Discussion:
I haue sifted out of my weake brayne
(too old to reply)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-02-26 17:23:34 UTC
Permalink
---------------------------------------------
. William Webbe (c. 1550-1591)
A Discourse of English Poetrie 1586
http://www.bartleby.com/359/14.html

A Preface to the Noble {POETS} of Englande.
.......................................................................
If the motion bee worthy your regard, it is enough to mooue it; if not,
my worde(S) woulde simply preuaile in perswadi(N)g you; and therefore
I rest vppon thys (O)nely request, that of your courtesie(S) you wyll
graunt passage, vnder your f(A)uourable corrections, for this my si(M)ple
censure of English Poetry, wherein, if you please to runne it ouer, you
shall knowe breefely myne opinion of the most part of your accustomed Poets,
and particularly, in his place, the lyttle somewhat which I haue sifted
out of my weake brayne concerning thys reformed versifying. - W.W.
.......................................................................
. <= 31 =>
.
. m y w o r d e (S) w o u l d e s i m p l y p r e u a i l e i n p
. e r s w a d i (N) g y o u;a n d t h e r e f o r e I r e s t v p
. p o n t h y s (O) n e l y r e q u e s t,t h a t o f y o u r c o
. u r t e s i e (S) y o u w y l l g r a u n t p a s s a g e,v n d
. e r y o u r f (A) u o u r a b l e c o r r e c t i o n s,f o r t
. h i s m y s i (M) p l e c e n s u r e o f E n g l i s h P o e t r y,
.
(MASONS) -31 : prob. at end of Preface ~ 1 in 1730
---------------------------------------------------
. [Hamlet (Quarto 2) 5.1]
.
Clown: What is he that builds {S}tronger
. {T}hen eyth{E}r [THE MAS{O}N],
. the Shy{P}wright, or the Carpenter.
........................................
. <= 8 =>
.
. W h a t
. i s h e t h a t
. b u i l (d) s {S} t
. r o n g (e) r {T} h
. e n e y (t) h {E} r
. [T H E M (A) S {O} N]
. t h e S (h) y {P} w
. r i g h t, o r t
. h e C a r p e n
. t e r.
.
{POETS} -8: Prob. in question: ~ 1 in 660
.
Answer: (hated) [M(A)S{O}N] {POETS} ?
------------------------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greene%27s_Groats-Worth_of_Wit

<<[ROBERT] {G}reene's (1592) _Groats-worth of Witte, bought with a million of Repentance_ begins with an account of the brothers [ROBERT{O}] and Lucanio Gorinius, sons of a wealthy usurer. [ROBERT{O}] is a scholar, while Lucanio is being groomed to take over the family business. After their father dies, leaving [ROBERT{O}] only a groat to buy a "groat's worth of wit", [ROBERT{O}] takes his now wealthy brother to visit the dazzling courtesan Lamilia. Lucanio is enchanted with her. The characters sing songs, tell fables and comic anecdotes. [ROBERT{O}] attempts to make a deal with Lamilia to share the proceeds if she can fleece the naive Lucanio, but Lamilia tells Lucanio about his brother's proposal and kicks [ROBERT{O}] out of the house. [ROBERT{O}] then meets an actor who tells [ROBERT{O}] he can make a living as a playwright. Two years later [ROBERT{O}] is a successful playwright and Lucanio is penniless, having spent all the money he inherited on Lamilia, who has now discarded him. [ROBERT{O}] employs his brother, but Lucanio leaves and spends the remainder of his life as a pimp. [ROBERT{O}]'s success does not stop him from squandering all his money until he is left dying, once again finding himself with just one groat left.>>
------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.luminarium.org/renascence-editions/greene1.html

GREENS, GROATS-WORTH of Wit, bought with a million of Repentance. (1592)
...................................................................
To the Gentlemen Readers.

GEntlemen.

