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Benson
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Arthur Neuendorffer
2017-10-28 02:50:59 UTC
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---------------------------------------------------
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/peachmb.html
.
Oxfordian Myths: The Oxford Anagram in "Minerva Britanna"
by Terry Ross: http://tinyurl.com/zv93mdf
.
<<The title page of Henry Peacham's 1612 emblem book Minerva
Britanna has long fascinated antistratfordians: <<A curtain is drawn
to hide a figure, the hand only of which is protruding. It has just
written the words "MENTE VIDEBOR" -- "By the mind I shall be seen."
Around the scroll are the words "Vivitur ingenio cetera mortis erunt"
-- one lives in one's genius, other things shall be in death.>>
.
In 1937 Eva Turner Clark saw a message about Oxford:
.
. *MENTE VIDEBOR(i)*
. *TIB(i) NOM. DE VERE*
. Thy Name is De Vere.
.
There are several problems with this:
.
When Peacham uses someone's name in a Latin poem or epigram, he gives
the Latin version of the name. The Latin form of "DE VERE" is "VERUS."
.
The use of an abbreviation "nom." for "nomen."
Peacham's anagrams never in his genuine uses abbreviations.
.
. *MENTE VIDEBOR*
. *DE VERE IN TOMB*
. "Thy Name is De Vere"
---------------------------------------------------
Shakespearean tragedies based on Plutarch:
......................................
Antony and Cleopatra
Timon of Athens
Iulius Caesar
Coriolanus
................................................
Plutarch's Lives Englished by Sir THOMAS NORTH
in Ten Volumes, Vol. 5 *LYSANDER* (1595)

http://tinyurl.com/qal8ahq

To him selfe they sent immediately that which they call Scytala...
The Scytala is in this sort. When the Ephori doe send a Generall,
or an Admirall to the warres, they cause two litle round staues
to be made [etc.]... These two litle staues they call Scytales.
Ibid., This litle scrowle of parchment also is called
as the rowle of wodde, Scytala.
................................................................
<<The *SCYTALE* is the oldest known military ciphering method.
In the year 404 B.C. only one of five messengers survived the
grueling march from Persia back to the Spartan general *LYSANDER*.
The messenger gave *LYSANDER* his belt and *LYSANDER* winded his
belt around the so-called *SCYTALE*. Thus he was informed that
the Persians planned an attack, he prepared for this attack
and was able to fend it successfully.>> - Simon Singh

http://tinyurl.com/l4b4rvk
......................................................
. A Midsummer Night's Dream: II, ii
.
HERMIA: *LYSANDER RIDDLES VERy* prettily:
. Now much beshrew my MANNERS and my pride,
. If Hermia meant to say *LYSANDER LIED*.
-----------------------------------------------------------
. Twelfth Night (Folio 1, 1623) II, v
.
Mal. I may command where I adore, but silence like a Lucresse knife:
. With bloodlesse stroke my heart doth gore,
. [M.O.A.I.] d[O]th s{W}[A]y m{Y} l[I]f{E}.
.
Fa. A fustian *RIDDLE*.
.
To. Excellent Wench, say I.
.
Mal. [M.O.A.I.] d[O]th s{W}[A]y m{Y} l[I]f{E}.
. Nay but first let me see, let me see, let me see.
.........................................................
. <= 4 =>
.
. [M. O. A. I.]
. d [O] t h
. s {W}[A] y
. m {Y} l [I]
. f {E}
.
[MOAI] : Prob. ELS in repeated nonsense phrase ~ 1 in 1092
...........................................................
. Henry V (Quarto 1, 1600) Act III, scene IV

Kate: Le main da han la bras de arma.

Allice: {OWYE} madam.
................................................
. Henry V (Quarto 1, 1600) Act IV, scene VII

Flewellen: I thinke it was Macedon indeed where Alexander
. Was borne: looke you captaine Gower,
. And if you looke into the mappes of the worell well,
. You shall finde litle difference betweene
. Macedon and Monmorth. Looke you, there is
. A Riuer in Macedon, and there is also a Riuer
. In Monmorth, the Riuers name at Monmorth,
. Is called {WYE}.

Kin. No Flewellen, for I am wealch as well as you.

Flewellen: All the water in {WYE} wil not wash your wealch
. Blood out of you, God keep it, and preserue it,
. To his graces will and pleasure.
...........................................................
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wye,_Kent

<<{WYE} is a hilly village in Kent, England, 12 miles from Canterbury. The village's name comes from the Old English "Wēoh" meaning "idol" or "shrine". The place may have used for worship by the pre-Christian Angles. {WYE} College was founded in 1447 as a Latin school and seminary by John Cardinal *KEMPE*, Archbishop of Canterbury and Lord Chancellor.>>
...........................................................
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Kempe

<<Will Kempe's was one of a core of five actor-shareholders in the Lord Chamberlain's Men alongside Shakespeare and Richard Burbage, but in a short time he parted company with the group. Leicester's nephew, Philip Sidney, sent letters home by way of a man he called "Will, my Lord of Lester's jesting player" and it is now generally accepted this was Kempe. After a brief return to England, Kempe accompanied two other future Lord Chamberlain's Men, George Bryan and Thomas Pope, to Elsinore where he entertained Frederick II of Denmark.

Thomas Nashe's An Almond for a Parrot (1590). Nashe was dedicated to Kempe, calling him "vicegerent general to the ghost of Dick Tarlton." Similarly, the title-page of the quarto of A Knack to Know a Knave advertises Kempe's "merriments". By 1592 Kempe was one of Lord Strange's Men. In 1594, upon the dissolution of Strange's Men, Kempe, along with Burbage & Shakespeare, joined the Lord Chamberlain's Men. Kemp played his last role for Shakespeare in 1598.

After his departure from the Chamberlain's Men Kempe continued to pursue his career as a performer. In February and March 1600, he undertook his "Nine Days Wonder", in which he morris danced from London to Norwich, often amid cheering crowds. In a 1615 lawsuit brought by Thomasina (née Heminges) Ostler, widow of William Ostler, against her father, John Heminges, William Kempe was referred to as a gentleman (Willelmo Kempe nuper de Londonia generoso defuncto), and it has been suggested that he was a member of the Kempe family of Olantigh, a property 1 mile north of {WYE}. Sir Thomas Kempe (1517–1591) did indeed have a son named William.>>
-------------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/zv93mdf
.
_The MINERVA BRITANNA_ Banner Folding clearly demonstrates
how the Equidistant Linear Sequence decoding is to be performed:
..........................................................
"all thinges perish and come to theyr last end, but workes
of learned WITS & monuments of Poetry abide *for EVER* ."
......................................................
_______ <= 7 =>
.
. [V] I {V} I T U R
. [I] N G {E} N I O
. [C] Æ (T) E {R} A M
. [O] R (T) I S {E} R
. [U N T]
.
{VERE} 8
[VICOU/NT] 7
.
Key?: Triple (T)AU & first word
......................................................
1579: Dedication to Oxford in the only edition of
. Geoffrey Gates' The Defence of Militarie profession.
.
. TO THE RIGHT honorable, Edward de \VERE\, Earle of
. Oxenford, [VICOUNT] Bulbecke, Lord of Escales
. and Baldesmere, and Lord great Chamberlaine of England.
------------------------------------------------------------
. <= 19 =>
.
. {T H E S E I N(S)U I N G S O N N E T S}
----------------------------------------
. M r W h a L L(H)A P P I N S S S E A N
. D t h a t E T[E]R N I T I E P R O M I
. S E D B Y O u[R]E V[E]R L I V I N G P
. O E t W I s h[E]T H(T)H E W E L L W I
. S h I N G a[d V e]N(T)u R e R I N S E
. t T I N G f o r t H(T)T
..........................................
the probability of the [de.VERE] "T cross"
assuming that the 19 letters of the 2nd line:
{THESE INSUING SONNETS}
provide the # key to the ELS array is ~ 1 in 978
---------------------------------------------------------
. <= 34 =>
.
.{TERRATE (G) ITPOPUL U S M (Æ) R ETO LYMPUSHABE T}
........................................................
. STAYPAS [S] ENGERWH Y G O E (S) TTH OUBYSOFAST R
. EADIFTH [O] UCANSTW H O M {E} N VIO USDEATHHAT H
. PLASTWI [T] HINTHIS M O (N){U} M ENT {SHAKSPEARE} W
. ITHWHOM [E] QUICKNA T (U) R {E}{D} IDE {WHOSENAMED} O
. THDeCKY [S] TOMBEFA (R) M O {R}{E} tHE NCOSTSIEHA L
. LYTHEHA [T] HWRITTL E A V {E} S LIV INGARTBUTP A
. GETOSER V EHISWIT T

