Discussion:
T.LUCY
(too old to reply)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2020-08-21 19:14:41 UTC
Permalink
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. To the memory of my beloved, The Author
. MR. W I L L I A M S H A K E S P E A R E :
.
.[W]hich, since thy flight frõ hence, hath mourn'd like NIGHT,
.[A]nd despaires day, but for thy Volumes light.
---------------------------------------------------------
.[T]o draw no envy (Shakespeare) on thy name,
.[A]m I thus ample to thy Booke, and Fame;
.[W]hile I confesse thy writings to be such,
.[A]s neither Man, nor Muse, can praise too much.
'[T]is TRUE, and all men's suffrage. But these wayes
.
. Were not the paths I meant unto thy praise;
. For seeliest Ignorance on these may light,
. Which, when it sounds at best, but *ECCHO's right* ;
.
.[W]hich were so richly spun, and wouen so fit,
.[A]s, since, she will vouchsafe no other Wit.
.[T]he merry Greeke tart Aristophanes,
------------------------------------------------
.[T A W] Phoenician letter for T
---------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 76 (1609)
.
. {T}o new found methods, and to compounds *STRANGE*?
. {W}hy write I still all one, [EVER] the same,
. {A}nd keepe inuention in a *NOT[ED WEED]*,
. {T}hat *[EVER]y WORD* [D]oth almost fel {M[Y] NAME},
. {S}hewing th[E]ir birth, and whe[R]e they did proce[E]d?
. {O} know sweet love I alwaies writ[E] of you,
. A\n\d you an[D] love are still my argument:
................................................
[T.WATSO\n\] Acrostic Prob. ~ 1 in 5500
-------------------------------------------------
. SONNET 32
.
.[W]hen that churl death my *BONES with DUST shall coVER*
.[A]nd shalt by fortune once more re-survey
.[T]hese poor rude lines of thy deceased lover:
-------------------------------------------------------
. Gematria (PHILIP SIDNEI) = 125
. Hebrew Gematria (יהוה‎ i.e., YHWH) = *26*
...............................................
. Sonnet 125
.
. WEr't ought to me I "bore the canopy",
. With my extern the outward honoring,
. Or layd great bases {For} eternity,
. Which proues more [S]hort then wast or ruining?
. Haue [I] not seene dwellers on forme an[D] fauor
. Lose all,and more by payi[N]g too much rent
. For compound sw[E]et;Forgoing simple sauor,
. Pitt[I]full thriuors in their gazing spent.
. Noe,let me be obsequious in thy heart,
. And take thou my oblacion,poore but free,
. Which is not mixt with seconds,knows no art,
. But mutuall render onely me for thee.
. Hence,thou subbornd Informer, a trew soule
. When most impeacht,stands least in thy controule.
.......................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} e t e r n i t y,W h i c h p r o u e s m o r e
. [S] h o r t t h e n w a s t o r r u i n i n g?H a u e
. [I] n o t s e e n e d w e l l e r s o n f o r m e a n
. [D] f a u o r L o s e a l l,a n d m o r e b y p a y i
. [N] g t o o m u c h r e n t F o r c o m p o u n d s w
. [E] e t;F o r g o i n g s i m p l e s a u o r,P i t t
. [I] f u l l t h r i u o r s i n t h e i r g a z i n g
,
{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
..........................................................
Shortest ELS skip {For}[SIDNEI] or [SIDNEY] in KJV = 869
Shortest {For}[SIDNEI] or [SIDNEY] in Moby Dick = 2818
..........................................................
"Raw" {For}[SIDNEI] probability skip less than
or equal to *26* in these ~ 1 in 108 million.
...........................................................
The Encyclopædia Britannica ~ 190 million letters
-------------------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 47
.
. BEtwixt mine eye and heart a league is tooke,
. And each doth good turnes now vnto the other,
. When that mine eye is famisht {For} a looke,
. Or heart in loue with [S]ighes himselfe doth smother;
. W[I]th my loues picture then my eye [D]oth feast,
. And to the painted ba[N]quet bids my heart:
. An other tim[E] mine eye is my hearts guest,
. And [I]n his thoughts of loue doth share a part.
. So either by thy picture or my loue,
. Thy seife away,are present still with me,
. For thou nor farther then my thoughts canst moue,
. And I am still with them,and they with thee.
. Or if they sleepe, thy picture in my sight
. Awakes my heart,to hearts and eyes delight.
.......................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} a l o o k e,O r h e a r t i n l o u e w i t h
. [S] i g h e s h i m s e l f e d o t h s m o t h e r;W
. [I] t h m y l o u e s p i c t u r e t h e n m y e y e
. [D] o t h f e a s t,A n d t o t h e p a i n t e d b a
. [N] q u e t b i d s m y h e a r t:A n o t h e r t i m
. [E] m i n e e y e i s m y h e a r t s g u e s t,A n d
. [I] n h i s t h o u g h t s
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
-----------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 108
.
But makes antiquitie {For} aye *HIS PAGE*,
Finding the fir[S]t conceit of love there bred,
Wh[E]re time and outward forme woul[D] shew it dead.
................................................
. <= 26 =>
.
. {F o r} a y e*H I S P A G E*F i n d i n g t h e f i r
. [S]t c o n c e i t o f l o v e t h e r e b r e d,W h
. [E]r e t i m e a n d o u t w a r d f o r m e w o u l
. [D]s h e w i t d e a d.
.
{For}[S.E.D.] *26* : Prob. in any *NAME* Sonnet ~ 1 in 175
[starting in the middle of the 3rd line from bottom]
----------------------------------------------------------
Thirteen *NAME* Sonnets:
....................................................
36, 71, 72, *76* , 80, 81, 89, 95, 108, 111, 127, 151
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Sir Thomas Lucy of Charlecote Park, whose
coat of arms had three luces (pike) it.
[William Dugdale’s Antiquities of Warwickshire]

Loading Image...
.........................................................
https://silibrary1.wordpress.com/2015/12/21/sing-lousy-lucy-shakespeare-and-the-roes-of-charlecote/

The deer-stealing story begins with two independent accounts; the first
in notes written around 1688 by Richard Davies, an Oxford clergyman:

‘Shakespeare was much given to all unluckiness in stealing venison
and *RABBITS*, particularly from Sir – Lucy who oft had him
whipped and sometimes imprisoned and at last made him fly
his native country to his great advancement.’
----------------------------------------------------------
*RABBITS* & three *LUCES* top center of Sonnets headpiece:
Loading Image...
---------------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 76 (1609)
.
. WHy is m{Y} verse so barren of new pride?
. So far from variation or qui{C}ke change?
. Why with the time do I not glance aside
. To new fo{U}nd methods, and to compounds *STRANGE*?
. Why write I still al{L} one, [EVER] the same,
. And keepe inuention in a *NOT[ED WEED]*,
. Tha{T} *[EVER]y WORD* [D]oth almost fel {M[Y] NAME},
. Shewing th[E]ir birth, and whe[R]e they did proce[E]d?
. O know sweet love I alwaies writ[E] of you,
. And you an[D] love are still my argument:
.
{T.LUCY} -47 : only ELS in Sonnets.
................................................
____ <= 14 =>
.
. (N O T)[E D W E E D](T) h A T E
. V E R y w o r D [D](O) t h a l
. m o S T F E L M [Y](N) A M E S
. h e w i n g t H [E] I r b i r
. t h a n d w h e [R] e t h E y
. D i d p r o c e [E] d O K n o
. w s w e E t l o [V] e I a l w
. a i e s w r i t [E] o f y o u
. A n d y o u a n [D] l O v E
..................................................
[DEVERE] -14 {found by James Ferris}
[DYER] 14 {found by A.W.Burgstahler}
[DYEREVED] 14 : Prob. in any Sonnet ~ 1 in 3,000
..................................................
. So all my best is dressing old words new,
. Spending againe what is already spent:
. For as the *SUN* is daily new and old,
. So is my loue still te(L)l(I)n(G) w(H)a(T) i(S) told,

