Discussion:
cloudy stuffe to puzzell intellect
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Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-03-16 01:05:20 UTC
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After his library FIRE of 1623 Ben Jonson (1572-1637)
wrote of his LOSS in "An Execration upon Vulcan"
.......................................................
Thou mightst have had (me) perish, piece by peic[E],
To light Tobacco, or sa[V]e roasted Geese.
Sindg[E] Capons, or *poor Piggs* , d[R]oping their Eyes;
Cond[E]mn'd me to the Ovens wit{H} the <PIES> ;
.....................................................
_________ <= 19 =>
.
. h{O}u m i g h t s t h a v e h a d(m e)
. {E}p{E}r i s h,p i{E}c e b y p{E}i c[E],
. T{O}l i g h t T{O}b a c c{O|O}r s a[V]
. {E}r o a s t{E}d G{E|E}s{E}S i n d g[E]
. {C}a p o n s{O}r p{O|O}r P i g g s,d[R]
. {O}p i n g t h{E}i r{E}y e s;C o n d[E]
. m n'd m e t{O}t h e{O}v e n s w i t{H}
. t h e<P I{E}S>;
.....................................
[E.VERE] 19 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1020
19 {E.O.}s : Prob. ~ 1 in 52
--------------------------------------------------------
______________ <= 19 =>
.
. T OTHEO - (N) l ___{I} _ <E>B E G E T T E RO
. F THESE_- (I) n __-{S} - U<I>N G S O N N ET
. S MrWha_- (L) L __ [H]A {P} <P>{I}_(N){S}S{S}EA
. N Dthat___ (E) T __ [E]R N_ <I> T__(I) E<P>R OM
. I SEDB Y O u ___- [R]E _ V <E> R_ (L)<I>V I NG
. <P>OEtW I s h ____ [E]T __ H (T) H__(E) W E L LW
. <I>ShIN- G a _____ [d V e] __ N (T) u _____ ReRI NS
. <E>tTIN G fort----_________ H (T) t
........................................................
. Probability of Upper & Lower (NILE)'s ~ 1/176,000
. Probability of 4 oven <PIE>'s ~ 1/38,000
--------------------------------------------------------
Inscribed to [GERT on the Isle of Wight]:

[G I R T] with a boyish garb for boyish task,
[E]ager she wields her spade: y(E)t loves as we(L)l
[R]est o(N) a fr(I)end(L)y kn(E)e, i(N)tent to ask
[T]he tale he loves to tell.
.........................
. <= 5 =>
.
. y (E) t l o
. v e s a s
. w e (L) l R
. e s t o (N)
. a f r (I) e
. n d (L) y k
. n (E) e, i (N)
. t e n t
.
(NILE) 4,-11 : Prob. of both in first stanza ~ 1 in 500
---------------------------------------------------------------------
<<The Least Successful Collector Betsy Baker played a central role in
the history of collecting. She was employed as a servant in the house
of John Warburton (1682-1759) who had amassed a fine collection of 58
1st edition plays, including most of the works of Shakespeare. One day
Warburton returned home to find 55 of them charred beyond legibility.
Betsy had either burned them or used them as <PIE> bottoms.
The remaining 3 folios are now in the British Museum.>>
.
. http://hometown.aol.com/clasz/Chap9.html
.
NOTE: some 60 manuscripts of plays of this period eventually come
. into the hands of a collector named John Warburton* (1682-1759).
.
. Many are the only surviving co<PIES> of plays that had never
. been printed. Unfortunately Warburton was careless with
. them and his servant, Betsy Baker, made use of them
. to light her stove and line the bottom of <PIES>.>>
----------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larder

