Discussion:
whackfalltherdebblen
(too old to reply)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-02-05 03:48:16 UTC
Permalink
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http://www.finnegansweb.com/wiki/index.php/Category:Thunderwords

<<Joyce described FW as a downwards parabola into sleep, or as a tunnel going through a mountain. As HCE moves through the dream, the "thunderwords" track his movement. There are 10 thunderwords, the first 9 of 100 letters each, the last of 101, for a total of 1,001--tales of a thousand and one nights, appropriate for this book of sleep.

As each thunderword leads into another part of the book, it fits into Joyce's usage of Vico's philosophy to tell the story. Each thunderword leads to a new cycle and a deeper part of sleep, and a deeper, more muddled state in HCE's mind (where the "mudmound" of his body fades from view and even the acrostics for HCE become muddled, as hec, ech, etc.). Thunder itself was important in Vico's philosophy as a motivating force and a symbolic marker of events in history.

Pappa
parr: Old Parr
Piaras an Ua Ragheallach na Tullagh Mongan (Irish):
Piers, the descendant of Reilly (Perse O'Reilly) of Tullymongan (099.26)
macmacmac (Irish): son son son
whackfalltherdebblen:
"Whack-fol-the-diddle": refrain in Irish songs
"Whack! The fall of father Dublin"
Dublin on the Dubh Linn: Dublin on the Black Pool
daddydoodled

"There are ten thunders in the Wake. Each is a cryptogram or codified explanation of the thundering and reverberating consequences of the major technological changes in all human history. When a tribal man hears thunder, he says, 'What did he say that time?', as automatically as we say 'Gesundheit.'" -- Marshall McLuhan>>
-----------------------------------------------------------
Finnegans Wake p.332 (8th 100 letter *THUNDER* word)
http://everything2.com/title/thunderword

822.33 : WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE. A. Authorship controversies
...........................................................
Snip snap snoody. *Noo err historyend goody*.
Of a lil trip trap and a big treeskooner for he
put off the ketyl and they made three (for fie!) and
if hec dont love alpy then lad you annoy me. For hanigen
with hunigen still haunt ahunt to finnd their hinnigen

where - Pappappapparrassannuaragheallach[N]atullaghm[O]ngan
macma[C]macwhackf[A]lltherdeb[B]lenonthedubblandaddydoodled
............................................................
Joyce would have been familiar with the
simple gematria cipher the letters of [BACON] = #33
and :FRANCIS BACON: = #100

[BACON] cipher starts on the #33rd letter of #100 letters:
..................................
_____ <= 10 x 10 =>

. P a p (p) a p p a p p
. a r r (a) s s a n n u
. a r a (g) h e a l l a
. c h [N](a) t u l l a g
. h m [O](n)(g) a n m a c
. m a [C] m (a) c w h a c
. k f [A] l (l) t h e r d
. e b [B] l (e) n o n t h
. e d u b b l a n d a
. d d y d o o d l e d
..........................................
Prob. of [BACON] in one of FW's 10 perfect
"thunderword" 10 x 10 arrays: ~ 1 in 855
-------------------------------------------------
He has hidden his o[W]n NAME, a fair NAM(E),
[WILL]iam, [I]n the p{L}ays, a super here, a
c[L]own th{E}re, as a painter of o[L]d <I{T}AL{Y}>
set his face in a dark corner of his canvas.
He has REVE(al)ED it in the sonnets
where there is [WILL] in overplus.
........................................
. <= 6 =>
.
. H e h a s h
. (I D) d e {N} h
. i s o [W] n N
. A M E a f a
. i r N A M (E)
. [W I L L] i a
. m,[I] n t h e
. p {L} a (Y) s {A}
. s u p (E) r h
. e r e (A) c [L]
. o w n (T) h {E}
. r e, a (S) a p
. a i n t e r
.
(YEATS) 6 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1,550
-----------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._B._Yeats

<<[WILL]iam Butler (YEATS) (13 June 1865 – 28 January 1939) was an Irish poet and one of the foremost figures of 20th century literature. A pillar of both the Irish & British literary establishments, he helped to found the Abbey Theatre, and in his later years served as an Irish Senator for two terms. Yeats was a driving force behind the Irish Literary Revival along with Lady Gregory, Edward Martyn and others.>>
........................................................................
"The Lake Isle of Innisfree" (1888)

I {WILL} arise and go now, a[N]d go t[O] Inni[S|FREE],
[A]nd a s[M]all c[A]bin build there, of clay and wattles made:
Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honeybee,
And live alone in the bee-loud glade.
....................................
. <= 5 =>
.
. I {W I L L}
. a r i s e
. a n d g o
. n o w, a [N]
. d g o t [O]
. I n n i [S]
. [F R E E][A]
. n d a s [M]
. a l l c [A]
. b i n b u
. i l d t h
. e r e, o f
........................
[FREE] 1
[A MASON] 5 : Prob. in first 2 lines ~ 1 in 10,850
-----------------------------------------------------------
http://hedgemason.blogspot.com/2014/05/freemasonry-and-victorian-hermetic.html