(RUNES) 33 : Prob. in Roper array = ~ 1 in 4930
..........................................................
the probability of David Roper's: {DE} next to {E.UERE}

assuming that the 34 letters of the
2nd line: {TERRA TEGIT POPULUS MÆRET OLYMPUS HABET}

provide the # key to the ELS array is ~ 1 in 106,000--------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.folger.edu/shakespeare-coat-of-arms-discovery

<<Odin carved the (RUNES) upon the shaft of his {SPEARE};
By this means he obtained power over all.>>
................................................................
<<The word (RUNES) comes from Germanic "RUNA" meaning secret.>>
----------------------------------------------------------
(S)hake-sp(E)ares So(N)Nets. Ne(V)Er befo(R)E ImprinTed.
.
At London By G. Eld for T. T.
and are to be solde by William Aspley. 1609.
....................................
. <= 6 =>
.
. (S) h a k e -s
. p (E) a r e s
. S o (N) N E t
. s. N e (V) E R
. b e f o (R) E
. I m p r i n
. T E d.
.
(RVNES) -7: Prob. ~ 1 in 353
--------------------------------------------------
To the memory of my beloved,
...................................
That I n{O}t mixe th{E}e so, my b[R]aine exc[U]ses ;
I mea[N]e with gr[E]at, but di[S]proportion'd Muses :
........................................
. <= 7 =>
.
. T h a t I n O
. t m i x e t h
. E e s o, m y b
. (R) a i n e e x
. c (U) s e s; I m
. e a (N) e w i t
. h g r (E) a t, b
. u t d i (S) p r
. o p o r t i o
. n' d M u s e S
.
(RUNES) 8 : Prob. ~ 1 in 42
------------------------------------------------------
http://www.mythographica.demon.co.uk
.
<<Odin hung upon the branches of Yggdrasil, the sacred Tree.
For *nine days* and nine nights he suffered.
Self wounded by his spear, sacrificed by his hand, an
offering unto himself. In agony and torment he stared into
the bottomless depths of Niflheim, searching the dark pool in
silence. Finally, with great effort, he reached down before
him. His hand was chilled to the bone in the ice cold waters.
With a cry of triumph he grasped the knowledge he sought
.
. the Sacred *RUNES* , their magic and their power.
. He took the *RUNES* and he used them well.
.
He carved them upon the shaft of his *SPEAR*; he carved *RUNES*
. upon all things. By this means he obtained power over all.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/nine-days-wonder.html

<<In 1600, William Kemp, an Elizabethan clown actor, who is thought to
have been the original Dogberry in Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing,
1599, danced a morris dance between London and Norwich. He took up the
challenge for a bet and covered the distance of a hundred miles or more
in nine days. Some doubted that he had achieved this and, to quell
dissent, he wrote 'Kemps nine daies wonder', published in 1600:
................................................................
"Wherein EVERy dayes iourney is pleasantly set downe, to
satisfie his friends the truth, against all lying Ballad-makers;
what he did, how hee was welcome, and by whome entertained."
................................................................
The earliest record in print that most people today would be able to
decipher is in 'Poems written in English during his captivity in England,
after the battle of Agincourt' by Charles, Duke of Orleans, 1465:

"For this a wondir last but dayes nyne, An oold proverbe is seid."
...........................................................
" This wonder (as wonders last) lasted *nine daies* ."
-- John Heywood. Proverbes (1546) Part ii. Chap. i.
...........................................................
The first record in print of the phrase as we now use it is
from George Herbert's poem The Temple, 1633:

The brags of life are but a nine days wonder;
And after death the fumes that spring
From private bodies make as big a thunder,
As those which rise for a huge King.
-------------------------------------------------------------
Yggdrasil is rendered as Ygg's (i.e., Odin's) GALLOWS. As the
discoverer of the (RUNES), Odin was also the sorcerer of the gods.>>
.
. I ween that I hung on a windy tree,
. Hung there for nights full nine;
. With the {SPEAR} I was wounded, and offered I was
. To Odin, myself to myself,
. On the tree that none may EVER know
. What root beneath it runs. -Robert Graves

<<To learn the secrets of the dead Odin underwent a ritual
spiritual death, sacrificing himself to himself. He pierced
himself with his own spear then hung himself from
Yggdrasil, the World (ASH) Tree, for nine days and nights.
He used magick to free himself, an act of spiritual rebirth.
He came down from the tree with 9 songs of power & 18 runes,
a runic alphabet made of ASH twigs. Odin is all-seeing & divine
but not immortal. He is said to never eat and live on wine.
He possesses Draupnir /Draupner, a magic ring which produces
eight new rings every 9th night. It is Odin who must face
the Frost Giants at (r)AGNA(ro)K, the DOOM of the gods.>>
ANAGK(h) => DOOM
-------------------------------------------------
. (E)DW(E)ED [DYER/DEVERE]
...............................................
. Sonnet 76 (1609)

WHy is my verse so barren of new pride?
So far from variation or quicke change?
Why with the time do I not glance aside
To new found methods, and to compounds *STRANGE* ?

Why write I still all one, [EVER] the same,
And keepe inuention in a *NOTED WEED*,
That *[EVER]y WORD* doth almost fel {MY NAME},
Shewing their birth, and where they did proceed?

O know sweet love I alwaies write of you,
And you and love are still my argument:
..................................................
____ <= 14 =>
.
. A*N O T[(E) D W (E) E D] T h {A}{T}
. E V E R y w o r <D>[D] O t h a
. l m o {S}{T} F E L m [Y] N a m {E}
. S h e w i n g t {H}[E]<I> r b i
. r t h a n d w h e [R] e t h {E}
. y(D) i d p r o c e [E] d O <K> n
. o w s w e {E} t l o [V] e I a l
. w a i e s w r i t [E] o f y o
. u A n d y o u a n [D] l (O) v (E)
..................................................
[DYER] 14 {Found by A.W.Burgstahler}
.
[DEVERE] -14 {Found by James Ferris}
.
[DYEREVED] 14 Prob. in any sonnet ~ 1 in 9375
..................................................
Edward de Vere & Edward Dyer:
.
1) Only two Shakespeare authorship candidates
. named Edward: http://tinyurl.com/6yqvqwz
.
2) Only two Shakespeare authorship candidates
. sharing yet another authorship controversy:
..........................................................
- [King Richard the Third (Quarto 1, 1597) 3.1]
.
Buckingham: [A HA] my Lord this prince is *NOT AN EDWARD* :
. He is not lulling on a lewd day bed,
. But on his knees at meditation:
----------------------------------------------------
___ O , could he but have drawne his wit
__ [A]s well *IN-BRASSe* , as he hath hit
__ [H]is face ; the Print would then surpasse
__ [A]ll, that was *EVER WRI-TIN-BRASSe* . - B.J.
..........................................................
PSALM 40:13: DE(l)IVER me: O LORD, make *HASTE* to help me.
. Let them be ashamed & confounded together that seek after my soul
. to destroy it; let them be driven backward and put to shame that
. wish me evil. Let them be desolate for a *REWARD* of their shame
. that say unto me, [AHA, AHA] .
------------------------------------------------------
. King Richard III (Quarto 1, 1597) Act 1, Scene 1
.
CLARENCE: Yea Richard when I know; for I protest
.
__ [A]s yet I doe not, but as I can learne,
__ [H]e harkens after Prophecies and dreames,
__ [A]nd from the crosse-rowe pluckes the letter (G):

__ [A]nd saies a wisard told him that by (G),
__ [H]is issue disinherited should be.
__ [A]nd for my name of (G)eorge begins with (G),

__ It followes in his thought that *I AM HE*.
__ These as I learne and such like toies as these,
__ Haue moued his highnes to commit me now.
..................................................
__ *NIL VERO-VERIU (S) *
__ *OUR EVER-LIVIN (G) *
------------------------------------------------------------
https://archive.org/details/ghostrichardthi00collgoog
.
The ghost of Richard the Third. A poem, printed in 1614, and founded
upon Shakespeare's historical play. Reprinted from the only known
copy in the Bodleian library by Brooke, Christopher, d. 1628

The Ghost of Richard the Third

*STANLEY* with Richmond joines his regiment
Some fled, some stood at gaze, the rest were seene
With idle action to maintaine the field :
Powre faintly answer’d argues will to yeeld.
...........................................................
https://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A16936.0001.001/1:7?rgn=div1;view=fulltext

. THE LEGEND OF RICHARD THE THIRD [START]
.
"To him that *IMPT my FAME* with Clio's quill
Whose magick rais'd me from oblivion's den,
That writ my storie on the Muses' hill,
And with my actions dignifi'd his pen;
He that from Helicon sends many a rill,
Whose nectared veines are drunke by thirstie men;
Crown'd be his stile with fame, his head with bayes,
And none detract, but gratulate his praise.