The Swan sings melodiously before death, that in all his life
useth but a iarring sound. Greene though able inough to write,
yet deeplyer searched with [S]ickenes than EVER heeretofore, sendes you his
Swanne like songe, for tha[T] he feares he shal neer againe carroll to you woonted
lov{E} layes, ne{V}er ag[A]in{E} discove{R} to you yo{U}ths plea{S}ures. How EVER
yet sickenesse, riot, Inco[N]tinence, have at once shown their extremitie, yet
if I recover, you shall a[L]l see, more fresh sprigs, then EVER sprang from me,
directing you how to liv[E, Y]et not diswading ye from lo(V)e. This is the last
I have writ, and I fear(E) me the last I shall writ. And how EVER I h(A)ve
beene censured for some of my forme(R) bookes, yet Gentlemen I protest,
they w(E)re as I had speciall information.
...................................................................
. The Swan sings melodiously before death,
.
. <= 60 =>
.
thatinallhislif e usethbu t aiar r i n g soundGr e enethou g habeino u ghto
writeyetdeeplye r searche d with [S] i c k enestha n EVERhee r etofore s ende
syouhisSwanneli k esongef o rtha [T] h e f eareshe s halneer a gaineca r roll
toyouwoontedlov{E}layesne{V}erag [A] i n{E}discove{R}toyouyo{U}thsplea{S}ures
HowEVERyetsicke n esserio t Inco [N] t i n encehav e atonces h ownthei r extr
emitieyetifIrec o veryous h alla [L] l s e emorefr e shsprig s thenEVE R spra
ngfrommedirecti n gyouhow t oliv [E Y] e t notdisw a dingyef r om
.
[STANLE/Y] 60 : Prob. in top 3 sentences ~ 1 in 9240
{E.VERUS} 8 : Prob. in top 3 sentences ~ 1 in 570
......................................................
. <= 32 =>
.
. lo (V) eThisisthelastIhavewritandIfe
. ar (E) methelastIshallwritAndhowEVER
. Ih (A) vebeenecensuredforsomeofmyfor
. me (R) bookesyetGentlemenIprotestthe
. yw (E) reasIhadspeciallinformation
.
(VEARE) 32
...................................................................
But passing them, I commend this to your favourable censures, and
like an Embrion without shape, I feare me WILL be thrust into the world.
If I live to ende it, it shall be otherwise: if not, yet WILL I commend it to
your courtesies, that you may as well be acquainted with my repentant death, as
you have lamented my careles course of life. But as *NEMO ante obitum felix*, so
Acta Exitus probat: Beseeching therefore to be deemed heereof as I DE(s)ERVE,
I leave the worke to your likinges, and leave you to your delightes.
........................................................................
........................................................................
Is it not *STRANGE* that I, to whom they al haue beene beholding: is it not like
that you, to whome they all haue beene beholding, shall (were yee in that case
that I am now) bee both at once of th{E}m fo[R]saken? Yes, trust them not: f[O]r
there is an vpstart Cr{O}w, [B]eautified with our feath[E]rs, that with his Tygers
ha[RT] wrapt in a Players hyde, supposes he is as well able to b[O]mbast out
a blanke verse as the best of you: and being an a[B]solute Iohannes fac totum,
is in his owne conceit the on[E]ly *SHAKE-SCENE* in a countrey. O that I might
intreate you[R] rare wits to be imploied in more profitable courses: & le[T]
those Apes imitate your past excellence, and neuer more acquaint them with your
admired inuentions. I know the best husband of you all will neuer proue an
Usurer, and the kindest of them all will neuer seeke you a kind nurse: yet
whilest you may, {S}eeke you better Mais{T}ers; for it is pittie m{E}n of
such rare wits, sh{O}uld be subiect to the {P}leasure of such rude {G}roomes.
........................................................................
. <= 22 =>
.
. I s i t n o t*S T R A N G E*t h a t I,t o w
. h o m t h e y a l h a u e b e e n e b e h o
. l d i n g:i s i t n o t l i k e t h a t y o
. u,t o w h o m e t h e y a l l h a u e b e e
. n e b e h o l d i n g,s h a l l(w e r e y e
. e i n t h a t c a s e t h a t I a m n o w)b
. e e b o t h a t o n c e o f t h{E}m f o [R]s
. a k e n?Y e s,t r u s t t h e m n o t:f [O]r
. t h e r e i s a n v p s t a r t C r{O}w,[B]e
. a u t i f i e d w i t h o u r f e a t h [E]r
. s,t h a t w i t h h i s T y g e r s h a [R T]
. w r a p t i n a P l a y e r s h y d e,
.
[ROBER/T] 22 : Prob. in *SHAKE-SCENE* paragraph ~ 1 in 225
..................................................................
. <= 46 =>
.
. Isitnot *S T R A N G E*t h a t I t o w h omtheyalhauebeenebehold
. ingisit n o t l i k e t h a t y o u t o whometheyallhauebeenebe
. holding s h a l l w e r e y e e i n t h atcasethatIamnowbeeboth
. atonceo f t h {E} m f o r s a k e n Y e s trustthemnotforthereisa
. nvpstar t C r {O} w b e a u t i f i e d w ithourfeathersthatwithh
. isTyger s h a [R] t w r a p t i n a P l a yershydesupposesheisasw
. ellable t o b [O] m b a s t o u t a b l a nkeverseasthebestofyoua
. ndbeing a n a [B] s o l u t e I o h a n n esfactotumisinhisowneco
. nceitth e o n [E] l y*S H A K E-S C E N E* inacountreyOthatImighti
. ntreate y o u [R] r a r e w i t s t o b e imploiedinmoreprofitabl
. ecourse s l e [T] t h o s e A p e s i m i tateyourpastexcellence
.
[ROBERT] 46 : Prob. in *SHAKE-SCENE* paragraph ~ 1 in 360
..................................................................
. <= 18 =>
.
. {S} e e k e y o u b e t t e r M a i s
. {T} e r s;f o r i t i s p i t t i e m
. {E} n o f s u c h r a r e w i t s,s h
. {O} u l d b e s u b i e c t t o t h e
. {P} l e a s u r e o f s u c h r u d e
. {G} r o o m e s.
.
{G-POETS} -18 : Prob. in *SHAKE-SCENE* paragraph ~ 1 in 1325
------------------------------------------------------------------
Scratching it and patchin{G} at with a prompt from a {P}rimer.
And what scrips {O}f nutsnolleges I peck{E}d up me meself EVERy
le{T}ter is a hard but yours {S}ure is the hardest crux EVER.
................................................................
. <= 18 =>
.
. S c r a t c h i n g i t a n d p a t
c h i n{G}a t w i t h a p r o m p t
f r o m a{P}r i m e r.A n d w h a t
s c r i p s{O}f n u t s n o l l e g
e s I p e c k{E}d u p m e m e s e l
f E V E R y l e{T}t e r i s a h a r
d b u t y o u r s{S}u r e i s t h e
h a r d e s t c r u x E V E R.
.
{G POETS} 19
-----------------------------------------------------------------
I first got excited about Oxfordian ciphers from reading about 2
amazing near anagrams in Michell's book _Who Wrote Shakespeare_:
..................................................
. OUR EVER-LIVIN(g) POET
. VERO NIL VERIU(s) POET

. and:

. ENVIOU(s) SLIVER broke
. NIL VE(r)O VERIUS broke
..................................................
. Hamlet (Quarto 2, 1604) Act 4, Scene 7
.
Queen: There is a Willow growes ascaunt the Brooke
. That showes his horry leaves in the glassy streame,
. Therewith FANTASTIQUE gaRLANDs did she make
. Of Crowflowers, Nettles, Daises, and long *PURPLES*
. That liberall Shepheards giue *A GROSSER NAME* ,
. But our cull-cold maydes doe dead mens fingers call them.
. There on the pendant boughes her *CRONET WEEDES*
. Clambring to hang, an *ENVIOU(s) SLIVER* broke,
. When downe her weedy trophiEs and her selfe
--------------------------------------------------
JULY 6, 1604 - Edward de Vere buried
. on St. GodeliEVE's Day
................................................
July 6, 1070 - St. GodeliEVE murdered by
. *DROWNING IN A POND* after being strangled into
. unconciousness by her mother-in-law's servants.
-----------------------------------------------------------------
David Roper Stratford Monument array:
........................................................
<= 34 =>

TE RRAT E (G) I TPOP U L U S M Æ R E T O{L Y M P U S H A B E}T
..................................................................
ST AYPA S (S) E NGER W H Y G O E S T T H O U B Y S O F A S T R
EA DIFT (H)(O) U CANS T W H O M[E N V I O U S]D E A T H H A T H
PL ASTW (I)(T) H INTH I S {M O N[U]M E N T|S H A K S P E A R E}W
IT HWHO (M)(E) Q UICK(N)a {T U R[E|D]I D E|W H O S E N A M E D}O
<TH DECK> Y (S) T OMBE F A R M O[R|E]t H E N C O S T{S I E H}A L
LY THEH A (T) H WRIT T L E[A.V|E|S L I V]I N G A R T B U T P A
GE TOSE R V E HISW I T T
...............................................................
"[ENVIOUS SLIV/ER] broke"
--------------------------------------------------------------
I read Michell's hardback book 25 years ago and it
soon after fell apart so I bought a new paperback.