<<Societas Rosicruciana in Anglia (SRIA) was founded around 1860-1865 by the [FREEMASON] Robert Wentworth Little. The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn (HOGD) was founded in 1888 by [FREEMASONS] and members of the SRIA. The Rosicrucian connection allegedly derived from a mysterious German adept; Fraulein Anna Sprengel, whom they contacted after having encountered some old cypher-manuscripts belonging to her lodge. The HOGD became an indisputable success, and attracted many prominent persons of its time, including A.E. Waite, Mina Bergson, Edvard Munch, August Strindberg, Rider Haggard, R.F. Felkin, "Aleister" Alexander Edward Crowley, and William Butler Yeats.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Joyce

<<[J]oyce, [JAMES] Augustine Aloysius (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) returned to
Dublin again briefly in mid-1912 during his years-long fight with Dublin publisher
George Roberts over the publication of Dubliners. His trip was once again fruitless,
and on his return he wrote the poem "Gas from a Burner", an invective against Roberts.
After this trip, he never again came closer to Dublin than London, despite many
pleas from his father and invitations from fellow Irish writer William Butler Yeats.
"When Yeats died in 1939, Joyce sent a wreath to the funeral and confessed
to a friend that Yeats was a better writer than he.">>
-----------------------------------------------------
. Ulysses p. 746 of 768
.
Molly darling he called me what was his *NAME*
(J)ack [J]oe H[a]rry [M]ulv[e]y wa[s] it yes
...........................................
. <= 4 =>
.
. *N A M E*
. (J) a c k
. [J] o e H
. [A] r r y
. [M] u l v
. [E] y w a
. [S]
.
[J., JAMES] 4
Prob. of [JAMES] skip 2,3,4 in last 4% of Ulysses ~ 1 in 281
-----------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnegans_Wake

<<By 1938 virtually all of Finnegans Wake was in print in the transition
serialisation and in the booklets, with the exception of Part IV. Joyce continued
to revise all previously published sections until Finnegans Wake's final published
form, resulting in the text existing in a number of different forms, to the point
that critics can speak of Finnegans Wake being a different entity to Work in Progress.
The book was finally published simultaneously by Faber and Faber in London and by
Viking Press in New York on 4 May 1939, after seventeen years of composition.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------
. Finnegans Wake : Publication date : 4 May 1939
.
.[RIVER]run, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend
. of b[A|Y}, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to
. Howth Cast[L|E} and Environs.
. Sir Tristram, violer d'amores, fr'over the short sea, had [P|A}ssen-
. core rearrived from North Armorica on this [S]ide the scraggy
. is{T}hmus of Europe Minor [T]o wielderfight hi(S) peni[SOLA(T)]e war: nor
. h[A]d top{S}awy(E)r's rocks b(Y) the strea{m} Oconee [E]xaggerated themselse
. to Laurens Count[Y]'s gorgios while they went doublin their {m}umper
. all the time:
...............................................................................
. <= 57 =>
.
[RIVER]r u npas t Eve a ndAdam s from s werve o f s h oretoben d ofb [A]{Y} bri n g s
usbya c o mmod i usv i cusofr e circ u latio n b a c ktoHowth C ast [L]{E} and E n v
irons S i rTri s tra m violer d amor e sfrov e r t h eshortse a had [P]{A} sse n c o
rerea r r ived f rom N orthAr m oric a onthi s[S]i d ethescra g gyi s {T} hmu s o f
Europ e M inor[T]owi e lderfi g hthi(S)peniS O L A(T)ewarnorh[A]dto p {S} awy(E)r s
rocks b(Y)thes t rea{m}Oconee[E]xagg e rated t h e m selsetoL a ure n s Cou n t[Y]
sgorg i o swhi l eth e ywentd o ubli n their{m}u m p erallthe t ime

[ALP] 57
{YEATS} 57 : YEATS was buried 2 days before Joyce's 57th birthday
..........................................................................
. <= 34 =>
.
. r i ver r u npa s tEvea n d A d amsfro m s w erveo
. f s hor e t obe n dofba{Y}b r i ngsusb y a c ommod
. i u svi c u sof r ecirc u l a t ionbac k t o Howth
. C a stl{E}a ndE n viron s S i r Tristr a m v ioler
. d a mor e s fro v erthe s h o r tseaha d p{A}ssenc
. o r ere a r riv e dfrom N o r t hArmor i c a onthi
. s [S] ide t h esc r aggyi s{T}h m usofEu r o p eMino
. r [T] owi e l der f ighth i(S)p e niSOLA(T)e w arnor
. h [A] dto p{S}awy(E)rsroc k s b(Y)thestr e a m Ocone
. e [E] xag g e rat e dthem s e l s etoLau r e n sCoun
. t [Y] sgo r g ios w hilet h e y w entdou b l i nthei
. r {m} ump e r all t hetim e
.
[{m}YEATS] -34
.........................................................
. <= 9 =>
.
. [T] o w i e l d e r
. f i g h t h i (S) p
. e n i S O L A (T) e
. w a r n o r h [A] d
. t o p {S} a w y (E) r
. s r o c k s b (Y) t
. h e s t r e a {m} O
. c o n e
.
({m}YEATS) -9 :
. Prob. of 2[{m}YEATS] ~ 1 in 7,000,000
. Prob. of 3{YEATS} ~ 1 in 230,000
-----------------------------------------------------
. Ulysses p. 736 of 768
.
in love with I suppo(S)e hes like (T)he first m(A)n
going th(E) roads onl(Y) for the *NA{m}E* of a king
...................................................
. <= 9 =>
.
. i n l o v e w i t
. h I s u p p o (S) e
. h e s l i k e (T) h
. e f i r s t m (A) n
. g o i n g t h (E) r
. o a d s o n l (Y) f
. o r t h e n a {m} e
. o f a k i n g
.
({m}YEATS) -9
-----------------------------------------------------
Young Colum and Starkey. George Roberts is doing the commercial part. Longworth
will give it a good puff in the Express. O, will he? I liked Colum’s Drover.
Yes, I think he has that queer thing genius. Do you think he has genius really?
{YEATS} admired his line: As in wild earth a Grecian vase. Did he?