Yet if his scaenes have not engrost all grace
The much fam'd action could extend on stage;
If time or memory have left a place
For me to fill, t' enforme this ignorant age,
To that intent I shew my horrid face,
Imprest with feare, and characters of rage:
Nor wits, nor chronicles, could ere containe
The hell-deepe [R]each[E]s of m[Y] soun[D]l{E}s{S}[E] brai[N]e."
.............................................................
. <= 5 =>
.
. [R] e a c h
. [E] s o f m
. [Y] s o u n
. [D] l {E} s {S}
. [E] b r a i
. [N] e.
..............................................
[NEDYER] -5 : Prob. at start ~ 1 in 5000
{SED} -2
..............................................
. THE LEGEND OF RICHARD THE THIRD [END]
.
Now Englands Chaos was reduc't to order
By God-like Richmond; whose successive Stems,
The hand of Time hath Branch't in curiou(S) [B]order,
Unto the mem'rie o{F} thrice {R}oyall (I)[A]mes:
An A{N}gels Trumpe be his *TRUE FAMES* Re[C]order,
And (M)ay that Britt(A)ine Phoebus f(R)[O]m his Beame{S}
(I)n Glories lig(H)t h{I}s influe[N]ce exten{D},
His Off-spring, cou{N}tles; Peace, nor Dat{E}, nor End.
....................................................
. <= 17 =>
.
. w h o s e s u c c e s s i v e S t
. e m s T h e h a n d o f T i m e h
. a t h B r a n c h t i n c u r i o
. u (S)[B] o r d e r U n t o t h e m e
. m r i e o{F}t h r i c e{R}o y a l
. l (I)[A] m e s A n A{N}g e l s T r u
. m p e b e h i s t r u e F a m e s
. R e [C] o r d e r A n d(M)a y t h a
. t B r i t t(A)i n e P h o e b u s
. f (R)[O] m h i s B e a m e{S|I)n G l
. o r i e s l i g(H)t h{I}s i n f l
. u (E)[N] c e e x t e n{D}H i s O f f
. s p r i n g c o u{N}t l e s P e a
. c e n o r D a t{E}n o r E n d
.
{FRAN.} 7
[BACON] 34 : Prob. at end ~ 1 in 387
(MARI.H.) 12 : Prob. at end ~ 1 in 328
{SIDNE.} 16 : Prob. at end ~ 1 in 120
----------------------------------------------------
____ Richard III Q1 (1597)
.
The Tragedy of King Richard the third. Containing, His
treacherous Plots against his brother Clarence : the pittiefull
murthe(R) of his innocent nephewes : his tyrannicall vsurpation
: with the whole cours(E) of his de{TEST}ed life,
and most deserued death. As it hath beene
lately Acted b[Y] the Right honourabl[E]
the Lord Chamberlai[N]e his seruants.
At Lon[D]on, Print(eD) by Valent[I]ne Sims,
for Andrew Wi[S]e, dwelling in Paules
{CHURCH-YARD}, at (the sig(N)e of the Angell). 1597.
...........................................
. <= 63 =>
.
murth e(R) ofhisinn o centneph e weshisty r annicall v surpatio n withthew h ol
ecour s(E) ofhisdeT E STedlife a ndmostde s erueddea t hAsithat h beenelat e ly
Acted b[Y] theRight h onourabL[E]THELordC h amberlai[N]ehisseru a ntsAtLon[D]on
Print (eD) byValent[I]neSimSfo r AndrewWi{SED}welLin g inPaules{C}HURCHYAR D}at
thesi g(N) eoftheAn g ell

(N/e/DYER) -63
...........................................
. <= 18 =>
.
. m u r t h e (R) o f h i s i n n o c e
. n t n e p h e w e s:h i s t y r a n
. n i c a l l v s u r p a t i o n:w i
. t h t h e w h o l e c o u r s(E)o f
. h i s d e{T E S T}e d l i f e,a n d
. m o s t d e s e r u e d d e a t h.A
. s i t h a t h b e e n e l a t e l y
. A c t e d b [Y] t h e R i g h t h o n
. o u r a b L [E] T H E L o r d C h a m
. b e r l a i [N] e h i s s e r u a n t
. s A t L o n [D] o n P r i n t e(D)b y
. V a l e n t [I] n e S i m S f o r A n
. d r e w W i {S E D} w e l L i n g i n
. P a u l e s {C} H U R C H Y A R D}a t
. (t h e s i g N e o f t h e A n g e l l)
.
{SED} 1
[{C}SIDNEY] -18: Prob. of [SIDNEY] ~ 1 in 2150

{C}ountesse of pembrooke: mary [SIDNEY]
---------------------------------------------------
(1603) Francis Davison’s
Anagrammata in Nomina Illustrissimorum Heroum
.............................................
http://www.philological.bham.ac.uk/anagrams/text.html
.
____ *EDOUDARUS V(e)IERUS*
_____ per anagramma
____ *AURE SURDUS VIDEO*
.
{A} uribus hisce licet studio, Fortuna, susurros
{PE} rfidiae et technas efficis esse procul,
. Attamen accipio (quae mens horrescit et auris)
. Rebus facta malis corpora surda tenus.
. Imo etiam cerno Catilinae¶ fraude propinquos
. Funere solventes [FATA] aliena suo.
.............................................
_______ *EDWARD VERE*
______ by an anagram
____ *DEAF IN MY EAR, I SEE*

Though by your zeal, FORTUNE, you keep perfidy's
murmurs & schemings at a distance, nonetheless I learn
(at which my mind & ear *QUAKE*) that our bodies have
been deafened with respect to evil affairs. Indeed,
I perceive men who come close to Catiline* in deception,
freeing other men's [FATES] by their death.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Loading Image...
1640 Sonnets (Benson)

This *SHADOWE* is renow{NED} Shakespear's?
Soule o[F] th' [A]ge [T]he [A]pplause?
Delight? The wonder of the {S}tage.
Nature her selfe, was proud of {H}is designs
[A]nd joy'd to weare the dr{E}ssing of his lines;
[T]he learned will Confess, his works as such,
[A]s neither man, nor Muse can prayse {TO M}uch.
[F]or *EVER* live thy fame, the worl(D) to tell,
Th(Y) like, no ag(E), shall *EVE(R)* paralell.
.
[FATA] 3 : Prob. ~ 1 in 178
(DYER) 9 : Prob. ~ 1 in 90
{NASHE} 29 : Prob. ~ 1 in 36
----------------------------------------------------------
WHATE-VER (pron.) mid-14c., "what in the world," emphatic of what,
. with ever. From late 14c. as "anything at all; all of; no matter
. what or who." From late 14c. as an adjective, "any sort of,
. any, every; no matter what, regardless of what."
...........................................................
. Wm Shaxpere & Anna *WHATEley* of Temple Grafton
....................................................
<<There is an old English word *WHATE* ,
. meaning fortune, *FATE* , or destiny,
I think that in a desperate moment of inspiration,
confused before the clerk, Shakespeare reached into
his heart and came out with the name of that Anne
who would have been his choice, his *FATE*, his destiny.>>
...................................................
. - _The Late Mr. Shakespeare_ by Robert Nye
------------------------------------------------------
. [ON POET-{APE}] EPIGRAMS by Ben Jonson
.
Poor POET-{APE}, that would be thought our chief,
. Whose works are e'en the frippery of wit,
[F]rom brokage is become so bold a thief,
. As we, the robb'd, leave rage, and pity it.
[A]t first he made low shifts, would pick and glean,
. Buy the rEVERsion of old plays ; now grown
[T]o a little wealth, and credit in the scene,
. He takes up all, makes each man's wit his own :
[A]nd, told of this, he slights it. Tut, such crimes
. The sluggish gaping auditor devours ;
. He marks not whose 'twas first : and after-times
. May judge it to be his, as well as ours.
. Fool ! as if half eyes will not know a fleece
. From locks of wool, or shreds from the whole piece ?
-----------------------------------------------------
. . . Sonnet 70

