Discussion:
Sublime Shake-speare
(too old to reply)
Dennis
2020-12-04 23:50:33 UTC
Permalink
Hi Art - have you been collecting notes on the Sublime? I'd be very interested in any ideas you might have regarding the following - thanks. Nicole


The Sublimation of Edward de Vere

Edward de Vere embodied the sublime style (Longinus) and the je ne sais quois/I know not what of _The Courtier_ at the court of Elizabeth I. The Shakespearean Sublime is a subset of Oxfordian Sublime. : ) The Knight of the Tree of the Sun and perhaps _Endymion_ are also examples of this elevated style.

In Cynthia's Revels Jonson attacked the court's 'airy forms' and flights of fancy in a manner that prefigures Alexander Pope's attacks on the Dunces in his *Dunciad*. The mixing of high and low was particularly offensive to classical sensibilities. Jonson also refers back to a 1584? dedication to Oxford to identify Amorphus as the Earl - but to also identify him as a type of Parnassian fool (Southern, Pandora, only the poet well-born etc). Just as the Dunciad is a mock epic, Jonson brands Oxford/Shake-speare as a foolish figure in the First Folio mock encomium. Jonson and Chapman insisted upon an ethical and rational component to their art - as well as 'matter above words' etc.. The sublime blows up these ideas.

.
Merriam Webster:
The word sublimate comes from the Latin verb sublimare, which means "to lift up" or "raise" and which is also the ancestor of our sublime. "Sublimate" itself once meant "to elevate to a place of dignity or honor" or "to give a more elevated character to," but these meanings are now obsolete.
*Also includes - to soar, to fly aloft, to be carried into the sky*
*******************************
Jonson mocks Shakespeare's formlessness and undecidability (hallmarks of the sublime style) in the disproportionate Droeshout engraving - a dull ridiculous figure replete with absurdities.

Middle English dul; akin to Old English dol foolish, Old Irish dall blind
'Shakespeare to thee was dull...' - Cartwright
Dulness - the goddess of the Dunces. : )

Broke at the end of his life and his glory days at the Elizabethan Court behind him, Oxford made one last sublime courtly gesture towards Elizabeth. As _Cynthia's Revels_ shows, the sublime style at court was becoming a political liability (similar to Charles I Eikon Basilike?) and all of Oxford's beauties were being satirically inverted (see Othello/Black-faced Folly). In 'Love's Martyr' he embodied true courtly love by sublimating himself and Elizabeth in poetic fire - the immolation/transformation of the Phoenix and the Turtle (Mutual Flame) created a more perfect and immortal creature. A fifth element? The creature - William Shake-speare (written in a gorgeous and outstanding font in the original publication) - is the product of the marriage of the true minds of a great courtier and his queen.

Unfortunately Elizabeth didn't share her property as willingly. 'Shake-speare' seems to have become orphaned at this point.


Chester, Love's Martyr
Pellican.
VVHat wondrous hart-grieuing spectacle,
Hast thou beheld the worlds true miracle?
With what a spirit did the Turtle flye
Into the fire, and chearfully did dye?
He look't more pleasant in his countenance
Within the flame, then when he did aduance,
*His pleasant wings vpon the naturall ground,*

True perfect loue had so his poore heart bound,
The Phoenix Natures dea• adopted child,
With a pale heauy count'nance, wan and mild,
Grieu'd for to see him first possesse the place,
That was allotted her, her selfe to grace,
And followes cheerfully her second turne,
And both together in that fire do burne.
O if the rarest creatures of the earth,
Because but one at once did ere take breath
Within the world, should with a second he,
A perfect forme of loue and amitie
Burne both together, what should there arise,
And be presented to our mortall eyes,
Out of the fire, but a more perfect creature?
Because that two in one is put by Nature,
The one hath giuen the child inchaunting beautie,
The other giues it loue and chastitie:
The one hath giuen it wits rarietie,
The other guides the wit most charily:
The one for vertue doth excell the rest,
The other in true constancie is blest.
If that the Phoenix had bene separated,
And from the gentle Turtle had bene parted,
Loue had bene murdred in the infancie,
Without these two no loue at all can be.

I can't shake the idea that at the end of his life Herman Melville was tracing the sublime arc of Edward de Vere and his book/foundling/heir. He registers Captain Vere's sacrifice of Beauty/Billy Budd/foundling/book at the 'exacting behest' of the state. Billy's movements 'aloft and alow' also describes the height and depths of the sublime/profound (natural?) object. I think it is possible that at the end of his life Melville was shaping a response to Emerson's challenge to explain the poem referred to as the Phoenix and Turtle and taking a turn at the sublime as well.

Beauty's Resistless Thunder - Marston, Love's Martyr

A narration and description of a most exact wondrous creature, arising out of the Phoenix and Turtle Doues ashes. - Marston
O Twas a mouing Epicedium!
Can Fire? can Time? can blackest Fate consume
So rare creation? No; tis thwart to sence,
Corruption quakes to touch such excellence,
Nature exclaimes for Iustice, Iustice Fate,
Ought into nought can neuer remigrate.
Then looke; for see what glorious issue brighter
Then clearest fire, and beyond faith farre whiter
Then Dians tier) now springs from yonder flame?
Let me stand numb'd with wonder, neuer came
So strong amazement on astonish'd eie
As this, this measurelesse pure Raritie.
Lo now; th'xtracture of deuinest Essence,
The Soule of heauens labour'd Quintessence,
(Peans to Phoebus) from deare Louer's death,
Takes sweete creation and all blessing breath.
What strangenesse is't that from the Turtles ashes
Assumes such forme? (whose splendor clearer flashes,
Then mounted Delius) tell me genuine Muse.
Now yeeld your aides, you spirites that infuse
A sacred rapture, light my weaker eie:
Raise my inuention on swift Phantasie,
That whilft of this same Metaphisicall
God, Man, nor Woman, but elix'd of all
My labouring thoughts, with strained ardor sing,
My Muse may mount with an vncommon wing.

Beauty's Resistless Thunder - Marston
Perfectioni Hymnus.
WHat should I call this creature,
Which now is growne vnto maturitie?
How should I blase this feature
As firme and constant as Eternitie?
Call it Perfection? Fie!
Tis perfecter thē brightest names can light it:
Call it Heauens mirror? I.
Alas, best attributes can neuer right it.
Beauties resistlesse thunder?
All nomination is too straight of sence:
Deepe Contemplations wonder?
That appellation giue this excellence.
Within all best confin'd,
(Now feebler Genius end thy slighter riming)

No Suburbes * all is Mind
As farre from spot, as possible defining.
Iohn Marston.
**************************************
Beauties Resistlesse Thunder:
.
Synonyms for stupefied

amazed, astonished, astounded, awestruck (also awestricken), bowled over, dumbfounded (also dumfounded), dumbstruck, flabbergasted, shocked, stunned, thunderstruck
Stupefaction - the action of stupefying, making dull or lethargic

