Discussion:
GRAND MASTERS OF THE FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS IN ENGLAND
(too old to reply)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-03-11 03:43:38 UTC
Permalink
<<Spenser was buried, at his own request, near the tomb of Chaucer,
in Westminster Abbey. His funeral was at the expense of the Earl of
Essex. The pall was held by brother poets. Mournful elegies and poems,
together with the pens that wrote them, were thrown into his grave.
Gadzooks! Zounds! This "throwing into the grave" of Spenser invites
us to imagine that Shakespeare attended the funeral, wrote something
mournful, and threw it and his pen into the grave along with other
notable literati.>>
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Sounds like a Masonic {POETS} funeral!
------------------------------------------
. [Hamlet (Quarto 2) 5.1]
.
Clown: What is he that builds {S}tronger
. {T}hen eyth{E}r [THE MAS{O}N],
. the Shy{P}wright, or the Carpenter.
........................................
. <= 8 =>
.
. W h a t
. i s h e t h a t
. b u i l (d) s {S} t
. r o n g (e) r {T} h
. e n e y (t) h {E} r
. [T H E M (A) S {O} N]
. t h e S (h) y {P} w
. r i g h t, o r t
. h e C a r p e n
. t e r.
.
{POETS} -8: Prob. in question: ~ 1 in 660
.
Answer: (hated) [M(A)S{O}N] {POETS} ?
------------------------------------------
So, Don,.... are you a MASON (or a Lewis).
Don wrote:

<<I hardly know the difference between masonry, Scottish Rites, Freemasons, and Craft Guilds. Can't even tell if I'm a "Lewis," or son of a Mason, since my step-father was one.>>

I'll take that as a yes.

Don wrote:
<<Fun to see them juggling Masonic with other orders on the "Secret of Oak Island" TV series, finding out clues linking Knights Templar with some of the treasure maps and lore in the archives of Masonic orders, going all the way back to the Sinclairs of Scotland. One of the tempting possible treasures in the underground vaults they search is supposed to be old parchment, maybe a Shakespeare lost play? Masons do keep secrets and have their labyrinth of exclusive communications, I suppose. BTW, they seem to need help decoding something that looks vaguely Templar.

My understanding is that Catholic Church early on supported Masonic orders in England and Scotland, then sometime after 17th century, when Scottish Freemasonry was strong, made papal decisions against it, on the grounds that it allowed indifferent attitudes to religion. Flat out Satanic, some said. Don't know if the possible link between Knights Templar and Freemasons has a similar Catholic Church controversy.>>
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Moore C W The Freemasons Monthly Magazine Vol IV 1845"

GRAND MASTERS, OR PATRONS, OF THE FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS IN ENGLAND,
from the coming in of the Saxons to the year 1839, with brief
references to remarkable events. Compiled and condensed from
the most authoritative records, by Br. Thomas Joseph Tennison,
President of the Masonic Council of Armagh, Ireland.

1422. Henry Chichely , Archbishop of Canterbury, was Grand Master Mason
under Henry V., the renowned conqueror of France. By the King’s direction
he rebuilt the Palace and Abbey of Sheen, now called Richmond-on-Thames.

William Wanefleet , Bishop of Winchester, Grand Master, built Eton College,
and King’s College, also founded Christ’s and Queen’s Colleges, Cambridge,
at the command of Henry VI., whilst Brother Wanefleet, at his own cost,
built Magdalen Hall, Oxford. In the third year of Henry’s reign, an ignorant
and illiterate Parliament passed an act "forbidding Freemasons to confederate
in chapters or congregations ; those so offending to be judged felons;
visiting Brethren to be punished by fine or imprisonment.” But this grossly
tyrannical piece of legislative humbug was never enforced, and is fully
explained in the learned Coke’s Institutes, Part. III. fol. 19.

1471. Richard Beachamp y Bishop of Sarum, Grand Master. He repaired the Royal
Castles, after the depopulating wars between the houses of York & Lancaster.

1485. The Grand Master of the Knights of Malta.

1493. John Islip , Bishop of Winchester.

1500. Henry VII, having been chosen Protector by the Grand Master and
Fellows of the Order of St. John at Rhodes, (afterwards Malta} he selected
as his Wardens, John Islip, Abbot of Westminster, and Sir Reginald Bray,
Knight of the Garter, and by them summoned a Lodge of Master Masons in the
Palace, with whom he marched in procession to the East-end of Westminster
Abbey, and with his own hand levelled the footstone of his celebrated
chapel, June 24, (St. John’s day,) 1502.

Deputy Grand Master, Sir Reginald Bray, Knight.

Cardinal Wolsey was, in the following reign, chosen Grand Master. He built
Hampton Court, Whitehall, College of Christ, Oxford, and several splendid
edifices, which, when he was hurled from “The full meridian of his glory,”
to merited degradation, were forfeited to his false and fickle monarch,
the subtle and truculent Henry VIII.

Thomas Cromwell Earl of Essex, was the next Grand Master.
He built St. James’s Palace, Christ’s Hospital, Greenwich Castle.

On Cromwell’s fall & decollation, John Touchet Lord Audley, became Grand Master.

1552. At the death of Henry, Protector Somerset was Grand Master,
and built Somerset House, which was forfeited to the Crown.
When the duke was beheaded, John Peynet, Bishop of Winchester,
was Grand Patron of Freemasons until the demise of Edward VI.

1561. Sir Thomas Sackville succeeded, and continued Grand Master, until the
accession of Elizabeth, who “ finding that Freemasons had certain secrets
which could not be revealed to her,” she sent an armed force to break up
their annual Grand Lodge at York, on St John’s day, the 27th of December;
but some of the commanding officers having been initiated, returned, and
made so favorable a report to her Majesty, that she ever afterwards
patronized and protected them.

1567. When Sir Thomas Sackville demitted, the Earl of Bedford
was chosen in the North ; and, in the South.

1570. Sir Thomas Gresham, who built the Exchange, and which was burned in 1838.

1588 to 1603. George Hastings , Earl of Huntingdon.

1602. Charles Howard , Lord of Effingham, (who, when Lord Admiral, took
or destroyed the celebrated Spanish Armada,) was Grand Master in the
South till 1558, and the Earl of Huntingdon till the Queen died. Sir
Walter Raleigh (who, without any government assistance, had colonised
New England), the Earl of Essex, the generous and affable Norfolk, and
indeed most of the great men of this interesting period, were all Freemasons.

1607. James I., a Brother Mason, Grand Patron by Prerogative, appointed the
celebrated Inigo Jones, Grand Master of all England, in which capacity
he served for eleven years. His Wardens were the Earl of Pembroke, and
*Nicholas Stone*, Esq., who, attended by many Brothers attired in Craft
clothing, walked to White Hall, and laid the first stone of the
Banquetting Hall, with knocks, huzzas, and sound of trumpets,
throwing a purse of gold upon the stone for the operatives
to drink “To the King and Craft!"