. That thou are b{L}am'd sh{A}ll not {B}e thy d{E}fect,
[F|O}r slanders m{A}rke was EUER yet the *FAIRE* ,
. The [ORNAMENT] of {B}eauty is (SUS)pect,
[A] Crow that fli[E]s in hea[V|E}ns swe[E]{TEST} ay[R]e.
. {SO} tho[U] be good,[S]lander d{O}th but approue,
[T]heir *WORTH* the greater beeing woo'd of TIME,
. {F}or Canker vice the sweetest buds doth loue,
[A]nd thou present'st a pure vnstayined prime.
. {T}hou hast past by the ambush of young daies,
{E}ither not assayld, or victor beeing charg'd,
. Yet this thy *PRAISE* cannot be soe thy *PRAISE* ,
To tye vp *ENUY*, EUERmore inlarged,
. If some (SUS)pect of ill *MASKT not thy show*,
. Then thou alone kingdomes of hearts shouldst owe.
....................................................
. <= 7 =>
.
. A C r o w
. t h a t f l i
. [E] s i n h e a
. [V] e n s s w e
. [E]{T E S T}a y
. [R] e{S O}t h o
. [U] b e g o o d,
. [S] l a n d e r
.................................................
. [E.VERUS] 7 : Prob. in any Sonnet ~ 1 in 55
.................................................
__ <= 35 =>
.
. thouareb {L} amdsh{A}llnot{B}et h yd{E}fect[F|O}rs
. landersm {A} rkewa s EUERy e tt h eF A IRET h e OR
. NAMENTof {B} eauty i sSUSp e ct[A]Cr o wtha t f li
. esinheau {E} nsswe e testa y re.S ot h oube g o od
. slanderd {O} thbut a pprou e
.
{LABEO} 6,35 : Prob. 2{LABEO}s start any Sonnet ~ 1 in 740
.........................................................
. *John Marston* Satire note:
.
. So {LABEO} did complain his love was *STONE*,
. Obdurate, flinty, so relentless none:
. Yet Lynceus knows that in the end of this
. He wrought as *STRANGE a metamorphosis*.
--------------------------------------------------------
http://www.poetrynook.com/poem/satire-9-0
. *John Marston* Satire nine:
.
Grim-fac'd Reproofe , sparkle with threatning eye
Bend thy sower browes in my tart po[E]sie.
A[V]ant y[E]e cur[R]es, ho[U|L)e in [S|o)me cl(O)udie mist,
*QUAKE* to behold a sharp-fang'd Satyrist.
...........................................
. <= 5 =>
.
. m y t a r
. t p o [E] s
. i e. A [V] a
. n t y [E] e
. c u r [R] e
. s, h o [U](L)
. e i n [S](o)
. m e c l (O)
. u d i e m
. i s t, Q u
. a k e t o
. b e h o l
. d a s h a
. r p- f a n
. g' d S a t
. y r i s t.

[E.VERUS] 5: Prob. at start or end ~ 1 in 42,000
(Lo.O) 5
...............................................
...............................................
Ill-tutor'd pe[D]ant, Mortimers numb[E]rs
With muck-pit esc[U]line filth bescumb[E]rs.
Now th'{APE} chatte[R]s, and is as malecont[E]nt
As a bill-patch'd doore, whose entrailes out haue sent
And spewd theyr tenant.
...........................................
. <= 17 =>
.
. I l l-t u t o r'd p[E|D] a n t,M o
. r t i m e r s n u m b[E] r s W i t
. h m u c k-p i t e s c[U] l i n e f
. i l t h b e s c u m b[E] r s.N o w
. t h'A p e c h a t t e[R] s,a n d i
. s a s m a l e c o n t[E] n t

[E/DEUERE] 17: Prob. at start ~ 1 in 1,675
...........................................
My soule adores iudiciall schollership,
But when to seruile imitatorship
Some spruce Athenian pen is prentized,
Tis WORSE then Apish. Fie, bee not flattered
With seeming *WORTH*, fond affectation
Befits an {APE}, and mumping Babilon.

. O what a tricksie lerned (NICKI)ng straine
. Is this applauded, sencles, modern vain!
. When late I heard it from sage Mutius lips
. How il me thought such wanton Iigging skips
. Beseem'd his *GRAVER* speech. Farre flie thy *FAME*
. Most, most, of me belou'd,
...............................................
. {whose silent name One letter bounds.}
...............................................
. Thy TRUE iudiciall stile
. I EVER honour, and if my loue beguile
. Not much my hopes, then thy unvalued *WORTH*
. Shall mount faire place, when {APES} are turned *FORTH*.
----------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 87
.
[F]or how do I hold thee but by thy granting,
[A]nd for that ritches where is my deseruing?
[T]he cause of this *FAIRE* guift in me is wanting,
[A]nd so my pattent back againe is sweruing.
-----------------------------------------------------------
____ SONNET 60
.
. LIke as the waues make towards the pibled shore,
. So do our minuites hasten to [T]heir end,
. Each [C]hanging plac[E] with that whi[C]h goes before,
. [I]n sequent toi[L]e all forwards do contend.
. Natiuity once in the maine of light.
. Crawles to maturity, wherewith being crown'd,
. *CROOKED ECLIPSES* gainst his glory fight,
. [A]nd time that gaue, doth now his gift confound.
. [T]ime doth transfixe the florish set on youth,
. [A]nd delues the paralels in beauties brow,
.([F]EEDE)s on the rarities of natures *TRUTH* ,
. And nothing stands but for his sieth to mow.
. And yet to times in hope, my verse shall stand
. Praising thy *WORTH*, dispight his cruell hand.
................................................
___ <= 12 =>

. S o d o o u r m i n u (I)
. t e s h a s t e n t o [T]
. h e i r e n d,E a c h [C]
. h a n g i n g p l a c [E]
. w i t h t h a t w h i [C]
. h g o e s b e f o r e,[I]
. n s e q u e n t t o i [L]
. e a l l f o r w a r d s
. d o c o n t e n d.

[T.CECIL] 12 prob. in Sonnets ~ 1 in 67
................................................
[T]homas [CECIL]: only Garter vote for Oxford.
Robert CECIL: *CROOKED ECLIPSES* ?
-----------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/jq8h944

. This Shadow is renowned Shakespear's? Soule of th' age
. The applause? Delight? The wonder of the Stage.
. Nature her selfe, was proud of his designs
. [A]nd joy'd to weare the dressing of his lines,
. [T]he learned will confess his works as such
. [A]s neither man, nor Muse can praise to much
. [F]or ever live thy fame, the world to tell,
. Thy like, no age, shall ever paralell
-------------------------------------------------------------
. http://home.freeuk.net/sidsoft/pensinfo.html
.
The Sidney Family arms shows a *PORCUPINE* & a lion
. on either side of the Sidney PHEON.
.
"Whither the *FATES* call" is the meaning of Sidney's motto:
____ *QUO FATA VOCANT*

"Whither the *FATES* carry" is the meaning of Bermuda's motto:
____ *QUO FATA FERUNT*
----------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coat_of_arms_of_Bermuda

<<The coat of arms of Bermuda depicts a red lion holding a shield that
has a depiction of a wrecked ship upon it. The red lion is a symbol of
Great Britain and alludes to Bermuda’s relationship with that country.
The wrecked ship is that of a French ship under the command of Captain
M. de la Barbotiere, not the Sea {VENTURE}, the flagship of the Virginia
Company. On 30 November 1593, Captain de la Barbotiere sailed from
Laguna, Hispaniola, and on 17 December of that same year, at midnight,
the ship struck the north-west reefs off of Bermuda and were so badly
damaged that out of 55 men, only *26* reached the shore alive. Henry
May and Captain de la Barbotiere were among the survivors. It is the
wreck of this French ship on the Bermuda coat of arms.

It is widely believed that the wrecked ship on the Coat of Arms is
that of the Sea {VENTURE}, the flagship of the Virginia Company,
but it is not. This ship was deliberately driven on to the reefs of
Bermuda, by Admiral Sir [G]eorge [SOMERS], in 1609, to prevent it
from foundering in a storm. All aboard survived, resulting in the
settlement of the island. The Latin motto under the coat of arms,

*QUO FATA FERUNT*, means “Whither the Fates Carry [Us]”.

In the 20th century, the coat of arms—without the banner holding the
motto—was added to the Red ensign to create the distinguishing colonial
flag (the national flag is the Union Jack, which appears in its upper,
left corner), and on the Governor's Flag. The coat of arms features on
the cover of the 1624 edition of The Generall Historie of Virginia,
New-England, and the Summer Isles (the Somers Isles is another name
for Bermuda, commemorating Admiral [G.SOMERS]), by Captain John Smith.>>
----------------------------------------------------------------
http://docsouth.unc.edu/southlit/smith/smith.html