************************************
No Master of Himself: Pope and the Response of Wonder
Katherine Playfair Quinsey
.The late seventeenth-century invocation of the response of wonder was thus a dynamic process replete with ambivalence, a characteristic that continues to inform even current criticism on Longinian aesthetics. Often described as “rapture” or a loss of a sense of self, in an overwhelming emotive response to objects that go beyond the limits of perception, this immersion of the self in the otherness of the perceived arose, ironically, from a new focus on the self: from philosophical, religious, and scientific empiricism, and an unprecedented recognition of the empirical validity of the subjective response. As an aesthetic and philosophical concept, wonder develops through an ongoing tension with the formalistic rhetorical tradition of artful persuasion. This particular ambivalence is clearly evident in the classical treatise frequently invoked, Longinus’s Peri Hupsos[9]—usually referred to as On the Sublime—which opens with a lucid analysis of the relationship between rhetorical strategy and emotive expression, clearly delineating the difference between persuasion and the action of the “sublime”:

*For great and lofty Thoughts do not so truly perswade, as charm and throw us into a Rapture. They form in us a kind of Admiration made up of Extasy and Surprize, which is quite different from that motion of the Soul, by which we are pleas’d, or perswaded. Perswasion has only that power over us, which we will give it; but Sublime carries in it such a noble Vigour, such a resistless Strength, which ravishes away the hearer’s Soul against his consent.*
An Essay upon the Sublime, 3

The chief feature of the response of wonder or “admiration” is ecstasy, or separation from the body, here described as separation from the willed consciousness of the self, acting “against his [the hearer’s] consent” and imaged as the near-violent overcoming of the will and reason. This is opposed to rhetorical persuasion, in which the hearer is an active participant who willingly “allows” the argument to have emotional power as well as logical validity. (Note that Longinus also invokes the traditional meaning of nil admirari, the association of admiration with “surprise.”) The rapture of the soul, or sense of a loss of self, through being immersed in that which is greater than oneself, is a distinguishing feature of the sublime, as is the word “resistless,” itself a favourite term of Pope’s, used repeatedly in this 1698 translation to characterize the action of the sublime in both individual perception and rhetorical technique.
Arthur Neuendorffer
2020-12-05 14:47:25 UTC
Permalink
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https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=sublime