1618. William Herbert , Earl of Pembroke, was chosen Grand Master.
He appointed Inigo Jones his Deputy.

Charles I., a Royal Mason and Grand Patron by Prerogative ;
under him the Earl of Darnley, Grand Master, who erected
the beautiful gate of the Physick Gardens, at Oxford.

1630-1-2. Henry Danvers , Earl of Danby.

1634. Thomas Howard , Earl of Arundel, was Grand Master.
----------------------------------------------------------------
Don wrote:
<<But you would be the one to make a case for Shakespeare's membership in Freemasons, maybe draw lines between known Freemasons in London during Shakespeare's time? Using Freemasons' symbolism, though, like the phoenix, doesn't add up to membership.>>
----------------------------------------------------
http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/ThomasSackville(1EDorset).htm

<<In co-operation with Thomas Norton [Thomas Sackville] wrote "The Tragedie of Gorboduc" but he handed over his other literary project "A myrroure for magistrates" to George Ferrers and William Baldwin after completing the 'Introduction'. During the year of 1561 he received the title of "Grandmaster of the Order of Freemasons". In 1563 he was once again elected to Parliament this time for Aylesbury. When he became thirty one years of age, he was knighted and raised to peerage as Lord Buckhurst which did take place on the eighth day of Jun of that year.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
[In first Quarto (1603) Guildenstern was GILDERSTONE]

Thomas Sackville, Lord Buckhurst, (1536-1608)
was the English dramatist that paved the way for Shakespeare.
Sackville was Grandmaster Freemason (1561-1567)
{Freemason => Stone Guild => Guildensteen}
---------------------------------------------------------------
Many Elizabethans (e.g., Edward Dyer, Francis Bacon,
_____________ John Dee & (maybe) William Stanley)
were Rosicrucians {Rosencrantz => Rosenkreutz}

In _Hamlet_ the Hermetic side is represented by Rosencrantz
The Masonic side is represented by Guildenstern
.............................................................
. Q1 Rossencraft Gilderstone
. Q2 Rosencrans Guyldensterne
. F1 Rosincrane Guildensterne
. F2,3,4 Rosincross(e) Guildenstare

. Rosy Cross Stone Guild
. Rosicrucians Freemasons / the Craft
--------------------------------------------------------------
1607. James I., a Brother Mason, Grand Patron by Prerogative, appointed the
celebrated Inigo Jones, Grand Master of all England, in which capacity
he served for eleven years. His Wardens were the Earl of Pembroke, and
*Nicholas Stone*, Esq., who, attended by many Brothers attired in Craft
clothing, walked to White Hall, and laid the first stone of the
Banquetting Hall, with knocks, huzzas, and sound of trumpets,
throwing a purse of gold upon the stone for the operatives
to drink “To the King and Craft!"

1618. William Herbert , Earl of Pembroke, was chosen Grand Master.
He appointed Inigo Jones his Deputy.
--------------------------------------------------------------
http://91.1911encyclopedia.org/S/SH/SHAKESPEARE.htm
Loading Image...

<<The Stratford bust & monument must have been erected
on the N. wall. The design in its general aspect was one
often adopted by the "tombe-makers "of the period, and
according to Dugdale was executed by a *Fleming* resident
in London since 1567, Garratt Johnson (Gerard JANssen),
who was occasionally a collaborator with *Nicholas Stone*,
Esq., (Freemason Warden with William Herbert).
.............................................................
. Gerard JANssen / NICK Stone

. Q1 Rossencraft Gilderstone
. Q2 Rosencrans Guyldensterne
. F1 Rosincrane Guildensterne
. F2,3,4 Rosincross(e) Guildenstare

. Rosy Cross Stone Guild
. Rosicrucians Freemasons / the Craft
--------------------------------------------------------
Terry Ross wrote: <<The emblematic device at the head
of the [*MINERVA* Britanna] title page with its motto:
........................................................
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
. ("as you burn I consume myself")
. and its picture of *TWO (Masonic?) LIGHTED CANDLES*.>>
.
Loading Image...
. (3rd Masonic candle = arm + feather)
.
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
......................................................
_______ [M-A-S-ONS]: (cui e mel {TU}i)
_______________ (and from your honey)
--------------------------------------------------------
_____ {UT} [MASTER M-A-S-ONS]
..............................................
___ <= 3 x 7 =>
.
. {U} P o n t h e L i n e s a n d L i f e o f
. {T} H e F a m o u s S c e n i c k e P o e t
.
. [M A S T E R] W I L L I A M S H A K E S P E
. [A] R E T h o s e h a n d s w h i c h y o u
. [S] O c l a p t g o n o w a n d w r i n g Y
. [O] u B r i t a i n e s b r a v e f o r d o
. [N] e a r e S h a k e s p e a r e s d a y e
. [S]

[MASONS] 21 : Prob. at start of poem ~ 1 in 9460
---------------------------------------------
William Webbe (c. 1550-1591)
A Discourse of English Poetrie 1586
http://www.bartleby.com/359/14.html

A Preface to the Noble {POETS} of Englande. (the end)
.......................................................................
If the motion bee worthy your regard, it is enough to mooue it; if not,
my worde(S) woulde simply preuaile in perswadi(N)g you; and therefore
I rest vppon thys (O)nely request, that of your courtesie(S) you wyll
graunt passage, vnder your f(A)uourable corrections, for this my si(M)ple
censure of English Poetry, wherein, if you please to runne it ouer, you
shall knowe breefely myne opinion of the most part of your accustomed Poets,
and particularly, in his place, the lyttle somewhat which I haue sifted
out of my weake brayne concerning thys reformed versifying. - W.W.
.......................................................................
. <= 31 =>
.
. m y w o r d e (S) w o u l d e s i m p l y p r e u a i l e i n p
. e r s w a d i (N) g y o u;a n d t h e r e f o r e I r e s t v p
. p o n t h y s (O) n e l y r e q u e s t,t h a t o f y o u r c o
. u r t e s i e (S) y o u w y l l g r a u n t p a s s a g e,v n d
. e r y o u r f (A) u o u r a b l e c o r r e c t i o n s,f o r t
. h i s m y s i (M) p l e c e n s u r e o f E n g l i s h P o e t r y,
.
(MASONS) -31 : prob. at end of Preface ~ 1 in 1730
-------------------------------------------------------------------
. Cymbeline (Folio 1, 1623) Act 4, scene 2
.
Imogen: I am *NOTHING* ; or if not,
. *NOTHING* to be were better: This was my {MASTER},
. A VERy valiant Britaine, and a good,
. That heere by Mountaineers lyes slaine: Alas,
. There is no more such {MASTER}s: I may wander
. From East to Occident, cry out for Seruice,
. Try many, all good: *sERVE TRUly: nEVER*
. Finde such another {MASTER}.