Michell not only sold me on ciphers but also on group theory...

I think Oxford wrote the (self referential) Hamlet 1603
Quarto while others (including Rutland & Lord STRANGE)
improved upon it for the 1604 Quarto.

After Rutland died in 1612
William Stanley honored him in Hamlet's letter:
----------------------------­-------------­-----------
1623 Folio (Act 4, Scene 7)
Claudius reads Hamlet's letter to Laertes:

'High and mighty, You shall know I am set naked on
your kingdom. To-morrow shall I beg leave to see
your kingly eyes: when I shall, first asking your
pardon thereunto, recount the occasion of my sudden
*AND MORE STRANGE RE(t)URN*.' 'HAMLET.'
......................................................
____ *AND MORE STRANGE RE(t)URN*
____ *ROGER MANNERS, E. RUT(l)AND*
-------------------------------------------------------
Ben Jonson folio dedication:

These are, as some infamous Baud, or Whore,
{SH|O]uld praise a Matron. What could hurt her more?
But thou a[R]t proofe against them, and indeed
Above th' ill fortune [O]f them, or the need.
I, therefore will begin. Soule of the {A|G]e !
The applause ! delight ! the wonder of our Stage !
{My Sha{k|E]SPEARE}, rise; I will no{T LODGE} thee by
Chaucer, or [SPENS{E|R], or bid Beaumont lye
A little further, to make thee a roo[M]e :
............................................
________ <= 45 =>
.
___ {S H|O] uldpra iseaMatronW h atcou ldhurthermoreBu
. ttho u a[R] tproof eagainstthe m andin deedAbovethillf
. ortu n e[O] fthemo rtheneedIth e refor ewillbeginSoule
. ofth e{A|G] eTheap plausedelig h tthew onderofourStage
. {MySH A{k|E] SPEARE} riseIwillno {T LODGE} theebyChauceror
. [SPEN S{E|R] orbidB eaumontlyeA l ittle furthertomaketh
. eear o o[M] e

Prob. of *O(ROGER)M* with skip <46 ~ 1 in 10,500
---------------------------------------------------
. *GROS(s)ER NAME* : *ENVIOU(s) SLIVER*
. *ROGE(r) MANERS* : *NIL VE(r)O VERIUS*
..................................................
. Hamlet (Quarto 2, 1604) Act 4, Scene 7
.
Queen: There is a Willow growes ascaunt the Brooke
. That showes his horry leaves in the glassy streame,
. Therewith FANTASTIQUE gaRLANDs did she make
. Of Crowflowers, Nettles, Daises, and long *PURPLES*
. That liberall Shepheards giue *A GROS(s)ER NAM{E}* ,
. But our cull-c{O}ld maydes doe [D]ead mens fing[E]rs call them.
. There on the pen[D]ant boughes h[E]r *CRONET WEED{E}S*
. Clamb(RING) t{O} hang, an *ENVIO[U](s) SLIVER* brok[E],
. When downe he[R] weedy trophi[E]s and her selfe
................................................
. <= 12 =>
.
. *A G R O S (s) E R N A M {E}*
. B u t o u r c u l l -c {O}
. l d m a y d e s d o e [D]
. e a d m e n s f i n g [E]
. r s c a l l t h e m. T h
. e r e o n t h e p e n [D]
. a n t b o u g h e s h [E]
. r *C R O N E T W E E D {E}
. S* C l a m b (R I N G) t {O}
. h a n g, a n *E N V I O [U]
. (s) S L I V E R* b r o k [E]
. W h e n d o w n e h e [R]
. w e e d y t r o p h i [E]
. s a n d h e r s e l f e
.
[DE{E.O.}UERE] 12
-------------------------------------------------
_______ *DROESHOUT*
_______ *HERODOTUS*
................................................
____ (1939) Encyclopedia Britannica on "Drama"
.
____ *HERODOTUS* had a lot to say
____about TRAGEDY (i.e., a goat-song) being a PATHOS
_____(i.e., the violent death of Dionysus/Osiris
_______ by *SPARAGMOS* or dismemberment):
.
<<...we have the express testimony of *HERODOTUS* that the ritual
_worship of Dionysus (the god of Drama) was the same as the ritual
___ worship of Osiris such that it involved a "sparagmos"
_ (dismemberment), mourning, search, discovery & resurrection.>>
.
____ HowEVER, *HERODOTUS* avoided directly mentioning
____Dionysus OR Osiris in this regard:
.
____ "When the Egyptians lament the god
___ whom I may not name in this connection"
_ "They lament but whom they lament I must not say" -- *HERODOTUS*
.
__ For in the manner of ancient religion, it was always necessary
____ that Dionysus or Osiris be represented by some surrogate.
.......................................................
In fact, ALL TRAGIC HEROS are simply surrogates of Dionysus/Osiris:
.
<<We find a frequent sparagmos of beings who have committed some sin:
.
____ Actaeon by hounds
____ Dirce by a bull
____ Orpheus by Maenads
____ Lycurgus by horses
____ Pentheus by Maenads
____ HYPPOLYTUS by horses
.
This use of a surrogate was made easier by the fact that both
at Eleusis & in the Osiris rite the myth was conveyed by
*tableaux* (i.e., 'things shown') rather than by words.
.
___ Thus the death of Pentheus, wearing Dionysiac dress,
_ would be shown by exactly the same tableau as that of Dionysus.
.
____ THE TRUTH COULD BE SHOWN TO THE WISE
_ AND AT THE SAME TIME *VEILED FROM THE UNKNOWING*
.
____ Such facts help to explain the charge of
_"profaning the mysteries" brought against Aeschylus.>>
-------------------------------------------------------
. Page 262 The Hiram Key :
.
<<The candidate ... dressed as a Royal Arch Mason ... is joined
by THREE other companions and the THREE are referred to as "the
THREE SOJOURNERS," known as the THREE Master Masons of Babylon:
.
. [H]ananiah of Shadrach,
. [A]zariah of Abednego and
. [M]ishael of Meshech.
.
. *ZERUBBABEL* requests them to relate their story:
.
<< . . on clearing away the fragments as rubbish we came
to something that seemed like solid rock but accidentally
sticking it with my CROW, it emitted a hollow sound...>>
.
<<In the centre of the vault I saw a pedestal of pure virgin marble,
with certain mystic characters engraven thereon, and a *VEIL* covering
the upper face of the altar. Approaching with reverential awe,
.
I lifted the *VEIL*, and beheld what
I humbly supposed to be the *SACRED WORD* itself.>>
-------------------------------------------------------------------