<<A pantry may contain a thrawl, a term used in [DERBY]shire, to
denote *A STONE* slab or shelf used to keep food cool. These rooms
would have been placed as low in the building as possible in order
to use the mass of the ground to retain a low summer temperature.
For this reason, a *BUTTERY* was usually called the *CELLAR*.
----------------------------------------------------------------
. [ALICE S]PENCER: Countess of [DERBY] and
. Merry Wife of Lord *STRANGE* Act 1, Scene 1
.............................................................
SIMPLE: *BOOK of Riddles!* why, did you not lend it to
. *[ALICE S]HORTCAKE* upon All-hallowmas last,
. a fortnight afore *MICHAELMAS* ?
...........................................................
SHORTCAKE, n. An unsweetened breakfast cake shortened
. with *BUTTER* , rolled thin, and baked.
.
*SPENCER*, n. [OF. d(E.SPENS)i(ER).]
. One who has the care of the *SPENCE, or BUTTERY* .
...........................................................
. *[ALICE S]PENCER*/(a.k.a. SHORTCAKE) was the WIDOW
. of Ferdinando Stanley - Lord *STRANGE* & sister-in-law
. of William Stanley who died on *MICHAELMAS* 1642
. (Cervantes 95th birthday).
.
William Stanley (6th Earl of Derby) married Edward de Vere's
. daughter Elizabeth and fathered Lord *STRANGE*
. James Stanley Governor of the Isle of Mann.
--------------------------------------------------------------
THE HUNTING OF THE SNARK an Agony, in Eight Fits.
BY [LEWIS] CARROLL

WITH NINE ILLUSTRATIONS BY HENRY HOLIDAY
London MACMILLAN AND CO. 1876.
------------------------------------------------------------
{P}REFACE: {I}f—and th{E} thing i{S} wild[L]y possible—
the charg[E] of writing nonsense [W]ere EVER brought
aga[I]nst the author of thi[S] brief but instructive poem,
it would be based, I feel convinced, on the line

“Then the bowsprit got mixed with the rudder sometimes.”
.......................................................
. <= 18 =>
.
. {P}R E F A C E{I} f— a n d t h{E}t h i
. n g i{S}w i l d [L] y p o s s i b l e—
. t h e c h a r g [E] o {F} w r i t i n g
. n o n s e n s e [W] e {R} e E V E R b r
. o u g h t a g a [I] n {S} t t h e a u t
. h o r o f t h i [S] b r i e f b u t i
. n s t r u c t i v e {P} o e m,i t w o
. u l d b e b a s e d,{I} f e e l c o n
. v i n c e d,o n t h {E} l i n e“T h e
. n t h e b o w s p r i t g o t m i x
. e d w i t h t h e r u d d e r s o m
. e t i m e s.”

[LEWIS] 18 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1,200
{PIES} 7
.......................................................
.......................................................
Rule 42 of the Code, “No one shall speak to the Man at the Helm,”
had been compl(E)ted by the Bel(L)man himself w(I)th the
words “a(N)d the Man at the Helm shall speak to no one.”
So remonstranc(E) was impossib(L)e, and no steer(I)ng
could be do(N)e till the next varnishing day. During
these bewildering intervals the ship usually sailed *BACKWARDS*.
.......................................................
. <= 12 =>
.
. R u l e 4 2 o f t h e C
. o d e “N o o n e s h a l
. l s p e a k t o t h e M
. a n a t t h e H e l m” h
. a d b e e n c o m p l (E)
. t e d b y t h e B e l (L)
. m a n h i m s e l f w (I)
. t h t h e w o r d s “a (N)
. d t h e M a n a t t h e
. H e l m s h a l l s p e
. a k t o n o o n e”S o r
. e m o n s t r a n c (E) w
. a s i m p o s s i b (L) e,
. a n d n o s t e e r (I) n
. g c o u l d b e d o (N) e
. t i l l t h e n e x t v
. a r n i s h i n g d a y.
.
. D u r i n g t h e s e b
. e w i l d e r i n g i n
. t e r v a l s t h e s h
. i p u s u a l l y s a i
. l e d *B A C K W A R D S*.
--------------------------------------------------
Fit the First.
THE LANDING.

“Just the place for a {SNARK}!” the Bellman cried,
As he landed his crew with care;
Supporting each man on the top of the tide
By a finger entwined in his hair.

“Just the place for a {SNARK}! I have said it twice:
That alone should encourage the crew.
Just the place for a {SNARK}! I have said it thrice:
What I tell you three times is *TRUE*.”

The crew was complete: it included a Boots—
A maker of Bonnets and Hoods—
A Barrister, brought to arrange their dispute{S}—
A{N}d {A} B{R}o{K}er, to value their goods.
.......................................................
.......................................................
There was one who was famed for the number of things
He forgot when he entered the ship:
His umbrella, his watch, all his jewels and rings,
And the clothes he had bought for the trip.

He had forty-two boxes, all carefully packed,
With his name painted clearly on each:
But, since he omitted to mention the fact,
They were all left behind on the beach.

The loss of his clothes hardly mattered, because
He had seven coats on when he came,
With three pair of boots—but the worst of it was,
He had wholly forgotten his name.