*SUBLIME* (adj.) 1580s, "expressing lofty ideas in an elevated manner," from Middle French sublime (15c.), or directly from Latin sublimis "uplifted, high, borne aloft, lofty, exalted, eminent, distinguished," possibly originally "sloping up to the lintel," from sub "up to" (see sub-) + limen "lintel, threshold, sill" (see limit (n.)). The sublime (n.) "the sublime part of anything, that which is stately or imposing" is from 1670s.
........................................................
limit (n.) c. 1400, "boundary, frontier," from Old French limite "a boundary," from Latin limitem (nominative limes) "a boundary, limit, border, embankment between fields," which is probably related to limen "threshold," and possibly from the base of limus "transverse, oblique," which is of uncertain origin. Originally of territory; general sense from early 15c.
-----------------------------------------------------------
____ *ELMOND* : narrate, relate, tell (Hungarian)
____ *VERtellen, VERhalen* : narrate, relate, tell (Dutch)
-----------------------------------------------------------
http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~?ahnelson/ITALY/Tirata.htm>
.
<<Julia Cooley Altrocci, in Shakespeare Authorship Review,
2 (Autumn, 1959), cites the following literary fantasy
from Andrea Perrucci, Dell' Arte Rappresentative
Premeditata ed all'Improviso (Naples, 1699):
.........................................
"I found myself ambassador of my illustrious country of
Bologna at the court of the Emperor Polidor of Trebizond,
and attending the great tournament celebrating his
marriage to Irene, Empress of Constantinople."
.
"Present were many great *WORTHIES* , Basil, King of Zelconda,
Doralba, Princess of Dacia, Arcont, vaivode of Moldavia,
Arsileus, heir of Denmark, ISUF, pasha of Aleppo,
Fatima, Sultan of Persia, *ELMOND, milord of OXFORD* "
.
"The horse of MILORd of Oxford is faun-colored
and goes by the name of OLTRAMARIN (BEYOND-THE-SEA).">>
..........................................
Dwebb: <<Do you know what the Templars called the Holy Land, Art...
OUTREMER, the Frankish VERsion of BEYOND-THE-SEA!>>
..........................................
"Edward carried a large sword (spadone).
. His color of costume is SOCRATES."
.
<<"though Socrates is pale and pale is a color,
it does not follow that Socrates is a color.">>
.
*He carries for device a FALCON with a motto taken from TERENCE*
Tendit IN ARDUA virtus (VALOR proceeds to arduous undertakings).">>
..........................................
Dwebb:
.
<<The allusions to Socrates & Terence are self-evident.
Note that "in ardua" is a perfect anagram of "Arduina,"
the name of the bear-goddess of the Sicambrians
to whom you alluded in your "Helm" post!
.
. "Valor" is of course a perfect anagram of "Orval",
. which you'll no doubt recall from your own post:
.
. In 1070, a group of monks from Calabria, Italy,
led by one Prince URSUS, founded the Abbey of ORVAL
. in France near Stenay, in the Ardennes (ARDEN!).
.
These monks are said to have formed the basis for the Order de Sion,
into which they were "folded" in 1099 by Godfroi de Bouillion.">>
..........................................
<<"In this Tirata, Milord of Oxford, amusingly enough, tilted against
Alvida, COUNTESS of Edenburg, who was mounted on a dapple grey,
was armed with *a Frankish LANCE* and was robed in lemon color.
In the end, Edward and Alvida, alas, threw one another
simultaneously, both landing face down in the dust!.""
.
NeVERtheless, Emperor Polidor awarded to all the knights
& amazons GIFTS OUT OF THE CUPBOARD OF ANTIQUITY.
To Elmond - Edward - was given the *HORN oF ASTOLF*
paladin of Charlemagne, the magic horn to rout armies
- a *SPEAR of sorts to SHAKE* , with enchanted consequences.>>
..........................................
Dwebb: <<Aside from the spear-shaking,
note the connection of *ASTOLF* with Sir John *FASTOLFEe* ,
. one of the early incarnations of Falstaff.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------
<<Dr. Han *FASTOLFEe*
is a fictional character in Isaac Asimov's Robot series.
A Spacer scientist from the planet Aurora, he specializes in
creating robots which mimic the outward appearance of human
beings?androids, although Asimov calls them "humaniform robots".
His most significant creations are R. Daneel Olivaw and R. Giskard
REVEntlov, who are both fully characterized personalities, and R.
Jander Panell, who only appears as an inert body, having been
"murdered" off-stage, before the novel The Robots of Dawn begins.
*FASTOLFEe* is Elijah Baley's chief Spacer ally; together, he and
Baley are key figures in the human race's expansion into the Galaxy.
.
Fastolfe's name most likely comes from Shakespeare's 1 Henry VI,
where a Fastolfe is a soldier in the English army. The soldier's
name was likely the inspiration for Sir John Falstaff's moniker.
Asimov, author of a two-volume Guide to Shakespeare, certainly
knew of this earlier Fastolfe, and of the theory connecting his
name to Falstaff, one of Shakespeare's most renowned characters.
.
Like Falstaff, Dr. Fastolfe appears in three works, while being
mentioned in a fourth. He plays an active role in three novels:
The Caves of Steel, The Robots of Dawn, and Robots and Empire.
Characters in The Naked Sun speak of him,
but he does not personally appear.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------
Longfellow: (1833) Outre-Mer: A Pilgrimage Beyond the Sea.
http://shop.store.yahoo.com/mainehistorical/outremer.html
.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's first prose book is a series
of travel essays similar to Washington Irving's Sketch Book.
-------------------------------------------------------------
<<The horse of MILORd of Oxford is faun-colored & goes
by the name of *OLTRAMARIN* : *BEYOND-THE-SEA*.
.
. -- Andrea Perrucci, Dell' Arte Rappresentative
. Premeditata ed all'Improviso (Naples, 1699)]>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
June 29, 1587, Marlowe Privy Council dispensation Letter:
.
"Whereas it was reported that Christopher MORLEY was
determined to have gone *BEYOND THE SEAS* *TO REAMES* "
-------------------------------------------------------------
. *BEYOND THE SEAS* = *OuT-REMEr*
.
<<The First Crusade, which began in 1096, was successful in its aim of
freeing Jerusalem. The Crusaders called this area *OUTREMER* , French
for *BEYOND THE SEAS* . The First Crusade attracted no European
kings & few nobles, drawing mainly lesser barons & their followers.
They came primarily from the lands of French culture & language, which
is why Westerners in *OUTREMER* were referred to as Franks.>>
.
http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761561210/Crusades.html
------------------------------------------------------------
<<After the astonishing success of the First Crusade, many
crusaders fulfilled their vows by completing their pilgrimage
at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, & went home. Others
stayed, however, & continued to build up the society
known as *OUTREMER* (Old French for "Across the Sea"),
consisting of the four Crusader States established by the First
Crusade. Eventually an Islamic Counter-Crusade or Jihad was taken up
by Muslim leader Zengi. On Christmas Eve, 1144, Zengi's troops took
the capital of the County of Edessa and destroyed the oldest Crusader
state. The West reacted strongly to this disaster, and the result
was the Second Crusade, preached by St. Bernard of Clairvaux and
led by King Louis VII of France & the Holy Roman Emperor Conrad II.
The Second Crusade was a near complete failure, however, and
people quickly lost interest in another such expedition.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------
. Augustine Phillips apologises for "Richard II"
------------------------------------------------------------
The 3rd Crusade was led by Richard I, Philip Augustus
. of France, & Emperor Frederick Barbarossa.
.
<<Saladin was arguably the greatest of Muslim generals, & possessed an
appealing & admirable character. In 1187 he caught the entire army of
the Kingdom of Jerusalem at the mountain known as the Horns of Hattin,
near the Sea of Galilee, & annihilated it. Within a few months he held
all of the Kingdom except for the seaport of Tyre and a nearby castle.
Tyre held out, however, and the West once again came to the aid of the
Crusader states. King Richard I of England, King Phillip II Augustus
of France, and Emperor Frederick Barbarossa managed to recover much
of the lost territory. Third Crusade passed into European and Muslim
folklore as a time of great chivalry, particularly between Saladin
& Richard the Lion-Hearted, who became the principle crusade leader.
But despite Richard's best efforts, OUTREMER was not recovered.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------
. http://www.livius.org/li-ln/li?vy/livy.htm
.
<<TITUS Livius or Livy (59 BCE - 17 CE): Roman historian.
.
When Livy was 10 years old, civil war broke out between Caesar &