. The Tempest > Act II, scene II
.
STEPHANO: Come on your ways; open your mouth; here is
. that which will give language to you, cat: open your
. mouth; this *WILL SHAKE* your shaking, I can tell you,
. and that soundly: you cannot tell who's your friend:
. open your chaps again.
----------------------------------------------------------
. A Midsummer Night's Dream (Quarto 1, 1600) Act III, scene II
.
LYSANDER: Hang of thou cat, thou bur: vile thing let loose;
. Or I *WILL SHAKE* thee from mee, like a *SERPENT*.
----------------------------------------------------------
. The Comedy of Errors > Act IV, scene III
.
SYRACUSE DROMIO: Some diuels aske but the parings of ones *NAILE*,
. a rush, a haire, a drop of blood, a pin, a nut, a cherrie-
. *STONE* : but she more couetous, wold haue a *CHAINE* :
. Master be wise, and if you giue it her, the
. diuell *WILL SHAKE* her *CHAINE*, and fright vs with it.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
. Haggai 2 (end) : 1611 KJV
.
21-23 Speak [T]o Zerubbabel, governor of Judah, saying, I *WILL SHAKE* the
heavens [A]nd the earth; And I will overthrow the throne of kingdoms, and
I wi[L]l destroy the strength of the kingdoms of the heathen; and I will
[O]verthrow the chariots, and those that ride in them; and the horse[S]
and their riders shall come down, every one by the sword of his brother.
In that day, [S]aith the LORD of hosts, will I take thee, [O] Zerubbabel,
my servant, the son of Shea[L]tiel, saith the LORD, and will make thee
[A]s a signet: for I have chosen thee, saith [T]he LORD of hosts.

[TALOS] -32, 53 : Prob. both near *WILL SHAKE* ~ 1 in 400
------------------------------------------------------------------------
. ZECHARIAH 2 (end) : 1611 KJV
.
8-14 For thus sayth the Lord of hostes, After the glory hath he sent me vnto
the nations which spoiled you: for he that toucheth you, [T]oucheth the apple
of his eye. For behold, I *WILL SHAKE* mine hand vpon them, [A]nd they shall
bee a spoile to their seruants: and yee shall know that the [L]ord of hostes
hath sent me. Sing and reioyce, O daughter of Zion: for loe, I c[O]me, and I
will dwell in the middest of thee, sayth the Lord. And many nation[S] shalbe
ioyned to the Lord in that day, and shall be my people: and I will dwel in
the middest of hee, and thou shalt know that the Lord of hostes hath sent me
vnto thee. Therefore it is come to passe, that as he cried, and they would
not heare, so they cried, an{D} I would not heare, sa{I}th the Lord of
hoste{S}. But I scattered the{M} with a whirlewinde {A}mong all the nation{S}
, whom they knew not: thus the land was de[SOLAT]e after them, that no man
passed through, nor returned: for they layed the pleasant land de[SOLAT]e.
.
{DISMAS} 17
[TALOS] 59,-1,-1
-----------------------------------------------------------
The cryptography of Shakespeare, (1922) By Walter Arensberg
[ http://home.att.net/~mleary/baco1.htm ]
............................................................
An interesting discovery is the [BACON] acrostic
in 'Ch. Marl. THE TRAGICALL History of D.Faustus'
Printed by V. S. for [THOMAS BUSHELL]. (1604):

___ [N]ow will I make an ende immediately.
Me.[O]what will not I do to obtaine his soule?
Fau.[C]onsummatum est , this Bill is ended,
___ [A]nd Faustus hath bequeath'd his soule to LUCIFER.
___ [B]ut what is this inscription on mine arme?

Homo FUGE

FAUSTUS: I, John Faustus, OF WITTENBERG,
Doctor, by these present, do give both body and soul
To LUCIFER Prince of the East,
and his minister Mephistophilis;
-----------------------------------------------------------
THE TRAGICALL History of D.Faustus'
..................................................
Chorus: So soon he profits in divinity,
. The fruitful plot of scholarism graced,
. Tha{T} [S]hortly he {W|A]s graced w{I|T]h doctor's {N|A]me,
. Excelli[N]g all whose [S]weet delig[H]t disputes
.[I]n heavenly [M]atters of theology;
. Till swollen with cunning, of a self-conceit,
. His waxen wings did mount above his reach,
. And, melting, Heavens conspired his overthrow;
. For, falling to a devilish exercise,
. And glutted now with learning's golden gifts,
. He surfeits upon cursed necromancy;
. Nothing so sweet as magic is to him,
. Which he prefers before his chiefest bliss:
. And this the man that in his study sits!
......................................
. <= 10 =>
.
. T h a {T}[S] h o r t l
. y h e {W}[A] s g r a c
. e d w {I}[T] h d o c t
. o r's {N}[A] m e,E x c
. e l l i [N] g a l l w
. h o s e [S] w e e t d
. e l i g [H] t d i s p
. u t e s [I] n h e a v
. e n l y [M] a t t e r s
.
[SATAN] 10 : Prob. at start ~ 1 in 32
[SATAN'S HIM] 10
{TWIN} 10
------------------------------------------------------------------------
. Revelation 1611 KJV
.
20:1-3 And I saw an Angel come down from heauen, haui[N]g the key of the
. bottomles pit, & a great chai{N}e in his hand. [A]nd hee l{A}id hold
. on the dragon {T}hat old serpent, whic{H} is [T]he deuill and [SAT{A}N],
. and bound him a thou{S}and yeres, And c[A]st him into the bottomlesse
. pit, and shut him vp, and set a [S]eale vpon him, that he should
. deceiue the nations no more, till the thousand yeeres should bee
. fulfilled: and after that hee must be loosed a little season.
..........................................
. <= 15 =>
.
. a n A n g e l c o m e d o w n f
. r o m h e a u e n,h a u i[N]g t
. h e k e y o f t h e b o t t o m
. l e s p i t&a g r e a t c h a i
. {N}e i n h i s h a n d[A]n d h e
. e l{A}i d h o l d o n t h e d r
. a g o n{T}h a t o l d s e r p e
. n t,w h i c{H}i s[T]h e d e u i
. l l a n d[S A T{A}N]a n d b o u
. n d h i m a t h o u{S}a n d y e
. r e s,A n d c[A]s t h i m i n t
. o t h e b o t t o m l e s s e p
. i t,a n d s h u t h i m v p,a n
. d s e t a[S]e a l e v p o n h i
. m,t h a t h e s h o u l d d e c
. e i u e t h e n a t i o n s n o
. m o r e,t i l l t h e t h o u s
. a n d y e e r e s s h o u l d b
. e e f u l f i l l e d:
.
[SATAN] -46, 1 : Prob. ~ 1 in 10
{SAHTAN} -18 : Prob. ~ 1 in 215
----------------------------------------------------------------
20: 14-15 And death and hell were c(A)st into the lake of fi(R)e:
. this is the second *D(E)ATH*. And whosoeuer wa(S) not found
. written in (T)he booke of life, was cast into the lake of fire.
..........................................
. <= 18 =>
.
. A n d *D E A T H*a n d h e l l w e r
. e c (A) s t i n t o t h e l a k e o f
. f i (R) e:t h i s i s t h e s e c o n
. d*D (E) A T H*A n d w h o s o e u e r
. w a (S) n o t f o u n d w r i t t e n
. i n (T) h e b o o k e o f l i f e,w a
. s c a s t i n t o t h e l a k e o f
. f i r e.
.
(AREST) 18
-----------------------------------------------------------------
. ZECHARIAH. 1611 KJV
.
3:1-2 And he shewed me *IOSHUA* the high Priest, standing before the Angel
of the Lord, and Satan standing at his right hand to resist him. And the
Lord said vnto Satan; The Lord rebuke thee, O Satan, euen the Lord that
hath chosen Ierusalem rebuke thee. Is not this a brand pluckt out of the fire?
....................................................................
. Sonnet 154
.
THe little love-God l[Y]ing once a sleepe,
Laid by his side his heart inflaming brand,
Whilst many Nymph[E]s that vou'd chast life to keep,
Came tripping by, but in her maiden {H}and,
The fayre[S]t votary tooke up tha{T} fire,
Which many Legions of true hea{R}ts had warm'd,
And so t[H]e Generall of h{O}t desire,
Was sleeping by a Virgin ha{N}d disarm'd.
This br(A)nd she q[U]enched in a coo(L)e Well by,
Which from lov(E)s fire tooke heat perpe(T)uall,
Growing [A] *BATH* and (H)ealthfull remedy,
For m(E)n diseasd, but I my *M(I)STRISSE tHrALL*,