But the first English-man that was euer in them,
was one Henry May, a worthy Mariner that went with
Captaine Lancaster to the East-Indies 1591. and in their
returne by the West-Indies, being in some distresse,
sent this Henry May for England by one Mounsier de la
Barbotier, to acquaint the Merchants with their estate.
The last of Nouember, saith May, we departed from
aguna in Hispaniola, and the seuenteenth of December
following, we were cast away vpon the North-west of
the Bermudas; the Pilots about noone made themselues
Southwards of the Iles twelue leagues, and demanded of
the Captaine their Wine of hight as out of all danger,
which they had: but it seemes they were either drunke,
or carelesse of their charge; for through their
negligences a number of good men were cast away. I being
but a stranger amongst fiftie and odde French-men, it
pleased God to appoint me to be one of them should be
saued. In this extremity we made a raft, which we towed
with our Boat, there were but six and twentie of vs
saued; and I seeing scarce roome for the one halfe,
durst not passe in amongst them till the Captaine called
me along with him, leauing the better halfe to the seas
mercy: that day we rowed till within two houres of night
ere we could land, being neere dead with thirst, euery
man tooke his way to seeke fresh water, at length, by
searching amongst many weeds, we found some raine water,
but in the maine are many faire Baies, where we had
enough for digging.
.........................................................
Sometimes are also seene Falcons & Iar-
falcons, Ospraies, a Bird like a Hobby, but because they
come seldome, they are held but as passengers; but aboue
all the[S]e, most deseruing obseruation and respect are
those two so[R]ts of Birds, the one for the tune of his
voice, the other for th[E] effect, called the Cahow, and
Egge bird, which on the first of [M]ay, a day constantly
obserued, fall a laying infinite store [O]f Eggs neere as
big as Hens, vpon certaine small sandie baie[S] especially
in Coupers Ile; and although men sit downe amon[G]st them
when hundreds haue bin gathered in a morning, yet there
is hath stayed amongst them till they haue gathered as
many more: they continue this course till Midsummer, and
so tame & feareles, you must thrust them off from their
Eggs with your hand; then they grow so faint with laying,
they suffer them to breed & take infinite numbers of
their young to eat, which are very excellent meat.
....................................................
. <= 49 =>
.
. SometimesarealsoseeneFalcons I arfalconsOspraiesaBi
. rdlikeaHobbybutbecausetheyco m eseldometheyareheldb
. utaspassengersbutaboueallthe [S] emostdeseruingobseru
. ationandrespectarethosetwoso [R] tsofBirdstheoneforth
. etuneofhisvoicetheotherforth [E] effectcalledtheCahow
. andEggebirdwhichonthefirstof [M] ayadayconstantlyobse
. ruedfallalayinginfinitestore [O] fEggsneereasbigasHen
. svponcertainesmallsandiebaie [S] especiallyinCoupersI
. leandalthoughmensitdowneamon [G] stthemwhenhundredsha
. uebingatheredinamorningyetth e reishathstayedamongs
. tthemtilltheyhauegatheredasm a nymoretheycontinueth
. iscoursetillMidsummer

[G.SOMERS] -49 : Prob. ~ 1 in 45
-------------------------------------------------------------
http://docsouth.unc.edu/southlit/smith/smith.html

Betwixt Sagadahock, & Sawocatuck, there is but two or three
Sandy Bayes, but betwixt that and Cape Iames very many: especially
the Coast of the Massachusets is so indifferently mixed with high
Clay or Sandy clifts in one place, and the tracts of large long
ledges of diuers sorts, and Quaries of stones in other places, so
strangely diuided with tinctured veines of diuers colours: as Free-
stone for building, Slate for tyling, smooth stone to make Furnasses
and Forges for Glasse and Iron, and Iron Ore sufficient conueniently
to melt in them; but the most part so resembleth the Coast of
Deuonshire, I thinke most of the clifts would make such Lime-stone:
if they bee not of these qualities, they are so like they may
deceiue a better iudgement then mine: all which are so neere
adioyning to those other aduantages I obserued in these parts, that
if the Ore proue as good Iron and Steele in those parts as I know it
is within the bounds of the Countrey, I dare ingage my head (hauing
but men skilfull to worke the Simples there growing) to haue all
things belonging to the building and rigging of ships of any
proportion and good Merchandise for their fraught, within
a square of t{E}n o{R} fo{U}re{T}ee{N}e l{E}ag{U}es, and
it were no hard matter to proue it within a lesse limitation.
.
{UENTURE} -3
............................................................
............................................................
if I had gone a begging to build an Vniuersitie: where had
men beene as forward to ad{VENTURE} their purses, and performe
the conditions they promised mee, as to crop the fruits of my
labours, thousands ere this had beene bettered by these designes.
Thus betwixt the spur of desire and the bridle of reason, I am
neere ridden to death in a ring of despaire; the reines are in
your hands, therefore I intreat you ease me, and those that thinke
I am either idle or vnfortunate, may see the cause and know:
vnlesse I did see better dealing, I haue had warning enough not
to be so forward againe at euery motion vpon their promises,

{U}nless{E} I inte{N}ded no{T}hing b{U}t to ca{R}ie new{E}s;

for now they dare ad{VENTURE} a ship, that when
I went first would not ad{VENTURE} a groat, so they may be
at home againe by Michaelmas, which makes me remember and
say with Master Hackluit; Oh incredulitie the wit of fooles,
that slouingly doe spit at all things faire, a sluggards
Cradle, a Cowards Castle, how easie it is to be an Infidell.

{UENTURE} 6 : Prob. of 2 {UENTURE}s ~ 1 in 300
ad{VENTURE} : 3 of 110 in book
------------------------------------------------------
Their lodgings.
Their gardens

Against the fire they lie on little hurdles of
Reeds covered with a Mat, borne from the ground a foote
and more by a hurdle of wood. On these round about the
house they lie heads and points one by th'other against
the fire, some covered with Mats, some with skins, and
some starke naked lie on the ground, from 6 to 20 in a
house. Their houses are in the midst of their fields or
gardens, which are small plots of ground. Some 20 acres,
some 40. some 100. some 200. some more, some lesse. In
some places from 2 to 50 of those houses together, or
but a little separated by groues of trees. Neare their
habitation[S] is little small wood or old trees on the
gro[U]nd by reason of their burning of them for fi[R]e.
So that a man may gallop a horse amongst th[E]se woods
any way, but where the creekes or Ri[V]ers shall hinder.
How they vse their childr[E]n.

[E.VERUS] -36
....................................................
Captaine Smith, my Master is here present in the

company, thinking it Capt. Winne, and not you, (of
him he intended to haue beene revenged) having never
offended him. If he hath offended you in escaping your
imprisonment, the fishes swim, the foules fly, and
the very beasts striue to escape the snare and liue.
Then blame not him being a man. He would intreat you
remember, you being a prisoner, what paines he tooke
to saue your life. If since he hath iniured you he was
compelled to it but howsoeuer, you haue revenged it
with our too great losse. We perceiue and well know
you intend to destroy us, that are here to intreat and
desire your friendship, and to enioy our hou[S]es and
plant our fields, of whose fruit you shall participate:
otherwise yo[U] will haue the worse by our absence;
for we can plant any where, though with mo[R]e labour,
and we know you cannot liue if you want our harvest,
and that relief[E] we bring you. If you promise vs
peace, we will beleeue you; if you proceed in
re[V]enge we will abandon the Country. Vpon these
tearmes the President promis[E]d them peace, till
they did vs iniury, vpon condition they should bring
in provision. Thus all departed goods friends,
and so continued till Smith left the Countrey.

[E.VERUS] -62
------------------------------------------------------------
. Early Oxford translations
.
. (1566) ADLINGTO(n)'s Lucius Apuleius' Metamorphoses
. (1567) A(r)T(hur) GOLDIN(g)'s Ovid's Metamorphoses
............................................
. A(r)TH(ur) GOLD(i)N(g)
. TH(e) GOLD(e)N A(sse)
-------------------------------------------------------
. THE GOLDEN ASSE : by Lucius Apuleius "Africanus"
. Translated by William ADLINGTO(n) (1566)
.
Dedication: To the Right Honourable and Mighty Lord,
. *THOMAS EARLE OF SUSSEX*,
. Viscount Fitzwalter, Lord of Egremont and of Burnell, Knight
. of the most noble Order of the Garter, Iustice of the forrests
. and Chases from Trent Southward; Captain of the Gentleman
. Pensioners of the House of the QUEENE our Soveraigne Lady.

http://www.sourcetext.com/sourcebook/Star/ch14.html
-------------------------------------------------------------
http://public.wsu.edu/~delahoyd/shakespeare/vere.html

SHAKE-SPEARE: EDWARD DE VERE, 17th EARL OF OXFORD
Dr. Michael Delahoyde, Washington State University

<<In 1570 when de Vere was 20, and still under wardship, after some persistent requests to see military service, he was sent to *THE NORTH* as an aide to *THOMAS* [RADCLIF]fe, 3rd *EARLE OF SUSSEX* (c. 1525 - 9 June 1583) who had the unpleasant task of subduing the rebels and disposing of the survivors of a rebellion led by the earls of Northumberland and Westmoreland. He and Sussex became staunch mutual supporters at court (parallel to Philip Sidney and his uncle Leicester). The older Sussex and Leicester had come to blows more than once in Council-chamber. Sussex served at court also in personally selecting plays to be performed; he superintended rehearsals too. When Sussex lay dying of consumption in 1583 (unless Leicester poisoned him), his last words were, "Beware of the Gypsy [Leicester], for he will be to hard for you all. You do not know the beast as well as I do".>>
................................................
THIS STAR OF ENGLAND "William Shakes-speare"
Chapter Fourteen (1578) : by Dorothy and Charlton Ogburn