Lucius: 'Lacke, good youth:
. Thou mou'st no lesse with thy complaining, then
. Thy {MAISTER} in bleeding: say his name, good Friend.

Imogen: [RICHARD d][U CHAMP]: If I do lye, and do
. No harme by it, though the Gods heare, I hope
. They'l pardon it. Say you Sir?

Lucius: Thy name?

Imogen: [FIDEL]e Sir.

Lucius: Thou doo'st approue thy selfe the very same:
. Thy Name well fits thy Faith; thy Faith, thy Name:
---------------------------------------------------------
<<[RICHARD d]e BEA[UCHAMP]:
appointed Freemason Grand {MASTER} by Edward IV.>>

1471. Richard Beachamp y Bishop of Sarum, Grand Master. He repaired the Royal
Castles, after the depopulating wars between the houses of York & Lancaster.
----------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
Don
2018-03-11 06:37:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<Spenser was buried, at his own request, near the tomb of Chaucer,
in Westminster Abbey. His funeral was at the expense of the Earl of
Essex. The pall was held by brother poets. Mournful elegies and poems,
together with the pens that wrote them, were thrown into his grave.
Gadzooks! Zounds! This "throwing into the grave" of Spenser invites
us to imagine that Shakespeare attended the funeral, wrote something
mournful, and threw it and his pen into the grave along with other
notable literati.>>
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Sounds like a Masonic {POETS} funeral!
Didn't mean to suggest Shakespeare threw the other literati into the grave.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
------------------------------------------
. [Hamlet (Quarto 2) 5.1]
.
Clown: What is he that builds {S}tronger
. {T}hen eyth{E}r [THE MAS{O}N],
. the Shy{P}wright, or the Carpenter.
........................................
. <= 8 =>
.
. W h a t
. i s h e t h a t
. b u i l (d) s {S} t
. r o n g (e) r {T} h
. e n e y (t) h {E} r
. [T H E M (A) S {O} N]
. t h e S (h) y {P} w
. r i g h t, o r t
. h e C a r p e n
. t e r.
.
{POETS} -8: Prob. in question: ~ 1 in 660
.
Answer: (hated) [M(A)S{O}N] {POETS} ?
------------------------------------------
So, Don,.... are you a MASON (or a Lewis).
<<I hardly know the difference between masonry, Scottish Rites, Freemasons, and Craft Guilds. Can't even tell if I'm a "Lewis," or son of a Mason, since my step-father was one.>>
I'll take that as a yes.
Stepfather wasn't amused when I made comments about Masonic symbols of leather apron, geometry and measuring devices. But I eased up on that about the time I read how much of Washington, D.C. is planned along Masonic lines and symbols, even the paper money.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<Fun to see them juggling Masonic with other orders on the "Secret of Oak Island" TV series, finding out clues linking Knights Templar with some of the treasure maps and lore in the archives of Masonic orders, going all the way back to the Sinclairs of Scotland. One of the tempting possible treasures in the underground vaults they search is supposed to be old parchment, maybe a Shakespeare lost play? Masons do keep secrets and have their labyrinth of exclusive communications, I suppose. Can't reveal more or I'd have to kill you. BTW, they seem to need help decoding something that looks vaguely Templar.
My understanding is that Catholic Church early on supported Masonic orders in England and Scotland, then sometime after 17th century, when Scottish Freemasonry was strong, made papal decisions against it, on the grounds that it allowed indifferent attitudes to religion. Flat out Satanic, some said. Don't know if the possible link between Knights Templar and Freemasons has a similar Catholic Church controversy.>>
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Moore C W The Freemasons Monthly Magazine Vol IV 1845"
GRAND MASTERS, OR PATRONS, OF THE FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS IN ENGLAND,
from the coming in of the Saxons to the year 1839, with brief
references to remarkable events. Compiled and condensed from
the most authoritative records, by Br. Thomas Joseph Tennison,
President of the Masonic Council of Armagh, Ireland.
1422. Henry Chichely , Archbishop of Canterbury, was Grand Master Mason
under Henry V., the renowned conqueror of France. By the King’s direction
he rebuilt the Palace and Abbey of Sheen, now called Richmond-on-Thames.
William Wanefleet , Bishop of Winchester, Grand Master, built Eton College,
and King’s College, also founded Christ’s and Queen’s Colleges, Cambridge,
at the command of Henry VI., whilst Brother Wanefleet, at his own cost,
built Magdalen Hall, Oxford. In the third year of Henry’s reign, an ignorant
and illiterate Parliament passed an act "forbidding Freemasons to confederate
in chapters or congregations ; those so offending to be judged felons;
visiting Brethren to be punished by fine or imprisonment.” But this grossly
tyrannical piece of legislative humbug was never enforced, and is fully
explained in the learned Coke’s Institutes, Part. III. fol. 19.
1471. Richard Beachamp y Bishop of Sarum, Grand Master. He repaired the Royal
Castles, after the depopulating wars between the houses of York & Lancaster.
1485. The Grand Master of the Knights of Malta.
1493. John Islip , Bishop of Winchester.
1500. Henry VII, having been chosen Protector by the Grand Master and
Fellows of the Order of St. John at Rhodes, (afterwards Malta} he selected
as his Wardens, John Islip, Abbot of Westminster, and Sir Reginald Bray,
Knight of the Garter, and by them summoned a Lodge of Master Masons in the
Palace, with whom he marched in procession to the East-end of Westminster
Abbey, and with his own hand levelled the footstone of his celebrated
chapel, June 24, (St. John’s day,) 1502.
Deputy Grand Master, Sir Reginald Bray, Knight.
Cardinal Wolsey was, in the following reign, chosen Grand Master. He built
Hampton Court, Whitehall, College of Christ, Oxford, and several splendid
edifices, which, when he was hurled from “The full meridian of his glory,”
to merited degradation, were forfeited to his false and fickle monarch,
the subtle and truculent Henry VIII.
Thomas Cromwell Earl of Essex, was the next Grand Master.
He built St. James’s Palace, Christ’s Hospital, Greenwich Castle.
On Cromwell’s fall & decollation, John Touchet Lord Audley, became Grand Master.
1552. At the death of Henry, Protector Somerset was Grand Master,
and built Somerset House, which was forfeited to the Crown.
When the duke was beheaded, John Peynet, Bishop of Winchester,
was Grand Patron of Freemasons until the demise of Edward VI.
1561. Sir Thomas Sackville succeeded, and continued Grand Master, until the
accession of Elizabeth, who “ finding that Freemasons had certain secrets
which could not be revealed to her,” she sent an armed force to break up
their annual Grand Lodge at York, on St John’s day, the 27th of December;
but some of the commanding officers having been initiated, returned, and
made so favorable a report to her Majesty, that she ever afterwards
patronized and protected them.
1567. When Sir Thomas Sackville demitted, the Earl of Bedford
was chosen in the North ; and, in the South.
1570. Sir Thomas Gresham, who built the Exchange, and which was burned in 1838.
1588 to 1603. George Hastings , Earl of Huntingdon.
1602. Charles Howard , Lord of Effingham, (who, when Lord Admiral, took
or destroyed the celebrated Spanish Armada,) was Grand Master in the
South till 1558, and the Earl of Huntingdon till the Queen died. Sir
Walter Raleigh (who, without any government assistance, had colonised
New England), the Earl of Essex, the generous and affable Norfolk, and
indeed most of the great men of this interesting period, were all Freemasons.
1607. James I., a Brother Mason, Grand Patron by Prerogative, appointed the
celebrated Inigo Jones, Grand Master of all England, in which capacity
he served for eleven years. His Wardens were the Earl of Pembroke, and