He would answer to “Hi!” or to any loud cry,
Such as “Fry me!” or “Fritter my wig!”
To “What-you-may-call-um!” or “What-was-his-name!”
But especially “Thing-um-a-jig!”

While, for those who preferred a more forcible word,
He had different names from these:
His intimate friends called him “Candle-ends,”
And his enemies “Toasted-cheese.”

“His form is ungainly—his intellect small—”
(So the Bellman would often remark)
“But his courage is perfect! And that, after all,
Is the thing that one needs with a {SNARK}.”

He would joke with hyænas, returning their stare
With an impudent wag of the head:
And he once went a walk, paw-in-paw, with a bear,
“Just to keep up its spirits,” he said.

He came as a B[A]ker: but owned, when too late—
And it drove the poor Bel[L]man half-mad—
He could only bake Bridecake—for which, [I] may state,
No materials were to be had.
The last of the [C]rew needs especial remark,
Though he looked an incr[E]dible dunce:
He had just one idea—but, that one being “Snark,”
The good Bellman engaged him at once.
................................................
[ALICE] 43 : Prob. in first Fit ~ 1 in 10
................................................
He came as a Butcher: but gravely declared,
When the ship had been sailing a week,
He could only kill Beavers. The Bellman looked scared,
And was almost too frightened to speak:

But at length he explained, in a tremulous tone,
There was only one Beaver on board;
And that was a tame one he had of his own,
Whose {DEATH} would be deeply deplored.

The Beaver, who happened to hear the remark,
Protested, with tears in its eyes,
That not even the rapture of hunting the {SNARK}
Could atone for that dismal surprise!

It strongly advise[D] that th[E] Butche[R] should [B]e
Conve[Y]ed in a separate ship:
But the Bellman declared that would never agree
With the plans he had made for the trip:
................................................
[DERBY] 7 : Prob. in first Fit ~ 1 in 185
................................................
Navigation was always a difficult art,
Though with only one ship and one bell:
And he feared he must really decline, for his part,
Undertaking another as well.

The Beaver’s best course was, no doubt, to procure
A second-hand dagger-proof coat—
So the Baker advised it—an{D} next, to insure
Its life in some Office of note:

This the Bank{E}r suggested, and offered for hire
(On moderate terms), or for s{A}le,
Two excellent Policies, one Against Fire,
And one Agains{T} Damage From Hail.

Yet still, ever after that sorrowful day,
W{H}enever the Butcher was by,
The Beaver kept looking the oppo{S}ite way,
And appeared unaccountably shy.
..............................
{DEATHS} 49
-----------------------------------------------------
Fit the Second.
THE BELLMAN’S SPEECH.
....................................................
But the principal failing occurred in the sailing,
And the Bellman, per(P)lexed and distressed,
Sa(I)d he had hoped, at least, w{H|E)n the wind blew (D)u(E) E(A)s(T),
{T|H)at the ship would not tr{A}vel due West!

But the dang{E}r was past—they had lande{D} at la(S)t,
Wi(T)h th(E)ir b(O)xes, (P)ortmanteaus, and bags:
Yet at first sight the crew were not pleased with the view,
Which consisted of chasms and crags.
.......................................................
. <= 20 =>
.
. B u t t h e p r i n c i p a l f a i l i
. n g o c c u r r e d i n t h e s a i l i n
. g,A n d t h e B e l l m a n, p e r (P) l e x
. e d a n d d i s t r e s s e d, S a (I) d h e
. h a d h o p e d,a t l e a s t, w {H}(E) n t h
. e w i n d b l e w (D) u (E) E (A) s (T){T}(H) a t t
. h e s h i p w o u l d n o t t r {A} v e l d
. u e W e s t!B u t t h e d a n g {E} r w a s
. p a s t—t h e y h a d l a n d e {D} a t l a
. (S)t,W i(T)h t h(E) i r b (O) x e s,(P) o r t m
. a n t e a u s,a n d b a g s:
.
(DEATH) 2
(POETS) -4
{DEATH} -20
..........................................................
..........................................................
Last stanza of Fit 2:

“For, although common Snarks do no manner of harm,
Yet, I feel it my duty to say,
“Some ar(E) Boojums—” (T)he Bellm(A)n broke o(F)f in al(A)rm,
For (T)he Bak(E)r had fainted away.
.......................................................
. <= 7 =>
.
. “S o m e
. a r (E) B o o j
. u m s (T) h e B
. e l l m (A) n b
. r o k e o (F) f
. i n a l (A) r m,
. F o r (T) h e B
. a k (E) r h a d
. f a i n t e d
. a w a y.
.
(FATE) 8,-6
-----------------------------------------------------
Fit the Third.
THE BAKER’S TALE.
......................................................
They roused him with muffins—they roused him with ice—
They roused him with mustard and cress—
They roused him with jam and judicious advice—
They set him conundrums to guess.

