Discussion:
A Piel of Stratfordian Orthodoxy
(too old to reply)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-01-10 22:52:19 UTC
Permalink
-----------------------------------------------------
Mr. Edw. Dyer "bore the canopy" {For}[SIDNEI]:
....................................................
. Sonnet 125

. WEr't ought to me I "bore the canopy",
. With my extern the outward honoring,
. Or layd great bases (For) eternity,
. Which proues more [S]hort then wast or ruining?
. Haue [I] not seene dwellers o{N} f{O}r{M}e {A}n[D] fauor
. Lose all,and more by payi[N]g too much rent
. For compound sw[E]et;Forgoing simple sauor,
. Pitt[I]full thriuors in their gazing spent.
. Noe,let me be obsequious in thy heart,
. And take thou my oblacion,poore but free,
. Which is not mixt with seconds,knows no art,
. But mutuall render onely me for thee.
. Hence,thou subbornd Informer, a trew soule
. When most impeacht,stands least in thy controule.
.......................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. O r l a y d g r e a t b a s e s(F o r) e t e r n i t
. y W h i c h p r o u e s m o r e[S]h o r t t h e n w
. a s t o r r u i n i n g?H a u e[I]n o t s e e n e d
. w e l l e r s o{N}f{O}r{M}e{A}n{D}f a u o r L o s e
. a l l,a n d m o r e b y p a y i[N]g t o o m u c h r
. e n t F o r c o m p o u n d s w[E]e t;F o r g o i n
. g s i m p l e s a u o r,P i t t[I]f u l l t h r i u
. o r s i n t h e i r g a z i n g s p e n t

(For)[SIDNEI] *26*
{DAMON} -2
---------------------------------------------------------------
Note that Thomas Lant's: http://tinyurl.com/ptpxsdu
.
_The Procession at the Obsequies of Sir Philip Sidney_
features exactly 344 engraved figures (mostly in pairs).
.
. 344 = 2 x [(Sonnet *125* + Sonnet 47)]
...............................................................
Ergo:

1) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet *125* provides an excellent story
that Fulke Greville: Recorder of Stratford (1606-1628)
probably honored his deceased good friends:
Ned Dyer & Philip Sidnei in the Sonnets

2) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet 47 verifies that mathematically.
----------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 47 (= 125 - 3 x 26)

. BEtwixt mine eye and heart a league is tooke,
. And each doth good turnes now vnto the other,
. When that mine eye is famisht {For} a looke,
. Or heart in loue with [S]ighes himselfe doth smother;
. W[I]th my loues picture then my eye [D]oth feast,
. And to the painted ba[N]quet bids my heart:
. An other tim[E] mine eye is my hearts guest,
. And [I]n his thoughts of loue doth share a part.
. So either by thy picture or my loue,
. Thy seife away,are present still with me,
. For thou nor farther then my thoughts canst moue,
. And I am still with them,and they with thee.
. Or if they sleepe, thy picture in my sight
. Awakes my heart,to hearts and eyes delight.
.......................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} a l o o k e,O r h e a r t i n l o u e w i t h
. [S] i g h e s h i m s e l f e d o t h s m o t h e r;W
. [I] t h m y l o u e s p i c t u r e t h e n m y e y e
. [D] o t h f e a s t,A n d t o t h e p a i n t e d b a
. [N] q u e t b i d s m y h e a r t:A n o t h e r t i m
. [E] m i n e e y e i s m y h e a r t s g u e s t,A n d
. [I] n h i s t h o u g h t s
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
...............................................
I calculate the probability of yet another Sonnet
skip *26* ELS {For}[SIDNEI] at around 1 chance in 150,000
-----------------------------------------------------------------
<<"For Sidnei" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of
skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art. It's
really a pity that George Mason Elementary was unable to teach you
either to read *or* to count, Art!>>
I distinctly recall that I subscribed to _My Weekly Read *or* [sic]_ at GME.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weekly_Reader
Lea wrote:

<<That's before me time, Art, but _My Weekly Reader_
was written in English, so it would have been useless to you.>>

"The publishing company for _My Weekly Reader_ also created workbooks,
literacy centers, and picture books for younger grades."
(I also subscribed to Martin Gardner's _Humpty Dumpty Magazine_ in
the 1950s, before your group promoted him to Scientific American.)
Lea wrote:

<<My group? What group would that, be, Art? And how could any group,
other than the editorial staff of _Scientific American_, "promote" him?>>

Because your group is just "a lot of very lovely guys"
who promote others who are "certifiably illiterate:"
-------------------------------------------------------
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/07/obituaries/gerard-piel-89-who-revived-scientific-american-magazine-dies.html

Gerard Piel, 89, Who Revived Scientific American Magazine, Dies
By WOLFGANG SAXON, SEPT. 7, 2004

Gerard Piel, a science writer and editor who helped revive Scientific American magazine a half-century ago and made it thrive, died Sunday at Mount Sinai Hospital of Queens. Mr. Piel and associates took a gamble in 1947 to buy the magazine with money borrowed from people he called "a lot of very lovely guys." (They included the Whitney partners and the Rosenwald family.) Four years and a million dollars in venture capital later, the magazine began to turn a profit. Revived, the magazine, which was established in 1845, covers groundbreaking events in science and technology as they happen. It counts more than 100 Nobel laureates among its contributors.

Mr. Piel was a scion of a brewing family from 19th-century Brooklyn. Gottfried Piel and his brother Michael, Gerard's grandfather, started Piel Brothers Brewery in 1883 to supply the clan's biergarten, whose chief cook was Maria, Michael's wife.

Gerard Piel graduated magna cum laude as a history major from Harvard in 1937, and started as an editorial trainee at Time Inc.

Family lore has it that one year after college he was named science editor of Life magazine because his boss deemed him qualified by being "certifiably illiterate in science." "The idea was that if I could understand what I was writing and publishing, then so could the reader," Mr. Piel explained years later.