*Nicholas Stone*, Esq., who, attended by many Brothers attired in Craft
clothing, walked to White Hall, and laid the first stone of the
Banquetting Hall, with knocks, huzzas, and sound of trumpets,
throwing a purse of gold upon the stone for the operatives
to drink “To the King and Craft!"
1618. William Herbert , Earl of Pembroke, was chosen Grand Master.
He appointed Inigo Jones his Deputy.
Charles I., a Royal Mason and Grand Patron by Prerogative ;
under him the Earl of Darnley, Grand Master, who erected
the beautiful gate of the Physick Gardens, at Oxford.
1630-1-2. Henry Danvers , Earl of Danby.
1634. Thomas Howard , Earl of Arundel, was Grand Master.
----------------------------------------------------------------
<<But you would be the one to make a case for Shakespeare's membership in Freemasons, maybe draw lines between known Freemasons in London during Shakespeare's time? Using Freemasons' symbolism, though, like the phoenix, doesn't add up to membership.>>
----------------------------------------------------
http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/ThomasSackville(1EDorset).htm
<<In co-operation with Thomas Norton [Thomas Sackville] wrote "The Tragedie of Gorboduc" but he handed over his other literary project "A myrroure for magistrates" to George Ferrers and William Baldwin after completing the 'Introduction'. During the year of 1561 he received the title of "Grandmaster of the Order of Freemasons". In 1563 he was once again elected to Parliament this time for Aylesbury. When he became thirty one years of age, he was knighted and raised to peerage as Lord Buckhurst which did take place on the eighth day of Jun of that year.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
[In first Quarto (1603) Guildenstern was GILDERSTONE]
Thomas Sackville, Lord Buckhurst, (1536-1608)
was the English dramatist that paved the way for Shakespeare.
Sackville was Grandmaster Freemason (1561-1567)
{Freemason => Stone Guild => Guildensteen}
---------------------------------------------------------------
Many Elizabethans (e.g., Edward Dyer, Francis Bacon,
_____________ John Dee & (maybe) William Stanley)
were Rosicrucians {Rosencrantz => Rosenkreutz}
In _Hamlet_ the Hermetic side is represented by Rosencrantz
The Masonic side is represented by Guildenstern
.............................................................
. Q1 Rossencraft Gilderstone
. Q2 Rosencrans Guyldensterne
. F1 Rosincrane Guildensterne
. F2,3,4 Rosincross(e) Guildenstare
. Rosy Cross Stone Guild
. Rosicrucians Freemasons / the Craft
--------------------------------------------------------------
1607. James I., a Brother Mason, Grand Patron by Prerogative, appointed the
celebrated Inigo Jones, Grand Master of all England, in which capacity
he served for eleven years. His Wardens were the Earl of Pembroke, and
*Nicholas Stone*, Esq., who, attended by many Brothers attired in Craft
clothing, walked to White Hall, and laid the first stone of the
Banquetting Hall, with knocks, huzzas, and sound of trumpets,
throwing a purse of gold upon the stone for the operatives
to drink “To the King and Craft!"
1618. William Herbert , Earl of Pembroke, was chosen Grand Master.
He appointed Inigo Jones his Deputy.
--------------------------------------------------------------
http://91.1911encyclopedia.org/S/SH/SHAKESPEARE.htm
http://www.stratford-upon-avon.org/images/memorial.jpg
<<The Stratford bust & monument must have been erected
on the N. wall. The design in its general aspect was one
often adopted by the "tombe-makers "of the period, and
according to Dugdale was executed by a *Fleming* resident
in London since 1567, Garratt Johnson (Gerard JANssen),
who was occasionally a collaborator with *Nicholas Stone*,
Esq., (Freemason Warden with William Herbert).
.............................................................
. Gerard JANssen / NICK Stone
. Q1 Rossencraft Gilderstone
. Q2 Rosencrans Guyldensterne
. F1 Rosincrane Guildensterne
. F2,3,4 Rosincross(e) Guildenstare
. Rosy Cross Stone Guild
. Rosicrucians Freemasons / the Craft
--------------------------------------------------------
Terry Ross wrote: <<The emblematic device at the head
........................................................
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
. ("as you burn I consume myself")
. and its picture of *TWO (Masonic?) LIGHTED CANDLES*.>>
.
https://hankwhittemore.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/minerva-1.jpeg
. (3rd Masonic candle = arm + feather)
.
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
......................................................
_______ [M-A-S-ONS]: (cui e mel {TU}i)
_______________ (and from your honey)
--------------------------------------------------------
_____ {UT} [MASTER M-A-S-ONS]
..............................................
___ <= 3 x 7 =>
.
. {U} P o n t h e L i n e s a n d L i f e o f
. {T} H e F a m o u s S c e n i c k e P o e t
.
. [M A S T E R] W I L L I A M S H A K E S P E
. [A] R E T h o s e h a n d s w h i c h y o u
. [S] O c l a p t g o n o w a n d w r i n g Y
. [O] u B r i t a i n e s b r a v e f o r d o
. [N] e a r e S h a k e s p e a r e s d a y e
. [S]
[MASONS] 21 : Prob. at start of poem ~ 1 in 9460
---------------------------------------------
William Webbe (c. 1550-1591)
A Discourse of English Poetrie 1586
http://www.bartleby.com/359/14.html
A Preface to the Noble {POETS} of Englande. (the end)
.......................................................................
If the motion bee worthy your regard, it is enough to mooue it; if not,
my worde(S) woulde simply preuaile in perswadi(N)g you; and therefore
I rest vppon thys (O)nely request, that of your courtesie(S) you wyll
graunt passage, vnder your f(A)uourable corrections, for this my si(M)ple
censure of English Poetry, wherein, if you please to runne it ouer, you
shall knowe breefely myne opinion of the most part of your accustomed Poets,
and particularly, in his place, the lyttle somewhat which I haue sifted
out of my weake brayne concerning thys reformed versifying. - W.W.
.......................................................................
. <= 31 =>
.
. m y w o r d e (S) w o u l d e s i m p l y p r e u a i l e i n p
. e r s w a d i (N) g y o u;a n d t h e r e f o r e I r e s t v p
. p o n t h y s (O) n e l y r e q u e s t,t h a t o f y o u r c o
. u r t e s i e (S) y o u w y l l g r a u n t p a s s a g e,v n d
. e r y o u r f (A) u o u r a b l e c o r r e c t i o n s,f o r t
. h i s m y s i (M) p l e c e n s u r e o f E n g l i s h P o e t r y,
.
(MASONS) -31 : prob. at end of Preface ~ 1 in 1730
-------------------------------------------------------------------
. Cymbeline (Folio 1, 1623) Act 4, scene 2
.
Imogen: I am *NOTHING* ; or if not,
. *NOTHING* to be were better: This was my {MASTER},
. A VERy valiant Britaine, and a good,
. That heere by Mountaineers lyes slaine: Alas,
. There is no more such {MASTER}s: I may wander
. From East to Occident, cry out for Seruice,
. Try many, all good: *sERVE TRUly: nEVER*
. Finde such another {MASTER}.
. Thou mou'st no lesse with thy complaining, then
. Thy {MAISTER} in bleeding: say his name, good Friend.
Imogen: [RICHARD d][U CHAMP]: If I do lye, and do
. No harme by it, though the Gods heare, I hope
. They'l pardon it. Say you Sir?
Lucius: Thy name?
Imogen: [FIDEL]e Sir.
---------------------------------------------------------
appointed Freemason Grand {MASTER} by Edward IV.>>
1471. Richard Beachamp y Bishop of Sarum, Grand Master. He repaired the Royal
Castles, after the depopulating wars between the houses of York & Lancaster.
----------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
Should you want marginal Freemason activity in the U.S., you could examine the DeMolay organization for young people. (Are you now or ever have been a card carrying member of DeMolay?) Here's a list of notable past members, from
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DeMolay_International:

(quote)


The following is a partial list of the members of the DeMolay Hall of Fame. The full list is available on the DeMolay International Web site..[7]

Name Dates Profession Notes
Carl B. Albert 1908–2000 Politician Speaker of the United States House of Representatives (1971–1977)
Cecil D. Andrus b. 1931 Politician Governor of Idaho (1971–1977, 1987–1995), US Secretary of the Interior (1977–1981)
Reubin O'Donovan Askew 1928-2014 Politician 37th Governor of Florida (1971–1979)
Walter "Red" Barber 1908–1992 Sports broadcaster Recipient of Ford C. Frick Award from National Baseball Hall of Fame
Mel Blanc 1908–1989 Cartoon voice actor "Man of a Thousand Voices"
Frank Borman b. 1928 Astronaut Commander of Apollo 8, CEO of Eastern Airlines (1975–1986), recipient of Congressional Space Medal of Honor
Vance D. Brand b. 1931 Astronaut Flew on Apollo-Soyuz and three Space Shuttle missions
Richard Bryan b. 1937 Politician Governor of Nevada (1983-89), and as a United States Senator from Nevada from 1989 to 2001
Carroll A. Campbell, Jr. 1940–2005 Politician Governor of South Carolina (1987–1995)
Curtis L. Carlson 1914–1999 Entrepreneur, philanthropist Founded the Carlson Companies in 1938 as the Gold Bond Trading Company
Mel Carnahan 1934–2000 Politician Governor of Missouri (1991–2000)
Bill Clinton b. 1946 Politician 42nd President of the United States
Gary Collins 1938-2012 Actor Best known for Airport (1970)
Walt Disney 1901–1966 Cartoonist and entrepreneur Creator of Mickey Mouse; co-founder of The Walt Disney Company
Lee S. Dreyfus 1926-2008 Educator and politician Governor of Wisconsin (1979–1983)
Buddy Ebsen 1908–2003 Actor, singer, dancer Star of Barnaby Jones and The Beverly Hillbillies
David Goodnow b. 1939 Broadcast journalist Former anchor of CNN Headline News
Paul Harvey 1918–2009 ABC Radio broadcaster Recipient of Presidential Medal of Freedom
Mark Hatfield 1922-2011 Politician Governor of Oregon (1959–1967), US Senator (1967–1997)
Sgt. William Hoover Soldier and Patriot Injured while protecting Maj. Gen. Harold Greene in Afghanistan.
Burl Ives 1909–1995 Folk singer and actor Have a Holly Jolly Christmas, narrator of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer
Henry M. Jackson 1912–1983 Politician US Senator (1953–1983)
Brereton C. Jones b. 1939 Politician Governor of Kentucky (1991–1995)
Harmon Killebrew 1936-2011 Former professional baseball player and businessman Member of National Baseball Hall of Fame
Richard King b. 1938 Former President of Rotary International
Tom Leppert b. 1954 59th mayor of Dallas, Texas
Elmer Lower 1913–2011 Journalist, media executive Former President of ABC News
Bob Mathias 1930-2006 Olympic athlete; politician Two-time Olympic gold medalist; US Representative from California (1967–1975)
Edgar D. Mitchell 1930-2016 Astronaut Sixth man to walk on the Moon; Apollo 14 astronaut
Tom Osborne b. 1937 Athlete, coach, politician Former Head Coach at University of Nebraska; member of College Football Hall of Fame
Walter C. Ploeser 1907–1993 Businessman, politician US Representative from Missouri (1941–1949); US Ambassador to Paraguay (1957–1959), US Ambassador to Costa Rica (1970–1972)
Richard Riley b. 1933 Politician United States Secretary of Education under President Bill Clinton and the 111th Governor of South Carolina
Pete Rose b. 1941 Baseball player All-time Major League Baseball leader in hits, with 4,256
James Nicholas Rowe 1938–1989 United States Army Colonel Vietnam POW; author of Five Years to Freedom
Edward T. Schafer b. 1946 Politician 29th United States Secretary of Agriculture; Governor of North Dakota 1992 – 2000
Harold Schafer 1912–2001 Philanthropist and businessman Founder of Gold Seal Company
Lance P. Sijan 1942–1968 United States Air Force Captain Recipient of the Medal of Honor
Alex Spanos b. 1923 Owner of the San Diego Chargers
Jim Steeg b. 1950 American Sports Executive with the National Football League Credited with popularizing and improving the Super Bowl.
John Steinbeck 1902–1968 Pulitzer Prize-winning author and Nobel laureate Wrote The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men
John Cameron Swayze 1906–1995 Newscaster
Fran Tarkenton b. 1940 Professional football player; businessman; entrepreneur Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame and College Football Hall of Fame
John Wayne 1907–1979 Actor Won Academy Award for Best Actor for True Grit in 1969
Larry Wilcox b. 1947 Actor, Businessman
Samuel C. Williamson b. 1926 Freemason Right Worshipful Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, F&AM. Grand Treasurer Emeritus of DeMolay International
James C. Wright, Jr. 1922-2015 Politician Speaker of the United States House of Representatives (1987–1989)
(unquote)