(LIGHTS) 2: Prob. in last couplet ~ 1 in 197,000
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. Sonnet 108

WHAT'S in the bra{I}ne that Inck may {C}haracter,
Which {H}ath not figur'd t{O} thee my *TRUE* spi{R}it,
................................................
. <= 10 =>
.
. W H A T'S i n t h e b r a {I}
. n e t h a t I n c k m a y {C}
. h a r a c t e r,W h i c h {H}
. a t h n o t f i g u r'd t {O}
. t h e e m y t r u e s p i {R} i t,

{ICHOR} 10
................................................
WHAT'S new to speake, what now to register,
That may expresse my love, or thy deare merit?

[N]othing sweet boy, but yet like prayers diuine,
[I] must each day say ore the very same,
[C]ounting no old thing old, thou mine, I thine,
[E]uen as when first I hallowed *THY FAIRE NAME*.

So that eternall love in loves fresh case,
Waighes not the *DUST* and iniury of age,
Nor giues to necessary wrinckles place,
But makes antiquitie for aye his page,

Finding the first conceit of love there bred,
Where time and outward forme would shew it dead,
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. Henry the Sixth, Part Three (Octavo 1, 1595): V, i
.
KING EDWARD IV: This Hand, fast wound about thy coale-black hayre,
. Shall, whiles thy Head is warme, and new cut off,
. Write in the *DUST* this Sentence with thy blood,
. Wind-changing Warwicke now can change no more.
.
. Enter *OXFORD*, with Drumme and Colours.
.
*OXFORD*: Ah Warwike, Warwike, cheere vp thy selfe and liue,
. For yet thears hope enough to win the daie.
. Our warlike Queene with troopes is come from France,
. And at *SOUTH-HAMPTON* landed all hir traine,
. And mightst thou liue then would we neuer flie.
...............................................................
. King Henry VI, part 3 (Folio 1, 1623): V, i
.
KING EDWARD IV: This Hand, fast wound about thy coale-black hayre,
. Shall, whiles thy Head is warme, and new cut off,
. Write in the *DUST* this Sentence with thy blood,
. Wind-changing Warwicke now can change no more.
.
. Enter Oxford, with Drumme and Colours.
.
WARWICK: Oh chearefull Colours, see where *OXFORD COMES*!
.
OXFORD: *OXFORD, OXFORD*, for Lancaster!
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. Henry the Sixth, Part Three (Octavo 1, 1595): V, ii
.
War. What is pompe, rule, raigne, but earth and *DUST*?
. And liue we how we can, yet die we must.
. Sweet rest his soule, flie Lords and saue your selues,
. For Warwike bids you all farewell to meet in Heauen,
. He dies.
...........................................................
. King Henry VI, part 3 (Folio 1, 1623): V, ii
.
WARWICK: For who liu'd King, but I could digge his Graue?
. And who durst smile, when Warwicke bent his Brow?
. Loe, now my Glory smear'd in *DUST* and blood.
. My Parkes, my Walkes, my *MANNORS* that I had,
. Euen now forsake me; and of all my Lands,
. Is nothing left me, but my bodies length.
. Why, what is Pompe, Rule, Reigne, but Earth and *DUST*?
. And liue we how we can, yet dye we must.
.
. Enter *OXFORD* and Somerset.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
The way to *DUSTY* death. out, out, brief candle! : Macbeth: V, v
...................................................................
. Julius Caesar: III, i
.
BRUTUS: How many times shall Caesar bleed in sport,
. That now on Pompey's basis lies along
. No worthier than the *DUST*!
..................................................................
. King John: IV, ii
.
Messenger: My liege, her ear
. Is stopp'd with *DUST*; the first of April died
..................................................................
. Cymbeline: IV, ii
.
ARVIRAGUS: [To IMOGEN]: Are we not brothers?
.
IMOGEN: So man and man should be;
: But clay and clay differs in dignity,
: Whose *DUST* is both alike. I am *VERy* sick.
......................................................
BELARIUS: Together, have one *DUST*, yet r[EVERE]nce,
: That angel of the world, doth make distinction
: Of place 'tween high and low. Our foe was princely
: And though you took his life, as being our foe,
: Yet bury him as a prince.
......................................................
GUIDERIUS: Fear no more the heat o' the sun,
: Nor the furious winter's rages;
: Thou thy worldly task hast done,
: Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages:
: Golden lads and girls all must,
: As chimney-sweepers, come to *DUST*.
.
ARVIRAGUS: Fear no more the frown o' the great;
: Thou art past the tyrant's stroke;
: Care no more to clothe and eat;
: To thee the reed is as the oak:
: The sceptre, learning, physic, must
: All follow this, and come to *DUST*.
.
GUIDERIUS: Fear no more the lightning flash,
.
ARVIRAGUS: Nor the all-dreaded thunder-stone;
.
GUIDERIUS: Fear not slander, censure rash;
.
ARVIRAGUS: Thou hast finish'd joy and moan:
.
GUIDERIUS: | All lovers young, all lovers must
ARVIRAGUS: | Consign to thee, and come to *DUST*.
..................................................................
You are not worth the *DUST* which the rude wind King Lear: IV, ii
To the descent and *DUST* below thy foot, King Lear: V, iii
That all my bowels crumble up to *DUST*: King John: V, vii
Hark, villains! I will grind your bones to *DUST* Titus Andronicus: V, ii
And give to *DUST* that is a little gilt Toilus and Cressida: III, iii
Wipe off the *DUST* that hides our sceptre's gilt King Richard II: II, i
Which now, two tender playfellows to *DUST*, King Richard III: IV, iv
Where no priest shovels in *DUST*. o cursed wretch, The Winter's Tale: IV, iv
Where *DUST* and damn'd oblivion is the tomb All's Well that Ends Well: II, iii
Until this day, to scour it in the *DUST*. Pericles, Prince of Tyre: II, ii
To sweep the *DUST* behind the door. A Midsummer Night's Dream: V, i
To *DUSTY* nothing, yet let memory, Toilus and Cressida: III, ii
Threw *DUST* and rubbish on king richard's head. King Richard II: V, ii
Thou, that threw'st *DUST* upon his goodly head King Henry IV, part II: I, iii
This mould of marcius, they to *DUST* should grind it Coriolanus: III, ii
The *DUST* that did offend it. All's Well that Ends Well: V, iii
The *DUST* on antique time would lie unswept, Coriolanus: II, iii
That issue out of *DUST*. happy thou art not; Measure for Measure: III, i
Take *DUST*, like mistress mall's picture? why dost Twelfth Night: I, iii
Shall blow each *DUST*, each straw, each little rub, King John: III, iv
Only compound me with forgotten *DUST* King Henry IV, part II: IV, v
O woe! thy canopy is *DUST* and stones;-- Romeo and Juliet: V, iii
Now, france, thy glory droopeth to the *DUST*. King Henry VI, part I: V, iii
Nor from the *DUST* of old oblivion raked, King Henry V: II, iv
More laud than gilt o'er-*DUST*ed. Toilus and Cressida: III, iii
Make *DUST* our paper and with rainy eyes King Richard II: III, ii
Lies on my tongue: no, percy, thou art *DUST* King Henry IV, part I: V, iv
He hath no eyes, the *DUST* hath blinded them. King Henry VI, part II: III, iii
For these, these, tribunes, in the *DUST* I write Titus Andronicus: III, i
Doth choke the air with *DUST*: in, and prepare: Timon of Athens: V, ii
Destroy our friends and after weep their *DUST* All's Well that Ends Well: V, iii
Dared once to touch a *DUST* of england's ground? King Richard II: II, iii
But *DUST* was thrown upon his sacred head: King Richard II: V, ii
Blows *DUST* in other's eyes, to spread itself; Pericles, Prince of Tyre: I, i
Ay, and laying autumn's *DUST*. King Lear: IV, vi
And throw their power i' the *DUST*. Coriolanus: III, i
And stop this gap of breath with fulsome *DUST* King John: III, iv
And lay the summer's *DUST* with showers of blood King Richard II: III, iii
And by the merit of vile gold, dross, *DUST*, King John: III, i
And shed my dear blood drop by drop in the *DUST*, King Henry IV, part I: I, iii
A grain, a *DUST*, a gnat, a wandering hair, King John: IV, i
but see how I lay the *DUST* with my tears. The Two Gentlemen of Verona: II, iii
Overmastered with a pierce of valiant *DUST*? to make Much Ado About Nothing: II, i
Longing for what it had not; nay, the *DUST* Antony and Cleopatra: III, vi
-------------------------------------------------------
Seek for thy noble father in the *DUST*: Hamlet: I, ii
What is this quintessence of *DUST*? Hamlet: II, ii
Compounded it with *DUST*, whereto 'tis kin. Hamlet: IV, ii
--------------------------------------------------------
. Hamlet, Prince of Denmark Act 5, Scene 1
.
HAMLET: Dost thou think *ALEXANDER*
. looked o' this fashion i' the earth?
.
HORATIO: E'en so.
.
HAMLET: And smelt so? pah!
. [Puts down the skull]
.
HORATIO: E'en so, my lord.
.
HAMLET: To what base uses we may return, Horatio! Why may
. not imagination trace the noble *DUST* of *ALEXANDER*,
. till he find it stopping a bung-hole?
.................................................
*PUL-VERE* : DUST (Danish, Latin)
*POL-VERE* : DUST (Italian)
.................................................
HORATIO: 'Twere to consider too curiously, to consider so.
.
HAMLET: No, faith, not a jot; but to follow him thither
. with modesty enough, and likelihood to lead it: as
. thus: *ALEXANDER* died, *ALEXANDER* was buried,
. *ALEXANDER* returneth into *DUST*; the *DUST* is earth; of
. earth we make loam; and why of that loam, whereto he
. was converted, might they not stop a beer-barrel?
. Imperious Caesar, dead and turn'd to clay,
. Might stop a hole to keep the wind away:
. O, that that earth, which kept the world in awe,
. Should patch a wall to expel the winter flaw!
. But soft! but soft! aside: *HERE COMES* the king.
.................................................
.................................................
LAERTES: [Leaps into the grave]