Over the years he was an overseer at Harvard and a trustee at Radcliffe and was on the boards of the American Museum of Natural History and the New York Botanical Garden. Until recently he sat of the boards of Phillips Andover Academy, the Henry J. Kaiser Foundation and the Mayo Clinic.>>
----------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-01-10 23:24:14 UTC
Permalink

nordicskiv2
2018-01-11 00:59:14 UTC
Permalink
[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= *26* =>
.
. O r l a y d g r e a t b a s e s(F o r) e t e r n i t
. y W h i c h p r o u e s m o r e[S]h o r t t h e n w
. a s t o r r u i n i n g?H a u e[I]n o t s e e n e d
. w e l l e r s o{N}f{O}r{M}e{A}n{D}f a u o r L o s e
. a l l,a n d m o r e b y p a y i[N]g t o o m u c h r
. e n t F o r c o m p o u n d s w[E]e t;F o r g o i n
. g s i m p l e s a u o r,P i t t[I]f u l l t h r i u
. o r s i n t h e i r g a z i n g s p e n t
(For)[SIDNEI] *26*
The string "FORSIDNEI" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
{DAMON} -2
The best rejoinder to such cretinous crackpot cryptography is simply to read it in the correct direction, Art: "No, mad".
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Note that Thomas Lant's: http://tinyurl.com/ptpxsdu
.
_The Procession at the Obsequies of Sir Philip Sidney_
features exactly 344 engraved figures (mostly in pairs).
.
. 344 = 2 x [(Sonnet *125* + Sonnet 47)]
...............................................................
You're misusing the word "ergo", Art -- it means "therefore", and is used in chains of deductive reasoning. Your lunatic logorrhea is not deductive -- nor is it reasoning, for that matter.

But perhaps you meant "ergot", which your crackpot cryptography strongly suggests that you have been ingesting.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
1) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet *125*
The string "FORSIDNEI" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in Sonnet 125, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
provides an excellent story
By a story, you must have in mind (what's left of it, at any rate) a work of fiction, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
that Fulke Greville: Recorder of Stratford (1606-1628)
Ned Dyer & Philip Sidnei in the Sonnets
2) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet 47 verifies that mathematically.
The string "FORSIDNEI" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in Sonnet 47, Art.

And you manifestly have *no idea* what constitutes a mathematical VERification!

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} a l o o k e,O r h e a r t i n l o u e w i t h
. [S] i g h e s h i m s e l f e d o t h s m o t h e r;W
. [I] t h m y l o u e s p i c t u r e t h e n m y e y e
. [D] o t h f e a s t,A n d t o t h e p a i n t e d b a
. [N] q u e t b i d s m y h e a r t:A n o t h e r t i m
. [E] m i n e e y e i s m y h e a r t s g u e s t,A n d
. [I] n h i s t h o u g h t s
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
The string "FORSIDNEI" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in Sonnet 47, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
I calculate the probability of yet another Sonnet
skip *26* ELS {For}[SIDNEI] at around 1 chance in 150,000
That's because you "calculate" like an idiot, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<"For Sidnei" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of
skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art. It's
really a pity that George Mason Elementary was unable to teach you
either to read *or* to count, Art!>>
I distinctly recall that I subscribed to _My Weekly Read *or* [sic]_ at GME.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weekly_Reader
<<That's before me time, Art, but _My Weekly Reader_
was written in English, so it would have been useless to you.>>
"The publishing company for _My Weekly Reader_ also created workbooks,
literacy centers,
That would have been useless to you too, Art -- plainly, George Mason Elementary did not succeed in imparting literacy in six years of concentrated effort, so a voluntary literacy center set up by _My Weekly Reader_ could scarcely have succeeded where the professionals had failed.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
and picture books for younger grades."
(I also subscribed to Martin Gardner's _Humpty Dumpty Magazine_ in
the 1950s,
But that's such a striking coincidence, Art -- Oxford is reported to have subscribed to Humpty Rumpty in his youth, or at any rate to have engaged in humping the rumps of the youths in his entourage.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
before your group promoted him to Scientific American.)
<<My group? What group would that, be, Art? And how could any group,
other than the editorial staff of _Scientific American_, "promote" him?>>
Because your group is just "a lot of very lovely guys"
who promote others who are "certifiably illiterate:"
You mean, the way I offered to promote you should you attempt to write a book, Art? By the way, my offer to write a Preface still stands.

But you didn't answer the question, Art: what is "my group"? I have neVER belonged to the editorial board of Scientific American.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/07/obituaries/gerard-piel-89-who-revived-
scientific-american-magazine-dies.html
Gerard Piel,
But Art -- _piel_ means "skin" in Spanish! S[hakespeare's]kin, Art! Was Piel one of the scions of the Bloodline?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
89, Who Revived Scientific American Magazine, Dies
By WOLFGANG SAXON, SEPT. 7, 2004
But Art -- "Saxon" is an anagram of "A. N.'s Ox"!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Gerard Piel, a science writer and editor who helped revive Scientific
American magazine a half-century ago and made it thrive, died Sunday at
Mount Sinai Hospital of Queens. Mr. Piel and associates took a gamble in
1947 to buy the magazine with money borrowed from people he called "a lot
of very lovely guys." (They included the Whitney partners and the Rosenwald
family.) Four years and a million dollars in venture capital later, the
magazine began to turn a profit. Revived, the magazine, which was
established in 1845, covers groundbreaking events in science and technology
as they happen. It counts more than 100 Nobel laureates among its
contributors.
Mr. Piel was a scion of a brewing family
...not to mention of the Bloodline...
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
from 19th-century Brooklyn. Gottfried Piel and his brother Michael,
Gerard's grandfather, started Piel Brothers Brewery in 1883 to supply
the clan's biergarten, whose chief cook was Maria, Michael's wife.
Gerard Piel graduated magna cum laude as a history major from Harvard in
1937, and started as an editorial trainee at Time Inc.
Family lore has it that one year after college he was named science editor
of Life magazine because his boss deemed him qualified by being "certifiably
illiterate in science." "The idea was that if I could understand what I was
writing and publishing, then so could the reader," Mr. Piel explained years
later.
That idea has its merits, of course, but it doesn't take into account the irremediably illiterate -- for example, someone who could not meet Lehigh's literacy requirement could not read _Scientific American_, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Over the years he was an overseer at Harvard and a trustee at Radcliffe
and was on the boards of the American Museum of Natural History and the
New York Botanical Garden. Until recently he sat of the boards of Phillips
Andover Academy, the Henry J. Kaiser Foundation and the Mayo Clinic.>>
----------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-01-11 04:56:11 UTC
Permalink
-----------------------------------------------------
Mr. Edw. Dyer "bore the canopy" {For}[SIDNEI]:
....................................................
. Sonnet 125