When at length he sat up and was able to speak,
His sad story he offered to tell;
And the Bellman cried “Silence! Not even a shriek!”
And excitedly tingled his bell.

There was silence supreme! Not a shriek, not a scream,
Scarcely even a howl or a groan,
As the man they called “Ho!” told his story of woe
In an antediluvian tone.

“My father and mother were honest, though poor—”
“Skip all that!” cried the Bellman in haste.
“If it once becomes dark, there’s no chance of a {SNARK}—
We have ha[R]dly a minut[E] to waste!”

“I s[K]ip forty ye[A]rs,” said the [BAKER], in tears,
“And proceed without further remark
To the day when you took me aboard of your ship
To help you in hunting the {SNARK}.
.......................................................
. <= 10 =>
.
. h a [R]d l y a m i n
. u t [E]t o w a s t e!”
. “I s [K]i p f o r t y
. y e [A]r s”s a i d t
. h e [B A K E R] i n t
. e a r s,

[BAKER] -10 : Prob. off of one of 7 BAKER's ~ 1 in 277
.......................................................
“A dear uncle of mine (after whom I was named)
Remarked, when I bade him farewell—”
“Oh, skip your dear uncle!” the Bellman exclaimed,
As he angrily tingled his bell.

“He remarked to me then,” said that mildest of men,
“‘If your {SNARK} be a {SNARK}, that is right:
Fetch it home by all means—you may serve it with greens,
And it’s handy for striking a light.

“‘You may seek it with thimbles—and seek it with care;
You may hunt it with forks and hope;
You may threaten its life with a railway-share;
You may charm it with smiles and soap—’”

(“That’s exactly the method,” the Bellman bold
In a hasty parenthesis cried,
“That’s exactly the way I have always been told
That the capture of Snarks should be tried!”)

“’But oh, beamish nephew, beware of the day,
If your {SNARK} be a Boojum! For then
You will softly and suddenly vanish away,
And never be met with again!’

“It is this, it is this that opp(R)esses my so(U)l,
When I thi(N)k of my uncl(E)’s last word(S):
And my heart is like nothing so much as a bowl
Brimming over with quivering curds!
...................................
(RUNES) 10
...................................
“It is this, it is this—” “We have had that before!”
The Bellman indignantly said.
And the Baker replied “Let me say it once more.
It is this, it is this that I dread!

“I engage with the {SNARK}—every night after dark—
In a dreamy delirious fight:
I serve it with greens in those shadowy scenes,
And I use it for striking a light:

“But if ever I meet with a Boojum, that day,
In a moment (of this I am sure),
I shall softly and suddenly vanish away—
And the notion I cannot endure!”
-----------------------------------------------------
Fit the Fifth.
THE BEAVER’S LESSON.
.......................................................
He thought of his childhood, left far far behind—
That blissful an[D] innocent state—
The sound so [E]xactly recalled to his mind
[A] pencil that squeaks on a sla[T]e!

“’Tis the voice of the Jubjub!” [H]e suddenly cried.
(This man, that they used to call “Dunce.”)
“As the Bellman would tell you,” he added with pride,
“I have uttere[D] that sentiment once.