Now pile your *DUST* upon the quick and dead,
Till of this flat a mountain you have made,
To o'ertop old Pelion, or the skyish head
Of blue Olympus.
--------------------------------------------------------
. King Henry V Act 4, Scene 7
.
FLUELLEN: Ay, he was porn at Monmouth, Captain Gower. What
. call you the town's name where *ALEXANDER the Pig* was born!
.
GOWER: *ALEXANDER the Great*.
.
FLUELLEN: Why, I pray you, is not pig great? the pig,
. or the great, or the mighty, or the huge, or the
. magnanimous, are all one reckonings, save the phrase
. is a little variations.
.
GOWER: I think *ALEXANDER the Great* was born in Macedon;
. his father was called Philip of Macedon, as I take it.
.
FLUELLEN: I think it is in Macedon where *ALEXANDER* is porn. I
. tell you, captain, if you look in the maps of the
. 'orld, I warrant you sall find, in the comparisons
. between Macedon and Monmouth, that the situations,
. look you, is both alike. There is a river in
. Macedon; and there is also moreover a river at
. Monmouth: it is called Wye at Monmouth; but it is
. out of my prains what is the name of the other
. river; but 'tis all one, 'tis alike as my fingers is
. to my fingers, and there is salmons in both. If you
. mark *ALEXANDER's* life well, Harry of Monmouth's life
. is come after it indifferent well; for there is
. figures in all things. *ALEXANDER*, God knows, and
. you know, in his rages, and his furies, and his
. wraths, and his cholers, and his moods, and his
. displeasures, and his indignations, and also being a
. little intoxicates in his prains, did, in his ales and
. his angers, look you, kill his best friend, Cleitus.
----------------------------------------------------------
The Shepherd's Week — John Gay

MONDAY, OR, THE SQUABBLE
Lobbin Clout, Cuddy, CloddipoleCUDDY

Hold, witless Lobbin {C}lout, I thee advise,
Lest bliste{R}s sore on thy own tongue arise.
L{O} y[O]nder Cloddipole, the blithe{S}ome [S]wain,
The wisest lout of all the ne[I]ghbouring plain!
From Cloddipol[E] we learnt to read the skies,
To know when hail will fall, or winds arise.
.........................................................
. <= 27 =>
.
. H o l d,w i t l e s s L o b b i n{C}l o u t,I t h e e
. a d v i s e,L e s t b l i s t e[R]s s o r e o n t h y
. o w n t o n g u e a r i s e.L{O}y[O]n d e r C l o d d
. i p o l e,t h e b l i t h e{S}o m e[S]w a i n,T h e w
. i s e s t l o u t o f a l l t h e n e[I]g h b o u r i
. n g p l a i n!F r o m C l o d d i p o l[E]w e l e a r
. n t t o r e a d t h e s k i e s,T o k n o w w h e n h
. a i l w i l l f a l l,o r w i n d s a r i s e.
.
[ROSIE] 28 : Prob at top ~ 1 in 57
{CROS} 26 : Prob at top ~ 1 in 44
-------------------------------------------------------
. TUESDAY; OR, THE DITTY
.
. Last Friday's eve, when as the sun was set,
. I, nea[R] y[O]n [S]t[I]l[E], three sallow gypsies met
. Upon my hand they cast a poring look,
. Bid me beware, and thrice their heads they shook,
. They said that many {CROSS}es I must prove,
. Some in my worldly gain, but most in love.
.
[ROSIE] 2
{CROS} 1
-------------------------------------------------------
https://tinyurl.com/rumaxot