POMPEY the Great. It was decided during the battle of PHARSALUS.
.
. Later, Livy recalled a miraculous incident:
.
"At Patavium, there was a well-known prophet called Caius Cornelius,
who was a fellow-citizen and acquaintance of Livy the historian.
On the day of the battle this man happened to be sitting at his
prophetic work and first, according to Livy, he realized that
the battle was taking place at that very moment and said to
those who were present that now was the time when matters
were being decided and now the troops were going into
action; then he had a second look and, when he had examined
the signs, he jumped up in a kind of ecstasy & cried out:
.
. 'Caesar, the victory is yours!'
.
Those who were standing by were amazed at him, but
he took the garland from his head and solemnly swore
that he would not WEAR it again until facts had
proved that his arts had REVEaled the TRUTH to him.
Livy, certainly, is most emphatic that this really happened.">>
-----------------------------------------------------------------?
[ The name POMPEY occurs 196 times in Shakespeare! ]
-----------------------------------------------------------------?
. _Julius Caesar_ Act 1 scene 1
.
. Knew you not POMPEY? Many a time and oft
. Have you climb'd UP to WALLS and battlements,
. To towers and windows, yea, to *chimney-tops* ,
. YOUR INFANTS IN YOUR ARMS, and there have sat
. The livelong day, with patient expectation,
. To see great POMPEY pass the streets of Rome:
.
On June 29, 1805, Sacagawea & her papoose "POMPY" were caught in
a flood near some waterfalls in present-day Great Falls, Montana,
and saved by William Clark, who pushed them UP a hill to safety.
.
["POMPY / Jean Baptiste" is seen on Sacagawea gold dollar]
-----------------------------------------------------------
Christian Lanciai wrote HLAS:
.
<<By a curious coincidence, two important events took place on
(29th June) which are relevant to any Shakespeare discussion.
In 48 B.C. POMPEY the Great was defeated at PHARSALUS,
which ended the democracy of the Roman Empire,
since POMPEY was the last to challenge Caesar's autocracy.
The tragedy was immotalized by Lucan, the brilliant poet
who was murdered by Nero. This work, "PHARSALia", was
translated by Christopher Marlowe, who translated the brilliant
rhetorical style of Lucan into English, which must have influenced
him to set the English drama with the same brilliant rhetorical style,
admirably sustained through all the years by 'Shakespeare'. This is
one of the major arguments for Marlowe having survived as Shakespeare.
.
On the same day in 1613 the Globe burned down, marking the end of that
unique epoch. There was no more Shakespeare work produced after that,
as far as we know. There are theories that he carried on, but the
practical stage epoch was finished. What went on went on backstage.
----------------------------------------------------------
. The Feast of Saints Peter & Paul: June 29th
. http://www.ntin.net/McDaniel/0?629.htm
.
. In Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus,
. an invisible Dr. Faustus attends a St. Peter's Day feast
. at the Vatican and plays havoc with the ceremony.
.
June 29, 1022, German language standardizer Notker LABEO dies.
.
June 29, 1577, Flemish master PETER PAUL Rubens born
.
June 29, 1613, Globe Theatre fire
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Travis Bickle: June twenty-ninth. I gotta get in shape. Too much
sitting
has ruined my body. Too much abuse has gone on for too long. From now
on there will be 50 pushups each morning, 50 pullups. There will be
no more pills, no more bad food, no more destroyers of my body.
From now on will be total organization. EVERy muscle must be tight.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
June 29, 1587, Marlowe Privy Council dispensation Letter:
"Whereas it was reported that Christopher MORLEY was
determined to have gone BEYOND THE SEAS TO REAMES..."
-------------------------------------------------------------
http://www2.localaccess.com/marlowe/primdocs.htm
<<The following is [a typescript prepared by Peter Farey]
of the Privy Council's entail to Cambridge University
dated 29 June 1587 demanding Marlowe's degree:
.
"Whereas it was reported that Christopher Morley was determined
to have gone beyond the seas to Reames and there to remaine, Their
L(ordship)s thought good to certefie that he had no such intent,
but that in all his accions he had behaued himself orderlie and
discreetelie wherebie he had done her ma(jes)tie good seruice,
and DEsERUEd to be rewarded for his faithfull dealinge:
Their L(ordship)s request was thst the rumor thereof
should be allaied by all possible means, and that he should
furthered in the degree he was to take this next Commencement:
Because it was not her ma(jes)ties pleasure that anie one employed as
he had been in matters touching the benefitt of his Countrie should
be defamed by those that are ignorant in th'affaires he went about"
.
Peter reminds us, "This had been signed by the 'Lord Archbishop'
(Whitgift), 'Lord Chancelor' (Hatton), 'Lord Threasurer' (Burghley),
'Lord Chamberlaine' (Hunsdon) & 'Mr Comptroler' (Crofts'. It is worth
remembering that Lord Burghley was also Chancellor of the University!"
----------------------------------------------------------------
. The Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul: June 29th
. http://www.ntin.net/McDaniel/0?629.htm
.
June 29, 1236, Ferdinand III of Castile & Leon take C?rdoba.
.
June 29, 1521, Loyola recovers from Pamplona May 20th cannon ball.
.
June 29, 1776, George Mason's Virginia Constitution
. & Bill of Rights adopted
.
June 29, 1804, Privates John Collins & Hugh Hall of the Lewis &
. CLARK Expedition found guilty for getting drunk on duty.
.
June 29, 1854, Charlotte Bront? married a young curate named
Arthur Bell Nichols. Since her difficult curate-father refused to go
to the wedding, she was given away in marriage by her former teacher.
.
June 29, 1858, George Washington Goethals, the U.S. Army officer
. & engineer in charge of building of the Panama Canal, born.
.
June 29, 1861, Elizabeth Barrett Browning dies in Florence.
.
June 29, 1863, Germans HENRY & Prof. Von *HARDWIGG*
. commence their "Journey to the Centre of the Earth"
.
June 29, 1868, Astronomer George Ellery Hale born.
.
June 29, 1900, Antoine de Saint-Exup?ry born in Lyon.
.
June 29, 1927 Total eclipse seen from Giggleswick, Yorkshire.
Loading Image...
http://www.eclipse.org.uk/eclipse/0311927/
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Chapter VII: _Journey to the Center of the Earth_ by Jules VERnE
.
WHEN I returned, dinner was ready. This meal was devoured by my WORTHY
relative with avidity and voracity. His shipboard diet had turned his
interior into a perfect gulf. The repast, which was more Danish than
Icelandic, was in itself nothing, but the excessive hospitality
of our host made us enjoy it doubly.
.
The conversation turned upon scientific matters, and M. Fridriksson
asked my uncle what he thought of the public library.
.
"Library, sir?" cried my uncle; "it appears to me a collection of
useless odd volumes, and a beggarly amount of empty shelves."
.
"What!" cried M. Fridriksson; "why, we have eight thousand volumes
of most rare and valuable works- some in the Scandinavian language,
besides all the new publications from Copenhagen."
.
"Eight thousand volumes, my dear sir- why, where are they?"
. cried my uncle.
.
"Scattered over the country, Professor Hardwigg. We are VERy studious,
my dear sir, though we do live in Iceland. EVERy farmer, EVERy
*LABORER*, EVERy fisherman can both read and write- and we think
that books instead of being locked up in cupboards, far from the
sight of students, should be distributed as widely as possible.
The books of our library are therefore passed from hand to hand
without returning to the library shelves perhaps for years."
.
"Then when foreigners visit you, there is nothing for them to see?"
.
"Well," sir, foreigners have their own libraries, and our first
consideration is, that our humbler classes should be highly educated.
Fortunately, the love of study is innate in the Icelandic people.
In 1816 we founded a Literary Society and Mechanics' Institute; many
foreign scholars of eminence are honorary members; we publish books
destined to educate our people, and these books have rendered
valuable services to our country. Allow me to have the honor,
Professor Hardwigg, to enroll you as an honorary member?"
.
My uncle, who already belonged to nearly EVERy literary and
scientific institution in Europe, immediately yielded to
the amiable wishes of good M. Fridriksson.
.
"And now," he said, after many expressions of gratitude and
good will, "if you will tell me what books you expected to find,
perhaps I may be of some assistance to you."
.
I watched my uncle keenly. For a minute or two he hesitated, as if
unwilling to speak; to speak openly was, perhaps, to unveil his
projects. NEVERtheless, after some reflection, he made up his mind.
.
"Well," M. Fridriksson," he said in an easy, unconcerned kind of way,