—Longworth is awfully sick, he said, after what you wrote about that old hake
Gregory. O you inquisitional drunken jewjesuit! She gets you a job on the paper
and then you go and slate her drivel to Jaysus. Couldn’t you do the {YEATS} touch?

BEST: (Smiling, lifts the hat and displays a shaven poll from the crown of which
bristles a pigtail toupee tied with an orange topknot.) I was just beautifying him,
don’t you know. A thing of beauty, don’t you know, {YEATS} says, or I mean, Keats says.
-----------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 65

Since brasse, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundlesse sea,
But sad mortallity ore-swaies their power,
How with this rage shall beautie hold a plea,
Whose action is no stronger then a flower?

O how shall summers hunny breath hold out,
Against the wrackfull siedge of battring dayes,
When rocks impregnable are not so stoute,
Nor gates of steele so strong but time decayes?

O feare{F}ull meditation, where alack,
Sh[(A)LL] times {B}est Iewell from times chest lie hid?
Or wh{A|T) strong hand can hold his swift foote ba{C}k,
Or who his (S)poile of beautie can [FOR]bid?

{O N} [ONE], vnlesse this mir(A)cle haue might,
That in black inck my love may still s(H)ine bright.
.........................................................
. <= 34 =>
.
. O f e are {F} u l l m edita t ionwhere a lackSh
.[(A)L L]t i mes {B} e s t I ewell f romtimes c hestli
. e h i d O rwh {A} t s t r ongha n dcanhold h isswif
. t f o o t eba {C} k O r w hohis(S)poileofb e autiec
. a n[F O R]bid {ON} [O N E] vnles s ethismir(A)clehau
. e m i g h tTh a t i n b lacki n ckmylove m aystil
. l s h i n ebr i g h t T hatin b lackinck m ylovem
. a y s t i lls (H) i n e b right.
.
{F.BACO/N} 34 : Prob. in Sonnets ~ 1 in 23
(HASTA) -43 : Prob. in last 6 lines ~ 1 in 42
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Is it not *STRANGE*, that I, to whom they all have beene beholding:
is it not like that you, to whome they all have bee[N]e be-holding,
shall (were yee in that case that I am now) bee both at [ON]ce of
them forsaken? Yes trust them not: for there is an vpstart [C]row,
beautified with our feathers, that with his Tygers hart wr[A]pt in
a Players hyde, supposes he is as well able to bombast out a [B]lanke
verse as the best of you: and beeing an absolute *IOHANNES [F]ACTOTUM*
, is in his owne conceit the onely Shake-scene in a countrey.
...................................................................
. <= 52 =>
.
. Isitnot*STRANGE*thatI towhomthey allhave b e enebeho ldingis
. itnotli kethaty outow hometheyal lhavebe e [N] ebehold ingshal
. lwereye einthat caset hatIamnowb eebotha t [ON] ceofth emforsa
. kenYest rustthe mnotf orthereisa nvpstar t [C] rowbeau tifiedw
. ithourf eathers thatw ithhisTyge rshartw r [A] ptinaPl ayershy
. desuppo sesheis aswel labletobom bastout a [B] lankeve rseasth
. ebestof youandb eeing anabsolute *IOHANNE S [F] ACTOTUM* isinhis
. ownecon ceitthe onely *SHAKESCENE* inacoun t r ey
.
[F.BACON] -52 : Prob. ~ 1 in 6460
[F.BACO/N] -52 : Prob. ~ 1 in 4500
-------------------------------------------------------------------
The KJV title page to the 1611 : http://tinyurl.com/yafpyqk

At the top, is:

1) the Tetragrammaton "יהוה" ("YHWH"/*26*) over
2) the holy spirit in a form of a dove over
3) a grotesque *St.THOMAS* with a *carpenter's square* in *SHADOW*
-----------------------------------------------------------------
The KJV (1611) Epistle Dedicatory
Loading Image...
.......................................................
. TO THE MOST HIGH AND MIGHTIE
. (P)rince, (I)AMES by the grace of (G)od
. King of Great Britaine,{FRANC}e, and I{R}ela[N]d,
. Defe{N}der [O]f the F{A}ith, &[C].
. THE TRANSL[A]TORS OF THE [B]IBLE,
. w{IS}h Grace, Mercie, and Pea{C}e, through IESVS
. Christ our Lord.
............................................
Masonic *carpenter's square* :