. WEr't ought to me I "bore the canopy",
. With my extern the outward honoring,
. Or layd great bases (For) eternity,
. Which proues more [S]hort then wast or ruining?
. Haue [I] not seene dwellers o{N} f{O}r{M}e {A}n[D] fauor
. Lose all,and more by payi[N]g too much rent
. For compound sw[E]et;Forgoing simple sauor,
. Pitt[I]full thriuors in their gazing spent.
. Noe,let me be obsequious in thy heart,
. And take thou my oblacion,poore but free,
. Which is not mixt with seconds,knows no art,
. But mutuall render onely me for thee.
. Hence,thou subbornd Informer, a trew soule
. When most impeacht,stands least in thy controule.
.......................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. O r l a y d g r e a t b a s e s(F o r) e t e r n i t
. y W h i c h p r o u e s m o r e[S]h o r t t h e n w
. a s t o r r u i n i n g?H a u e[I]n o t s e e n e d
. w e l l e r s o{N}f{O}r{M}e{A}n{D}f a u o r L o s e
. a l l,a n d m o r e b y p a y i[N]g t o o m u c h r
. e n t F o r c o m p o u n d s w[E]e t;F o r g o i n
. g s i m p l e s a u o r,P i t t[I]f u l l t h r i u
. o r s i n t h e i r g a z i n g s p e n t

(For)[SIDNEI] *26*
{DAMON} -2
---------------------------------------------------------------
Note that Thomas Lant's: http://tinyurl.com/ptpxsdu
.
_The Procession at the Obsequies of Sir Philip Sidney_
features exactly 344 engraved figures (mostly in pairs).
.
. 344 = 2 x [(Sonnet *125* + Sonnet 47)]
...............................................................
Ergo:

1) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet *125* provides an excellent story
that Fulke Greville: Recorder of Stratford (1606-1628)
probably honored his deceased good friends:
Ned Dyer & Philip Sidnei in the Sonnets

2) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet 47 verifies that mathematically.
----------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 47 (= 125 - 3 x 26)

. BEtwixt mine eye and heart a league is tooke,
. And each doth good turnes now vnto the other,
. When that mine eye is famisht {For} a looke,
. Or heart in loue with [S]ighes himselfe doth smother;
. W[I]th my loues picture then my eye [D]oth feast,
. And to the painted ba[N]quet bids my heart:
. An other tim[E] mine eye is my hearts guest,
. And [I]n his thoughts of loue doth share a part.
. So either by thy picture or my loue,
. Thy seife away,are present still with me,
. For thou nor farther then my thoughts canst moue,
. And I am still with them,and they with thee.
. Or if they sleepe, thy picture in my sight
. Awakes my heart,to hearts and eyes delight.
.......................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} a l o o k e,O r h e a r t i n l o u e w i t h
. [S] i g h e s h i m s e l f e d o t h s m o t h e r;W
. [I] t h m y l o u e s p i c t u r e t h e n m y e y e
. [D] o t h f e a s t,A n d t o t h e p a i n t e d b a
. [N] q u e t b i d s m y h e a r t:A n o t h e r t i m
. [E] m i n e e y e i s m y h e a r t s g u e s t,A n d
. [I] n h i s t h o u g h t s
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
...............................................
I calculate the probability of yet another Sonnet
skip *26* ELS {For}[SIDNEI] at around 1 chance in 150,000
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Lea wrote:

<<That's because you "calculate" like an idiot, Art.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.etymonline.com/word/idiot

<<idiot (n.) from Latin idiota "ordinary person, layman; outsider," in Late Latin "uneducated or ignorant person," from Greek idiotes "layman, person lacking professional skill" (opposed to writer, soldier, skilled workman), literally "private person" (as opposed to one taking part in public affairs), used patronizingly for "ignorant person," from idios "one's own" (see idiom). In plural, the Greek word could mean "one's own countrymen." In old English law, one who has been without reasoning or understanding from birth, as distinguished from a lunatic, who became that way.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------------
I got "professional skill" at my trade school.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<"For Sidnei" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of
skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art. It's
really a pity that George Mason Elementary was unable to teach you
either to read *or* to count, Art!>>
I distinctly recall that I subscribed to _My Weekly Read *or* [sic]_ at GME.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weekly_Reader
<<That's before me time, Art, but _My Weekly Reader_
was written in English, so it would have been useless to you.>>
"The publishing company for _My Weekly Reader_ also created workbooks,
literacy centers,
Lea wrote:

<<That would have been useless to you too, Art -- plainly, George Mason Elementary did not succeed in imparting literacy in six years of concentrated effort, so a voluntary literacy center set up by _My Weekly Reader_ could scarcely have succeeded where the professionals had failed.>>

Dick and Jane (and Spot) might disagree.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
and picture books for younger grades."
(I also subscribed to Martin Gardner's _Humpty Dumpty Magazine_ in
the 1950s, before your group promoted him to Scientific American.)
<<My group? What group would that, be, Art? And how could any group,
other than the editorial staff of _Scientific American_, "promote" him?>>
Because your group is just "a lot of very lovely guys"
who promote others who are "certifiably illiterate:"
Lea wrote:

<<You mean, the way I offered to promote you should you attempt to write a book, Art?
By the way, my offer to write a Preface still stands.>>

But you only offer to deface me here.

Lea wrote:

<<But you didn't answer the question, Art: what is "my group"?>>

My guess would be a semisimple lie group with few ideals.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/07/obituaries/gerard-piel-89-who-revived-
scientific-american-magazine-dies.html
Gerard Piel,
Lea wrote:

<<But Art -- _piel_ means "skin" in Spanish! S[hakespeare's]kin, Art!

Well...it's no skin off my nose.