“’Tis the not[E] of the Jubjub! Keep count, I entre[A]t;
You will find I have told it you [T]wice.
’Tis the song of the Jubjub! T[H]e proof is complete,
If only I’ve stated it thrice.”
.......................................................
. <= 25 =>
.
. T h a t b l i s s f u l a n[D]i n n o c e n t s t
. a t e—T h e s o u n d s o[E]x a c t l y r e c a l
. l e d t o h i s m i n d[A]p e n c i l t h a t s q
. u e a k s o n a s l a[T]e!T i s t h e v o i c e o
. f t h e J u b j u b[H]e s u d d e n l y c r i e d.
. (T h i s m a n,t h a t t h e y u s e d t o c a l l
. “D u n c e”A s t h e B e l l m a n w o u l d t e l
. l y o u”h e a d d e d w i t h p r i d e“I h a v e
. u t t e r e[D]t h a t s e n t i m e n t o n c e“T
. i s t h e n o t[E]o f t h e J u b j u b!K e e p c
. o u n t,I e n t r e[A]t;Y o u w i l l f i n d I h
. a v e t o l d i t y o u[T]w i c e’T i s t h e s o
. n g o f t h e J u b j u b!T[H]e p r o o f i s c o
. m p l e t e,I f o n l y I’v e s t a t e d i t t h
. r i c e.”
.
[DEATH] 24,27
--------------------------------------------------------
Loading Image...
...............................................
. GOOD FREND FOR [IE]{SUS}' SAKE FOR[BE]ARE,
___ TO DIGG THE DU[ST] ENCLOASED [HE]ARE:
---............................................
___ BLESTE BE Ye MAN Yt SPA[RE]S THES STONES,
_ AND CURST *BE HE* Yt MO[VE]S *MY BONES* .
...............................................
http://library.thinkquest.org/5175/images/grave1.jpg

........................................
*STIE/STY* , v.i. To soar; to ascend.
.
*STIE/STY* , n. 1. A pen or inclosure for SWine.
. 2. A place of *BESTial* debauchery.
........................................
{SUS} m, f : *PIG* (Latin)
--------------------------------------------------------
Fit the Sixth.
THE BARRISTER’S DREAM.
...............................................................
He [i.e., the Barrister] dreamed that he stood in a shadowy Court,
Where the {SNARK}, with a *GLASS* in its eye,
Dressed in gown, bands, and wig, was defending a *PIG*
On the charge of deserting its *STY*.
The Witnesses proved, without error or flaw,
That the *STY* was deserted when found:
................................................
“In the matter of Treason the *PIG* would appear
To have aided, but scarcely abetted:
While the charge of Insolvency fails, it is clear,
If you grant the plea ‘never indebted.’
................................................
But the Judge said he never had summed up before;
So the {SNARK} undertook it instead,
And summed it so well that it came to far more
Than the Witnesses ever had said!

When the VERDict was called for, the Jury declined,
As the word was so puzzling to spell;
But they ventured to hope that the {SNARK} wouldn’t mind
Undertaking that duty as well.

So the {SNARK} found the VERDict, although, as it owned,
It was spent with the toils of the day:
When it said the word “GUILTY!” the Jury all groaned,
And some of them fainted away.

Then the {SNARK} pronounced sentence, the Judge being quite
Too nervous to utter a word:
When it rose to its feet, there was silence like night,
And the fall of a pin might be heard.

“Transportation for life” was the sentence it gave,
“And then to be fined *FORTY* pound.”
-----------------------------------------------------------
Fit the Seventh.
THE BANKER’S FATE.
................................................................
To the horr{O}r o[F] all wh[O] {W}ere p[R]esen{T} [T]hat da[Y].
He uprose in full evening dress,
And with senseless grimaces endeavoured to say
What his tongue could no longer express.
..........................
. <= 6 =>
.
. T o t h
. e h o r r {O}
. r o [F] a l l
. w h [O]{W} e r
. e p [R] e s e
. n {T}[T] h a t
. d a [Y].
.
[FORTY] 6
{TWO} -10 : Prob. of both in single Snark line ~ 2 in 29
-----------------------------------------------------
Fit the Eighth.
THE VANISHING.

They soug(H)t it with thimbles, they sought it with care;
They pursued it wi(T)h forks and hope;
They threatened its life with a railw(A)y-share;
They charmed it with smiles and soap.

They shudder(E)d to think that the chase might fail,
And the Beaver, excite(D) at last,
Went bounding along on the tip of its tail,
For the d(A)ylight was nearly past.
......................................
(A DEATH) -48
......................................
“There is Thingumbob shouting!” the Bellman said.
“He is shouting like mad, only hark!
He is waving his hands, he is wagging his head,
He has certainly found a Snark!”

They gazed in delight, while the Butcher exclaimed
“He was always a desperate wag!”
They beheld him—their Baker—their hero unnamed—
On the top of a neighbouring crag,

Erect and sublime, for one moment of time.
In the next, that wild figure they saw
(As if stung by a spasm) plunge into a chasm,
While they waited and listened in awe.