"I was desirous of ascertaining, if among other valuable works,
you had any of the learned Arne Saknussemm."
.
"Arne Saknussemm!" cried the Professor of Reykjavik; "you speak of
one of the most distinguished scholars of the sixteenth century,
of the great naturalist, the great alchemist, the great traveler."
.
. "Exactly so."
.
"One of the most distinguished men
connected with Icelandic science and literature."
.
. "As you say, sir-"
.
. "A man illustrious above all."
.
. "Yes, sir, *ALL this IS TRUE* , but his works?"
.............................................................
<<On June 29, 1613, during a performance of
Shakespeare's HENRY VIII (or All Is True), the Globe theater
caught fire and burned to the ground. The fire was allegedly
started accidentally, by a cannon salute to HENRY VIII.>>
...........................................................
. "We have none of them."
.
. "Not in Iceland?"
.
"There are none in Iceland or elsewhere," answered the other, sadly.
.
. "Why so?"
.
. "Because Arne Saknussemm was persecuted for heresy,
. and in 1573 his works were publicly burnt at Copenhagen,
. by the hands of the common hangman."
.
"VERy good! capital!" murmured my uncle,
to the great astonishment of the worthy Icelander.
.
"You said, sir-"
.
"Yes, yes, all is clear, I see the link in the chain; EVERything is
explained, and I now understand why Arne Saknussemm, put out of court,
forced to hide his magnificent DIscoVERiEs, was compelled to conceal
*beneath the VEIL of an incomprehensible cryptograph* , the secret-"
.
. "What secret?"
.
. "A secret- which," stammered my uncle.
.
"Have you discoVERED some wonderful manuscript?" cried M. Fridriksson.
----------------------------------------------------------------
. http://JV.Gilead.org.il/butcher/jwe.html
.
The Hardwigg version emphasis on Harry being the son of a widow:
.
"My uncle was a German, having married my
mother's sister, an Englishwoman. Being very much
attached to his fatherless nephew,"
.
. is surely indicative of a Freemasonry influence.
-----------------------------------------------------------------
<<Every word of Chapter XLI, describing "Harry's" bird-nesting in
the crags of an old castle, is invented from beginning to end.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------------
. The eagle's nest inclusion seems to be a reference to
. the Stanley's Lathom Hall IMO:
.
<<"Be calm, "he cried, "if we pull down the whole ruin,
. you shall be saved."
. They were delicious words, but I had little hope.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------
. CHAPTER 41 Hunger
.
HUNGER, prolonged, is temporary madness! The brain is at work
without its required food, and the most fantastic notions fill
the mind. Hitherto I had never known what hunger really meant.
I was likely to understand it now.
. And yet, three months before I could tell my terrible story
of starvation, as I thought it. As a boy I used to make frequent
excursions in the neighborhood of the Professor's house.
. My uncle always acted on system, and he believed that, in addition
to the day of rest and worship, there should be a day of recreation.
In consequence, I was always free to do as I liked on a Wednesday.
. Now, as I had a notion to combine the useful and the agreeable, my
favorite pastime was birds' nesting. I had one of the best collections
of eggs in all the town. They were classified, and under glass cases.
. There was a certain wood, which, by rising at early morn, and taking
the cheap train, I could reach at eleven in the morning. Here I
would botanize or geologize at my will. My uncle was always glad
of specimens for his herbarium, and stones to examine.
When I had filled my wallet, I proceeded to search for nests.
. After about two hours of hard work, I, one day, sat down by a
stream to eat my humble but copious lunch. How the remembrance
of the spiced sausage, the wheaten loaf, and the beer, made my
mouth water now! I would have given every prospect of worldly
wealth for such a meal. But to my story.
. While seated thus at my leisure, I looked up at the ruins
of an old castle, at no great distance. It was the remains of
an historical dwelling, ivy-clad, and now falling to pieces.
. While looking, I saw two eagles circling about the summit of a lofty
tower. I soon became satisfied that there was a nest. Now, in all my
collection, I lacked eggs of the native eagle and the large owl.
. My mind was made up. I would reach the summit of that tower, or
perish in the attempt. I went nearer, and surveyed the ruins. The
old staircase, years before, had fallen in. The outer walls were,
however, intact. There was no chance that way, unless I looked to
the ivy solely for support. This was, as I soon found out, futile.
. There remained the chimney, which still went up to the top, and
had once served to carry off the smoke from every story of the tower.
. Up this I determined to venture. It was narrow, rough, and therefore
the more easily climbed. I took off my coat and crept into the
chimney. Looking up, I saw a small, light opening, proclaiming the
summit of the chimney.
. Up- up I went, for some time using my hands and knees, after the
fashion of a chimney sweep. It was slow work, but, there being
continual projections, the task was comparatively easy. In this way,
I reached halfway. The chimney now became narrower. The atmosphere
was close, and, at last, to end the matter, I stuck fast.
I could ascend no higher.
. There could be no doubt of this, and there remained no resource
but to descend, and give up my glorious prey in despair. I yielded
to fate and endeavored to descend. But I could not move. Some
unseen and mysterious obstacle intervened and stopped me.
In an instant the full horror of my situation seized me.
. I was unable to move either way, and was doomed to a terrible
and horrible death, that of starvation. In a boy's mind, however,
there is an extraordinary amount of elasticity and hope, and
I began to think of all sorts of plans to escape my gloomy fate.
. In the first place, I required no food just at present, having had
an excellent meal, and was therefore allowed time for reflection.
My first thought was to try and move the mortar with my hand.
Had I possessed a knife, something might have been done,
but that useful instrument I had left in my coat pocket.
. I soon found that all efforts of this kind were vain and useless,
and that all I could hope to do was to wriggle downwards.
. But though I jerked and struggled, and strove to turn, it was all in
vain. I could not move an inch, one way or the other. And time flew
rapidly. My early rising probably contributed to the fact that I
felt sleepy, and gradually gave way to the sensation of drowsiness.
. I slept, and awoke in darkness, ravenously hungry.
. Night had come, and still I could not move. I was tight bound, and
did not succeed in changing my position an inch. I groaned aloud.
Never since the days of my happy childhood, when it was a hardship
to go from meal to meal without eating, had I really experienced
hunger. The sensation was as novel as it was painful. I began now to
lose my head and to scream and cry out in my agony. Something
appeared, startled by my noise. It was a harmless lizard, but it
appeared to me a loathsome reptile. Again I made the old ruins resound
with my cries, and finally so exhausted myself that I fainted.
. How long I lay in a kind of trance or sleep I cannot say, but
when again I recovered consciousness it was day. How ill I felt,
how hunger still GNAWed at me, it would be hard to say.
I was too weak to scream now, far too weak to struggle.
. Suddenly I was startled by a roar.
. "Are you there, Henry?" said the voice of my uncle;
"are you there, my boy?"
. I could only faintly respond, but I also made a desperate effort
to turn. Some mortar fell. To this I owed my being discovered.
When the search took place, it was easily seen that mortar and small
pieces of stone had recently fallen from above. Hence my uncle's cry.
. "Be calm, "he cried,
"if we pull down the whole ruin, you shall be saved."
. They were delicious words, but I had little hope.
. Soon however, about a quarter of an hour later
I heard a voice above me, at one of the upper fireplaces.
. "Are you below or above?"
. "Below," was my reply.
. In an instant a basket was lowered with milk, a biscuit, and
an egg. My uncle was fearful to be too ready with his supply of
food. I drank the milk first, for thirst had nearly deadened
hunger. I then, much refreshed, ate my bread and *HARD EGG*.
. They were now at work at the wall. I could hear a pickax.
Wishing to escape all danger from this terrible weapon I made a
desperate struggle, and the belt, which surrounded my waist and
which had been hitched on a stone, gave way. I was free, and only
escaped falling down by a rapid motion of my hands and knees.
. In ten minutes more I was in my uncle's arms,
after being two days and nights in that horrible prison.
My occasional delirium prevented me from counting time.