___ <= 10 =>
.
. {F R A N C.}E A N D I
. {R}E L A[N] D,D E F E
. {N}D E R[O] F T H E F
. {A}I T H[C] T h e T r
. a n s l[A] t o r s o
. f t h e[B] i b l e w
. {I S}h G r a c e,M e
. r c i e,a n d P e a
. {C}e,t h r o u g h I
. E S V S C h r i s t
. o u r L o r d.
.
[BACON] -10 : Prob. ~ 1 in 750
..........................................................
[BACON] skip < 11 occurs only 8 times in the rest of KJV
--------------------------------------------------------------
Good [BACON]: gone musty. Shakespeare [BACON]'s wild oats.
Cypherjugglers going the highroads.
*SEEKERS* on the great quest. What town, good *MASTERS*?
.................................................................
When Rutland[BACON]southamptonshakespeare or another poet of the same
name in the comedy of errors wrote Hamlet he was not the father of
his own son merely but, being no more a son, he was and felt himself
the father of all his race, the father of his own grandfather, the
father of his unborn grandson who, by the same token, nEVER was
born for nature, as Mr Magee understands her, *abhors PERFECTION*
-----------------------------------------------------------------
—And I seen a man killed in [TRIESTE] by an [IT]alian chap.
Knife in his back. Knife like that.
............................................................
would I yes to say yes my mountain flower and first I put my arms around
him yes and drew him down to me so he could feel my breasts all perfume
yes and his heart was going like mad and yes I said yes I will Yes.

[TRIESTE]-Zurich-Paris
----------------------------------------------------
He puts Bohemia on the seacoast
and makes Ulysses quote Aristotle.
...................................................
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Joyce

<<In 1915, after most of his students were conscripted in [TRIESTE: then part of "Bohemia"] for World War I, [James Joyce (2 February 1882 - 13 January 1941)] moved to Zurich. (BArON) Ambrogio Ralli & Count Francesco Sordina, petitioned officials for an exit permit for the Joyces, who in turn agreed not to take any action against the emperor of Austria-Hungary during the war. Zurich during the war was home to exiles and artists from across Europe, and its bohemian, multilingual atmosphere suited him. Nevertheless, after four years he was restless, and after the war he returned to [TRIESTE: now part of {ITALY}] as he had originally planned. He found the city had changed, and some of his old friends noted his maturing from teacher to full-time artist. His relations with his brother (who had been interned in an Austrian
prison camp for most of the war due to his pro-{ITALY} politics) were more
strained than ever. Joyce headed to Paris in 1920 at an invitation from Ezra Pound, supposedly for a week, but he ended up living there for the next twenty years.>>
----------------------------------------------------------------
However reverting to friend Sinbad and his horrifying adventures
(who reminded him a bit of Ludwig, _alias_ Ledwidge, when he occupied
the boards of the Gaiety when Michael Gunn was identified with the
management in the _Flying Dutchman_, a stupendous success, and his host
of admirers came in large numbers, everyone simply flocking to hear him
though ships of any sort, phantom or the reverse, on the s[T]age usually
fell a bit flat as also did t[R]ains) there was nothing intrinsically
[I]ncompatible about it, he conceded. On th[E] contrary that stab in the
back touch wa[S] quite in keeping with those {ITALIANOS} [T]hough candidly he
was none the less fre[E] to admit those icecreamers and friers [I]n the fish
way not to mention the chip po[T]ato variety and so forth over in little
<ITALY> there near the Coombe were sober thrifty hardworking fellows
except perhaps a bit too given to pothunting the harmless necessary
animal of the feline persuasion of others at night so as to have a good
old succulent tuckin with garlic _de rigueur_ off him or her next day
on the quiet and, he added, on the cheap.
............................................
. <= 33 =>
.
. a stup endoussuccessandhis hostofadm
. i rers cameinlargenumberse veryonesi
. m plyf lockingtohearhimtho ughshipso
. f anys ortphantomorthereve rseonthes
. [T] ageu suallyfellabitflata salsodidt
. [R] ains therewasnothingintr insically
. [I] ncom patibleaboutithecon cededOnth
. [E] cont rarythatstabintheba cktouchwa
. [S] quit einkeepingwiththose{ITALIANOS}
. [T] houg hcandidlyhewasnonet helessfre
. [E] toad mitthoseicecreamers andfriers
. [I] nthe fishwaynottomention thechippo
. [T] atov arietyandsoforthove rinlittle
. <I TALY>thereneartheCoombe

[TRIESTE,IT.] 33 : Prob. anywhere in Ulysses ~ 1%

<<In 33 BC Emperor Augustus built walls around [TRIESTE].>>
-------------------------------------------------
The *ONLY* other <ITALY> in Ulysses:
.............................................
He has hidden his o[W]n NAME, a fair NAM(E),
[WILL]iam, [I]n the p{L}ays, a super here, a
c[L]own th{E}re, as a painter of o[L]d <I{T}AL{Y}>
set his face in a dark corner of his canvas.
He has REVE(al)ED it in the sonnets
where there is [WILL] in overplus.
................................................
. <= 22 =>
.
. H e h a s h(I D)d e{N}h i s o [W] n N A M E a
. f a i r N A M(E|W I L L]i a m,[I] n t h e p{L}
. a(Y)s{A}s u p(E)r h e r e(A)c [L] o w n(T)h{E}
. r e,a(S)a p a i n t e r o f o [L] d<I{T}A L{Y}>
. s e t h i s f a c e i n a d a r k c o r n e
. r o f h i s c a n v a{S}H e h a s R E V E a
. l E D i t i n t h e s o n n e t s w h e r e
. t h e r e i s[W I L L]i n o v e r p l u s.
.
[WILL] 22 : Prob. ~ 1 in 45
{STAN} -34 : Prob. ~ 1 in 3.7
{LEY} 22 : Prob. in 22 array ~ 1 in 83
(I/DEE) 22 : Prob. in 22 array ~ 1 in 70
---------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 135