“It’s a Snark!” was the sound that first came to their ears,
And seemed almost too good to be *TRUE*.
Then followed a torrent of laughter and cheers:
Then the ominous words “It’s a Boo–”

Then, silence. Some fancied they heard in the air
A weary and wan[D]ering sigh
That sound[E]d like “–jum!” but the othe[R]s declare
It was only a [B]reeze that went by.
The[Y] hunted till darkness came on, but they found
Not a button, or feather, or mark,
By which they could tell that they stood on the ground
..............................................
. <= 19 =>
.
. A w e a r y a n d *W A N [D] E R I N G S*
. i g h T h a t s o u n d [E] d l i k e“j
. u m”b u t t h e o t h e [R] s d e c l a
. r e I t w a s o n l y a [B] r e e z e t
. h a t w e n t b y. T h e [Y] h u n t e d
. t i l l d a r k n e s s c a m e o n,
.
[DERBY] 19 : Prob. in last 3 stanzas ~ 485
..............................................
Where the Baker had met with th{E} [S]nark.
In the midst of the word he was t{R|Y]ing to say,
In the midst of his laught{E|R] and glee,
He had softly and suddenly {V|A]nished away—
For the Snark was a Booju[M], you see.
.......................................................
. <= 31 =>
.
. W h e r e t h e B a k e r h a d m e t w i t h t h {E}[S] n a r k.
. I n t h e m i d s t o f t h e w o r d h e w a s t {R}[Y] i n g t
. o s a y,I n t h e m i d s t o f h i s l a u g h t {E}[R] a n d g
. l e e,H e h a d s o f t l y a n d s u d d e n l y {V}[A] n i s h
. e d a w a y—F o r t h e *S n a r k w a s a B o o j u [M]* y o u s
. e e.
.
[DERBY] 19
[MARY S.] -31
{VERE} -31 : Prob. of both in last 2 stanzas ~ 1,400,000
[No 'VM' only one 'VA' and one 'RY']
--------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------
EXODUS 2:10 And she called his name *Moses* and
. she said, because I *drew him out of the water* .
...................................................
*Moses* is from the Hebrew/Aramaic:
*MoSHeH* : "drawing out (of the water)"
He has *REVE(al)ED* it in the sonnets where
there is *Wil{(L IN O)VER}pl{US}* [anagram: {NIL VERO}]
.....................................................
____ *VERUS (LINO) RIVE*
____ *VERO NIL VERIUS*
.................................................
. *LINO* : to *DAUB* , besmear, anoint.
. *RIVE* : a small stream of water, a brook. (vocative)
.......................................................
Exodus 2:3. And when she could not longer hide him,
. she took for him an ARK of bulrushes [i.e., BASKET],
. and *DAUBED* it with *SLIME* and with PITCH,
. and put the child therein; and she laid it
. in the flags by the *[RIVER]'s BRINK* .
.
[Anne Hathaway gave birth in 6 months like the mother of Moses]
...........................................................
*Ma.S.He.H.* : Ma(ry) S(idney) He(nry) H(erbert)
----------------------------------------------------------------
. _Shakespeares POEMS_ (1640) - *I.BENSON*
http://www.library.upenn.edu/etext/furness/poems/00a.html

