) smelling P{A}ra[S]ite.
But I r(E)pent me: Stay. Who [E]'re is {R}ai(S)'d,
For worth he has not, He is (T)ax'd, no{T} prais'd.
................................................................
______________ <= 31 =>

. B e t h y n e x t M a s t e r s m o r e u n l u c k y{M U S E},
. a n d,a s t h o u'a s t m i n e,h i s H o u r s,a n[D]Y o u t
. h a b u s e.G e t h i m t h e T i m e s l o n g g r[U]d g,t h
. e C o u r t s i l l w i l l;A n d R e c o n c i l'd[K]e e p h
. i m S u s p e c t e d s t i l l.M a k e h i m l o s[E]a l l h
. i s F r i e n d s;a n d,w h i c h i s w o r s e,A l m o s t a
. l l w a y s,t o a n y b e t t e r c o u r s e.W i t h m e t h
. o u l e a v{S}t a n h a p p i e r M u s e t h a n t h e e,A n
. d w h i c h{T}h o u b r o u g h t's t m e,w e l c o m e P o v
. e r t y.S h{E}s h a l l i n(S)t r u c t m y A f t[E]r-t h o u
. g h t s t(O|W}r i t e T h i n g s[M]a n l y,a n d n o(T)s m e
. l l i n g P{A}r a[S]i t e.B u t I r(E)p e n t m e:S t a y.W h
. o[E]r e i s{R}a i(S)d,F o r w o r t h h e h a s n o t,H e i s
.(T)a x'd,n o{T}p r a i s'd.
.
{STEWART} 31 : Prob. skip < 32 ~ 1 in 10,200
[DUKE] 31 : Prob. same skip ~ 1 in 2,900
.................................................
______________ <= 23 =>

. S h{E}s h a l l i n(S)t r u c t m y A f t[E]r-
. t h o u g h t s t(O|W}r i t e T h i n g s[M]a
. n l y,a n d n o(T)s m e l l i n g P{A}r a[S]i
. t e.B u t I r(E)p e n t m e:S t a y.W h o[E]r
. e i s{R}a i(S)d,F o r w o r t h h e h a s n o
. t,H e i s(T)a x'd,n o{T}p r a i s'd.

[ESME] -23
(SO TEST) 22
-------------------------------------------------------
"To My Book" by Ben Jonson

It will be looked for, book, when some but see
Thy title, Epigrams, and named of me,
Thou should'st be bold, {L}icentious, full of gall,
Wormwo{O}d, and sulphur, sharp, and toothe{D} withal;
Become a petulant thin{G}, hurl ink, and wit,
As madmen ston{E}s: not caring whom they hit.
Deceive their malice, who could wish it so.
And by thy wiser temper, let men know
Thou are not cov{E|T]ou(S) of lea{S}t s(E)lf-fam[E].
{M}a(D)e from [T]h{E} hazard [O]f another'[S] shame:
Much less with lewd, profane, and beastly phrase,
To catch the world's loose laughter, or vain gaze.
He that departs with his own HONESTY
For VULGAR PRAISE, doth it too dearly buy.
..............................................
. <= 9 =>
.
. T h o u a r e n o
. t c o v {E}[T] o u (S)
. o f l e a {S} t s (E)
. l f- f a m [E]{M} a (D)
. e f r o m [T] h {E} h
. a z a r d [O] f a n
. o t h e r'[S] s h a
. m e:

{LODGE} 26
{ESME} 10
[SO TEST] -9
-----------------------------------------­-------------------------
http://www.leylandandgoding.com/shakespeare_through_a_neville_lens/first_folio

Written around 1610, Epigram 109 is unequivocal in [Jonson]'s admiration for Neville:

To Sir Henry Nevil

Who now calls on thee, Nevil, is a {MUSE},
That serves nor fame, nor titles; but doth chuse
Where vertue makes them both, and that’s in thee:
Where all is faire, beside thy pedigree.

Thou art not one, seek’st miseries with hope,
Wrestlest with dignities, or fain’st a scope
Of seruice to the publique, when the end
Is priuate gaine, which hath long guilt to friend.

Thou rather s{T}riv’{S}t th{E} mat{T}er t{O} pos{S}esse,
And elements of honor, then {T}he dres{S}e(?);
To mak{E} thy len{T} life, go{O}d again{S}t the Fates:
And first to know thine owne state, then the States.

To be the same in roote, thou art in height;
And that thy soule should give thy flesh her weight.
Goe on, and doubt not, what posteritie,
Now I haue sung thee thus, shall iudge of thee.

Thy deedes, vnto thy name, will prove new wombes,
Whil’st others toyle for titles to their tombes.

{SO TEST} -4,-7 : Prob. in any one quatrain ~ 1 in 10,000
-----------------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/px4754h

*STRANGE NEWES*, Of the intercepting certaine Letters,
and a Convoy of Verse[S], as they were g[O]ing
P(R)ivilie [T]o vict(U)all th[E] Low Cou(N)trie[S].

Unda imp(E)lli[T]ur unda.