Lea wrote: <<Was Piel one of the scions of the Bloodline?>>

He was probably a bloody scion, sure.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
89, Who Revived Scientific American Magazine, Dies
By WOLFGANG SAXON, SEPT. 7, 2004
Lea wrote:

<<But Art -- "Saxon" is an anagram of "A. N.'s Ox"!>>

Is gored?
--------------------------------------------------------
. [HOLY GRAIL/TORCH]: CHRIST/MITHRAS
.
. C (o) M *e DIES*
. H I S T *O RIES*
. (t) R A *ge DIES*
------------------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Gerard Piel, a science writer and editor who helped revive Scientific
American magazine a half-century ago and made it thrive, died Sunday at
Mount Sinai Hospital of Queens. Mr. Piel and associates took a gamble in
1947 to buy the magazine with money borrowed from people he called "a lot
of very lovely guys." (They included the Whitney partners and the Rosenwald
family.) Four years and a million dollars in venture capital later, the
magazine began to turn a profit. Revived, the magazine, which was
established in 1845, covers groundbreaking events in science and technology
as they happen. It counts more than 100 Nobel laureates among its
contributors.
Mr. Piel was a scion of a brewing family
Lea wrote: <<...not to mention of the Bloodline...>>

You weren't supposed to mention that; were you?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
from 19th-century Brooklyn. Gottfried Piel and his brother Michael,
Gerard's grandfather, started Piel Brothers Brewery in 1883 to supply
the clan's biergarten, whose chief cook was Maria, Michael's wife.
Gerard Piel graduated magna cum laude as a history major from Harvard in
1937, and started as an editorial trainee at Time Inc.
Family lore has it that one year after college he was named science editor
of Life magazine because his boss deemed him qualified by being "certifiably
illiterate in science." "The idea was that if I could understand what I was
writing and publishing, then so could the reader," Mr. Piel explained years
later.
Lea wrote:

<<That idea has its merits, of course, but it doesn't take into account the irremediably illiterate -- for example, someone who could not meet Lehigh's literacy requirement could not read _Scientific American_, Art.>>

I may be a weak writer but I'm a weakly reader, Dave.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Over the years he was an overseer at Harvard and a trustee at Radcliffe
and was on the boards of the American Museum of Natural History and the
New York Botanical Garden. Until recently he sat of the boards of Phillips
Andover Academy, the Henry J. Kaiser Foundation and the Mayo Clinic.>>
----------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-01-11 20:09:05 UTC
Permalink
On Wednesday, January 10, 2018 at 11:56:13 PM UTC-5, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} a l o o k e,O r h e a r t i n l o u e w i t h
. [S] i g h e s h i m s e l f e d o t h s m o t h e r;W
. [I] t h m y l o u e s p i c t u r e t h e n m y e y e
. [D] o t h f e a s t,A n d t o t h e p a i n t e d b a
. [N] q u e t b i d s m y h e a r t:A n o t h e r t i m
. [E] m i n e e y e i s m y h e a r t s g u e s t,A n d
. [I] n h i s t h o u g h t s
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
The string "FORSIDNEI" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in the text above, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
I calculate the probability of yet another Sonnet
skip *26* ELS {For}[SIDNEI] at around 1 chance in 150,000
-----------------------------------------------------------------
<<That's because you "calculate" like an idiot, Art.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.etymonline.com/word/idiot
<<idiot (n.) from Latin idiota "ordinary person, layman; outsider," in
Late Latin "uneducated or ignorant person," from Greek idiotes "layman,
person lacking professional skill" (opposed to writer, soldier, skilled
workman), literally "private person" (as opposed to one taking part in
public affairs), used patronizingly for "ignorant person," from idios
"one's own" (see idiom). In plural, the Greek word could mean "one's own
countrymen." In old English law, one who has been without reasoning or
understanding from birth, as distinguished from a lunatic, who became that
way.>>
Is there a term for someone who has been without reasoning or understanding since reading Michell, Art?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
I got "professional skill" at my trade school.
You mean, the "professional skill" that induced you to extol the number 19 as remarkable for being both the sum of two consecutive integers and the difference of their squares, Art? The "professional skill" that led you to characterize the watt as a unit of energy? The "professional skill" that led you to confuse the sample mean of a random variable with its expected value? You have about as much "professional skill" as (T)rump, although he attended a different trade school.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<"For Sidnei" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of
skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art. It's
really a pity that George Mason Elementary was unable to teach you
either to read *or* to count, Art!>>
I distinctly recall that I subscribed to _My Weekly Read *or* [sic]_ at GME.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weekly_Reader
[...]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
"The publishing company for _My Weekly Reader_ also created workbooks,
literacy centers,
<<That would have been useless to you too, Art -- plainly, George Mason
Elementary did not succeed in imparting literacy in six years of
concentrated effort, so a voluntary literacy center set up by _My Weekly
Reader_ could scarcely have succeeded where the professionals had failed.>>
Dick and Jane (and Spot) might disagree.
WhateVER the successes of Dick and Jane may have been, Art, you are not among them. Indeed, despite Dick's and Jane's best efforts, you and Spot remain about equally literate in English.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
and picture books for younger grades."
It's too bad that nobody has produced a picture book about the methods of literary historians, Art; you might learn something.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
(I also subscribed to Martin Gardner's _Humpty Dumpty Magazine_ in
the 1950s, before your group promoted him to Scientific American.)
<<My group? What group would that, be, Art? And how could any group,
other than the editorial staff of _Scientific American_, "promote" him?>>
Because your group is just "a lot of very lovely guys"
who promote others who are "certifiably illiterate:"
<<You mean, the way I offered to promote you should you attempt to write a book, Art?
By the way, my offer to write a Preface still stands.>>
But you only offer to deface me here.
You could call it a Deface if you like.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<But you didn't answer the question, Art: what is "my group"?>>
My guess would be a semisimple lie group with few ideals.
Excellent, Art! As opposed to, say, the Fellowship, which can be described as more of a Weyl group?

And the Fellowship, being antithetical to my "group" and hence not semisimple, must have a nontrivial radical -- is it you, Art? Or Dr. antiStratnutter, perhaps?