Came there for cure and this by that I prove,
Loves fire heates water, water cooles not love.
......................................................................
. <= 65 =>
.
THelittleloveGodl [Y] ingonceasleepeLaidbyhissidehisheartinflamingbra
ndWhilstmanyNymph [E] sthatvoudchastlifetokeepCametrippingbybutinherm
aidenHandThefayre [S] tvotarytookevpthaTfireWhichmanyLegionsoftruehea
RtshadwarmdAndsot [H] eGenerallofhOtdesireWassleepingbyaVirginhaNddis
armdThisbrAndsheq [U] enchedinacooLeWellbyWhichfromlovEsfiretookeheat
perpeTuallGrowing [A] BATHandHealthfullremedyFormEndiseasdbutImyMISTR
ISSEtHrALLCamethe r eforcureandthisbythatIproveLouesfireheateswater
watercoolesnotlov e
..........................................................
(ALETHEI) 20 : Prob. in last Sonnet ~ 1 in 4020
[YESHUA] 65 : Prob. in last Sonnet ~ 1 in 2220
-----------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aletheia

<<ALETHEIa (Ancient Greek: ἀλήθεια) is truth or disclosure in philosophy. It was used in Ancient Greek philosophy and revived in the 20th century by Martin Heidegger. It is a Greek word variously translated as "unclosedness", "unconcealedness", "disclosure" or "truth". The literal meaning of the word ἀ–λήθεια is "the state of not being hidden; the state of being evident." It also means factuality or reality. It is the opposite of lethe, which literally means "oblivion", "forgetfulness", or "concealment". According to Pindar's Olympian Ode, ALETHEIa is the daughter of Zeus, while Aesop in his Fables said that she was crafted by Prometheus.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philalethes_Society

<<The *PhilALETHEs* Society is a Masonic research society based in North America and founded on October 1, 1928. Among the original forty Fellows [was Rudyard Kipling]. The Greek word φιλαλήθης (pronounced "fill-a-LAY-thayss") was used by ancient writers such as Aristotle & Plutarch, and means "a lover of truth." One of the early uses of the word was as part of a "nome de plume" of Eirenaeus PhilALETHEs (the peaceful lover of truth) who was a 17th-century alchemist and the author of many influential works.

Originally the PhilALETHEs Society consisted only of recognized Masonic authors, limited to forty Fellows at any given time in imitation of the Académie Française. Access was opened to all regular Master Masons through the Correspondence Circle. The number of Fellows is still restricted to 40.>>
--------------------------------------------------------
. King Henry VI, part I: IV, vii
.
LUCY: Knight of the noble order of SAINT GEORGE*,
. Worthy *SAINT MICHAEL* and the Golden Fleece;
. Great marshal to Henry the Sixth
. Of all his wars within the realm of France?
......................................................
. King Henry IV, part I: II, iv
.
PRINCE HENRY: How old art thou, Francis?
.
FRANCIS: Let me see--about *MICHAELMAS* next I shall be--
......................................................
. Merry Wives of Windsor: I, i
.
SIMPLE: Book of Riddles! why, did you not lend it
. to Alice Shortcake upon All-hallowmas last,
. a fortnight afore *MICHAELMAS*?
--------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_(archangel)

<<Depictions of *SAINT MICHAEL* (feast day: *29 September*) often portray the scene where Satan, or the fallen angels, are helpless below the sword or spear of a triumphant Saint Michael. In some depictions, the Latin phrase Quis ut Deus? can be seen on the shield of Saint Michael. The phrase means "Who is like God?" and Saint Michael asks it scornfully as he slays Satan, represented as a dragon, or a man-like figure, at times with wings. In Roman Catholicism Saint Michael has four distinct roles. First, he is the Enemy of Satan and the fallen angels. He defeated Satan and ejected him from Paradise and will achieve victory at the hour of the final battle with Satan. Secondly, he is the Christian angel of death: at the hour of death, Saint Michael descends and gives each soul the chance to redeem itself before passing. Saint Michael's third role is weighing souls (hence the saint is often depicted holding scales) on Judgment Day. And finally, Saint Michael is the Guardian of the Church.>>
--------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pompey#Judea