I notice that Mel Blanc, Walt Disney, Mickey Mouse, Pete Rose, and John Wayne were members of DeMoley.
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-03-11 15:15:12 UTC
Permalink
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Moore C W The Freemasons Monthly Magazine Vol IV 1845"

GRAND MASTERS, OR PATRONS, OF THE FREE AND ACCEPTED MASONS IN ENGLAND,
from the coming in of the Saxons to the year 1839, with brief references
to remarkable events. Compiled and condensed from the most authoritative
records, by Br. Thomas Joseph Tennison, President of the Masonic
Council of Armagh, Ireland.

1422. Henry Chichely , Archbishop of Canterbury, was Grand Master Mason
under Henry V., the renowned conqueror of France. By the King’s direction
he rebuilt the Palace and Abbey of Sheen, now called Richmond-on-Thames.

William Wanefleet , Bishop of Winchester, Grand Master, built Eton College,
and King’s College, also founded Christ’s and Queen’s Colleges, Cambridge,
at the command of Henry VI., whilst Brother Wanefleet, at his own cost,
built Magdalen Hall, Oxford. In the third year of Henry’s reign, an ignorant
and illiterate Parliament passed an act "forbidding Freemasons to confederate
in chapters or congregations ; those so offending to be judged felons;
visiting Brethren to be punished by fine or imprisonment.” But this grossly
tyrannical piece of legislative humbug was never enforced, and is fully
explained in the learned Coke’s Institutes, Part. III. fol. 19.

1471. Richard Beachamp y Bishop of Sarum, Grand Master. He repaired the Royal
Castles, after the depopulating wars between the houses of York & Lancaster.

1485. The Grand Master of the Knights of Malta.

1493. John Islip , Bishop of Winchester.

1500. Henry VII, having been chosen Protector by the Grand Master and
Fellows of the Order of St. John at Rhodes, (afterwards Malta} he selected
as his Wardens, John Islip, Abbot of Westminster, and Sir Reginald Bray,
Knight of the Garter, and by them summoned a Lodge of Master Masons in the
Palace, with whom he marched in procession to the East-end of Westminster
Abbey, and with his own hand levelled the footstone of his celebrated
chapel, June 24, (St. John’s day,) 1502.

Deputy Grand Master, Sir Reginald Bray, Knight.

Cardinal Wolsey was, in the following reign, chosen Grand Master. He built
Hampton Court, Whitehall, College of Christ, Oxford, and several splendid
edifices, which, when he was hurled from “The full meridian of his glory,”
to merited degradation, were forfeited to his false and fickle monarch,
the subtle and truculent Henry VIII.

Thomas Cromwell Earl of Essex, was the next Grand Master.
He built St. James’s Palace, Christ’s Hospital, Greenwich Castle.

On Cromwell’s fall & decollation, John Touchet Lord Audley, became Grand Master.

1552. At the death of Henry, Protector Somerset was Grand Master,
and built Somerset House, which was forfeited to the Crown.
When the duke was beheaded, John Peynet, Bishop of Winchester,
was Grand Patron of Freemasons until the demise of Edward VI.

1561. Sir Thomas Sackville succeeded, and continued Grand Master, until the
accession of Elizabeth, who “ finding that Freemasons had certain secrets
which could not be revealed to her,” she sent an armed force to break up
their annual Grand Lodge at York, on St John’s day, the 27th of December;
but some of the commanding officers having been initiated, returned, and
made so favorable a report to her Majesty, that she ever afterwards
patronized and protected them.

1567. When Sir Thomas Sackville demitted, the Earl of Bedford
was chosen in the North ; and, in the South.

1570. Sir Thomas Gresham, who built the Exchange, and which was burned in 1838.

1588 to 1603. George Hastings , Earl of Huntingdon.

1602. Charles Howard , Lord of Effingham, (who, when Lord Admiral, took
or destroyed the celebrated Spanish Armada,) was Grand Master in the
South till 1558, and the Earl of Huntingdon till the Queen died. Sir
Walter Raleigh (who, without any government assistance, had colonised
New England), the Earl of Essex, the generous and affable Norfolk, and
indeed most of the great men of this interesting period, were all Freemasons.

1607. James I., a Brother Mason, Grand Patron by Prerogative, appointed the
celebrated Inigo Jones, Grand Master of all England, in which capacity he
served for eleven years. His Wardens were the Earl of Pembroke, and Nicholas
Stone, Esq., who, attended by many Brothers attired in Craft clothing,
walked to White Hall, and laid the first stone of the Banquetting Hall,
with knocks, huzzas, and sound of trumpets, throwing a purse of gold
upon the stone for the operatives to drink •

“To the King and Craft!"

1618. William Herbert , Earl of Pembroke, was chosen Grand Master.
He appointed Inigo Jones his Deputy.

Charles I., a Royal Mason and Grand Patron by Prerogative ;
under him the Earl of Darnley, Grand Master, who erected
the beautiful gate of the Physick Gardens, at Oxford.

1630-1-2. Henry Danvers , Earl of Danby.