The 45º line from the Westminster *Altar* through Chaucer through Shakespeare
passed through the tomb of Scriblerus Club [Swift, Pope, etc.] member John Gay
[1685-1732]. Gay's poem _The Shepherd's Week_ involved the exploits of various
yokels with names such as Bumkinet and Boobyclod. Gay's Poet's Corner marble
monument consists of a high relief Rysbrack portrait of Gay on a roundel
against a pyramid with masks, a trumpet & pan-pipes. Just below
Gay's portrait bust is an inscription composed by the poet himself:

Life is a [JEST]; and all things show it,
I thought so once; but now I know it.
https://tinyurl.com/r2re8t3

so reminiscent of the [IE/ST] of the
Stratford *PIG STY*: {SVS} [ST/IE]
-----------------------------------------------------
Loading Image...
...............................................
. GOOD FREND FOR [IE]{SVS}' SAKE FORBEARE,
___ TO DIGG THE DV[ST] ENCLOASED HEARE:
. BLESTE BE Ye MAN Yt SPA[RE]S THES STONES,
_ AND CVRST BE HE Yt MO[VE]S MY BONES.
...............................................
On the 14th anniversary of Anne Hathaway's death [Aug. 6, 1637].
Ben Jonson was BURIED UPRIGHT leaning against the WALL
. of his Westminster Abbey crypt as requested:
.
. ' [TWO FEET BY TWO FEET]
. *WILL* do for all I WANT '. - Ben Jonson
----------------------------------------------
. Romans Chapter 10, Verse 6
.............................................
1395 Wyclif: Who schal *STIE* in to heuene?
. that is to seie, to lede doun Crist;
---------------------------------------------
"With bolder wing shall dare aloft to STY,
To the last praises of this Faery Queene." --Spenser.
-------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.westminster-abbey.org/abbey-commemorations/commemorations/john-gay

<<John Gay, the celebrated poet and dramatist, was buried in the south transept of Westminster Abbey on 23rd December 1732, in the central part of the area near Thomas Parr's grave. The funeral was a lavish affair and Alexander Pope was one of the pall bearers.

A monument was erected for him against the south wall and the monument to Samuel Butler was moved to accommodate it. But in the 1930s this, and the adjoining monument to Nicholas Rowe, was moved to the Abbey's triforium as two important wall paintings were discovered behind them during cleaning. The monuments can be viewed in the new Queen's Diamond Jubilee Galleries in the triforium.

The marble monument consists of a high relief portrait of the poet on a roundel against a pyramid with masks, a trumpet and pan-pipes above. At the top is a cartouche showing his coat of arms: "or, on a fess sable between three escallops azure, five lozenges argent". The sculptor was John Michael Rysbrack. Just below the portrait bust is an inscription composed by the poet himself:

Life is a jest; and all things show it,
I thought so once; but now I know it.

Below is an inscription written by Alexander Pope:

Of manners gentle, of affections mild; in wit a man; simplicity, a child; with native humour temp'ring virtuous rage, form'd to delight at once and lash the Age: above temptation, in a low estate, and uncorrupted, e'en among the Great; a safe companion, and an easy friend, unblam'd thro' life, lamented in thy end. These are thy honours! not that here thy bust is mix'd with heroes, or with kings thy dust; but that the worthy and the good shall say, striking their pensive bosoms – Here lies GAY. A:Pope.

In two columns below:

Here lye the ashes of Mr JOHN GAY, the warmest friend, the gentlest companion, the most benevolent man; who maintained independency in low circumstances of fortune; integrity, in the midst of a corrupt Age; and that equal serenity of mind, which conscious goodness alone can give, thro' the whole course of his life. Favourite of the Muses, he was led by them to every elegant art, refined in taste, and fraught with graces all his own. In various kinds of poetry, superior to many, inferior to none, his works continue to inspire, what his example taught, contempt of folly, however adorned; detestation of vice, however dignified; reverence for virtue, however disgraced.>>
-------------------------------------------------
https://www.poetsgraves.co.uk/gay.htm

<<John Gay died of an intestinal disorder on the 4th December 1732 in the house of his patrons the Duke and Duchess of Queensberry. He was only 46 years old. Arbuthnot remarked that Gay's funeral was: 'as splendid as if he had been a peer of the realm'.

Gay, a very well liked man, had a passion for good company, good food
and blue ribbons. (Both Pope and Swift teased him about the latter.)

Pope wrote an epitaph for Gay's monument which contained the following lines:
' Of manner gentle, of affections mild; In wit, a man; simplicity a child:
With native humour tempering virtuous rage,
Formed to delight at once and lash the age:'
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Michael_Rysbrack

Bust_of_Inigo_Jones_by_John_Michael_Rysbrack,_1725
https://tinyurl.com/u43t3ub

<<Johannes Michel Rysbrack, original name Jan Michiel Rijsbrack (24 June 1694 – 8 January 1770), was an 18th-century Flemish sculptor, who spent most of his career in England. (His birth-year is sometimes (wrongly) given as 1693 or 1684.)

Rysbrack was born on 24 June 1694 in Antwerp, the son of the landscape painter Pieter Rijsbraeck. His older brother Pieter Andreas Rijsbrack was a landscape and still life painter; and a younger brother Gerard Rijsbrack was a still life and sports painter. He studied drawings by Italian masters, before settling in London in 1720.

In London, Rysbrack quickly established himself as the leading sculptor, a position he was to retain until the mid-1740s, remaining one of the top three sculptors in Britain until shortly before his death. He executed busts and funerary monuments of many of the most prominent men of his day, including the monument to Isaac Newton in Westminster Abbey, a statue of Marlborough, and busts of Walpole, Bolingbroke, and Pope. Dr Cox Macro commissioned him to make a bust of Flemish painter Peter Tillemans on his death in 1734.

In 1733 he carved a magnificent marble portrait bust of George Hamilton, 1st Earl of Orkney (1666–1737) in the guise of a Roman centurion. Orkney was a distinguished general serving under the Duke of Marlborough. Orkney had taken the surrender of the French at the Battle of Blenheim in 1704, and he took part in numerous subsequent battles during the War of the Spanish Succession. One of Rysbrack's greatest works, the bust of Lord Orkney is on display at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Its special character owes something to a bond between the sculptor and Lord Orkney, one that had its origins nearly 30 years earlier and was no doubt enhanced in their conversation when Lord Orkney sat to the sculptor for the modelling of the bust.

In St Michael and All Angels Church, Badminton, there is another splendid monument by Rysbrack, signed and dated 1754. The 2nd and the 3rd Duke of Beaufort are depicted in Roman costume, one standing, the other seated on the sarcophagus and holding a medallion. Decorative, asymmetrical drapery hangs down over the sarcophagus. Rysbrack also cast the bronze equestrian statue of William III in Queen Square, Bristol in 1733, and a later monument to Edward Colston in All Saints, Bristol.