WHo euer hath her wish, thou hast thy [WILL],
And [WILL] too boote, and [WILL] in ouer-plus,
More then enough am I that vexe thee still,
To thy sweete [WILL] making addition thus.

Wilt thou whose [WILL] is large and spatious,
Not once vouchsafe to hide my [WILL] in thine,
Shall [WILL] in others seeme right gracious,
And in my [WILL] no faire acceptance shine:

The sea all water, yet receiues raine still,
And in aboundance addeth to his store,
So thou beeing rich in [WILL] adde to thy [WILL],
One [WILL] of mine to make thy large [WILL] more.

. Let no vnkinde, no faire beseechers kill,
. Thinke all but one, and me in that one [WILL].
-------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Stanislaus_Joyce

<<John Joyce (4 July 1849 - 29 December 1931) was the father of writer James Joyce, and a well known Dublin man about town. The son of [JAMES] and Ellen Joyce, John Joyce grew up in Cork, where his mother's family, which claimed kinship to "Liberator" Daniel O'Connell, was quite prominent. Of all his children, John Joyce got along well only with his eldest, [JAMES], who enjoyed his father's company and shared in some of his traits, including his musical talent and his inability with money. John Joyce inspired several characters in his son's works, such as Simon Dedalus in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Ulysses, Humphrey Chimpden Earwicker in Finnegans Wake, and the narrator's uncle in the stories "The Sisters" and "Araby" in Dubliners.>>
...........................................................
When Rutlandbaconsouthamptonshakespeare or another poet of the same
name in the comedy of errors wrote Hamlet he was not the father of
his own son merely but, being no more a son, he was and felt himself
the father of all his race, the father of his own grandfather, the
father of his unborn grandson who, by the same token, nEVER was
born for nature, as Mr Magee understands her, *abhors PERFECTION*
---------------------------------------------------------------
. Twelfth Night (Folio 1, 1623) I,iii
.
To. O knight, thou lack'st a cup of Canarie:
. when did I see thee so put downe?
.
An. Neuer in your life I thinke, vnlesse you see Ca-
. narie put me downe: mee thinkes sometimes I haue no
. more wit then a Christian, or an ordinary man ha's:
. but I am a great eater of beefe, and I beleeue
. that does harme to my wit.
----------------------------------------------------
___ Chapter 9 James Joyce's Ulysses (1922)
. 1961 revised Random House edition
...................................................
And sir William Davenant of *Oxford's mother*
with her cup of canary for *EVERy* cockcanary.

Buck Mulligan, his pious eyes upturned, prayed:
--Blessed Margaret Mary Anycock!
----------------------------------------------------
___ Chapter 9 James Joyce's Ulysses (1922)
. Hans Gabler's 1984 "Corrected edition"
.
http://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/j/joyce/james/j8u/episode9.html
http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/4300/pg4300.txt
http://tinyurl.com/nsjk9dz
.....................................................
And sir William Davenant of *Oxford's mother* with
her cup of ca{n|A)ry f<O|R> a[N]y {c|O)ck[C|a|N|A]ry.

<B>uck Mulligan, his pious eyes upturned, prayed:
--Blessed Margaret Mary Anycock!
.................................................
. <O> (r) a
. [N] y {c}
. (O) c k
. [C] {a}(N)
. [A] r y
. <B> u c k Mulligan,

[BACONO] Skip -3 {14,500,000}
...........................................
. {n} (A) r y f
. <O> (r) a [N] y
. {c} (O) c k [C]
. {a} (N)[A] r y
. <B> u c k Mulligan

*BACON* Skip -5 {975,000}

Prob of 2 [BACON]s in two adjacent sentences ~ 1 in 12,000
..............................................................
Good Bacon: gone musty. Shakespeare Bacon's wild oats.
Cypherjugglers going the highroads. Seekers on the great quest.
What town, good masters? Mummed in names: A.E., eon: Magee,
John Eglinton. East of the sun, west of the moon:
Tir na n-og. Booted the twain and staved.
-------------------------------------------------------
Bacon is Shake-Speare (1910).
by Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence

<<Bacon tells us that there are 24 letters in the alphabet (_i_ & _j_
being deemed to be forms of the same letter, as are also _u_ & _v_).
Bacon was himself accustomed frequently to use the letters of the
alphabet as numerals (the Greeks similarly used letters for numerals).
Thus A is 1, B is 2 ... Y is 23, Z is 24.
Let us take as an example Bacon's own name--
.
. B A C O N .
. 2 1 3 14 13
.
; all these added together make the number 33,
a number about which it is possible to say a good deal.>>
......................................................
33rd day of year: 2 February

Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence (born: 2 February 1837)
Delia [BACON] (born: 2 February, 1811)
James Joyce (born: 2 February 1882)
-----------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulysses_%28novel%29

<<The publication history of Ulysses is disputed and obscure. There have been at least 18 editions, and variations in different impressions of each edition. Joyce's handwritten manuscripts were typed by a number of amateur typists (one of whom was Robert McAlmon).