1634. Thomas Howard , Earl of Arundel, was Grand Master.
----------------------------------------------------------------
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<But you would be the one to make a case for Shakespeare's membership in Freemasons,
maybe draw lines between known Freemasons in London during Shakespeare's time?
Using Freemasons' symbolism, though, like the phoenix, doesn't add up to membership.>>
----------------------------------------------------
http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/Bios/ThomasSackville(1EDorset).htm
"The Tragedie of Gorboduc" but he handed over his other literary project
"A myrroure for magistrates" to George Ferrers and William Baldwin after
completing the 'Introduction'. During the year of 1561 he received the title
of "Grandmaster of the Order of Freemasons". In 1563 he was once again elected
to Parliament this time for Aylesbury. When he became thirty one years of
age, he was knighted and raised to peerage as Lord Buckhurst which did take
place on the eighth day of June of that year.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
[In first Quarto (1603) Guildenstern was GILDERSTONE]
Thomas Sackville, Lord Buckhurst, (1536-1608)
was the English dramatist that paved the way for Shakespeare.
Sackville was Grandmaster Freemason (1561-1567)
{Freemason => Stone Guild => Guildensteen}
---------------------------------------------------------------
Many Elizabethans (e.g., Edward Dyer, Francis Bacon,
_____________ John Dee & (maybe) William Stanley)
were Rosicrucians {Rosencrantz => Rosenkreutz}
In _Hamlet_ the Hermetic side is represented by Rosencrantz
The Masonic side is represented by Guildenstern
.............................................................
. Q1 Rossencraft Gilderstone
. Q2 Rosencrans Guyldensterne
. F1 Rosincrane Guildensterne
. F2,3,4 Rosincross(e) Guildenstare
. Rosy Cross Stone Guild
. Rosicrucians Freemasons / the Craft
--------------------------------------------------------------
1607. James I., a Brother Mason, Grand Patron by Prerogative, appointed the
celebrated Inigo Jones, Grand Master of all England, in which capacity
he served for eleven years. His Wardens were the Earl of Pembroke, and
*Nicholas Stone*, Esq., who, attended by many Brothers attired in Craft
clothing, walked to White Hall, and laid the first stone of the
Banquetting Hall, with knocks, huzzas, and sound of trumpets,
throwing a purse of gold upon the stone for the operatives
to drink “To the King and Craft!"
1618. William Herbert , Earl of Pembroke, was chosen Grand Master.
He appointed Inigo Jones his Deputy.
--------------------------------------------------------------
http://91.1911encyclopedia.org/S/SH/SHAKESPEARE.htm
http://www.stratford-upon-avon.org/images/memorial.jpg
<<The Stratford bust & monument must have been erected
on the N. wall. The design in its general aspect was one
often adopted by the "tombe-makers "of the period, and
according to Dugdale was executed by a *Fleming* resident
in London since 1567, Garratt Johnson (Gerard JANssen),
who was occasionally a collaborator with *Nicholas Stone*,
Esq., (Freemason Warden with William Herbert).
.............................................................
. Gerard JANssen / NICK Stone
. Q1 Rossencraft Gilderstone
. Q2 Rosencrans Guyldensterne
. F1 Rosincrane Guildensterne
. F2,3,4 Rosincross(e) Guildenstare
. Rosy Cross Stone Guild
. Rosicrucians Freemasons / the Craft
--------------------------------------------------------
Terry Ross wrote: <<The emblematic device at the head
........................................................
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
. ("as you burn I consume myself")
. and its picture of *TWO (Masonic?) LIGHTED CANDLES*.>>
.
https://hankwhittemore.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/minerva-1.jpeg
. (3rd Masonic candle = arm + feather)
.
. "{UT} [A]lij[S], me c[ONS]u[M]e"
......................................................
_______ [M-A-S-ONS]: (cui e mel {TU}i)
_______________ (and from your honey)
--------------------------------------------------------
_____ {UT} [MASTER M-A-S-ONS]
..............................................
___ <= 3 x 7 =>
.
. {U} P o n t h e L i n e s a n d L i f e o f
. {T} H e F a m o u s S c e n i c k e P o e t
.
. [M A S T E R] W I L L I A M S H A K E S P E
. [A] R E T h o s e h a n d s w h i c h y o u
. [S] O c l a p t g o n o w a n d w r i n g Y
. [O] u B r i t a i n e s b r a v e f o r d o
. [N] e a r e S h a k e s p e a r e s d a y e
. [S]
[MASONS] 21 : Prob. at start of poem ~ 1 in 9460
---------------------------------------------
William Webbe (c. 1550-1591)
A Discourse of English Poetrie 1586
http://www.bartleby.com/359/14.html
A Preface to the Noble {POETS} of Englande. (the end)
.......................................................................
If the motion bee worthy your regard, it is enough to mooue it; if not,
my worde(S) woulde simply preuaile in perswadi(N)g you; and therefore
I rest vppon thys (O)nely request, that of your courtesie(S) you wyll
graunt passage, vnder your f(A)uourable corrections, for this my si(M)ple
censure of English Poetry, wherein, if you please to runne it ouer, you
shall knowe breefely myne opinion of the most part of your accustomed Poets,
and particularly, in his place, the lyttle somewhat which I haue sifted
out of my weake brayne concerning thys reformed versifying. - W.W.
.......................................................................
. <= 31 =>
.
. m y w o r d e (S) w o u l d e s i m p l y p r e u a i l e i n p
. e r s w a d i (N) g y o u;a n d t h e r e f o r e I r e s t v p
. p o n t h y s (O) n e l y r e q u e s t,t h a t o f y o u r c o
. u r t e s i e (S) y o u w y l l g r a u n t p a s s a g e,v n d
. e r y o u r f (A) u o u r a b l e c o r r e c t i o n s,f o r t
. h i s m y s i (M) p l e c e n s u r e o f E n g l i s h P o e t r y,
.
(MASONS) -31 : prob. at end of Preface ~ 1 in 1730
-------------------------------------------------------------------
. Cymbeline (Folio 1, 1623) Act 4, scene 2
.
Imogen: I am *NOTHING* ; or if not,
. *NOTHING* to be were better: This was my {MASTER},
. A VERy valiant Britaine, and a good,
. That heere by Mountaineers lyes slaine: Alas,
. There is no more such {MASTER}s: I may wander
. From East to Occident, cry out for Seruice,
. Try many, all good: *sERVE TRUly: nEVER*
. Finde such another {MASTER}.
. Thou mou'st no lesse with thy complaining, then
. Thy {MAISTER} in bleeding: say his name, good Friend.
Imogen: [RICHARD d][U CHAMP]: If I do lye, and do
. No harme by it, though the Gods heare, I hope
. They'l pardon it. Say you Sir?
Lucius: Thy name?
Imogen: [FIDEL]e Sir.
---------------------------------------------------------
appointed Freemason Grand {MASTER} by Edward IV.>>
1471. Richard Beachamp y Bishop of Sarum, Grand Master. He repaired the Royal
Castles, after the depopulating wars between the houses of York & Lancaster.
----------------------------------------------------
Don wrote:

<<Should you want marginal Freemason activity in the U.S., you could examine the
DeMolay organization for young people. (Are you now or ever have been a card
carrying member of DeMolay?) Here's a list of notable past members, from
-----------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DeMolay_International:

The following is a partial list of the members of the DeMolay Hall of Fame. The full list is available on the DeMolay International Web site..[7]