Rysbrack died in *VERE* Street, Westminster, in 1770.>>
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.westminster-abbey.org/abbey-commemorations/commemorations/edmund-spenser

<<On the south wall of Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey is a marble memorial to Edmund Spenser, poet and author of The Faerie Queene. Anne Clifford, Countess of Dorset (to whose mother Spenser had dedicated a work) put up the memorial in 1620 but this fell into decay and was replaced by the present exact copy in 1778. The poet William *MASON*, whose memorial is nearby, raised the subscription for it. The epitaph reads:

HEARE LYES (EXPECTING THE SECOND COMMINGE OF OUR SAVIOVR CHRIST JESUS) THE BODY OF EDMOND SPENCER THE PRINCE OF POETS IN HIS TYME WHOSE DIVINE SPIRRIT NEEDS NOE OTHIR WITNESSE THEN THE WORKS WHICH HE LEFT BEHINDE HIM. HE WAS BORNE IN LONDON IN THE YEARE 1553 AND DIED IN THE YEARE 1598. Restored by private subscription 1778.

William Camden, in his 1600 guide to the Abbey records the following epitaph:

Here close to Chaucer lies Spenser; neares{T} to him in genius,
. so nearest to him in burial. Here ne{A}r Chaucer, O poet
. Spenser, you will join a poet, even c{L}oser to him in
. your verse than in your tomb. While yo{U} were living,
. English Poesy lived & clapped her hand{S}; now at
. the point of death, you dying, she fears to die.
...................................................................
. <= 42 =>
.
. HereclosetoChaucerliesSpenserneares {T} tohimi
. ngeniussonearesttohiminburialHerene {A} rChauc
. erOpoetSpenseryouwilljoinapoetevenc {L} oserto
. himinyourversethaninyourtombWhileyo {U} wereli
. vingEnglishPoesylivedclappedherhand {S} nowatt
. hepointofdeathyoudyingshefearstodie
.
{TALUS} 42
...................................................................
Nothing is known of Edmund’s family except that his mother’s name was Elizabeth. He attended Cambridge University and on 27th October 1579 married Maccabaeus Childe at St Margaret’s Westminster. They had two children, Sylvanus (d.1638) and Katherine. His second wife was Elizabeth Boyle and they had a son named Peregrine. For a short time Spenser was private secretary to Lord Grey, lord deputy of Ireland, and continued to live in Ireland for much of his life until rebels burnt down his house in 1598. He died on 13th January 1599, probably in King Street, near the Abbey (the date of death on his memorial is given in Old Style dating). He was buried near Geoffrey Chaucer’s grave in the south transept on 16th January, at the expense of the Earl of Essex. Many of his contemporaries attended the funeral, possibly including Shakespeare and, according to historian William Camden, they all threw elegies into the grave. In 1938 a search was instituted to try to find Spenser’s exact burial site and see if this story was true but nothing was found that could be positively identified as Edmund’s grave.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.westminster-abbey.org/abbey-commemorations/commemorations/matthew-prior#i13407

<<On the wall behind Shakespeare's memorial in Poets' Corner in Westminster Abbey is a large marble monument to poet and diplomat Matthew Prior which was in place by 1726. He was buried at the foot of the grave of Edmund Spenser but the actual grave is not marked. The memorial was designed by James Gibbs and executed by J.M. Rysbrack and incorporates a bust by Antoine Coysevox.
.......................................
. <= 17 =>
.
. H e w a s b u r i [E] d a t t h e
. f o o t o f t h e g [R] a v e o f E
. d m u n d S p e n s [E] r b u t t h
. e a c t u a l g r a [V] e i s n o t
. m a r k e d.T h e m [E] m o r i a l
. w a s d e s i g n [E D] b y J a m e
. s G i b b s a n d e x e c u t e d
. b y J.M.R y s b r a c k

[E/DEVERE] -17
.......................................
The bust had been presented to Prior in his lifetime by the King of France. On the base at the ends of the sarcophagus are life size figures of Poetry and History. The Latin inscription was written by Robert Freind, as Prior had requested, and can be translated:

Matthew Prior Esq. A fever, gradually creeping up on him, as he meditated upon the history of his times, broke together the thread of his life and of his labours on Sept.18th A.D.1721 in the 57th year of his age.

Here lies buried Matthew Prior Esq. a great man, who, under our most gracious Majesties King William and Queen Mary acted as Secretary to the Embassy at The Hague in 1690, and then as Secretary to the parties who in 1697 concluded the Peace of Ryswick, then in the following years to the French Legation, and also in that same year 1697 in Ireland. He was also Commissioner at the trade congress of 1700 and the taxation congress of 1711. Lastly, he was despatched by Queen Anne of blessed memory to Louis XIV of France in 1711 as Legate and Plenipotentiary in the peace negotiations, (peace being now well established and likely to endure, according to the hopes of all good men and true).

But all these titles with which he was adorned were as nothing to the praise accorded him for his philanthropy, intellect and learning. The kindly Muses smiled on him at birth, this royal school embellished him in boyhood, in youth St John's College, Cambridge, provided the most excellent education; and finally in manhood, he was matured and perfected by the society of the leading men of his time.

By circumstance of birth and upbringing, therefore, he could never be torn away from the company of poets, but was frequently used to season the burden of civil affairs with pleasanter literary studies, and as he essayed all manner of poetic works with great felicity, so did this admirable craftsman have no peer in the art of elegant and witty belles-lettres. These amusements of a noble mind, which cost him no toil, were readily perused by his circle of friends. In their company, and full of pleasantries and humour, he would discourse in jests appropriately, diversely and eloquently, upon whatever circumstance might have arisen, but to no far-fetched or forced effect; every word seemd to flow naturally and luxuriantly as though from a perennial spring. He leaves his acquaintance, therefore, uncertain as to whether he were more elegant as a writer of poetry, or more delightful as a companion in conversation.

He was born in Westminster in July 1664, the son of
George Prior and his wife Elizabeth. He had to leave

Westminst[E]r School when his father died and work in his
uncle's ta[V]ern. The Earl of Dorset was a regular there
and was impr[E]ssed by Matthew and paid to send him back to
school whe[R]e he became a King's Scholar. After university
he was a t[U]tor and wrote poetry while on his diplomatic
posting[S] and stayed with Louis XIV.
.........................................................
. <= 42 =>
.
. HewasborninWestminsterinJulythesonofGeorge P ri
. orandhiswifeElizabethHehadtoleaveWestminst [E] rS
. choolwhenhisfatherdiedandworkinhisunclesta [V] er
. nTheEarlofDorsetwasaregularthereandwasimpr [E] ss
. edbyMatthewandpaidtosendhimbacktoschoolwhe [R] eh
. ebecameaKingsScholarAfteruniversityhewasat [U] to
. randwrotepoetrywhileonhisdiplomaticposting [S] an
. dstayedwithLouisXIV
.
[E.VERUS] 42
---------------------------------------------------------------
Benjamin Franklin: Write injuries in *DUST* , benefits in marble.
.
Horace: We are but *DUST* and *SHADOW*.
.
Sir Thomas Browne: Time which antiquates antiquities,
. and hath an art to make *DUST* of all things.