TO THE READ[E]R. The[R]e presu{M|E] (under f{A|V]our)
to p{R|E]sent to {Y|O]ur view {S|o]me excel[L]ent
.....................................................
. <= 8 =>
.
. T O T H E R [E] A
. D E R T H e [R] e
. p r e s u {M|E] u
. n d e r f {A|V] o
. u r t o p {R|E] s
. e n t t o {Y|O] u
. r v i e w {S|o] m
. e e x c e l [L] e
. n t a n d s w e
. e t e l y c o m
. p o s e d P o e
. m s
.
{MARY S.} 8
[Lo. O., E. VERE] 8
.........................................................
and sweetely composed Poems, of Master William Shakespeare, Which
in themselves appeare of the same purity, the *AUTHOUR* himselfe then
living avouched ; they had not the fortune by reason of their Infancie
in his death to have the due accomodatio of proportionable glory with
the rest of his *EVER-living* Workes, yet the lines of themselves will
afford you a more authentick approbation than my assurance any way
can, to invite your allowance, in your perusall you shall find them
Seren, cleere and eligantly plaine, such gentle straines as shall
recreate and not perplexe your braine, no intricate or cloudy stuffe
to puzzell intellect, but perfect eloquence ; such as will raise your
admiration to his praise: this assurance I know will not differ from
your acknowledgment. And certaine I am, my opinion will be seconded
by the sufficiency of these ensuing lines ; I have beene somewhat
solicitus to bring this forth to the perfect view of all men ;
and in so doing glad to be serviceable for the continuance
of *GLORY* to th*E DEsERVED* AUTHOR in these his poems. - I. B.
.........................................................
. *DE(s)ERVED* AUTHOR
. *ED D(e) VERE* AUTHOR
................................................................
How much more pRAIS*E DESERVED* thy beauty's use, Sonnets: II
---------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
laraine
2018-03-24 18:27:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
-------------------------------------------------------
After his library FIRE of 1623 Ben Jonson (1572-1637)
wrote of his LOSS in "An Execration upon Vulcan"
.......................................................
Thou mightst have had (me) perish, piece by peic[E],
To light Tobacco, or sa[V]e roasted Geese.
Sindg[E] Capons, or *poor Piggs* , d[R]oping their Eyes;
Cond[E]mn'd me to the Ovens wit{H} the <PIES> ;
.....................................................
_________ <= 19 =>
.
. h{O}u m i g h t s t h a v e h a d(m e)
. {E}p{E}r i s h,p i{E}c e b y p{E}i c[E],
. T{O}l i g h t T{O}b a c c{O|O}r s a[V]
. {E}r o a s t{E}d G{E|E}s{E}S i n d g[E]
. {C}a p o n s{O}r p{O|O}r P i g g s,d[R]
. {O}p i n g t h{E}i r{E}y e s;C o n d[E]
. m n'd m e t{O}t h e{O}v e n s w i t{H}
. t h e<P I{E}S>;
.....................................
[E.VERE] 19 : Prob. ~ 1 in 1020
19 {E.O.}s : Prob. ~ 1 in 52
--------------------------------------------------------
______________ <= 19 =>
.
. T OTHEO - (N) l ___{I} _ <E>B E G E T T E RO
. F THESE_- (I) n __-{S} - U<I>N G S O N N ET
. S MrWha_- (L) L __ [H]A {P} <P>{I}_(N){S}S{S}EA
. N Dthat___ (E) T __ [E]R N_ <I> T__(I) E<P>R OM
. I SEDB Y O u ___- [R]E _ V <E> R_ (L)<I>V I NG
. <P>OEtW I s h ____ [E]T __ H (T) H__(E) W E L LW
. <I>ShIN- G a _____ [d V e] __ N (T) u _____ ReRI NS
. <E>tTIN G fort----_________ H (T) t
........................................................
. Probability of Upper & Lower (NILE)'s ~ 1/176,000
. Probability of 4 oven <PIE>'s ~ 1/38,000
--------------------------------------------------------
[G I R T] with a boyish garb for boyish task,
[E]ager she wields her spade: y(E)t loves as we(L)l
[R]est o(N) a fr(I)end(L)y kn(E)e, i(N)tent to ask
[T]he tale he loves to tell.
.........................
. <= 5 =>
.
. y (E) t l o
. v e s a s
. w e (L) l R
. e s t o (N)
. a f r (I) e
. n d (L) y k
. n (E) e, i (N)
. t e n t
.
(NILE) 4,-11 : Prob. of both in first stanza ~ 1 in 500
---------------------------------------------------------------------
<<The Least Successful Collector Betsy Baker played a central role in
the history of collecting. She was employed as a servant in the house
of John Warburton (1682-1759) who had amassed a fine collection of 58
1st edition plays, including most of the works of Shakespeare. One day
Warburton returned home to find 55 of them charred beyond legibility.
Betsy had either burned them or used them as <PIE> bottoms.
The remaining 3 folios are now in the British Museum.>>
.
. http://hometown.aol.com/clasz/Chap9.html
.
NOTE: some 60 manuscripts of plays of this period eventually come
. into the hands of a collector named John Warburton* (1682-1759).
.
. Many are the only surviving co<PIES> of plays that had never
. been printed. Unfortunately Warburton was careless with
. them and his servant, Betsy Baker, made use of them
. to light her stove and line the bottom of <PIES>.>>
A list of the plays thought lost is here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Warburton_(officer_of_arms)

The Philip Massinger wikipedia entry says 11 of his were lost in
the pie incident! He was lucky to have written others.

I also see one play by William Smith, not so lucky, called
"Saint George for England"
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
----------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larder
C.

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