Name Dates Profession Notes
Carl B. Albert 1908–2000 Politician Speaker of the United States House of Representatives (1971–1977)
Cecil D. Andrus b. 1931 Politician Governor of Idaho (1971–1977, 1987–1995), US Secretary of the Interior (1977–1981)
Reubin O'Donovan Askew 1928-2014 Politician 37th Governor of Florida (1971–1979)
Walter "Red" Barber 1908–1992 Sports broadcaster Recipient of Ford C. Frick Award from National Baseball Hall of Fame
Mel Blanc 1908–1989 Cartoon voice actor "Man of a Thousand Voices"
Frank Borman b. 1928 Astronaut Commander of Apollo 8, CEO of Eastern Airlines (1975–1986), recipient of Congressional Space Medal of Honor
Vance D. Brand b. 1931 Astronaut Flew on Apollo-Soyuz and three Space Shuttle missions
Richard Bryan b. 1937 Politician Governor of Nevada (1983-89), and as a United States Senator from Nevada from 1989 to 2001
Carroll A. Campbell, Jr. 1940–2005 Politician Governor of South Carolina (1987–1995)
Curtis L. Carlson 1914–1999 Entrepreneur, philanthropist Founded the Carlson Companies in 1938 as the Gold Bond Trading Company
Mel Carnahan 1934–2000 Politician Governor of Missouri (1991–2000)
Bill Clinton b. 1946 Politician 42nd President of the United States
Gary Collins 1938-2012 Actor Best known for Airport (1970)
Walt Disney 1901–1966 Cartoonist and entrepreneur Creator of Mickey Mouse; co-founder of The Walt Disney Company
Lee S. Dreyfus 1926-2008 Educator and politician Governor of Wisconsin (1979–1983)
Buddy Ebsen 1908–2003 Actor, singer, dancer Star of Barnaby Jones and The Beverly Hillbillies
David Goodnow b. 1939 Broadcast journalist Former anchor of CNN Headline News
Paul Harvey 1918–2009 ABC Radio broadcaster Recipient of Presidential Medal of Freedom
Mark Hatfield 1922-2011 Politician Governor of Oregon (1959–1967), US Senator (1967–1997)
Sgt. William Hoover Soldier and Patriot Injured while protecting Maj. Gen. Harold Greene in Afghanistan.
Burl Ives 1909–1995 Folk singer and actor Have a Holly Jolly Christmas, narrator of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer
Henry M. Jackson 1912–1983 Politician US Senator (1953–1983)
Brereton C. Jones b. 1939 Politician Governor of Kentucky (1991–1995)
Harmon Killebrew 1936-2011 Former professional baseball player and businessman Member of National Baseball Hall of Fame
Richard King b. 1938 Former President of Rotary International
Tom Leppert b. 1954 59th mayor of Dallas, Texas
Elmer Lower 1913–2011 Journalist, media executive Former President of ABC News
Bob Mathias 1930-2006 Olympic athlete; politician Two-time Olympic gold medalist; US Representative from California (1967–1975)
Edgar D. Mitchell 1930-2016 Astronaut Sixth man to walk on the Moon; Apollo 14 astronaut
Tom Osborne b. 1937 Athlete, coach, politician Former Head Coach at University of Nebraska; member of College Football Hall of Fame
Walter C. Ploeser 1907–1993 Businessman, politician US Representative from Missouri (1941–1949); US Ambassador to Paraguay (1957–1959), US Ambassador to Costa Rica (1970–1972)
Richard Riley b. 1933 Politician United States Secretary of Education under President Bill Clinton and the 111th Governor of South Carolina
Pete Rose b. 1941 Baseball player All-time Major League Baseball leader in hits, with 4,256
James Nicholas Rowe 1938–1989 United States Army Colonel Vietnam POW; author of Five Years to Freedom
Edward T. Schafer b. 1946 Politician 29th United States Secretary of Agriculture; Governor of North Dakota 1992 – 2000
Harold Schafer 1912–2001 Philanthropist and businessman Founder of Gold Seal Company
Lance P. Sijan 1942–1968 United States Air Force Captain Recipient of the Medal of Honor
Alex Spanos b. 1923 Owner of the San Diego Chargers
Jim Steeg b. 1950 American Sports Executive with the National Football League Credited with popularizing and improving the Super Bowl.
John Steinbeck 1902–1968 Pulitzer Prize-winning author and Nobel laureate Wrote The Grapes of Wrath and Of Mice and Men
John Cameron Swayze 1906–1995 Newscaster
Fran Tarkenton b. 1940 Professional football player; businessman; entrepreneur Member of Pro Football Hall of Fame and College Football Hall of Fame
John Wayne 1907–1979 Actor Won Academy Award for Best Actor for True Grit in 1969
Larry Wilcox b. 1947 Actor, Businessman
Samuel C. Williamson b. 1926 Freemason Right Worshipful Past Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, F&AM. Grand Treasurer Emeritus of DeMolay International
James C. Wright, Jr. 1922-2015 Politician Speaker of the United States House of Representatives (1987–1989)
-----------------------------------------------------------------
<<I notice that Mel Blanc, Walt Disney, Mickey Mouse, Pete Rose,
and John Wayne were members of DeMoley.>>

A half a block from here my best friend in HS: Lynwood Trytko belonged
to the DeMoleys which he would attend at the 333 foot Alexandria Lighthouse:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Washington_Masonic_National_Memorial
--------------------------------------------------------
Bloomsday begins at sunrise (3:33 LMT) Thursday June 16, 1904
__________ & ends at sunset (3:33 before midnight)
......................................................
The Names of the Principall Actors in all these Playes.
http://ise.uvic.ca/Library/SLT/stage/actorlist.html

333 Letters [= 9 x 37 (plays)]
.............................................
____ <= *37* = [4x4x4 - 3x3x3] =>
.
. WilliamShakespeareRichardBurbadgeJ [O] hn
. HemmingsAugustinePhillipsWilliamKe [M] pt
.
. ThomasPoopeGeorgeBryanHenryCondell [W] il
. liamSlyeRichardCowlyJohnLowineSamu [e] ll
. CrosseAlexanderCookeSamuelGilburne [R] ob
. ertArminWilliamOstlerNathanFieldJo [h] nU
. nderwoodNicholasTooleyWilliamEccle [s] to
.
. neJosephTaylorRobertBenfieldRobert {G} ou
. gheRichardRobinsonJohnShanckeJohnR {i} ce
_______________________________________________
[SHREW] 37 : Prob. in 9 x 37 array ~ 1 / 5,000

-------- 'The Deceived' = {G}{i}
----------------------------------------------------
. The Sufi Basis of The Taming of {The SHREW}
. http://www.sirbacon.org/mshrew.htm
. by Mather Walker
.
<< The word {SHREW} has an interesting orgin.
.
. In old english it was [SHREWE] -a maliciousperson;
. but its ultimate origin was from the even older
. german word schrouwel which meant *DEVIL* >>
......................................................
The Wife of Bath's Prologue: A [SHREWE]'s proverb

. Thow seyst, we wyves wol oure vices hide
. Til we be fast, and thanne we wol hem *SHEWE* , -
. Wel may that be a proverbe of a [SHREWE]!
-----------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer

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