. I was weeks recovering from that awful starvation adventure;
and yet what was that to the hideous sufferings I now endured?>>
----------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
marc hanson
2020-12-10 17:43:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
-----------------------------------------------------------
https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=sublime
*SUBLIME* (adj.) 1580s, "expressing lofty ideas in an elevated manner," from Middle French sublime (15c.), or directly from Latin sublimis "uplifted, high, borne aloft, lofty, exalted, eminent, distinguished," possibly originally "sloping up to the lintel," from sub "up to" (see sub-) + limen "lintel, threshold, sill" (see limit (n.)). The sublime (n.) "the sublime part of anything, that which is stately or imposing" is from 1670s.
........................................................
limit (n.) c. 1400, "boundary, frontier," from Old French limite "a boundary," from Latin limitem (nominative limes) "a boundary, limit, border, embankment between fields," which is probably related to limen "threshold," and possibly from the base of limus "transverse, oblique," which is of uncertain origin. Originally of territory; general sense from early 15c.
-----------------------------------------------------------
____ *ELMOND* : narrate, relate, tell (Hungarian)
____ *VERtellen, VERhalen* : narrate, relate, tell (Dutch)
-----------------------------------------------------------
http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~?ahnelson/ITALY/Tirata.htm>
.
<<Julia Cooley Altrocci, in Shakespeare Authorship Review,
2 (Autumn, 1959), cites the following literary fantasy
from Andrea Perrucci, Dell' Arte Rappresentative
.........................................
"I found myself ambassador of my illustrious country of
Bologna at the court of the Emperor Polidor of Trebizond,
and attending the great tournament celebrating his
marriage to Irene, Empress of Constantinople."
.
"Present were many great *WORTHIES* , Basil, King of Zelconda,
Doralba, Princess of Dacia, Arcont, vaivode of Moldavia,
Arsileus, heir of Denmark, ISUF, pasha of Aleppo,
Fatima, Sultan of Persia, *ELMOND, milord of OXFORD* "
.
"The horse of MILORd of Oxford is faun-colored
and goes by the name of OLTRAMARIN (BEYOND-THE-SEA).">>
..........................................
Dwebb: <<Do you know what the Templars called the Holy Land, Art...
OUTREMER, the Frankish VERsion of BEYOND-THE-SEA!>>
..........................................
"Edward carried a large sword (spadone).
. His color of costume is SOCRATES."
.
<<"though Socrates is pale and pale is a color,
it does not follow that Socrates is a color.">>
.
*He carries for device a FALCON with a motto taken from TERENCE*
Tendit IN ARDUA virtus (VALOR proceeds to arduous undertakings).">>
..........................................
.
<<The allusions to Socrates & Terence are self-evident.
Note that "in ardua" is a perfect anagram of "Arduina,"
the name of the bear-goddess of the Sicambrians
to whom you alluded in your "Helm" post!
.
. "Valor" is of course a perfect anagram of "Orval",
.
. In 1070, a group of monks from Calabria, Italy,
led by one Prince URSUS, founded the Abbey of ORVAL
. in France near Stenay, in the Ardennes (ARDEN!).
.
These monks are said to have formed the basis for the Order de Sion,
into which they were "folded" in 1099 by Godfroi de Bouillion.">>
..........................................
<<"In this Tirata, Milord of Oxford, amusingly enough, tilted against
Alvida, COUNTESS of Edenburg, who was mounted on a dapple grey,
was armed with *a Frankish LANCE* and was robed in lemon color.
In the end, Edward and Alvida, alas, threw one another
simultaneously, both landing face down in the dust!.""
.
NeVERtheless, Emperor Polidor awarded to all the knights
& amazons GIFTS OUT OF THE CUPBOARD OF ANTIQUITY.
To Elmond - Edward - was given the *HORN oF ASTOLF*
paladin of Charlemagne, the magic horn to rout armies
- a *SPEAR of sorts to SHAKE* , with enchanted consequences.>>
..........................................
Dwebb: <<Aside from the spear-shaking,
note the connection of *ASTOLF* with Sir John *FASTOLFEe* ,
. one of the early incarnations of Falstaff.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------
<<Dr. Han *FASTOLFEe*
is a fictional character in Isaac Asimov's Robot series.
A Spacer scientist from the planet Aurora, he specializes in
creating robots which mimic the outward appearance of human
beings?androids, although Asimov calls them "humaniform robots".
His most significant creations are R. Daneel Olivaw and R. Giskard
REVEntlov, who are both fully characterized personalities, and R.
Jander Panell, who only appears as an inert body, having been
"murdered" off-stage, before the novel The Robots of Dawn begins.
*FASTOLFEe* is Elijah Baley's chief Spacer ally; together, he and
Baley are key figures in the human race's expansion into the Galaxy.
.
Fastolfe's name most likely comes from Shakespeare's 1 Henry VI,
where a Fastolfe is a soldier in the English army. The soldier's
name was likely the inspiration for Sir John Falstaff's moniker.
Asimov, author of a two-volume Guide to Shakespeare, certainly
knew of this earlier Fastolfe, and of the theory connecting his
name to Falstaff, one of Shakespeare's most renowned characters.
.
Like Falstaff, Dr. Fastolfe appears in three works, while being
The Caves of Steel, The Robots of Dawn, and Robots and Empire.
Characters in The Naked Sun speak of him,
but he does not personally appear.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------
Longfellow: (1833) Outre-Mer: A Pilgrimage Beyond the Sea.
http://shop.store.yahoo.com/mainehistorical/outremer.html
.
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's first prose book is a series
of travel essays similar to Washington Irving's Sketch Book.
-------------------------------------------------------------
<<The horse of MILORd of Oxford is faun-colored & goes
by the name of *OLTRAMARIN* : *BEYOND-THE-SEA*.
.
. -- Andrea Perrucci, Dell' Arte Rappresentative
. Premeditata ed all'Improviso (Naples, 1699)]>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
.
"Whereas it was reported that Christopher MORLEY was
determined to have gone *BEYOND THE SEAS* *TO REAMES* "
-------------------------------------------------------------
. *BEYOND THE SEAS* = *OuT-REMEr*
.
<<The First Crusade, which began in 1096, was successful in its aim of
freeing Jerusalem. The Crusaders called this area *OUTREMER* , French
for *BEYOND THE SEAS* . The First Crusade attracted no European
kings & few nobles, drawing mainly lesser barons & their followers.
They came primarily from the lands of French culture & language, which
is why Westerners in *OUTREMER* were referred to as Franks.>>
.
http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761561210/Crusades.html
------------------------------------------------------------
<<After the astonishing success of the First Crusade, many
crusaders fulfilled their vows by completing their pilgrimage
at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, & went home. Others
stayed, however, & continued to build up the society
known as *OUTREMER* (Old French for "Across the Sea"),
consisting of the four Crusader States established by the First
Crusade. Eventually an Islamic Counter-Crusade or Jihad was taken up
by Muslim leader Zengi. On Christmas Eve, 1144, Zengi's troops took
the capital of the County of Edessa and destroyed the oldest Crusader
state. The West reacted strongly to this disaster, and the result
was the Second Crusade, preached by St. Bernard of Clairvaux and
led by King Louis VII of France & the Holy Roman Emperor Conrad II.
The Second Crusade was a near complete failure, however, and
people quickly lost interest in another such expedition.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------
. Augustine Phillips apologises for "Richard II"
------------------------------------------------------------
The 3rd Crusade was led by Richard I, Philip Augustus
. of France, & Emperor Frederick Barbarossa.
.
<<Saladin was arguably the greatest of Muslim generals, & possessed an
appealing & admirable character. In 1187 he caught the entire army of
the Kingdom of Jerusalem at the mountain known as the Horns of Hattin,
near the Sea of Galilee, & annihilated it. Within a few months he held
all of the Kingdom except for the seaport of Tyre and a nearby castle.
Tyre held out, however, and the West once again came to the aid of the
Crusader states. King Richard I of England, King Phillip II Augustus
of France, and Emperor Frederick Barbarossa managed to recover much
of the lost territory. Third Crusade passed into European and Muslim
folklore as a time of great chivalry, particularly between Saladin
& Richard the Lion-Hearted, who became the principle crusade leader.
But despite Richard's best efforts, OUTREMER was not recovered.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------