By {T}ho. {NASHE} Gentleman.
...................................................
[Ovid: "One wave is driven forward with an other."]
...................................................
. <= 13 =>
.
. *S T R A N G E N E W E S*
. O f t h e i n t e r c e
. p t i n g c e r t a i n
. e {L.}e t t e r s,a n d a
. C {O.}n v o y o f V e r s
. e [S] a s t h e y w e r e
. g [O] i n g P (R)i v i l i
. e [T]{O.}v i c t(U)a l l t
. h [E]{L.}o w C o u(N)t r i
. e [S] U n d a i m p(E)l l
. i [T] u r u n d a.B y{T}h
. o {N A S H E}
.
[SO TEST] 12 : Prob. ~ 1 in 3,000
(RUNE) 13 : Prob. ~ 1 in 21
...................................................
. To the most copious Carminist of our time,
. and famous persecutor of Priscian, his *VER(i)E*
. friend Maister Apis *LAPIS*: {T}ho. {NASHE} wisheth
. new strings to his old tawnie Purse, and all honour
[A]b[L]e [I]n[C]r[E]a[S]e of acquaintance *IN THE CELLAR*.
.
[ALICE S] 2
--------------------------------------------------------------
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/monrefs.html

17th-century References to Shakespeare's Stratford Monument
by David Kathman

<<One of the First Folios in the Folger Shakespeare Library (no. 26 according to the Folger numbering) contains three handwritten poems on the last end page of the volume, written in a secretary hand dating from approximately the 1620s. The first of these is the poem from Shakespeare's monument in the Stratford church ("Stay passenger why go'st thou by so fast"). The second is not recorded elsewhere, and goes as follows:
.
. Heere Shakespeare lye(S) whome none but Death could *SHAKE*
. and h(E)ere shall ly till judgement all awake;
. (W)hen the last trumpet doth unclose his (E)yes
. the wi{T}tie{S}t po{E}t in {T}he w[O]rld [S]ha(L)l *RISE*.

(LEWES) -32 (Prob. ~ 1 in 24)
.........................................................
__ <= 4 =>
.
. e w i {T}
. (T) i e {S}
. (T)<P> o {E}
. (T)<I> n {T}
. (H)<E> w {O}
. r l d {S}
. h a l l
. *R I S E*.
..............................................
{SO TEST} -4 (Prob. skip <5 ~ 1 in 2580)
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.bartleby.com/39/23.html

Preface to the First Folio Edition of Shakespeare’s Plays
Henrie Condell and Iohn Heminge (1623)

TO THE GREAT VARIETY OF READERS
..................................................
It had bene a thing, we confesse, worthie to haue bene wished, that the Author himselfe had liu'd to haue set forth, and ouerseen his owne writings; But since it hath bin ordain'd otherwise, and he by death departed from that right, we pray you do not envie his Friends, the office of their care, and paine, to haue collected & publish'd them; and so to haue publish'd them, as where (before) you were abus'd with diuerse stolne, and surreptitious copies, maimed, and deformed by the frauds and stealthes of iniurious impostors that expos'd them: euen those, are now offer'd to your view cur'd, and perfect of their limbes, and all the rest, absolute in their number{S}, as he conceiued them. Wh{O}, as he was a happie imita{T}or of Nature, was a most g{E}ntle expresser of it. Hi{S} mind and hand went toge{T}her: And what he thought, he vttered with that easinesse, that wee haue scarce receiued from him a blot in his papers. But it is not our prouince, who onely gather his works, and giue them you, to praise him. It is yours that reade him . .And there we hope, to your diuers capacities, you will finde enough, both to draw, and hold you: for his wit can no more lie hid, then it could be lost. Reade him, therefore; and againe, and againe: And if then you doe not like him, surely you are in some manifest danger, not to vnderstand him. And so we leaue you to other of his Friends, whom if you need, can bee your guides: if you neede them not, you can leade your selues, and others. And such Readers we wish him.
..................................................
. <= 20 =>
.
. a b s o l u t e i n t h e i r n u m b e
. r {S} a s h e c o n c e i u e d t h e m.W
. h {O},a s h e w a s a h a p p i e i m i t
. a {T} o r o f N a t u r e,w a s a m o s t
. g {E} n t l e e x p r e s s e r o f i t.H
. i {S} m i n d a n d h a n d w e n t t o g
. e {T} h e r

{SO TEST} 20
.............................................................
We have but collected them, and done an office to the dead, to procure
his Orphanes, Guardians; without ambition either of selfe-profit,
or fame: onely to keepe the memory of so worthy a Friend,
& Fellow alive, as was our S H A K E S P E A R E ,
by humble offer of his playes, to your most noble patronage.
------------------------------------------------------------

Lea wrote: <<Huh?>>

---------------------------------------------------------
. <= 34 =>
.
.{TERRATE (G) ITP O P U L U S M[Æ] R E T O LYMPUSHABE T}
........................................................
. STAYPAS [S] ENG [E]R W H Y G O[E](S)T T H OUBYSOFAST R
. EADIFTH [O] UCA N[S]T W H O M{E}[N]V I O USDEATHHAT H
. PLASTWI [T] HIN T H[I]S M O(N|U} M[E]N T {SHAKSPEARE} W
. ITHWHOM [E] QUI C K N[A]T(U)R{E}{D}I[D]E {WHOSENAMED} O
. THDeCKY [S] TOM B E F A[R]M O{R}{E}t H[E] NCOSTSIEHA L
. LYTHEHA [T] HWR I T T L E[A]V{E} S L I V INGARTBUTP A
. GETOSER V EHI S W I T T
.
(RUNES) -33 : Prob. in Roper array ~ 1 in 4930
[E.DENE] -35
[ARAISE] 35
..........................................................
the probability of David Roper's: {DE} next to {E.UERE}

assuming that the 34 letters of the
2nd line: {TERRA TEGIT POPULUS MÆRET OLYMPUS HABET}

provide the # key to the ELS array is ~ 1 in 106,000
------------------------------­-------------------------
Art Neuendorffer

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