According to Joyce scholar Jack Dalton, the first edition of Ulysses contained over two thousand errors but was still the most accurate edition published. As each subsequent edition attempted to correct these mistakes, it incorporated more of its own.

Notable editions include the first edition published in Paris on 2 February 1922 by Sylvia Beach at Shakespeare and Company (only 1000 copies printed), the pirated Roth edition, published in New York in 1929, the Odyssey Press edition of 1932 (including some revisions generally attributed to Stuart Gilbert, and therefore sometimes considered the most accurate edition); the 1934 Random House US edition, the first English edition of the Bodley Head in 1936, the revised Bodley Head Edition of 1960, the revised Random House edition of 1961 (reset from the Bodley Head 1960 edition), and the Gabler critical and synoptic edition of 1984.
.................................................
Gabler's "Corrected edition"

Hans Walter Gabler's 1984 edition was the most sustained attempt to produce a corrected text, but it received much criticism. Jerome McGann describes in detail the editorial principles of Gabler in his article for the journal Criticism, issue 27, 1985.

In June 1988 John Kidd published 'The Scandal of Ulysses' in the New York Review of Books, charging that not only did Gabler's changes overturn Joyce's last revisions, but in another four hundred places Gabler failed to follow any manuscript whatever, making nonsense of his own premises. Kidd accused Gabler of unnecessarily changing Joyce's spelling, punctuation, use of accents, and all the small details he claimed to have been restoring. Instead, Gabler was actually following printed editions such as that of 1932, not the manuscripts. More sensationally, Gabler was found to have made genuine blunders, the most famous being his changing the name of the real-life Dubliner Harry Thrift to 'Shrift' and cricketer Captain Buller to 'Culler' on the basis of handwriting irregularities in the extant manuscript. (These 'corrections' were undone by Gabler in 1986.) Kidd stated that many of Gabler's errors resulted from Gabler's use of facsimiles rather than original manuscripts.

In December 1988, Charles Rossman's 'The New Ulysses: The Hidden Controversy' for the New York Review revealed that Gabler's own advisers felt too many changes were being made, but that the publishers were pushing for as many alterations as possible. Then Kidd produced a 174-page critique that filled an entire issue of the Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, dated the same month. This 'Inquiry into Ulysses: The Corrected Text' was the next year published in book format and on floppy disk by Kidd's James Joyce Research Center at Boston University. Gabler and others rejected Kidd's critique, and the scholarly community remains divided.
.................................................
Gabler edition dropped; publishers revert to 1960/61 editions

In 1990 Gabler's American publisher Random House, after consulting a committee of scholars, replaced the Gabler edition with its 1961 version, and in the United Kingdom the Bodley Head press revived its 1960 version. In both the UK and USA, Everyman's Library, too, republished the 1960 Ulysses. In 1992 Penguin dropped Gabler and reprinted the 1960 text. The Gabler version is at present available from Vintage International.

While much ink has been spilt over the faults and theoretical underpinnings of the Gabler edition, the much vaunted Kidd edition has yet to be published. In 1992 W.W. Norton announced that a Kidd edition of Ulysses was about to be published as part of a series called "The Dublin Edition of the Works of James Joyce." This book had to be withdrawn, however, when the Joyce estate objected. The estate has refused to authorise any further editions of Joyce's work for the present.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
. Moby Dick Chapter 24: The Advocate
.
As Queequeg and I are now fairly embarked in this business of whaling;
and as this business of whaling has somehow come to be regarded among
landsmen as a rather unpoetical and disreputable pursuit; therefore,
I am all anxiety to convince ye, ye landsmen, of the injustice
hereby done to us hunters of whales.

In the first place, it may be deemed almost superfluous to establish
the fact, that among people at large, the business of whaling is not
accounted on a level with what are called [T]he liberal professions.
If a *STRANGER* were introduced into any miscellaneous metropolitan
society, it would but slightly advance the gene[R]al opinion of his
merits, were he presented to the company as a harpooneer, say; and
if in emulation of the naval officers he should append the in[I]tials
S.W.F. (Sperm Whale Fishery) to his visiting card, such a procedure
would be deemed pre-eminently presuming and ridiculous.