And what about the Cartan involution? "Cartan" is an anagram of "A.C.N. (Art)" -- INIPNC score 100%!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/07/obituaries/gerard-piel-89-who-revived-
scientific-american-magazine-dies.html
Gerard Piel,
<<But Art -- _piel_ means "skin" in Spanish! S[hakespeare's]kin, Art!
Well...it's no skin off my nose.
Lea wrote: <<Was Piel one of the scions of the Bloodline?>>
He was probably a bloody scion, sure.
No, Art; a Sciontific American.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
89, Who Revived Scientific American Magazine, Dies
By WOLFGANG SAXON, SEPT. 7, 2004
<<But Art -- "Saxon" is an anagram of "A. N.'s Ox"!>>
Is gored?
No, Art. En English, an apostrophe does not necessarily denote possession. It is also used in contractions.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. [HOLY GRAIL/TORCH]: CHRIST/MITHRAS
.
. C (o) M *e DIES*
. H I S T *O RIES*
. (t) R A *ge DIES*
Huh? More crackpot cryptography, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Gerard Piel, a science writer and editor who helped revive Scientific
American magazine a half-century ago and made it thrive, died Sunday at
Mount Sinai Hospital of Queens. Mr. Piel and associates took a gamble in
1947 to buy the magazine with money borrowed from people he called "a lot
of very lovely guys." (They included the Whitney partners and the Rosenwald
family.) Four years and a million dollars in venture capital later, the
magazine began to turn a profit. Revived, the magazine, which was
established in 1845, covers groundbreaking events in science and technology
as they happen. It counts more than 100 Nobel laureates among its
contributors.
Mr. Piel was a scion of a brewing family
Lea wrote: <<...not to mention of the Bloodline...>>
You weren't supposed to mention that; were you?
Maybe nobody will notice, Art -- it won't happen again.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
from 19th-century Brooklyn. Gottfried Piel and his brother Michael,
Gerard's grandfather, started Piel Brothers Brewery in 1883 to supply
the clan's biergarten, whose chief cook was Maria, Michael's wife.
Gerard Piel graduated magna cum laude as a history major from Harvard in
1937, and started as an editorial trainee at Time Inc.
Family lore has it that one year after college he was named science editor
of Life magazine because his boss deemed him qualified by being "certifiably
illiterate in science." "The idea was that if I could understand what I was
writing and publishing, then so could the reader," Mr. Piel explained years
later.
<<That idea has its merits, of course, but it doesn't take into account
the irremediably illiterate -- for example, someone who could not meet
Lehigh's literacy requirement could not read _Scientific American_, Art.>>
I may be a weak writer but I'm a weakly [sic] reader, Dave.
Is English your native tongue, Art?

If you only practice weekly, it's no wonder that you read weakly, Art -- that's too little practice for anyone to make much progress in reading, least of all an illiterate Alexandria boob.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Over the years he was an overseer at Harvard and a trustee at Radcliffe
and was on the boards of the American Museum of Natural History and the
New York Botanical Garden. Until recently he sat of the boards of Phillips
Andover Academy, the Henry J. Kaiser Foundation and the Mayo Clinic.>>
----------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-01-12 04:00:35 UTC
Permalink
-----------------------------------------------------
Mr. Edw. Dyer "bore the canopy" {For}[SIDNEI]:
....................................................
. Sonnet 125

. WEr't ought to me I "bore the canopy",
. With my extern the outward honoring,
. Or layd great bases (For) eternity,
. Which proues more [S]hort then wast or ruining?
. Haue [I] not seene dwellers o{N} f{O}r{M}e {A}n[D] fauor
. Lose all,and more by payi[N]g too much rent
. For compound sw[E]et;Forgoing simple sauor,
. Pitt[I]full thriuors in their gazing spent.
. Noe,let me be obsequious in thy heart,
. And take thou my oblacion,poore but free,
. Which is not mixt with seconds,knows no art,
. But mutuall render onely me for thee.
. Hence,thou subbornd Informer, a trew soule
. When most impeacht,stands least in thy controule.
.......................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. O r l a y d g r e a t b a s e s(F o r) e t e r n i t
. y W h i c h p r o u e s m o r e[S]h o r t t h e n w
. a s t o r r u i n i n g?H a u e[I]n o t s e e n e d
. w e l l e r s o{N}f{O}r{M}e{A}n{D}f a u o r L o s e
. a l l,a n d m o r e b y p a y i[N]g t o o m u c h r
. e n t F o r c o m p o u n d s w[E]e t;F o r g o i n
. g s i m p l e s a u o r,P i t t[I]f u l l t h r i u
. o r s i n t h e i r g a z i n g s p e n t

(For)[SIDNEI] *26*
{DAMON} -2
---------------------------------------------------------------
Note that Thomas Lant's: http://tinyurl.com/ptpxsdu
.
_The Procession at the Obsequies of Sir Philip Sidney_
features exactly 344 engraved figures (mostly in pairs).
.
. 344 = 2 x [(Sonnet *125* + Sonnet 47)]
...............................................................
Ergo:

1) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet *125* provides an excellent story
that Fulke Greville: Recorder of Stratford (1606-1628)
probably honored his deceased good friends:
Ned Dyer & Philip Sidnei in the Sonnets

2) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet 47 verifies that mathematically.
----------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 47 (= 125 - 3 x 26)

. BEtwixt mine eye and heart a league is tooke,
. And each doth good turnes now vnto the other,
. When that mine eye is famisht {For} a looke,
. Or heart in loue with [S]ighes himselfe doth smother;
. W[I]th my loues picture then my eye [D]oth feast,
. And to the painted ba[N]quet bids my heart:
. An other tim[E] mine eye is my hearts guest,
. And [I]n his thoughts of loue doth share a part.
. So either by thy picture or my loue,
. Thy seife away,are present still with me,
. For thou nor farther then my thoughts canst moue,
. And I am still with them,and they with thee.
. Or if they sleepe, thy picture in my sight
. Awakes my heart,to hearts and eyes delight.
.......................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} a l o o k e,O r h e a r t i n l o u e w i t h
. [S] i g h e s h i m s e l f e d o t h s m o t h e r;W
. [I] t h m y l o u e s p i c t u r e t h e n m y e y e
. [D] o t h f e a s t,A n d t o t h e p a i n t e d b a
. [N] q u e t b i d s m y h e a r t:A n o t h e r t i m
. [E] m i n e e y e i s m y h e a r t s g u e s t,A n d
. [I] n h i s t h o u g h t s
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
...............................................
I calculate the probability of yet another Sonnet
skip *26* ELS {For}[SIDNEI] at around 1 chance in 150,000
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<That's because you "calculate" like an idiot, Art.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.etymonline.com/word/idiot
<<idiot (n.) from Latin idiota "ordinary person, layman; outsider," in
Late Latin "uneducated or ignorant person," from Greek idiotes "layman,
person lacking professional skill" (opposed to writer, soldier, skilled
workman), literally "private person" (as opposed to one taking part in
public affairs), used patronizingly for "ignorant person," from idios
"one's own" (see idiom). In plural, the Greek word could mean "one's own
countrymen." In old English law, one who has been without reasoning or
understanding from birth, as distinguished from a lunatic, who became that
way.>>
Lea wrote:

<<Is there a term for someone who has been without
reasoning or understanding since reading Michell, Art?>>

Don't forget Frontline:


https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shakespeare/update/andersondoc.html
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
I got "professional skill" at my trade school.
Lea wrote:

<<You mean, the "professional skill" that induced you to extol the
number 19 as remarkable for being both the sum of two consecutive
integers and the difference of their squares, Art?

I have ALWAYS extolled the number 19 as remarkable due to the Quran.

It's your guy Marty G. who actually published this "amazing" fact:
-----------------------------------------------------------------
"Now for some 19 number juggling.
It is equal to 10^2 - 9^2."

-- Martin Gardner _Did Adam & Eve Have Navels?_ (p.261)
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<"For Sidnei" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of
skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art. It's
really a pity that George Mason Elementary was unable to teach you
either to read *or* to count, Art!>>
I distinctly recall that I subscribed to
_My Weekly Read *or* [sic]_ at GME.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weekly_Reader
[...]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
"The publishing company for _My Weekly Reader_ also created workbooks,
literacy centers,
<<That would have been useless to you too, Art -- plainly, George Mason
Elementary did not succeed in imparting literacy in six years of
concentrated effort, so a voluntary literacy center set up by _My Weekly
Reader_ could scarcely have succeeded where the professionals had failed.>>
Dick and Jane (and Spot) might disagree.
Lea wrote:

<<WhateVER the successes of Dick and Jane may have been, Art,
you are not among them. Indeed, despite Dick's and Jane's best
efforts, you and Spot remain about equally literate in English.>>

Pepper was the spitting image of Spot; I miss her.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
and picture books for younger grades."
Lea wrote:

<<It's too bad that nobody has produced a picture book about the
methods of literary historians, Art; you might learn something.>>

That sounds like a GREAT job for you, Dave!!
(It could be a pop-up book and I'll write the Preface.)
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
(I also subscribed to Martin Gardner's _Humpty Dumpty Magazine_ in
the 1950s, before your group promoted him to Scientific American.)
<<My group? What group would that, be, Art? And how could any group,
other than the editorial staff of _Scientific American_, "promote" him?>>
Because your group is just "a lot of very lovely guys"
who promote others who are "certifiably illiterate:"
<<You mean, the way I offered to promote you should you attempt to write a
book, Art?
By the way, my offer to write a Preface still stands.>>
But you only offer to deface me here.
Lea wrote: <<You could call it a Deface if you like.>>

I call you my Defoe.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<But you didn't answer the question, Art: what is "my group"?>>
My guess would be a semisimple lie group with few ideals.
Lea wrote: <<Excellent, Art!

As opposed to, say, the Fellowship, which can be described as more of a Weyl group?>>

We're much more Weyl than you guys (but you're still the Coxeters).

Lea wrote:

<<And the Fellowship, being antithetical to my "group" and hence
not semisimple, must have a nontrivial radical -- is it you, Art?>>

A nontrivial FREE radical.

Lea wrote:

<<And what about the Cartan involution?
"Cartan" is an anagram of "A.C.N. (Art)" -- INIPNC score 100%!>>

You're Killing me, Dave!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/07/obituaries/gerard-piel-89-who-revived-
scientific-american-magazine-dies.html
Gerard Piel,
<<But Art -- _piel_ means "skin" in Spanish! S[hakespeare's]kin, Art!
Well...it's no skin off my nose.
Lea wrote: <<Was Piel one of the scions of the Bloodline?>>
He was probably a bloody scion, sure.
Lea wrote: <<No, Art; a Sciontific American.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------------
science (n.) mid-14c., "what is known, knowledge (of something) acquired by
study; information;" also "assurance of knowledge, certitude, certainty,"
from Latin scientia "knowledge, a knowing; expertness,"

scion (n.) c. 1300, "a shoot or twig," especially one for grafting.
from Old French sion, cion "descendant; shoot, twig; offspring"

graft (n.2) "corruption," 1865, perhaps 1859, American English,
perhaps from British slang graft "one's occupation" (1853).
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
89, Who Revived Scientific American Magazine, Dies
By WOLFGANG SAXON, SEPT. 7, 2004
<<But Art -- "Saxon" is an anagram of "A. N.'s Ox"!>>
Is gored?
Lea wrote:

<<No, Art. En [sic] English, an apostrophe does not necessarily
denote possession. It is also used in contractions.>>

But contraction is *NOT* is 9/10 of the law
--------------------------------------------------------
. HOLY GRAIL / *TORCH* : CHRIST / *MITHRAS*
.
. C (o) M *e DIES*
. H I S T *O RIES*
. (t) R A *ge DIES*
................................................................
*MITHRAS'S two TORCH-bearers* form a trinity with *MITHRAS*.