<<*THOMAS [RADCLIF]fe, 3rd EARLE OF SUSSEX* was Oxford's staunch friend and Leicester's inveterate enemy: the two elder men were always ranged upon opposite sides. At this time Sussex, a Catholic, approved the Alençon marriage, while Leicester, as head of the Puritan party, bitterly opposed it, for politic as well as personal reasons.>>
-------------------------------------------------------
. THE GOLDEN ASSE :
(Dedicated to *THOMAS [RADCLIF]fe, EARLE OF SUSSEX*)
......................................................
CHAPTER 30: http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/ga/ga32.htm
.
How the boy that lead Apuleius to the field, was slaine in the wood.
.
While I devised with my selfe in what *MANNER* I might end my life, the roperipe
boy on the next morrow lead me to the same hill againe, and tied me to a bow of
a great Oke, and in the meane season he tooke his hatchet and cut wood to load
me withall, but behold there crept out of a cave by, a *MARVAILOUS great BEARE*,
holding out his mighty head, whom when I saw, I was sodainly stroken in feare,
and (throwing all the strength of my body into my hinder heeles) lifted up my
strained head and brake the *halter, wherewith I was tied*. Then there was no
need to bid me runne away, for I scoured not only on foot, but tumbled over the
stones and rocks with my body till I came into the open fields, to the intent
I would escape from the terrible *BEARE*, but especially from the boy that
was *WORSE than the BEARE*. Then a certaine *STRANGEr* that passed by the
way (espying me alone as a stray Asse) tooke me up and roade upon my backe,
beating me with a *STAFFE* (which he *BARE* in his hand) through
a wide and unknowne lane, whereat I was nothing displeased, but

willingly w{E}nt f{O}rwa[R]d to [A]voi[D] the [C]rue[L]l pa[I]ne o[F] gelding,

which the shepherds had ordained for me, but as for the stripes
I was nothing moved, since I was accustomed to be beaten so EVERy day.
.....................
. <= 4 =>
.
. w {E} n t
. f {O} r w
. a [R] d t
. o [A] v o
. i [D] t h
. e [C] r u
. e [L] l p
. a [I] n e
. o [F] g e
. l d i n g,
.....................
[RADCLIF] 4: shortest pos. skip in KJV : 1382

shortest pos. skip in Moby Dick : 835 ... except:
--------------------------------------------------------------
Moby Dick : Chapter 135 - THE CHASE - THIRD DAY

One after the other, through the po[R]tholes, [A]s he spe[D],
he also [C]aught f[L]ying gl[I]mpses o[F] Stubb and Flask,
busying themselves on deck among bundles of new irons and lances.
.................................
. <= 7 =>
.
. O n e a f t e
. r t h e o t h
. e r,t h r o u
. g h t h e p o
. [R] t h o l e s,
. [A] s h e s p e
. [D],h e a l s o
. [C] a u g h t f
. [L] y i n g g l
. [I] m p s e s o
. [F] S t u b b a
. n d F l a s k,
.
[RADCLIF] 7
--------------------------------------------------------------
THE GOLDEN ASSE: THE TWENTY-SECOND CHAPTER
http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/ga/ga25.htm

Then Psyches moved with delectation approched nigh and taking a bold
heart entred into the house, and {beheld EVER}y thing there with great
affection, she saw storehouses wrought exceedingly fine, and replenished
with aboundance of riches. Finally, there could nothing be devised which
lacked there: but among such great store of treasure this was most
MARVELLOUS, that there was no closure, bolt, nor locke to keepe the same.
.
And when with gr[E]at pleasure shee had [V]iewed all thes[E] things,
she hea[R]d a voyce witho[U]t any body, that [S]ayd, Why doe you marvell
Madame at so great riches? behold, all that you see is at your commandement,
wherefore goe you into the chamber, and repose your selfe upon the bed,
and desire what bath you will have, and wee whose voyces you heare bee
your servants, and ready to minister unto you according to your desire.
........................................................
_ <= 13 =>
.
. A n d w h e n w i t h g r
. e a t p l [E] a s u r e s h
. e e h a d [V] i e w e d a l
. l t h e s [E] t h i n g s,s
. h e h e a [R] d a v o y c e
. w i t h o [U] t a n y b o d
. y,t h a t [S] a y d,W h y d
. o e y o u m a r v e l l
.
[E.VERUS] 13
------------------------------------------------------
THE GOLDEN ASSE: THE FORTY-EIGHTH CHAPTER
http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/ga/ga49.htm

*the last 6 paragraphs*

the gods infernall have thee in r{EVERE}nc[E]:
thou environest all the worl[D], thou givest light to the Sunn[E],
thou governest the world, tho[U] treadest downe the power of
h[E]ll: By thy meane the times retu[R]ne, the Planets rejoyce,
the [E]lements serve: at thy commandment the winds do blow,
........................................................
_____ <= 25 =>
.
. t h e g o d s i n f e r n a l l h a v e t h e e i
. n r e v e r e n c [E] T h o u e n v i r o n e s t a
. l l t h e w o r l [D] T h o u g i v e s t l i g h t
. t o t h e S u n n [E] T h o u g o v e r n e s t t h
. e w o r l d,t h o [U] T r e a d e s t d o w n e t h
. e p o w e r o f h [E] l l:B y t h y m e a n e t h e
. t i m e s r e t u [R] n e,t h e P l a n e t s r e j
. o y c e,t h e E l [E] m e n t s s e r v e:a t t h y
. c o m m a n d m e n t t h e w i n d s d o b l o w,
.
[EDEUERE] 25 : Prob. in last 6 paragraphs ~ 1 in 190
................................................................
After this sort, the divine majesty perswaded me in my sleepe, whereupon by and by I went towards the Priest, and declared all that which I had seene, then I fasted ten dayes according to the custome, and of mine owne proper will I abstained longer then I was commanded: an[D VERE]ly I did nothing repent of the paine which I had taken, and of the charges which I was at, considering that the divine providence had given me such an order, that I gained much money in pleading of causes: Finally after a few dayes, the great god Osiris appeared to me in the night, not disguised in any other forme, but in his owne essence, commanding me that I should be an Advocate in the court, and not feare the slander and envie of ill persons, which *BEARE* me stomacke and grudge by reason of my doctrine, which I had gotten by much labour: moreover, he would not that I should be any longer of the number of his Priests, but he allotted me to be one of the Decurions and Senatours: and after he appointed me a place within the ancient pallace, which was erected in the time of Silla, where I executed my office in great joy with a shaven Crowne.
---------------------------------------------------------------------
To the Right Honourable and Mighty Lord,

THOMAS EARLE OF SUSSEX,

Viscount Fitzwalter, Lord of Egremont and of Burnell, Knight of the
most noble Order of the Garter, Iustice of the forrests and Chases from
Trent Southward; Captain of the Gentlemen Pensioners of the House of the
QUEENE our Soveraigne Lady.

After that I had taken upon me (right Honourable) in manner of that
unlearned and foolish Poet, Cherillus, who rashly and unadvisedly
wrought a big volume in verses, of the valiant prowesse of Alexander the
Great, to translate this present booke, contayning the Metamorphosis of
Lucius Apuleius; being mooved thereunto by the right pleasant pastime
and delectable matter therein: I eftsoones consulted with my selfe,
to whome I might best offer so pleasant and worthy a work, devised by
the Author, it being now barbarously and simply framed in our English
tongue... And not only that profit ariseth to children by such feined
fables, but also the vertues of men are covertly thereby commended,
and their vices discommended and abhorred.
.
For by the Fable of Actæon, where it is feigned that when he saw Diana
washing her selfe in a Well, hee was immediately turned into an Hart,
and so was slain of his owne Dogs; may bee meant, That when a man
casteth his eyes on the vaine and soone fading beauty of the world,
consenting thereto in his minde, he seemeth to bee turned into a brute
beast, and so to be slaine through the inordinate desire of his owne
affects.... And in this feined jest of Lucius Apuleius is comprehended
a figure of mans life, ministring most sweet and delectable matter, to
such as shall be desirous to read the same. The which if your honourable
Lordship will accept and take in good part, I shall not onely thinke
my small travell and labour well employed, but also receive a further
comfort to attempt some more serious matter, which may be more
acceptable to your Lordship: desiring the same to excuse my rash and
bold enterprise at this time, as I nothing doubt of your Lordships
goodnesse. To whome I beseech Almighty God to impart long life,
with encrease of much honour.

From Vniversity Colledge in Oxenford, the xviij. of September, 1566.
Your Honours most bounden,
WIL. ADLINGTON.
------------------------------------------------------------
Golding Ovid Book III: The Hounds of Acteaon
http://www.elizabethanauthors.org/ovid03.htm

Barbara Flues wrote:

<<In a pamphlet Harts, Hounds and Hedingham Elisabeth Sears, with the assistance of research into land deeds and transfers furnished by Charles Bird, provides evidence of a relationship between the names of Actaeon's pack and the environs of the Earl of Oxford's Castle Hedingham.>>
..........................................................
8. Spring (Ovid's Pack Laelaps [hurricane]) Oxford property assn:
A wood listed in the tithe map in Sybie Hedingham. Parcel #698.