Thomas Carlyle:
The *DUST* of controversy is merely the falsehood flying off.
----------------------------------------------------------------
<< *William Hall*, and Oxford graduate, in 1694 stood beside
the grave and after he had read the rude, absurd, and ignorant
epitaph, wrote his Commentary contained in a letter to his
friend, Edward Thwaites, preserved in the Bodleian Library.
.
The letter has brought to light the significant fact
concerning the depth of Shakspere's grave, "they have laid
him full *17 FEET DEEP* , DEEP enough to secure him.">>
.
- Shakespeare: The Personal Phase_
by *William Hall* Chapman (1920)
---------------------------------------------------------------
WASHINGTON IRVING, 1819 - p.48, Stratford-On-Avon, Sketch Book.
.
<<A flat stone marks the spot where the bard is buried. There are
four lines inscribed on it, said to have been written by himself,
and which have in them something extremely AWFUL. A few years since
also, as some laborers were digging to make an adjoining vault, the
earth caved in, so as to leave a vacant space almost like an arch,
through which one might have reached into his grave. No one, however,
presumed to meddle with his remains so awfully guarded by a
malediction; and lest any of the idle or the curious or any collector
of relics should be tempted to commit depredations, the old sexton
kept watch over the place for two days, until the vault was finished
and the aperture closed again. He told me that he had made bold to
look in at the hole, but could see neither coffin nor bones-

- *NOTHING BUT DUST* . It was something, I thought,
to have seen *THE DUST OF SHAKE SPEARE*.>>
-----------------------------------------------------
____ *NOTHING BUT DUST*
____ *NIENTE MA POLVERE* (Italian)
.
____ *THE DUST OF SHAKE SPEARE*
____ *LA POLVERE DEL LANCIA DI SCOSSA* (Italian)
-------------------------------------------------------
April 23, 1616 William Shakspere grave in Stratford:
.
. <<Good friend for Iesus sake F(orb)EAR(e)
__ To digg the *DUST* encloased __ *HE(a)RE* :
_______ Blest be ye man yt spares thes__ [STON]ES
__ And CURST be he yt moves my [BO]NES.>>
--------------------------------------------------------
. "[E]dwardus [C]omes [O]xon{iensis}"
. [ECO]: *HERE* (Venetian)
----------------------------------------------------------
March 6, 1616 Francis Beaumont's non-Tomb in Westminster:
.
. <<MORTALITY, behold and FEAR!
_____ What a change of flesh ____ *(IS) [HERE]* !
__ Think how many royal ____ [BO]NES
____ Sleep within this heap of ____ [STON]ES:>>
--------------------------------------------------------
. A Midsummer Night's Dream Act 2, Scene 2
.
PUCK: Who *IS HERE* ? WEEDS of Athens he doth *WEAR* :
--------------------------------------------------------------
T OTHEO [N] l ___ (I) _ <E> B E G_ E T T ERO
F THESE__ [I] n ___ (S) - U<I> N G_ S O N NET
S MrWha_- [L] L __ [H]a P <P> I__ [N] E S SEA
N Dthat____[E] T __ [E]r _ N <I> T___ [I] E <P> ROM
I SEDB Y O u ___- [R]e V <E> R [L]<I> V ING
<P> OEtW I s h ____ [E]t _ H [T] H_- [E] W E LLW
<I> ShIN- G a _____ [d V e] N [T] u_ R e R INS
<E> tTIN G fort---- _______ H [T] t
-------------------------------------------------------------
*POLVERE* : f (Italian) *DUST*
From Latin pulverem, accusative of pulvis
....................................................
*POL* : (Latin) by Pollux! indeed! truly!

*VERE* : (Latin) truly, verily
--------------------------------------------------------------
. Shakespeare & Cervantes died on St. George's day, 1616
.
. April 23 is preceded by *113* days
. September 9 precedes *113* days
-----------------------------------------------------------
Sonnet *113* : SInce I left you,mine eye is in my minde,
---------------------------------------------------------------
Psalms 113–118 constitute the *HALLEL* (Hebrew: *הַלֵּל* : *PRAISE*)
recited on the 3 great feasts: Passover, Weeks, and Tabernacles
.............................................................
Psalms *113*:7 He raiseth up the poor out of the *DUST*,
. and lifteth the needy out of the *DUNGHILL*;
. That he may set him with princes,
. even with the princes of his people.
--------------------------------------------------------
Aeneas (Αἰνείας, derived from *αἰνή* : *PRAISED*)
: son of prince Anchises & Aphrodite:
....................................................
*FATA (VIA)M INVENIENT* : Virgil Aeneid X, *113*
*INVIA) VIRTUTI NULL ES (VIA)* : Ovid, Met. XIV, *113*
----------------------------------------------------------------
*COR UNUM, (VIA) UNA* :
*CORABUS/Burghley’s motto*: “one heart, one way.”
.................................................................
<<Among Cecil House's many apartments was *a gallery 113 feet long*
"wainscoted with oak and paintings oVER the same
of DIVERs cities, rarely painted & SET FORTH.">>
.............................................................
355/*113* approximates pi to six decimal places.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
Shelton's Don Quixote, Part 1. The Third Book
http://www.bartleby.com/14/304.html

IV. Wherein Are Rehearsed the Discourses Passed between Sancho Panza
and His Lord, Don Quixote, with Other Adventures Worthy the Recital
.................................
‘This is, Sancho, the day wherein *SHALL BE MANIFEST* the good which
fortune hath reserved for me. This is the day wherein the force of
mine arm must be shown as much as in any other whatsoEVER; and in
it I will do such feats as shall for EVER remain recorded in the
*BOOKS OF FAME* . Dost thou see, Sancho the *DUST* which ariseth
there? Know that it is caused by a mighty army, and sundry and
innumerable nations, which come marching there.’

‘If that be so,’ quoth Sancho, ‘then must there be *two armies*;
for on this other side is raised as great a *DUST*.’

Don *Quixote* turned back to behold it, and
seeing it was *SO INDEED* , he was marvellous glad,
thinking that they were doubtlessly *two armies*, which came
to fight one with another in the midst of that spacious plain

[for he had his *FANTASY EVER replenished with these battles,
enchantments, successes, ravings, loves, and challenges which are
rehearsed in books of knighthood, and all that EVER he spoke, thought,
or did, was addressed and applied to the like things. And the *DUST*
which he had seen was raised by two great flocks of sheep, that came
through the same field by two different ways, and could not be
discerned, by reason of the *DUST*, until they were VERy near. Don
Quixote did affirm that they were two armies with so VERy good
earnest as Sancho believed it, and demanded of him,]

‘Sir, what then shall we two do?

‘What shall we do.’ quoth Don Quixote, ‘but assist the needful and
weaker side? For thou shalt know, Sancho, that he who comes towards
us is the great emperor Alifamfaron, lord of the great island of
Trapobana; the other, who marcheth at our back, is his enemy, the
king of the Garamantes, Pentapolin of the naked arm, so called
because he still entereth in battle with his right arm naked.’
--------------------------------------------------------------
‘This is, Sancho, the day wherein *SHALL BE MANIFEST*
.
" Este he," disse, "o dia, em que *SE HE DE VER* " - Portu.