<<Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (*29 September*r 106 BC – *28 September* 48 BC), known in English as Pompey, was a military and political leader of the late Roman Republic. He came from a wealthy Italian provincial background, and his father had been the first to establish the family among the Roman nobility. Pompey's immense success as a general while still very young enabled him to advance directly to his first consulship without meeting the normal requirements for office. His success as a military commander in Sulla's second civil war resulted in Sulla bestowing the nickname Magnus, "the Great", upon him. He was consul three times and celebrated three triumphs.
.
. Third Mithridatic War
.
Pompey built a wall around the area of the Temple and encamped inside this wall. Pompey took advantage of the enemy celebrating the Sabbath to deploy his battering rams. Jewish law did not allow the Jews to meddle with the enemy if they were not attacking them on the day of the Sabbath. Therefore, the defenders of the Temple did not counter the deployment of the battering rams by the Romans, which on the other days of the week they had successfully prevented. The next day the wall of the Temple was broken through and the soldiers went on the rampage. According to Josephus 12,000 Jews fell. Josephus wrote: "no small enormities were committed about the temple itself, which, in former ages, had been inaccessible, and seen by none; for Pompey went into it, and not a few of those that were with him also, and saw all that which it was unlawful for any other men to see but only for the high priests. There were in that temple the golden table, the holy candlestick, and the pouring vessels, and a great quantity of spices; and besides these there were among the treasures two thousand talents of sacred money: yet did Pompey touch nothing of all this, on account of his regard to religion; and in this point also he acted in a manner that was worthy of his virtue." The next day he ordered the men in charge of the Temple to purify it and to bring offerings to God as Jewish law required. Pompey restored Hyrcanus to the high priesthood "both because he had been useful to him in other respects, and because he hindered the Jews in the country from giving Aristobulus any assistance in his war against him.">>
--------------------------------------------------
Pompey is mentioned 81 times in Shakespeare.
--------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mithraism

<<The Greek biographer Plutarch (46–127 AD) says that "secret mysteries ... of Mithras" were practiced by the pirates of Cilicia, the coastal province in the southeast of Anatolia, who were active in the 1st Century BCE: "They likewise offered strange sacrifices; those of Olympus I mean; and they celebrated certain secret mysteries, among which those of Mithras continue to this day, being originally instituted by them." He mentions that the pirates were especially active during the Mithridatic wars (between the Roman Republic and King Mithridates VI of Pontus) in which they supported the king. The association between Mithridates and the pirates is also mentioned by the ancient historian Appian. The 4th century commentary on Vergil by Servius says that Pompey settled some of these pirates in Calabria in southern Italy.>>
--------------------------------------------------
. <= 10 =>
.
. T O T H E O N L I E
. B E G E T T E R O F
.................................
. T H E S E I N S U I
. N G S O N N E T S M
. R W H A L L H A P P
. I N E S [S] E A N D T
. H A T E [T] E R N I T
. I E P (R)[O] M I S E D
. B Y O (U)[R] E V E R L
. I V I (N)[G] P O E T W
. I S H (E) T H T H E W
. E L L W I S H I N G
. A D V E N T U R E R
. I N S E T T I N G F
. O R T H
.
[GROTS] -10
(RUNE) 10 : Prob. ~ 1 in 45
-------------------------------------------------------------
. <= 28 =>
.
. G O O D F R E N D F O (R) I E S U S S A K E F O R B E A R
. E,T O D I G G T H E D (U) S T E N C L O A S E D H E A R E:
.............................................................
. B L E S E B E Y e M A (N) Y t S P A R E S T H E S S T O N
. E S,A N D C U R S T B (E) H E Y t M O V E S M Y B O N E S.

(RUNE) 28 : Prob. ~ 1 in 33
http://tinyurl.com/oqv5lmt
-------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.mythographica.demon.co.uk
.
<<Odin, the god of *FATE, POETRY & UNCHAINING*, hung upon
the *SHAKING* branches of Yggdrasil, the sacred Tree.
For *nine days* and nine nights he suffered.
Self wounded by his *SPEAR*, sacrificed by his hand, an
offering unto himself. In agony & torment he stared into the
bottomless depths of Niflheim, searching the dark pool in
silence. Finally, with great effort, he reached down before
him. His hand was chilled to the bone in the ice cold waters.
With a cry of triumph he grasped the knowledge he sought
.
. the Sacred *RUNES* , their magic and their power.
. He took the *RUNES* and he used them well.
.
He carved them upon the shaft of his *SPEAR*; he carved *RUNES*
. upon all things. By this means he obtained power over all.>>
----------------------------------------------------------------
. (S)hake-sp(E)ares
. So(N)Nets.
. Ne(V)Er befo(R)E ImprinTED.
.....................................
. <= 7 =>
.
. (S) h a k e -s p
. (E) a r e s S o
. (N) N E t s. N e
. (V) E R b e f o
. (R) E I m p r i
. n T E D.
.
(RVNES) -7: Prob. ~ 1 in 353
--------------------------------------
SHAKE-SPEARES
{S}ONNE{T}S.
Nev{E}r bef{O}re Im{P}rinted.
..............................
. <= 5 =>
.
. {S} O N N E
. {T} S. N e v
. {E} r b e f
. {O} r e I m
. {P} r i n t
. e d.
.
{POETS} -5 : Prob. ~ 1 in 960
-----------------------------------------------------------
. GOOD FREND FO_{R} [ I E ] {SUS}'_S(AKE)__ FOR[BE]ARE,
___ TO DIGG THE D_{U} [ S(T)] ___ EN(CLO)ASED [HE]ARE:
__ BLESTE BE Ye MA_{N} Y(T)___ SPA[RE]S THES STONES,
__ AND CVRST BE H_{E} Y(T)___ MO[VE]S MY BONES.
...............................................
Loading Image...
-----------------------------------------------------
. <= 19 =>
.
. {T H E S E I N(S)U I N G S O N N E T S}
----------------------------------------
. M r W h a L L(H)A P P I N S S S E A N
. D t h a t E T[E]R N I T I E P R O M I
. S E D B Y O u[R]E V[E]R L I V I N G P
. O E t W I s h[E]T H(T)H E W E L L W I
. S h I N G a[d V e]N(T)u R e R I N S E
. t T I N G f o r t H(T)T
..........................................
the probability of the [de.VERE] "T cross"
assuming that the 19 letters of the 2nd line:
{THESE INSUING SONNETS}
provide the # key to the ELS array is ~ 1 in 978
-------------------------------------------------------------
. <= 34 =>
.
.{TERRATE (G) ITP O P U L U S M[Æ] R E T O LYMPUSHABE T}
........................................................
. STAYPAS [S] ENG [E]R W H Y G O[E](S)T T H OUBYSOFAST R
. EADIFTH [O] UCA N[S]T W H O M{E}[N]V I O USDEATHHAT H
. PLASTWI [T] HIN T H[I]S M O(N|U} M[E]N T {SHAKSPEARE} W
. ITHWHOM [E] QUI C K N[A]T(U)R{E}{D}I[D]E {WHOSENAMED} O
. THDeCKY [S] TOM B E F A[R]M O{R}{E}t H[E] NCOSTSIEHA L
. LYTHEHA [T] HWR I T T L E[A]V{E} S L I V INGARTBUTP A
. GETOSER V EHI S W I T T
.
(RUNES) -33 : Prob. in Roper array ~ 1 in 4930
[E.DENE] -35
[ARAISE] 35
..........................................................
the probability of David Roper's: {DE} next to {E.UERE}

assuming that the 34 letters of the
2nd line: {TERRA TEGIT POPULUS MÆRET OLYMPUS HABET}

provide the # key to the ELS array is ~ 1 in 106,000
-----------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/px4754h

*STRANGE NEWES*, Of the intercepting certaine Letters,
and a Convoy of Verse[S], as they were g[O]ing
P(R)ivilie [T]o vict(U)all th[E] Low Cou(N)trie[S].