. http://www.livius.org/li-ln/li?vy/livy.htm
.
<<TITUS Livius or Livy (59 BCE - 17 CE): Roman historian.
.
When Livy was 10 years old, civil war broke out between Caesar &
POMPEY the Great. It was decided during the battle of PHARSALUS.
.
.
"At Patavium, there was a well-known prophet called Caius Cornelius,
who was a fellow-citizen and acquaintance of Livy the historian.
On the day of the battle this man happened to be sitting at his
prophetic work and first, according to Livy, he realized that
the battle was taking place at that very moment and said to
those who were present that now was the time when matters
were being decided and now the troops were going into
action; then he had a second look and, when he had examined
.
. 'Caesar, the victory is yours!'
.
Those who were standing by were amazed at him, but
he took the garland from his head and solemnly swore
that he would not WEAR it again until facts had
proved that his arts had REVEaled the TRUTH to him.
Livy, certainly, is most emphatic that this really happened.">>
-----------------------------------------------------------------?
[ The name POMPEY occurs 196 times in Shakespeare! ]
-----------------------------------------------------------------?
. _Julius Caesar_ Act 1 scene 1
.
. Knew you not POMPEY? Many a time and oft
. Have you climb'd UP to WALLS and battlements,
. To towers and windows, yea, to *chimney-tops* ,
. YOUR INFANTS IN YOUR ARMS, and there have sat
. The livelong day, with patient expectation,
.
On June 29, 1805, Sacagawea & her papoose "POMPY" were caught in
a flood near some waterfalls in present-day Great Falls, Montana,
and saved by William Clark, who pushed them UP a hill to safety.
.
["POMPY / Jean Baptiste" is seen on Sacagawea gold dollar]
-----------------------------------------------------------
.
<<By a curious coincidence, two important events took place on
(29th June) which are relevant to any Shakespeare discussion.
In 48 B.C. POMPEY the Great was defeated at PHARSALUS,
which ended the democracy of the Roman Empire,
since POMPEY was the last to challenge Caesar's autocracy.
The tragedy was immotalized by Lucan, the brilliant poet
who was murdered by Nero. This work, "PHARSALia", was
translated by Christopher Marlowe, who translated the brilliant
rhetorical style of Lucan into English, which must have influenced
him to set the English drama with the same brilliant rhetorical style,
admirably sustained through all the years by 'Shakespeare'. This is
one of the major arguments for Marlowe having survived as Shakespeare.
.
On the same day in 1613 the Globe burned down, marking the end of that
unique epoch. There was no more Shakespeare work produced after that,
as far as we know. There are theories that he carried on, but the
practical stage epoch was finished. What went on went on backstage.
----------------------------------------------------------
. The Feast of Saints Peter & Paul: June 29th
. http://www.ntin.net/McDaniel/0?629.htm
.
. In Christopher Marlowe's Doctor Faustus,
. an invisible Dr. Faustus attends a St. Peter's Day feast
. at the Vatican and plays havoc with the ceremony.
.
June 29, 1022, German language standardizer Notker LABEO dies.
.
June 29, 1577, Flemish master PETER PAUL Rubens born
.
June 29, 1613, Globe Theatre fire
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Travis Bickle: June twenty-ninth. I gotta get in shape. Too much
sitting
has ruined my body. Too much abuse has gone on for too long. From now
on there will be 50 pushups each morning, 50 pullups. There will be
no more pills, no more bad food, no more destroyers of my body.
From now on will be total organization. EVERy muscle must be tight.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
"Whereas it was reported that Christopher MORLEY was
determined to have gone BEYOND THE SEAS TO REAMES..."
-------------------------------------------------------------
http://www2.localaccess.com/marlowe/primdocs.htm
<<The following is [a typescript prepared by Peter Farey]
of the Privy Council's entail to Cambridge University
.
"Whereas it was reported that Christopher Morley was determined
to have gone beyond the seas to Reames and there to remaine, Their
L(ordship)s thought good to certefie that he had no such intent,
but that in all his accions he had behaued himself orderlie and
discreetelie wherebie he had done her ma(jes)tie good seruice,
Their L(ordship)s request was thst the rumor thereof
should be allaied by all possible means, and that he should
Because it was not her ma(jes)ties pleasure that anie one employed as
he had been in matters touching the benefitt of his Countrie should
be defamed by those that are ignorant in th'affaires he went about"
.
Peter reminds us, "This had been signed by the 'Lord Archbishop'
(Whitgift), 'Lord Chancelor' (Hatton), 'Lord Threasurer' (Burghley),
'Lord Chamberlaine' (Hunsdon) & 'Mr Comptroler' (Crofts'. It is worth
remembering that Lord Burghley was also Chancellor of the University!"
----------------------------------------------------------------
. The Feast of Sts. Peter and Paul: June 29th
. http://www.ntin.net/McDaniel/0?629.htm
.
June 29, 1236, Ferdinand III of Castile & Leon take C?rdoba.
.
June 29, 1521, Loyola recovers from Pamplona May 20th cannon ball.
.
June 29, 1776, George Mason's Virginia Constitution
. & Bill of Rights adopted
.
June 29, 1804, Privates John Collins & Hugh Hall of the Lewis &
. CLARK Expedition found guilty for getting drunk on duty.
.
June 29, 1854, Charlotte Bront? married a young curate named
Arthur Bell Nichols. Since her difficult curate-father refused to go
to the wedding, she was given away in marriage by her former teacher.
.
June 29, 1858, George Washington Goethals, the U.S. Army officer
. & engineer in charge of building of the Panama Canal, born.
.
June 29, 1861, Elizabeth Barrett Browning dies in Florence.
.
June 29, 1863, Germans HENRY & Prof. Von *HARDWIGG*
. commence their "Journey to the Centre of the Earth"
.
June 29, 1868, Astronomer George Ellery Hale born.
.
June 29, 1900, Antoine de Saint-Exup?ry born in Lyon.
.
June 29, 1927 Total eclipse seen from Giggleswick, Yorkshire.
http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/SEatlas/SEatlas2/SEatlas1921.GIF
http://www.eclipse.org.uk/eclipse/0311927/
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Chapter VII: _Journey to the Center of the Earth_ by Jules VERnE
.
WHEN I returned, dinner was ready. This meal was devoured by my WORTHY
relative with avidity and voracity. His shipboard diet had turned his
interior into a perfect gulf. The repast, which was more Danish than
Icelandic, was in itself nothing, but the excessive hospitality
of our host made us enjoy it doubly.
.
The conversation turned upon scientific matters, and M. Fridriksson
asked my uncle what he thought of the public library.
.
"Library, sir?" cried my uncle; "it appears to me a collection of
useless odd volumes, and a beggarly amount of empty shelves."
.
"What!" cried M. Fridriksson; "why, we have eight thousand volumes
of most rare and valuable works- some in the Scandinavian language,
besides all the new publications from Copenhagen."
.
"Eight thousand volumes, my dear sir- why, where are they?"
. cried my uncle.
.
"Scattered over the country, Professor Hardwigg. We are VERy studious,
my dear sir, though we do live in Iceland. EVERy farmer, EVERy
*LABORER*, EVERy fisherman can both read and write- and we think
that books instead of being locked up in cupboards, far from the
sight of students, should be distributed as widely as possible.
The books of our library are therefore passed from hand to hand
without returning to the library shelves perhaps for years."
.
"Then when foreigners visit you, there is nothing for them to see?"
.
"Well," sir, foreigners have their own libraries, and our first
consideration is, that our humbler classes should be highly educated.
Fortunately, the love of study is innate in the Icelandic people.
In 1816 we founded a Literary Society and Mechanics' Institute; many
foreign scholars of eminence are honorary members; we publish books
destined to educate our people, and these books have rendered
valuable services to our country. Allow me to have the honor,
Professor Hardwigg, to enroll you as an honorary member?"
.
My uncle, who already belonged to nearly EVERy literary and
scientific institution in Europe, immediately yielded to
the amiable wishes of good M. Fridriksson.
.
"And now," he said, after many expressions of gratitude and
good will, "if you will tell me what books you expected to find,
perhaps I may be of some assistance to you."
.
I watched my uncle keenly. For a minute or two he hesitated, as if
unwilling to speak; to speak openly was, perhaps, to unveil his
projects. NEVERtheless, after some reflection, he made up his mind.
.
"Well," M. Fridriksson," he said in an easy, unconcerned kind of way,
"I was desirous of ascertaining, if among other valuable works,
you had any of the learned Arne Saknussemm."
.