Doubtless one l[E]ading reason why the world declines honouring us
whalemen, is this: they think that, at best, our vocation amounts
to a butchering sort of bu[S]iness; and that when actively engaged
therein, we are surrounded by all manner of defilements. Butchers
we are, that is true. But butchers, also, and bu[T]chers of the
bloodiest badge have been all Martial Commanders whom the world
invariably delights to honour. And as for the matter of the alleg[E]d
uncleanliness of our business, ye shall soon be initiated into certain
facts hitherto pretty generally unknown, and which, upon the whole,
w[I]ll triumphantly plant the sperm whale-ship at least among the
cleanliest things of this tidy earth. But even granting the charge
in question [T]o be true; what disordered slippery decks of a whale-
ship are comparable to the unspeakable carrion of those battle-fields
from which so many soldiers return to drink in all ladies' plaudits?
...............................
[TRIESTE,IT.] skip 117
----------------------------------------------------------
. Christina the Astonishing (Mirabilis)
.
<<Born in Brustheim, near Liège, Belgium, 1150; died 1224;
feast day formerly July 4. Fifteen-year-old Christina was left
an orphan with her two older sisters. When she was about 22 ,
she had an epileptic fit and was thought to be dead.
.
As custom Christina was carried into the church in an open coffin,
where a Requiem Mass was beginning. Suddenly, after the Agnus
Dei, Christina sat up, soared to the beams of the roof, and
perched there. The congregation fled in fright, except her
elder sister. When the Mass was completed, the priest
persuaded Christina to come down from the rafters.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------
. (a)M(adas) & (b)ARLOWE - 1584
. http://www.nps.gov/fora/amadas.htm
.
<<Philip Amadas & Arthur Barlowe's reconnaissance of the North
American coast was a pivotal episode in American history. The first
known published reference to the voyage appeared in Holingshed's
"Chronicles" in 1587. The most extensive account, written by Barlowe
was published in 1589, in Hakluyt's "Principal Navigations". Both
narratives were clearly designed to promote an interest in Ralegh's
colonizing efforts. While there is no concrete evidence that Barlowe
suppressed unpleasant details, there are indications that he distorted
the picture of his contact with the Native Americans. Barlowe, and
certainly Ralegh and Hakluyt wanted to entice settlers and backers.
In order to do so, they depicted a near-idyllic people, who were
ready to receive & trade with English explorers & colonists.>>
--------------------------------------------------------
(a)M(adas) &
(b)ARLOWE found shoals & smelled land: July 2, 1584
.
(a)M(adas) &
(b)ARLOWE sighted the North Americat July 4, 1584
.
*SADA* : *KIT* (Slovak)
---------------------------------------------------------------
"a new play called ALL IS TRUE" - Henry wo[TT]on, July 2, 1613
"a new play called ALL IS TRIEWE" - Henry blue[TT], July 4, 1613
--------------------------------------------------------------
On July 2, Congress voted for independence.
(John Adams, in a letter to his wife, supposed that this day
would be celebrated by Americans in perpetuity.)
On July 4, the text of the Declaration of Independence was adopted,
and signed by John Hancock, President of the Continental Congress
------------------------------------------------------
<<John Adams visited [Stratford] with Thomas Jefferson
. in April, 1786, and recorded his impressions:
.
"There is *NOTHING PRESERVED* of this great Genius which is worth
knowing and; *NOTHING* which might inform Us what Educations,
what *COMPANY* , what Accident turned his Mind to Letters
and the Drama. His name is not even on his Grave Stone." >>
--------------------------------------------------------------
<<Samuel Francis Smith was in his last year of seminary at Andover and
very poor. To make ends meet, he accepted literary work. That is how
it came about that musician Lowell *MASON* asked him to translate some
German verses for a songbook he was preparing. Among the tunes he
handed Smith was a German patriotic hymn, "God Bless Our Native Land."
When Smith read it, he immediately felt that the United states also
needed a stirring national poem. Writing on scraps of paper in
February 1832, he finished within thirty minutes a poem
he titled "America." *MASON* published it.
.
On this day, July 4, 1832 the children's choir of Park street
Congregational Church in Boston sang it at a Sunday school celebration.
Beginning with the now familiar words, "My country, 'tis of thee,
sweet land of liberty. . ." It gained immediate popularity.
One leader commented that since it was "strong in simplicity and
deep in trust in God, children and philosophers can repeat
the hymn together. Every crisis will hear it above the storm.">>
.
http://chi.gospelcom.net/DAILYF/2001/07/daily-07-04-2001.shtml
--------------------------------------------------------------
July 4, 1604 (NS), Edward de Vere dies
July 4, 1623, William Byrd dies
July 4, 1627, Thomas Middleton dies
July 4, 1761, Samuel Richardson, author of Pamela, dies
July 4, 1776, Declaration of Independence signed
July 4, 1804, Nathaniel Hawthorne (Freemason) born
July 4, 1807, Garibaldi born (latter lived on Staten Island)
July 4, 1817, Construction on Erie Canal begins
.
July 4, 1826, John Adams, 2nd president dies at 90!
July 4, 1826, Thomas Jefferson, 3rd president dies at 83
July 4, 1826, Stephen Foster born
.
July 4, 1827, Slavery abolished in NY
July 4, 1828, Construction begins on B&O (1st US passenger RR)
July 4, 1829, Cornerstone laid for 1st US mint
July 4, 1831, James Monroe, Freemason & 5th president dies at 73.
July 4, 1832, _America (the Beautiful)_ first sung.
July 4, 1848, Cornerstone laid for Washington Monument
July 4, 1849, John Joyce born to James Joyce
July 4, 1855, Walt Whitman publishs _Leaves of Grass_
July 4, 1862, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson "extemporizes"
July 4, 1865, _Alice in Wonderland_ published
July 4, 1895, _America the Beautiful_ first published
July 4, 1916, Tokyo Rose born
July 4, 1918, Twins Abigail Van Buren & Ann Landers born
July 4, 1931, James Joyce marries Nora Barnacle
---------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-02-05 19:18:07 UTC
Permalink
On Sunday, February 4, 2018 at 10:48:18 PM UTC-5, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