Unda imp(E)lli[T]ur unda.

By {T}ho. {NASHE} Gentleman.
...................................................
[Ovid: "One wave is driven forward with an other."]
...................................................
. <= 13 =>
.
. *S T R A N G E N E W E S*
. O f t h e i n t e r c e
. p t i n g c e r t a i n
. e {L.}e t t e r s,a n d a
. C {O.}n v o y o f V e r s
. e [S] a s t h e y w e r e
. g [O] i n g P (R)i v i l i
. e [T]{O.}v i c t(U)a l l t
. h [E]{L.}o w C o u(N)t r i
. e [S] U n d a i m p(E)l l
. i [T] u r u n d a.B y{T}h
. o {N A S H E}
.
[SO TEST] 12 : Prob. ~ 1 in 3,000
(RUNE) 13 : Prob. ~ 1 in 21
...................................................
. To the most copious Carminist of our time,
. and famous persecutor of Priscian, his *VER(i)E*
. friend Maister Apis *LAPIS*: {T}ho. {NASHE} wisheth
. new strings to his old tawnie Purse, and all honour
[A]b[L]e [I]n[C]r[E]a[S]e of acquaintance *IN THE CELLAR*.
.
[ALICE S] 2
--------------------------------------------------------------
[ALICE S]PENCER: Merry Wife of Lord *STRANGE* Act 1, Scene 1
.............................................................
SIMPLE: *BOOK of Riddles!* why, did you not lend it to
. *[ALICE S]HORTCAKE* upon All-hallowmas last,
. a fortnight afore *MICHAELMAS* ?
...........................................................
SHORTCAKE, n. An unsweetened breakfast cake shortened
. with *BUTTER* , rolled thin, and baked.
.
*SPENCER*, n. [OF. d(E.SPENS)i(ER).]
. One who has the care of the *SPENCE, or BUTTERY* .
...........................................................
. *[ALICE S]PENCER*/(a.k.a. SHORTCAKE) was the WIDOW
. of Ferdinando Stanley - Lord *STRANGE* & sister-in-law
. of William Stanley who died on *MICHAELMAS* 1642
. (Cervantes 95th birthday).
.
William Stanley (6th Earl of Derby) married Edward de Vere's
. daughter Elizabeth and fathered Lord *STRANGE*
. James Stanley Governor of the Isle of Mann.
-------------------------------------------------------
____ SONNET 60
.
. LIke as the waues make towards the pibled shore,
. So do our minuites hasten to [T]heir end,
. Each [C]hanging plac[E] with that whi[C]h goes before,
. [I]n sequent toi[L]e all forwards do contend.
. Natiuity once in the maine of light.
. Crawles to maturity, wherewith being crown'd,
. *CROOKED ECLIPSES* gainst his glory fight,
. [A]nd time that gaue, doth now his gift confound.
. [T]ime doth transfixe the florish set on youth,
. [A]nd delues the paralels in beauties brow,
.([F]EEDE)s on the rarities of natures *TRUTH* ,
. And nothing stands but for his sieth to mow.
. And yet to times in hope, my verse shall stand
. Praising thy *WORTH*, dispight his cruell hand.
................................................
___ <= 12 =>

. S o d o o u r m i n u (I)
. t e s h a s t e n t o [T]
. h e i r e n d,E a c h [C]
. h a n g i n g p l a c [E]
. w i t h t h a t w h i [C]
. h g o e s b e f o r e,[I]
. n s e q u e n t t o i [L]
. e a l l f o r w a r d s
. d o c o n t e n d.

[T.CECIL] 12 prob. in Sonnets ~ 1 in 67
................................................
[T]homas [CECIL]: only Garter vote for Oxford.
President of the Council of the NORTH: 1599–1603

Robert CECIL: *CROOKED ECLIPSES* ?
------------------------------------------------------------------------
http://www.statemaster.com/encyclopedia/Thomas-Cecil,-1st-Earl-of-Exeter

<<[T]homas [CECIL] (May 5, 1546 - February 8, 1623),
eldest son of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley,

was created 1st Earl of Exeter {May 4, 1605},

the same day his half-brother Robert Cecil,
1st Viscount Cranborne was created 1st Earl of Salisbury.>>
-----------------------------------------------------
. EPIGRAMS. *BOOK* I. The Author B. J.

64. To [Robert (Cecil) Earl of Salisbury. (May 4, 1608)]
Upon the Accession of the Treasurership to him.
.
NOt glad, like those that have new Hopes, or Suits,
With thy *NEW PLACE* , bring I [T]hese ear[L]y Fruits
[O]f Love, an[D] what the [G]olden Ag[E] did hold
A Treasure, Art: Condemn'd in th' Age of Gold.
..................................................
. ALICE Spencer (born May 4, 1559)
......................................................
In 1608 Thomas {GREENE} and his wife Leticia lived at
*NEW PLACE* , Stratford-on-Avon, had a son, William.
..................................................
_ <= 8 =>
.
. *N E W P L A C E* (May 4, 1597)
. b r i n g I[T]h
. e s e e a r[L]y
. F r u i t s[O]f
. L o v e,a n[D]w
. h a(T)t h e[G]o
. l d(E)n A g[E]d
. i d(H)o l d A T
. r e(A)s u r e,
.
[T LODGE] 8 Prob. ~ 1 in 7250
------------------------------­-------------------------
T O T H E R I G H T H O N O R A B L E
Henrie Wriothesley, Earle of Southampton,
and Baron of Titchfield.

RIght Honourable, I know not how I shall offend in
dedicating my unpolisht lines to your Lordship, nor
how the worlde Will censure mee for choosing so
strong a proppe to support so Weake a burthen,
onelye if your Honour seeme but pleased, I ac-
count my selfe highly praised,

and vowe to take advantage of all idle houres,

TILL I [H]AV[E] HO[N]OU[R]ED [Y]OU [W.]IT[H.] SO[M]E G[r.]