Cautes represents the position of the sun in the morning: *ORIENS*
*MITHRAS* its course at midday & Cautopates its setting (occidens).
......................................................
. *TORCH PERISH*
. *CHRISTOPHER*
------------------------------­-----------------------------
. Pericles Prince of Tyre Act 2, Scene 2
.
THAISA: A burning *TORCH* that's turned upside down;
. The word, 'Quod me alit, me extinguit.'
------------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Gerard Piel, a science writer and editor who helped revive Scientific
American magazine a half-century ago and made it thrive, died Sunday at
Mount Sinai Hospital of Queens. Mr. Piel and associates took a gamble in
1947 to buy the magazine with money borrowed from people he called "a lot
of very lovely guys." (They included the Whitney partners and the Rosenwald
family.) Four years and a million dollars in venture capital later, the
magazine began to turn a profit. Revived, the magazine, which was
established in 1845, covers groundbreaking events in science and technology
as they happen. It counts more than 100 Nobel laureates among its
contributors.
Mr. Piel was a scion of a brewing family
Lea wrote: <<...not to mention of the Bloodline...>>
You weren't supposed to mention that; were you?
Lea wrote:

<<Maybe nobody will notice, Art -- it won't happen again.>>

You forgot to say: "BELIEVE ME!"
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
from 19th-century Brooklyn. Gottfried Piel and his brother Michael,
Gerard's grandfather, started Piel Brothers Brewery in 1883 to supply
the clan's biergarten, whose chief cook was Maria, Michael's wife.
Gerard Piel graduated magna cum laude as a history major from Harvard in
1937, and started as an editorial trainee at Time Inc.
Family lore has it that one year after college he was named science editor
of Life magazine because his boss deemed him qualified by being "certifiably
illiterate in science." "The idea was that if I could understand what I was
writing and publishing, then so could the reader," Mr. Piel explained years
later.
<<That idea has its merits, of course, but it doesn't take into account
the irremediably illiterate -- for example, someone who could not meet
Lehigh's literacy requirement could not read _Scientific American_, Art.>>
I may be a weak writer but I'm a weekly reader, Dave.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Over the years he was an overseer at Harvard and a trustee at Radcliffe
and was on the boards of the American Museum of Natural History and the
New York Botanical Garden. Until recently he sat of the boards of Phillips
Andover Academy, the Henry J. Kaiser Foundation and the Mayo Clinic.>>
----------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-01-13 03:43:39 UTC
Permalink
On Thursday, January 11, 2018 at 11:00:37 PM UTC-5, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
As I said, Art, you're misusing the word -- but perhaps you were trying to communicate that you've been ingesting ergot?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
1) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet *125*
The string "FORSIDNEI" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in Sonnet 125, Art. If anyone is as delusional as (T)rump, it would have be to be you.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
provides an excellent story
that Fulke Greville: Recorder of Stratford (1606-1628)
Ned Dyer & Philip Sidnei in the Sonnets
2) {For}[SIDNEI] *26* in Sonnet 47
The string "FORSIDNEI" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in Sonnet 47, Art. If anyone is as delusional as (T)rump, it would have be to be you.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
verifies that mathematically.
Plainly, you have no idea whateVER what constitutes a mathematical VERification, Art -- that may be why you think (usual disclaimer) that the number 19 is so remarkable.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} a l o o k e,O r h e a r t i n l o u e w i t h
. [S] i g h e s h i m s e l f e d o t h s m o t h e r;W
. [I] t h m y l o u e s p i c t u r e t h e n m y e y e
. [D] o t h f e a s t,A n d t o t h e p a i n t e d b a
. [N] q u e t b i d s m y h e a r t:A n o t h e r t i m
. [E] m i n e e y e i s m y h e a r t s g u e s t,A n d
. [I] n h i s t h o u g h t s
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26*
The string "FORSIDNEI" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in Sonnet 47, Art. If anyone is as delusional as (T)rump, it would have be to be you.

[starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
...............................................
I calculate the probability of yet another Sonnet
skip *26* ELS {For}[SIDNEI] at around 1 chance in 150,000
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<That's because you "calculate" like an idiot, Art.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.etymonline.com/word/idiot
<<idiot (n.) from Latin idiota "ordinary person, layman; outsider," in
Late Latin "uneducated or ignorant person," from Greek idiotes "layman,
person lacking professional skill" (opposed to writer, soldier, skilled
workman), literally "private person" (as opposed to one taking part in
public affairs), used patronizingly for "ignorant person," from idios
"one's own" (see idiom). In plural, the Greek word could mean "one's own
countrymen." In old English law, one who has been without reasoning or
understanding from birth, as distinguished from a lunatic, who became that
way.>>
<<Is there a term for someone who has been without
reasoning or understanding since reading Michell, Art?>>
http://youtu.be/wkqcLJZ9I3s
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shakespeare/update/andersondoc.html
Thank you for confirming that you have been without reasoning or understanding since watching that Frontline show, Art. But I thought that it was Michell who left you bereft of reason and understanding.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
I got "professional skill" at my trade school.
<<You mean, the "professional skill" that induced you to extol the
number 19 as remarkable for being both the sum of two consecutive
integers and the difference of their squares, Art?
I have ALWAYS extolled the number 19 as remarkable due to the Quran.
No, Art. You listed a bunch of reasons that it was remarkable, among them the fact that 19 is both the sum of two consecutive integers and the difference of their squares.