" Este o dia," digo, " em que *SE HA DE VER* " - Cervantes
-------------------------------------------------
_ *[IT] SHALL BE MANIFEST* - Shelton
....................................
___ *SE HA DE VER* - DE CERVANTES
_ *I HAVE MYSELF DE CERVANTES*
___ *SE HE DE CERVANTES* - Portu.
_______ {anagram}
___ *DANVERS ESCHEETE*
-----------------------------------------------------
It ys now a yeare sythence BY YOWRE ONLY MEANES her
Magestye graunted her intereste in *DANVERS ESCHEETE*
.
- Hackney (Rozinante) , 22nd March, 1601.
(Hatfield MSS., Vol. XII.)
------------------------------------------------------
. *DAN* (Brewer Dictionary of Phrase & Fable)
A title of honour, common with the old poets, as Dan Ph'bus,
*Dan Cupid* , Dan Neptune, Dan Chaucer, etc. (Spanish, don.)
.
"That old Dan Geffrey, in whose GENTLE spright
. The pure well-head of poesie did dwell."
.
. -- Spenser: _Two Cantos of Mutability,_ Cant. VII.
----------------------------------------------­-----------
*ESCHEAT* is a common law doctrine that operates to ensure that
property is not left in limbo and ownerless. It originally referred
to a number of situations where a legal interest in land was destroyed
by operation of law, so that the ownership of the land reverted
to the immediately superior feudal lord.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
"–Éste es el día, ¡oh Sancho!, en el cual *SE HA DE VER* el bien que
me tiene guardado mi suerte; éste es el día, digo, en que se ha de
mostrar, tanto como en otro alguno, el valor de mi brazo, y en el que
tengo de hacer obras que queden escritas en *EL LIBRO DE LA FAMA*
por todos los venideros siglos. ¿Ves aquella *POLVAREDA* que allí
se levanta, Sancho? Pues toda es cuajada de un copiosísimo ejército
que de diversas e innumerables gentes por allí viene marchando.

–A esa cuenta, dos deben de ser –dijo Sancho–, porque desta parte
contraria se levanta asimesmo otra semejante *POLVAREDA*.

Volvió a mirarlo don Quijote, y vio que así era la *VERDAD* ;
y, alegrándose sobremanera, pensó, sin duda alguna, que
eran dos ejércitos que venían a embestirse y a encontrarse
en mitad de aquella espaciosa llanura (...)

–Señor, ¿pues qué hemos de hacer nosotros?

–¿Qué? –dijo don Quijote–: favorecer y ayudar a los menesterosos y
desvalidos. Y has de saber, Sancho, que este que viene por nuestra
frente le conduce y guía el grande emperador Alifanfarón, señor de la
grande isla Trapobana; este otro que a mis espaldas marcha es el de su
enemigo, el rey de los garamantas, Pentapolén del Arremangado Brazo,
porque siempre entra en las batallas con el brazo derecho desnudo."
----------------------------------------------------------------------
<<"In this Tirata, Milord of Oxford, amusingly enough, tilted against
. Alvida, COUNTESS of Edenburg, who was mounted on a dapple grey,
. was armed with *a Frankish LANCE* and was robed in lemon color.
. In the end, Edward and Alvida, alas, threw one another
. simultaneously, both landing face down in the *DUST*!.""
.
NeVERtheless, Emperor Polidor awarded to all the
knights & amazons GIFTS OUT OF THE CUPBOARD OF ANTIQUITY.
To Elmond - Edward - was given the horn *oF ASTOLF*
paladin of Charlemagne, the magic horn to rout armies -
*a SPEAR of sorts to SHAKE* , with enchanted consequences.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
It was not without some pleasurable *IMAGINATIONS*
that I saw Stratford-upon-Avon,
.
the VERy hills and woods which the boy Shakespeare had looked upon,
the VERy church where his *DUST* reposes, nay,
the VERy house where he was born, the threshold oVER
which his staggering footsteps carried him in infancy;
the VERy stones where the urchin played marbles and flogged tops...
.
HOMER, I afterwards discoVERed, had settled in Birmingham
as a *BUTTON* maker. -- CARLYLE, THOMAS, 1824,
.
Letter to John Carlyle, Life, ed. Froude, vol. I. p. 191.
--------------------------------------------------------------
. 1851 MOBY DICK; OR THE WHALE by Herman Melville
.
. ETYMOLOGY
(Supplied by a Late Consumptive *USHER* to a Grammar School)
.
The pale *USHER*- threadbare in coat, heart, body, and brain; I see
him now. He was *EVER DUSTing* his old lexicons and grammars, with
a QUEER HANDKERCHIEF, mockingly embellished with all the gay flags
of all the known nations of the world. He loved to *DUST* his
old grammars; it somehow mildly reminded him of his mortality.
.
"While you take in hand to school others, and to teach them by
*WHAT NAME* a whale-fish is to be called in our tongue leaving out,
through ignorance, the letter H, which almost alone maketh the
signification of the word, *you DEliVER that which is NOT TRUE* "
------------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
David Webb
2020-08-22 15:00:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
------------------------------------------------------------
. To the memory of my beloved, The Author
.
.[W]hich, since thy flight frõ hence, hath mourn'd like NIGHT,
.[A]nd despaires day, but for thy Volumes light.
---------------------------------------------------------
.[T]o draw no envy (Shakespeare) on thy name,
.[A]m I thus ample to thy Booke, and Fame;
.[W]hile I confesse thy writings to be such,
.[A]s neither Man, nor Muse, can praise too much.
'[T]is TRUE, and all men's suffrage. But these wayes
If you think (usual disclaimer) that "WATAWAT [sic]" is anything but moronic nonsense, then you have seVERal LUCE screws, Art.

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. Sonnet 76 (1609)
.
. {T}o new found methods, and to compounds *STRANGE*?
. {W}hy write I still all one, [EVER] the same,
. {A}nd keepe inuention in a *NOT[ED WEED]*,
. {T}hat *[EVER]y WORD* [D]oth almost fel {M[Y] NAME},
. {S}hewing th[E]ir birth, and whe[R]e they did proce[E]d?
. {O} know sweet love I alwaies writ[E] of you,
If you think (usual disclaimer) that "TWATSO [sic]" is anything but moronic nonsense, then you have seVERal LUCE screws, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
[T.WATSO\n\] Acrostic
If you think (usual disclaimer) that the string "T. WATSON" occurs as an acrostic in the text above, then you have seVERal LUCE screws, Art.

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} e t e r n i t y,W h i c h p r o u e s m o r e
. [S] h o r t t h e n w a s t o r r u i n i n g?H a u e
. [I] n o t s e e n e d w e l l e r s o n f o r m e a n
. [D] f a u o r L o s e a l l,a n d m o r e b y p a y i
. [N] g t o o m u c h r e n t F o r c o m p o u n d s w
. [E] e t;F o r g o i n g s i m p l e s a u o r,P i t t
. [I] f u l l t h r i u o r s i n t h e i r g a z i n g
,
{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
If you think (usual disclaimer) that the string "FORSIDNEI [sic]" occurs as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 (or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip) in the above text, then you have seVERal LUCE screws, Art.