[Reams of lunatic logorrhea and crackpot cryptography, all of it posted hundreds of times before, deleted]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
*SADA* : *KIT* (Slovak)
This is remarkably idiotic, Art -- even for you. First, the Slovak word _sada_ is translated by a great many English words, of which "kit" is by no means the first that comes to mind. _Sada_ most commonly means a set or collection of things (like a set of keys or a set of dishes) or a series. It can mean a deck -- but no doubt you'll think (usual disclaimer) that the Shakespeare Authorship CoVERup Conspiracy had Thomas DECKer in mind, Art. _Sada_ can mean a pack or a package. It can mean a suite. "Kit" is *by no means* the most obvious English translation of _sada_.

More to the point, the senses of the English word "kit" that can translate the Slovak _sada_ (senses 2-3 in the OED: "A collection of articles (called articles of kit) forming part of the equipment of a soldier, and carried in a valise or knapsack; also, the valise containing these, or this with its contents..."; "A collection of personal effects or necessaries, esp. as packed up for travelling"; "The outfit of tools required by a workman, esp. a shoemaker"; "A set or outfit of tools, equipment, etc.; spec., a collection of parts sold for the buyer to assemble"; "A number of things or persons viewed as a whole; a set, lot, collection; esp. in phr. _the whole kit_"; etc.) *did not exist in English until the late 18th century*!

In case your Chronologically Clueless Cretin persona is haplessly trying to understand, Art, I'll give you a hint: *all* the OED citations of these senses date to *at least a century and a half after Shakespeare's death*! Many are more recent still.

*None* of the senses of _kit_ in existence as early as the sixteenth century (e.g., "A small fiddle, formerly much used by dancing masters"; "kitten"; "Jack-O'-Lantern"; "Abbreviated pet form of the name Catherine or Kate"; "A circular wooden vessel, made of hooped staves; in different localities applied to vessels of various sizes, with or without a lid, and usually having a handle or handles; as, a small open tub with one or two of the staves fashioned into handles, used for holding water or ‘washing up’; a deeper vessel with a lid used as a milking-pail; a tub- or pail-shaped vessel, often with a lid, used for holding or carrying milk, butter, fish, or other commodities; whence, by extension, sometimes, a square box used for the same purpose."; etc.) could be rendered in Slovak as _sada_.

Thus this (nonexistent) secret code planted by your (nonexistent) cabal of conspirators is complete crap, Art -- like practically eVERything that you post.

For that matter, what on earth makes you think (usual disclaimer) that _sada_ is supposed to be interpreted as a Slovak word? It could just as well be Czech, for instance. In various other Slavic tongues, it is the genitive singular of the word for "garden". In various Uralic languages, _sada_ means "one hundred".

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped -- not that what follows is not lunatic logorrhea as well]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
July 4, 1604 (NS), Edward de Vere dies
July 4, 1623, William Byrd dies
July 4, 1627, Thomas Middleton dies
July 4, 1761, Samuel Richardson, author of Pamela, dies
July 4, 1776, Declaration of Independence signed
July 4, 1804, Nathaniel Hawthorne (Freemason) born
July 4, 1807, Garibaldi born (latter lived on Staten Island)
July 4, 1817, Construction on Erie Canal begins
.
July 4, 1826, John Adams, 2nd president dies at 90!
July 4, 1826, Thomas Jefferson, 3rd president dies at 83
July 4, 1826, Stephen Foster born
.
July 4, 1827, Slavery abolished in NY
July 4, 1828, Construction begins on B&O (1st US passenger RR)
July 4, 1829, Cornerstone laid for 1st US mint
July 4, 1831, James Monroe, Freemason & 5th president dies at 73.
July 4, 1832, _America (the Beautiful)_ first sung.
July 4, 1848, Cornerstone laid for Washington Monument
July 4, 1849, John Joyce born to James Joyce
July 4, 1855, Walt Whitman publishs [sic]
Is English your native tongue, Art?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_Leaves of Grass_
July 4, 1862, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson "extemporizes"
July 4, 1865, _Alice in Wonderland_ published
July 4, 1895, _America the Beautiful_ first published
July 4, 1916, Tokyo Rose born
July 4, 1918, Twins Abigail Van Buren & Ann Landers born
July 4, 1931, James Joyce marries Nora Barnacle
[Yawn.] So what, Art? Was there supposed to have been any point to the above idiotic effusion of nutcase numerology? If you take the set of events of interest to your Nutcase Numerologist persona (which, since it evidently includes the birth dates, death dates, etc. of practically eVERyone of note who eVER lived, as well as the date on which Whitman "publishs [sic]" _Leaves of Grass, there must be tens of thousands of such events or more) and take into account the fact that there are neVER more than 366 days in a year, it follows that *many* of these events will *have* to fall upon the same date, by the Pigeonhole Principle. Speaking of pigeons, Art, your posts most resemble what pigeons leave (often in VERy large measure) on statuary in public parks.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
---------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
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