Watching your attempts at h.l.a.s. history REVisionism is like watching (T)rump deny that the voice on the Access Hollywood tape is his (despite his having already acknowledged it and apologized for it pREViously, and despite the fact that Billy Bush and a half-dozen other people heard him say it) or watching him deny his assertion that the U. S. admits immigrants from "shithole countries" (again despite the fact that a roomful of people heard him say it).
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
-----------------------------------------------------------------
"Now for some 19 number juggling.
It is equal to 10^2 - 9^2."
-- Martin Gardner _Did Adam & Eve Have Navels?_ (p.261)
Much of what Martin Gardner wrote was *parody*, Art -- anyone VERsed in mathematics at about the level of the aVERage twelve-year-old would have noticed that.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<"For Sidnei" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of
skip 26 -- or indeed, of *any* skip -- in the above text, Art. It's
really a pity that George Mason Elementary was unable to teach you
either to read *or* to count, Art!>>
I distinctly recall that I subscribed to
_My Weekly Read *or* [sic]_ at GME.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weekly_Reader
[...]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
"The publishing company for _My Weekly Reader_ also created workbooks,
literacy centers,
<<That would have been useless to you too, Art -- plainly, George Mason
Elementary did not succeed in imparting literacy in six years of
concentrated effort, so a voluntary literacy center set up by _My Weekly
Reader_ could scarcely have succeeded where the professionals had failed.>>
Dick and Jane (and Spot) might disagree.
<<WhateVER the successes of Dick and Jane may have been, Art,
you are not among them. Indeed, despite Dick's and Jane's best
efforts, you and Spot remain about equally literate in English.>>
Pepper was the spitting image of Spot; I miss her.
I'm sorry, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
and picture books for younger grades."
<<It's too bad that nobody has produced a picture book about the
methods of literary historians, Art; you might learn something.>>
That sounds like a GREAT job for you, Dave!!
No, Art; I've long recognized the futility of trying to teach you anything, from rudimentary English to rudimentary mathematics (although I remain stubbornly optimistic in the hope that *somebody* may yet manage it.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
(It could be a pop-up book and I'll write the Preface.)
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
(I also subscribed to Martin Gardner's _Humpty Dumpty Magazine_ in
the 1950s, before your group promoted him to Scientific American.)
<<My group? What group would that, be, Art? And how could any group,
other than the editorial staff of _Scientific American_, "promote" him?>>
Because your group is just "a lot of very lovely guys"
who promote others who are "certifiably illiterate:"
<<You mean, the way I offered to promote you should you attempt to write a
book, Art?
By the way, my offer to write a Preface still stands.>>
But you only offer to deface me here.
Lea wrote: <<You could call it a Deface if you like.>>
I call you my Defoe.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<But you didn't answer the question, Art: what is "my group"?>>
My guess would be a semisimple lie group with few ideals.
Did you mean a Lea group, Art?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Lea wrote: <<Excellent, Art!
As opposed to, say, the Fellowship, which can be described as more of a Weyl group?>>
We're much more Weyl than you guys (but you're still the Coxeters).
Keep it clean, Art -- next thing you know, you'll be going on about Bruhat-Tits and running the risk of falling afoul of St. Carolyn, if in fact your pursuit of Brenda James hasn't already that effect. At least we're not nilpotent.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<And the Fellowship, being antithetical to my "group" and hence
not semisimple, must have a nontrivial radical -- is it you, Art?>>
A nontrivial FREE radical.
<<And what about the Cartan involution?
"Cartan" is an anagram of "A.C.N. (Art)" -- INIPNC score 100%!>>
You're Killing me, Dave!
Excellent, Art! But in fact our group rarely resorts to extreme measures.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
http://www.nytimes.com/2004/09/07/obituaries/gerard-piel-89-who-revived-
scientific-american-magazine-dies.html
Gerard Piel,
<<But Art -- _piel_ means "skin" in Spanish! S[hakespeare's]kin, Art!
Well...it's no skin off my nose.
Lea wrote: <<Was Piel one of the scions of the Bloodline?>>
He was probably a bloody scion, sure.
Lea wrote: <<No, Art; a Sciontific American.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------------
science (n.) mid-14c., "what is known, knowledge (of something) acquired by
study; information;" also "assurance of knowledge, certitude, certainty,"
from Latin scientia "knowledge, a knowing; expertness,"
scion (n.) c. 1300, "a shoot or twig," especially one for grafting.
from Old French sion, cion "descendant; shoot, twig; offspring"
graft (n.2) "corruption," 1865, perhaps 1859, American English,
perhaps from British slang graft "one's occupation" (1853).
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
89, Who Revived Scientific American Magazine, Dies
By WOLFGANG SAXON, SEPT. 7, 2004
<<But Art -- "Saxon" is an anagram of "A. N.'s Ox"!>>
Is gored?
<<No, Art. En [sic] English, an apostrophe does not necessarily
denote possession. It is also used in contractions.>>
But contraction is *NOT* is 9/10 of the law
Evidently you are not familiar with the Banach fixed point theorem, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. HOLY GRAIL / *TORCH* : CHRIST / *MITHRAS*
.
. C (o) M *e DIES*
. H I S T *O RIES*
. (t) R A *ge DIES*
................................................................
*MITHRAS'S two TORCH-bearers* form a trinity with *MITHRAS*.
Cautes represents the position of the sun in the morning: *ORIENS*
*MITHRAS* its course at midday & Cautopates its setting (occidens).
Huh?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. *TORCH PERISH*
"Torch perish [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. *CHRISTOPHER*
------------------------------­-----------------------------
. Pericles Prince of Tyre Act 2, Scene 2
.
THAISA: A burning *TORCH* that's turned upside down;
. The word, 'Quod me alit, me extinguit.'
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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Gerard Piel, a science writer and editor who helped revive Scientific
American magazine a half-century ago and made it thrive, died Sunday at
Mount Sinai Hospital of Queens. Mr. Piel and associates took a gamble in
1947 to buy the magazine with money borrowed from people he called "a lot
of very lovely guys." (They included the Whitney partners and the Rosenwald
family.) Four years and a million dollars in venture capital later, the
magazine began to turn a profit. Revived, the magazine, which was
established in 1845, covers groundbreaking events in science and technology
as they happen. It counts more than 100 Nobel laureates among its
contributors.
Mr. Piel was a scion of a brewing family
Lea wrote: <<...not to mention of the Bloodline...>>
You weren't supposed to mention that; were you?
<<Maybe nobody will notice, Art -- it won't happen again.>>
You forgot to say: "BELIEVE ME!"
That's your line, Art -- you and (T)rump are bird(brain)s of a feather.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
from 19th-century Brooklyn. Gottfried Piel and his brother Michael,
Gerard's grandfather, started Piel Brothers Brewery in 1883 to supply
the clan's biergarten, whose chief cook was Maria, Michael's wife.
Gerard Piel graduated magna cum laude as a history major from Harvard in
1937, and started as an editorial trainee at Time Inc.
Family lore has it that one year after college he was named science editor
of Life magazine because his boss deemed him qualified by being "certifiably
illiterate in science." "The idea was that if I could understand what I was
writing and publishing, then so could the reader," Mr. Piel explained years
later.
<<That idea has its merits, of course, but it doesn't take into account
the irremediably illiterate -- for example, someone who could not meet
Lehigh's literacy requirement could not read _Scientific American_, Art.>>
I may be a weak writer but I'm a weekly reader, Dave.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Over the years he was an overseer at Harvard and a trustee at Radcliffe
and was on the boards of the American Museum of Natural History and the
New York Botanical Garden. Until recently he sat of the boards of Phillips
Andover Academy,
..."and, O, Ver: a cad", Art!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
the Henry J. Kaiser Foundation and the Mayo Clinic.>>
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Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
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