9. Hunter (Ovid's Pack Theron) Oxford property assn:
Hunter's Wood, in sight of the Castle.

10. Lightfoot (Ovid's pack Pterelas [launcher of feathers]) Oxford
property assn: A wood name at Southey Green, in sight of the Castle.

19. Fleetwood (Ovid's Pack Dromas) Oxford property assn:
Adjacent parish of Sibie Hedingham, most of which DeVere property.

22. Bowman (Ovid's Pack Tigride) Oxford property assn:
Bowman field (Beaumont). #174

23. Roister (Ovid's Pack Alce) Oxford property assn:
Roister's Wood, in the parish of Sibie Hedingham.

28. Cole (Ovid's Pack -- none) Oxford property assn: Cole field, #746.

36. Ringwood (Ovid's Pack Hylactor [barker]) Oxford property assn:
Ringewood, a 26-acre parcel in sight of Hedingham Keep. #80
--------------------------------------------------
http://shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org/unpacking-merry-wives/

Unpacking Merry Wives of Windsor
Posted by: SOF October 7, 1999 by Robert Brazil

<<In Merry Wives Act II, scene 1, there is a reference from Ovid's Metamorphoses to the mythological hunter Actaeon and his pack of dogs, among which is one named "Ringwood."

PISTOL. He woos both high and low, both rich and poor,

Both young and old, one with another, Ford;

He loves the gallimaufry. Ford, perpend.

FORD. Love my wife!

PISTOL. With liver burning hot. Prevent, or go thou,

Like Sir Actaeon he, with Ringwood at thy heels.

Ringwood is a name unique to the first English translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses.

The historical credit for the translation goes to Arthur Golding, but there is mounting evidence that the brilliant and youthfully exuberant translation was actually done by Golding's nephew, the teenaged Edward deVere. Many Oxfordians find it unlikely that the starchy Calvinist Golding did more than edit or guide, with possible disapproval, his nephew's bawdy translation, one that set a new standard for bizarre extrapolation.

In myth, Actaeon traveled with a large pack of dogs, all given colorful names in the original Greek version, names that were adapted by Ovid for the Latin version. But, as Betty Sears has pointed out, the English translator took the names into a new dimension (Sears 910).

The final dog is named Ringwood in the original Vere/Golding translation. In the original the line is given: " ... the tother Chorle who ever gnoorring went,/ And Ringwood with a shyrle loud mouth the which he freely spent, /with divers mo whose names to tell it were but losse of tyme."

Ringwood is the invention of Vere/Golding; it's not in Ovid. Teasing out the name Ringwood from implications in the Latin and Greek was a clever creative move on the part of the translator.

"et acutae vocis Hylactor quosque referre mora est.... "

"et acutae vocis Hylactor" = "and shrill voiced Barker"

"quosque referre mora est" = "and others whom it were to long to name"

As Betty Sears points out in her 1997 publication Harts, "Hounds, & Hedingham," Ringwood was the name of a forest in the environs of Castle Hedingham, ancestral home of the earls of Oxford.

Sears offers a compelling study of the Vere connections with the names of the dogs in Actaeon's pack that were altered by the English translator for the 1567 version of The Metamorphoses (Book 3, lines 200 and forward). Andrew Hannas, a Latin scholar, has contributed the following analysis:

"Actually, there is an etymological suggestion, though probably not accurate, of 'wood' in "Hylactor" [from Greek 'hylakteo--'bark, howl,' etc.], as "hyle" in Greek means "wood[s], forest" (LiddellScott). "Ringwood" could be a colorful if somewhat fanciful attempt to give "barker" by its "etymology"-a dog that "howls in the wood"-as opposed to merely rendering the name by that of a familiar forest. >>
-----------------------------------------------------------
. http://tinyurl.com/p3la9rz
. P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses, (Golding)
.
. Too the Right Honourable and his singular good Lorde
. [R]obert [E]arle of [LEYCES]ter, Baron of Denbygyh,
. Knyght of the moste noble order of the Garter etc.,
. Arthur Goldyng gent, wisheth continuance of health,
. with prosperous estate and fcelicitie.
...........................................................
. Book 3 : Actaeon & Diana = [R.E.LEYCES.] & Elizabeth?
.
As soone a{S} with h{I}r scar{L}et whe{E}les ne{X}t morning bringeth light,
We will about our worke againe. But now Hiperion bright
Is in the middes of Heaven, and sear[E]s the fiel[D]es with fi[R]ie rayes.
T[A]ke up your toyles, and cease your worke, and let us go our wayes.
.
{SILEX-} 6
[EDRA] 9
.
Prob. of {SILEX-}[EDRA] in Metamorphoses ~ 1 in 1,250,000

http://www.nps.gov/features/yell/tours/fountainpaint/silexspring.htm
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap140827.html
..............................................................
He wist not whither (having staid his pastime till the morrow)
Comes Cadmus Nephew to this thicke: and entring in with sorrow
(Such was his cursed cruell fate) saw Phebe where she washt.
The Damsels at the sight of man quite out of countnance dasht,
(Bicause they EVERichone were BARE and naked to the quicke)
Did beate their handes against their breasts, and cast out such a shricke,
That all the wood did ring thereof: and clinging to their dame
Did all they could to hide both hir and eke them[S]elves fro shame.
But Ph[E]be was of personage so [C]omly and so tall,
That b[Y] the middle of hir neck[E] she overpeerd them al[L].
Such colour as appear[E]s in Heaven by Phebus b[R]oken rayes
Directly shining on the Cloudes, or such as is alwayes
The colour of the Morning Cloudes before the Sunne doth show,
Such sanguine colour in the face of Phoebe gan to glowe
There standing naked in his sight. Who though she had hir gard
Of Nymphes about hir: yet she turnde hir bodie from him ward.
.............................................
___ <= 19 =>
.
. D i d a l l t h e y c o u l d t o h i
. d e b o t h h i r a n d e k e t h e m
. [S] e l v e s f r o s h a m e B u t P h
. [E] b e w a s o f p e r s o n a g e s o
. [C] o m l y a n d s o t a l l,T h a t b
. [Y] t h e m i d d l e o f h i r n e c k
. [E] s h e o v e r p e e r d t h e m a l
. [L].S u c h c o l o u r a s a p p e a r
. [E] s i n H e a v e n b y P h e b u s b
. [R] o k e n r a y e s
.
[R.E.LEYCES.] -19 : Prob. in Metamorphoses ~ 1 in 275
(Dedicated to [R]obert [E]arle of [LEYCES]ter!)
................................................
[R.E.LEYCES.] shortest skip in KJV: 1491
---------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.luminarium.org/renascence-editions/lodge/lodge1.html
.
. THOMAS LODGE: Rosalynde. Euphues golden Legacie,
. found after his death in his Cell at {SILEX}[EDRA],
.
Did not Rosalinde content her Rosader? The
Forrest[E]r at this smiling, {S}hooke his head,
an[D] folding h{I}s armes made this merrie [R]ep{L}y.
*TRUTH gentle Swaine*, Rosad{E}r h[A]th his Rosalynde,
but as I{X}ion had Juno, who thinking to possesse a
goddesse, only imbraced a clowd : in these imaginary
fruitions of fancie, I resemble the birds that
fed them selves with *ZEUXIS painted GRAPES* ;
...........................................................
. <= 28 =>
.
. T h e F o r r e s t[E]r a t t h i s s m i l i n g{S}h
. o o k e h i s h e a d,a n[D]f o l d i n g h{I}s a r m
. e s m a d e t h i s m e r r i e[R]e p{L}y*T R U T H g
. e n t l e S w a i n e*R o s a d{E}r h[A]t h h i s R o
. s a l y n d e,b u t a s I{X}i o n h a d J u[N]o,w h o
. t h i n k i n g t o p o s s e s s e a g o d d e s[S]e,
. o n l y i m b r a c e d a c l o w d
.
{SILEX-} 26
[EDRANS] 30 :
...........................................................
. Rosalynde: SALADYNES SONNET.
.
. If it be *TRUE* that heavens eternall course
. With [R]est[L]ess[E] swa[Y] and [C]eas[E]les[S] turning glides,
. If aire inconstant be, and swelling sourse
. Turne and returns with many fluent tides,
. If earth in winter summers pride *eSTRANGE* ,
. And Nature seemeth onely faire in change.
...................................................
[R.LEYCES] 4 : Prob. in Sonnet ~ 1 in 200,000
................................................
[R.LEYCES] shortest pos. skip in KJV: 392
...................................................
. If it be *TRUE* that our immortall spright,
. Derivde from heavenly pure, in wandring still
. In noveltie and *STRANGEnesse* doth delight,
. And by discoVEREnt power discerneth ill,
. And if the body for to worke his best
. Doth with the seasons change his place of rest.
.
. Whence *COMES* it that (inforst by furious Skies)
. I change both place and soyle, but not my hart ?
. Yet salve not in this change my maladies ?
. Whence growes it that each object workes my smart ?
. Alas I see my faith procures my misse,
. And change in love against my nature is.
-------------------------------------------
On Wed, 12 May 1999, Terry Ross <***@bcpl.net> wrote:

<<What we have is a marginal note to a passage of praise
for *Spenser & Daniel* . Here's the main passage
(taken from *The Shakespeare Allusion Book* 1:23):

[Polimanteia 1595]

Let divine Bartasse, eternally praise-worthie for his weeks worke, say
the best thinges were made first: Let other countries (sweet Cambridge)
envie, (yet admire) my Virgil, thy petrarch, divine Spenser. And
unlesse I erre, (a thing easie in such simplicitie) deluded by dearly
beloved Delia, and fortunatelie fortunate Cleopatra; Oxford thou maist
extoll thy courte-deare-verse happie Daniell, whose sweete refined muse,
in contracted shape, were sufficient amongst men, to gaine pardon of
the sinne to Rosemond, pittie to distressed Cleopatra, and
everliving praise to her loving Delia:

This passage has baffled some other anti-Stratfordians. Some, including
Volker (who has perhaps never seen the words in context), imagine that
"Oxford thou maist extoll thy courte-deare-verse" is meant as praise of
Edward de Vere, but the passage clearly shows that Samuel Daniel (a man
of whom his alma mater, Oxford, could be justly proud, just as Cambridge
could brag on Spenser) and not Vere (who is not even mentioned) is
being praised here. [Slightly off-topic: note that Covell's use
of "everliving" contains no suggestion that Delia is dead.]

The marginal note accompanying this passage reads,

. All praiseworthy. Lucrecia Sweet Shakspeare.
. Eloquent Gaveston. Wanton Adonis. Watsons heyre.
. So well graced Anthonie deserveth immortall
. praise from the hand of that divine Lady who like
. Corrina contending with Pindarus was oft victorious.
..........................................................
The marginal note accompanying this passage reads,

. Al[L] prais[E]worth[Y]. Lucre[C]ia Swe[E]t Shak[S]peare.
. Eloquent Gaveston. Wanton Adonis. Watsons heyre.
. So well graced Anthonie deserveth immortall
. praise from the hand of that divine Lady who like
. Corrina contending with Pindarus was oft victorious.

[LEYCES] 6 : Prob. in marginal note ~ 1 in 58,000
................................................
[LEYCES] shortest pos. skip in KJV: 24

1 Peter 2:20 : For what glory is it, if, when ye be buffeted for your faults, ye sha[L]l take it patiently? but if, wh[E]n ye do well, and suffer for it, [Y]e take it patiently, this is a[C]ceptable with God. For even h[E]reunto were ye called: becau[S]e Christ also suffered for us,
..........................................................
The Polimanteia was dedicated to the [E]arle of [LEYCES]ter's
step-son & protege: Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex (1566-1601)
.
Spenser & Daniel both wrote dedications to Mary *SIDNEY* wife of
[LEYCES]ter's best friend: Henry Herbert Earl of Pembroke (1534-1601)

Robert Dudley, 1st [E]arle of [LEYCES]ter,
(24 June 1532 - 4 Sept. 1588) in 1565 knighted
Sir Thomas Lucy (24 April 1532 - 7 July 1600)

[LEYCES]ter is said to have disuaded Lucy from
prosecuting Shakspere for his deer poaching.
------------------------------------------------------
(end of) Satire 2 - by John Marston

But I am vext, when swarmes of Iulians
Are still manur'd by lewd Precisians.
Who scorning Church rites, take the simbole vp
As s[L]ou[E]nl[Y], as [C]ar[E]le[S]se Courtiers slup
.................................................
. A s s
. [L] o u
. [E] n l
. [Y],a s
. [C] a r
. [E] l e
. [S] s e
.
[LEYCES] 3 : Prob. at end ~ 1 in 1990
................................................
Their mutton gruell. Fie, who can with-hold,
But must of force make his milde Muse a scold?
When that he greeued sees, with red vext eyes,
That Athens antient large immunities,
Are eye sores to the fates; Poore cells forlorne!
Ist not enough you are made an abiect scorne
To iering Apes, but must the shadow too
Of auncient substance, be thus wrung from you?
O split my hart, least it doe breake with rage
To see th'immodest loosenes of our age.
Immodest loosenes? fie too gentle word,
When euery signe can brothelrie afford.
When lust doth sparkle from our females eyes
And modestie, is rousted in the skies.
Tell me Galliottae , what meanes this signe
When impropriat gentiles will turne Capuchine ?
Sooner be damn'd. O stuffe Satyricall?
When rapine feedes our pomp, pomp ripes our fall.
When the guest trembles at his hosts swart looke,
The sonne, doth feare his stepdame, that hath tooke
His mothers place for lust, the twin-borne brother
Malinges his mate, that first came from his mother.
When to be huge, is to be deadly sick,
When vertuous pesants, will not spare to lick
The deuils taile for poore promotion.
When for neglect, slubbred Deuotion
Is wan with greefe. When Rufus , yawnes for death
Of him that gaue him vndeserued breath.
When Hermus makes a worthy question,
Whether of Wright , as Paraphonalion
A siluer pispot fits his Lady dame?
Or i'st too good? a pewter best became.
When Agrippina poysons Claudius sonne,
That all the world to her own brat might run.
When the husband, gapes that his stale wife would die,
That he might once be in by curtesie .
The big paunch'd wife, longs for her loth'd mates death,
That she might haue more ioyntures here on earth.
When tenure for short yeeres, (by many a one)
Is thought right good be turn'd forth Littleton ,
All to be headdie , or free hold at least
When tis all one, for long life be a beast,
A slaue, as haue a short term'd tenancie
When dead's the strength of Englands yeomanrie,
When invndation of luxuriousnes,
Fatts all the world with such grosse beastlines.
Who can abstaine? what modest braine can hold,
But he must make his shamefac'd Muse a scold?
------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2017-10-28 17:18:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
---------------------------------------------------
http://shakespeareauthorship.com/peachmb.html
.
Oxfordian Myths: The Oxford Anagram in "Minerva Britanna"
by Terry Ross: http://tinyurl.com/zv93mdf
.
<<The title page of Henry Peacham's 1612 emblem book Minerva
Britanna has long fascinated antistratfordians: <<A curtain is drawn
to hide a figure, the hand only of which is protruding. It has just
written the words "MENTE VIDEBOR" -- "By the mind I shall be seen."
Around the scroll are the words "Vivitur ingenio cetera mortis erunt"
-- one lives in one's genius, other things shall be in death.>>
.
.
. *MENTE VIDEBOR(i)*
. *TIB(i) NOM. DE VERE*
. Thy Name is De Vere.
.
.
When Peacham uses someone's name in a Latin poem or epigram, he gives
the Latin version of the name. The Latin form of "DE VERE" is "VERUS."
.
The use of an abbreviation "nom." for "nomen."
Peacham's anagrams never in his genuine uses abbreviations.
.
. *MENTE VIDEBOR*
. *DE VERE IN TOMB*
But Art -- what about "Vere boned Tim"? Another of the boys in Oxford's entourage, no doubt. Besides, this anagram has a higher INIPNC score than "De Vere in tomb [sic]", which moreoVER isn't proper English.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. A Midsummer Night's Dream: II, ii
.
But Art -- "Lysander riddles very prettily" is an anagram of "Ver did rear ends slyly"! Thus it confirms the accusations of Howard and Arundel.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_______ <= 7 =>
.
. [V] I {V} I T U R
. [I] N G {E} N I O
. [C] Æ (T) E {R} A M
. [O] R (T) I S {E} R
. [U N T]
.
{VERE} 8
[VICOU/NT] 7
The word "Vicount [sic]" does not occur as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 7 in the above text, Art. In fact, it does not appear in the above text as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip! I realize that you can neither read not count, Art, but your Dunning-Kruger syndrome is getting out of hand!

Incidentally, Art, are you aware that you have a competitor in the pursuit of crackpot cryptography?

https://www.theguardian.com/culture/2017/oct/28/william-shakespeare-buried-westminster-abbey-alexander-waugh

What do you think (usual disclaimer) of Waugh's "decipherment", Art? While you are of course in no danger of having to relinquish your "Noonedafter" sobriquet, perhaps the competition is closer than I realized!

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
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