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= *26* =>
.
. {F o r} a l o o k e,O r h e a r t i n l o u e w i t h
. [S] i g h e s h i m s e l f e d o t h s m o t h e r;W
. [I] t h m y l o u e s p i c t u r e t h e n m y e y e
. [D] o t h f e a s t,A n d t o t h e p a i n t e d b a
. [N] q u e t b i d s m y h e a r t:A n o t h e r t i m
. [E] m i n e e y e i s m y h e a r t s g u e s t,A n d
. [I] n h i s t h o u g h t s
.
{For}[SIDNEI] *26* [starting in the middle of the 3rd line]
If you think (usual disclaimer) that the string "FORSIDNEI [sic]" occurs as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 (or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip) in the above text, then you have seVERal LUCE screws, Art.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 26 =>
.
. {F o r} a y e*H I S P A G E*F i n d i n g t h e f i r
. [S]t c o n c e i t o f l o v e t h e r e b r e d,W h
. [E]r e t i m e a n d o u t w a r d f o r m e w o u l
. [D]s h e w i t d e a d.
.
If you think (usual disclaimer) that the string "FORSED [sic]" occurs as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 26 (or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip) in the above text, then you have seVERal LUCE screws, Art.

[Nutcase numerology snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
The deer-stealing story begins with two independent accounts; the first
‘Shakespeare was much given to all unluckiness in stealing venison
and *RABBITS*, particularly from Sir – Lucy who oft had him
whipped and sometimes imprisoned and at last made him fly
his native country to his great advancement.’
Do you know how Shakespeare's offense against Lucy neatly mirrors Oxford's offense against the boys in his entourage, Art? (I've told you before, but your rapidly worsening senility leads me to fear that you may have forgotten this striking coincidence.)

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
____ <= 14 =>
.
. (N O T)[E D W E E D](T) h A T E
. V E R y w o r D [D](O) t h a l
. m o S T F E L M [Y](N) A M E S
. h e w i n g t H [E] I r b i r
. t h a n d w h e [R] e t h E y
. D i d p r o c e [E] d O K n o
. w s w e E t l o [V] e I a l w
. a i e s w r i t [E] o f y o u
. A n d y o u a n [D] l O v E
..................................................
[DEVERE] -14 {found by James Ferris}
[DYER] 14 {found by A.W.Burgstahler}
[DYEREVED] 14 : Prob. in any Sonnet ~ 1 in 3,000
"DYEREVED [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art.

[Asinine anthologizing snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
You are not worth the *DUST* which the rude wind King Lear: IV, ii
To the descent and *DUST* below thy foot, King Lear: V, iii
That all my bowels crumble up to *DUST*: King John: V, vii
Hark, villains! I will grind your bones to *DUST* Titus Andronicus: V, ii
And give to *DUST* that is a little gilt Toilus and Cressida: III, iii
Wipe off the *DUST* that hides our sceptre's gilt King Richard II: II, i
Which now, two tender playfellows to *DUST*, King Richard III: IV, iv
Where no priest shovels in *DUST*. o cursed wretch, The Winter's Tale: IV, iv
Where *DUST* and damn'd oblivion is the tomb All's Well that Ends Well: II, iii
Until this day, to scour it in the *DUST*. Pericles, Prince of Tyre: II, ii
To sweep the *DUST* behind the door. A Midsummer Night's Dream: V, i
To *DUSTY* nothing, yet let memory, Toilus and Cressida: III, ii
Threw *DUST* and rubbish on king richard's head. King Richard II: V, ii
Thou, that threw'st *DUST* upon his goodly head King Henry IV, part II: I, iii
This mould of marcius, they to *DUST* should grind it Coriolanus: III, ii
The *DUST* that did offend it. All's Well that Ends Well: V, iii
The *DUST* on antique time would lie unswept, Coriolanus: II, iii
That issue out of *DUST*. happy thou art not; Measure for Measure: III, i
Take *DUST*, like mistress mall's picture? why dost Twelfth Night: I, iii
Shall blow each *DUST*, each straw, each little rub, King John: III, iv
Only compound me with forgotten *DUST* King Henry IV, part II: IV, v
O woe! thy canopy is *DUST* and stones;-- Romeo and Juliet: V, iii
Now, france, thy glory droopeth to the *DUST*. King Henry VI, part I: V, iii
Nor from the *DUST* of old oblivion raked, King Henry V: II, iv
More laud than gilt o'er-*DUST*ed. Toilus and Cressida: III, iii
Make *DUST* our paper and with rainy eyes King Richard II: III, ii
Lies on my tongue: no, percy, thou art *DUST* King Henry IV, part I: V, iv
He hath no eyes, the *DUST* hath blinded them. King Henry VI, part II: III, iii
For these, these, tribunes, in the *DUST* I write Titus Andronicus: III, i
Doth choke the air with *DUST*: in, and prepare: Timon of Athens: V, ii
Destroy our friends and after weep their *DUST* All's Well that Ends Well: V, iii
Dared once to touch a *DUST* of england's ground? King Richard II: II, iii
But *DUST* was thrown upon his sacred head: King Richard II: V, ii
Blows *DUST* in other's eyes, to spread itself; Pericles, Prince of Tyre: I, i
Ay, and laying autumn's *DUST*. King Lear: IV, vi
And throw their power i' the *DUST*. Coriolanus: III, i
And stop this gap of breath with fulsome *DUST* King John: III, iv
And lay the summer's *DUST* with showers of blood King Richard II: III, iii
And by the merit of vile gold, dross, *DUST*, King John: III, i
And shed my dear blood drop by drop in the *DUST*, King Henry IV, part I: I, iii
A grain, a *DUST*, a gnat, a wandering hair, King John: IV, i
but see how I lay the *DUST* with my tears. The Two Gentlemen of Verona: II, iii
Overmastered with a pierce of valiant *DUST*? to make Much Ado About Nothing: II, i
Longing for what it had not; nay, the *DUST* Antony and Cleopatra: III, vi
-------------------------------------------------------
Seek for thy noble father in the *DUST*: Hamlet: I, ii
What is this quintessence of *DUST*? Hamlet: II, ii
Compounded it with *DUST*, whereto 'tis kin. Hamlet: IV, ii
Was there supposed to have been any point to the above effusion of asinine anthologizing, Art? If so, what was it? If you are not aware that _dust_ is a VERy commonplace English word, then you have seVERal screws LUCE.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
*PUL-VERE* : DUST (Danish, Latin)
Huh? No, Art. The usual Danish word for "dust" is _støv_; _pulver_ means "powder".

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
https://www.westminster-abbey.org/abbey-commemorations/commemorations/john-gay
<<John Gay, the celebrated poet and dramatist, was buried in the south
transept of Westminster Abbey on 23rd December 1732, in the central part of
the area near Thomas Parr's grave.
Was he any relation to Peter Gay, Art?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Michael_Rysbrack
Bust_of_Inigo_Jones_by_John_Michael_Rysbrack,_1725
https://tinyurl.com/u43t3ub
<<Johannes Michel Rysbrack, original name Jan Michiel Rijsbrack (24 June 1694
– 8 January 1770), was an 18th-century Flemish sculptor, who spent most of
his career in England. (His birth-year is sometimes (wrongly) given as 1693
or 1684.)
[Asinine anthologizing snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Rysbrack died in *VERE* Street, Westminster, in 1770.>>
(Yawn.) So what, Art? Was there supposed to have been any point to the above? If so, what was it?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]

[Crackpot cryptography snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<<Among Cecil House's many apartments was *a gallery 113 feet long*
"wainscoted with oak and paintings oVER the same
of DIVERs cities, rarely painted & SET FORTH.">>
.............................................................
355/*113* approximates pi to six decimal places.
Was there supposed to have been any point to the above nutcase numerology, Art? If so, what was it?

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
------------------------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
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