"Arne Saknussemm!" cried the Professor of Reykjavik; "you speak of
one of the most distinguished scholars of the sixteenth century,
of the great naturalist, the great alchemist, the great traveler."
.
. "Exactly so."
.
"One of the most distinguished men
connected with Icelandic science and literature."
.
. "As you say, sir-"
.
. "A man illustrious above all."
.
. "Yes, sir, *ALL this IS TRUE* , but his works?"
.............................................................
<<On June 29, 1613, during a performance of
Shakespeare's HENRY VIII (or All Is True), the Globe theater
caught fire and burned to the ground. The fire was allegedly
started accidentally, by a cannon salute to HENRY VIII.>>
...........................................................
. "We have none of them."
.
. "Not in Iceland?"
.
"There are none in Iceland or elsewhere," answered the other, sadly.
.
. "Why so?"
.
. "Because Arne Saknussemm was persecuted for heresy,
. and in 1573 his works were publicly burnt at Copenhagen,
. by the hands of the common hangman."
.
"VERy good! capital!" murmured my uncle,
to the great astonishment of the worthy Icelander.
.
"You said, sir-"
.
"Yes, yes, all is clear, I see the link in the chain; EVERything is
explained, and I now understand why Arne Saknussemm, put out of court,
forced to hide his magnificent DIscoVERiEs, was compelled to conceal
*beneath the VEIL of an incomprehensible cryptograph* , the secret-"
.
. "What secret?"
.
. "A secret- which," stammered my uncle.
.
"Have you discoVERED some wonderful manuscript?" cried M. Fridriksson.
----------------------------------------------------------------
. http://JV.Gilead.org.il/butcher/jwe.html
.
.
"My uncle was a German, having married my
mother's sister, an Englishwoman. Being very much
attached to his fatherless nephew,"
.
. is surely indicative of a Freemasonry influence.
-----------------------------------------------------------------
<<Every word of Chapter XLI, describing "Harry's" bird-nesting in
the crags of an old castle, is invented from beginning to end.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------------
. The eagle's nest inclusion seems to be a reference to
.
<<"Be calm, "he cried, "if we pull down the whole ruin,
. you shall be saved."
. They were delicious words, but I had little hope.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------
. CHAPTER 41 Hunger
.
HUNGER, prolonged, is temporary madness! The brain is at work
without its required food, and the most fantastic notions fill
the mind. Hitherto I had never known what hunger really meant.
I was likely to understand it now.
. And yet, three months before I could tell my terrible story
of starvation, as I thought it. As a boy I used to make frequent
excursions in the neighborhood of the Professor's house.
. My uncle always acted on system, and he believed that, in addition
to the day of rest and worship, there should be a day of recreation.
In consequence, I was always free to do as I liked on a Wednesday.
. Now, as I had a notion to combine the useful and the agreeable, my
favorite pastime was birds' nesting. I had one of the best collections
of eggs in all the town. They were classified, and under glass cases.
. There was a certain wood, which, by rising at early morn, and taking
the cheap train, I could reach at eleven in the morning. Here I
would botanize or geologize at my will. My uncle was always glad
of specimens for his herbarium, and stones to examine.
When I had filled my wallet, I proceeded to search for nests.
. After about two hours of hard work, I, one day, sat down by a
stream to eat my humble but copious lunch. How the remembrance
of the spiced sausage, the wheaten loaf, and the beer, made my
mouth water now! I would have given every prospect of worldly
wealth for such a meal. But to my story.
. While seated thus at my leisure, I looked up at the ruins
of an old castle, at no great distance. It was the remains of
an historical dwelling, ivy-clad, and now falling to pieces.
. While looking, I saw two eagles circling about the summit of a lofty
tower. I soon became satisfied that there was a nest. Now, in all my
collection, I lacked eggs of the native eagle and the large owl.
. My mind was made up. I would reach the summit of that tower, or
perish in the attempt. I went nearer, and surveyed the ruins. The
old staircase, years before, had fallen in. The outer walls were,
however, intact. There was no chance that way, unless I looked to
the ivy solely for support. This was, as I soon found out, futile.
. There remained the chimney, which still went up to the top, and
had once served to carry off the smoke from every story of the tower.
. Up this I determined to venture. It was narrow, rough, and therefore
the more easily climbed. I took off my coat and crept into the
chimney. Looking up, I saw a small, light opening, proclaiming the
summit of the chimney.
. Up- up I went, for some time using my hands and knees, after the
fashion of a chimney sweep. It was slow work, but, there being
continual projections, the task was comparatively easy. In this way,
I reached halfway. The chimney now became narrower. The atmosphere
was close, and, at last, to end the matter, I stuck fast.
I could ascend no higher.
. There could be no doubt of this, and there remained no resource
but to descend, and give up my glorious prey in despair. I yielded
to fate and endeavored to descend. But I could not move. Some
unseen and mysterious obstacle intervened and stopped me.
In an instant the full horror of my situation seized me.
. I was unable to move either way, and was doomed to a terrible
and horrible death, that of starvation. In a boy's mind, however,
there is an extraordinary amount of elasticity and hope, and
I began to think of all sorts of plans to escape my gloomy fate.
. In the first place, I required no food just at present, having had
an excellent meal, and was therefore allowed time for reflection.
My first thought was to try and move the mortar with my hand.
Had I possessed a knife, something might have been done,
but that useful instrument I had left in my coat pocket.
. I soon found that all efforts of this kind were vain and useless,
and that all I could hope to do was to wriggle downwards.
. But though I jerked and struggled, and strove to turn, it was all in
vain. I could not move an inch, one way or the other. And time flew
rapidly. My early rising probably contributed to the fact that I
felt sleepy, and gradually gave way to the sensation of drowsiness.
. I slept, and awoke in darkness, ravenously hungry.
. Night had come, and still I could not move. I was tight bound, and
did not succeed in changing my position an inch. I groaned aloud.
Never since the days of my happy childhood, when it was a hardship
to go from meal to meal without eating, had I really experienced
hunger. The sensation was as novel as it was painful. I began now to
lose my head and to scream and cry out in my agony. Something
appeared, startled by my noise. It was a harmless lizard, but it
appeared to me a loathsome reptile. Again I made the old ruins resound
with my cries, and finally so exhausted myself that I fainted.
. How long I lay in a kind of trance or sleep I cannot say, but
when again I recovered consciousness it was day. How ill I felt,
how hunger still GNAWed at me, it would be hard to say.
I was too weak to scream now, far too weak to struggle.
. Suddenly I was startled by a roar.
. "Are you there, Henry?" said the voice of my uncle;
"are you there, my boy?"
. I could only faintly respond, but I also made a desperate effort
to turn. Some mortar fell. To this I owed my being discovered.
When the search took place, it was easily seen that mortar and small
pieces of stone had recently fallen from above. Hence my uncle's cry.
. "Be calm, "he cried,
"if we pull down the whole ruin, you shall be saved."
. They were delicious words, but I had little hope.
. Soon however, about a quarter of an hour later
I heard a voice above me, at one of the upper fireplaces.
. "Are you below or above?"
. "Below," was my reply.
. In an instant a basket was lowered with milk, a biscuit, and
an egg. My uncle was fearful to be too ready with his supply of
food. I drank the milk first, for thirst had nearly deadened
hunger. I then, much refreshed, ate my bread and *HARD EGG*.
. They were now at work at the wall. I could hear a pickax.
Wishing to escape all danger from this terrible weapon I made a
desperate struggle, and the belt, which surrounded my waist and
which had been hitched on a stone, gave way. I was free, and only
escaped falling down by a rapid motion of my hands and knees.
. In ten minutes more I was in my uncle's arms,
after being two days and nights in that horrible prison.
My occasional delirium prevented me from counting time.
. I was weeks recovering from that awful starvation adventure;
and yet what was that to the hideous sufferings I now endured?>>
----------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer.
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