-AVER LABOUR.

[HENRY W.] 3 : Prob. in V&A [HENRY W.] dedication ~ 1 in 36,000
..............................................................
AVER, n. [OF. AVER domestic animal, whence LL. AVERia,
pl. cattle. cf. {AVERage}.] A WORKING OX. [Obs. or Dial. Eng.]
..............................................................
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Chapter 103: Measurement of The Whale's Skeleton

The largest, a middle one, is in width somet[H]ing less than three
fe[E]t, and in depth more tha[N] four. The smallest, whe[R]e the
spine tapers awa[Y] into the tail, is only t[W.]o inches in width,
and looks something like a white billiard-ball.

[HENRY W.] 19 : shortest skip in MD & KJV.
--------------------------------------------------------------
[M]r. William SHAKESPE[A|R)ES
COMEDIES, HISTO[R|I)ES, & TRAGEDIES.
Publ[I|S)hed according to t[H(e)] True Originall Co<PIES>
...............................................
_________ <= 17 =>

. [M]R. W i l l i a m S (H) A K <E S> P E
. [A|R} E S C o m e d i (E) s,H <I> s t o
. [R|I} e s&T r a g e d (I) e s <P> u b l
. [I|S} h e d a c c o r (D) i n g t o t
. [H E} T r u e O r i g (I) n a l l C o
. {P I E S}.
.
[MARI.H(e)] -17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 4174
(*RISE*)
-----------------------------------------------
*HIRAM* (Hebrew חירָם "high-born" = 51 = 3 x 17).
-----------------------------------------------
_________ <= 17 =>

. T O T H E (O) N L I E B E G E T T(E)
. R O F T H (E) S E I N S V I N G S(O)
. N N E T S [M] R W H A L L {H} A P P I
. N E S S E [A] N D T H A T {E} T E R N
. I T I E P [R] O M I S E D {B} Y O V R
. E V E R L [I] V I N G P O {E} T W I S
. H E T H T [H (E)]W E L L W I S H I N
. G A D V E N T V R E R I N S E T T
. I N G F O R T H T T

[MARI.H(e)] -17 : Prob. ~ 1 in 10,000
{HEBE} 17
[HIRAM(e)] -17
----------------------------------------------------
Ben Jonson (1623) _To the Memory of Shakespeare_
........................................
. My Shakespeare, {RISE} ; I Will no{T LODGE} THee by
. Chaucer, or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lye
. A little further to make thee a roome ;
. Thou art a Moniment, without a tombe,
........................................
. Sweet swan of Avon! what a fight it were
. To see thee in our waters yet appeare,
. And make those flights upon the bankes of Tha[M]es,
. That so did t[A]ke Eliza, and ou[R] James !
.{B}ut stay, [I] see th{E}e in the {He}misp{He}re
. Advanc'd, and made a Constellation there !
. Shine forth, thou StarrE Of Poets, and wi[T]h rage,
. Or inf[L]uence, chide, [O]r cheere the [D]rooping Sta[G]e;
. Which, sinc[E] thy flight fro' hence, hath mourn'd li{K(e)NIGHT},
. And despaires day, but for thy Volumes light.
........................................
_____ <= 12 =>
.
. S w e e t s w a n o f (A)
. v o n! w h a t a {S I G}(H)
. t i t w e r e T {O} s e (E)
. t h e e i n o u {R} w a (T)
. e r s y e t a p p e a r
. e, A n d m a k e t h o s
. e f l i g h t s u p o n
. t {H e B} a n k e {S} o f T
. <H> a [M] e} s, T h a {T} s o d
. <I> d t [A] k e E l {I} z a, a
. <N> d o u [R] J a m {E} s! B u
. <T> s t a y [I] s e e t h e
. (E) i n t h e {H e} m i s p
. {H e} r e A d v a n c' d, a
. n d m a d e a C o n s t
. e l l a t i o n t h e r
. e! S h i n e f o r t h, t
. h o u S t a r r e o f P
. o e t s, a n d w i [T] h r
. a g e, O r i n f [L] u {E} n
. c e, c h i d e,[O] r {C} h e
. e r e t h e [D] r {O} o p i
. n {G} S (T) a [G] e; W h i c h,
. s {I} n c [E] t h y f l i g
. h t f r o'(H) e n c e, h a
. t h m o u r n' d l i k e
. n i g h t, A n d d e s p
. a i r e s d a y, b u t f
. o r t h y V o l u m e s
. l i g h t.
.
[{He/Be}MARI{He}] 13
{STIE} 12
<HINT> 12
{E.C.O.} 11
[T LODGE] 11 Prob. with skip < 12 ~ 1 in 600
....................................................
THE LA. [MARI]e {He}r{Be}rt COUNTESSE OF PEMBROOKE.
-----------------------------------------------------
Epilogue _ROSALYNDE OR, EUPHUES' GOLDEN LEGACY_

Here, gentlemen, may you see in Euphues' Golden Legacy, that such as
neglect their fathers' precepts, incur much prejudice; that division
in nature, as it is a blemish in nurture, so 'tis a breach of good
fortunes; that virtue is not measured by birth but by action; that
younger brethren, though inferior in years, yet may be superior to
honors; that concord is the sweetest conclusion, and amity betwixt
brothers more forceable than fortune. If you gather any fruits by this
Legacy, speak well of Euphues for writing it, and me for fetching it.
If you grace me with that favor, you encourage me to be
more forward; and as soon as I have overlooked my labors,
expect the Sailor's Calendar.

*T. LODGE. FINIS*
--------------------------------------------------
In his Frontline essay, William Murphy
mentions *THOMAS LODGE* once and only once:
......................................................
Thirty-Six Plays in Search of an Author
by William M. Murphy, Union College Symposium 1964
.............................................................
There are those, like Delia Bacon, who are afflicted with what
has been called the "Corporation Syndrome," holding that such
distinguished literature must be the work of a commi[T]tee.
Its members wou[L]d include, in additi[O]n to BACON and
Oxfor[D], Robert {GREENE}, Geor[G]e PEELE, Samuel DANI[E]L,
*THOMAS NASHE, THOMAS LODGE, Michael Drayton, and THOMAS DEKKER.*
................................................................
_________ <= 17 =>
.
. m u s t b e t h e w o r k o f a c
. o m m i [T] t e e.I t s m e m b e r
. s w o u [L] d i n c l u d e,i n a d
. d i t i [O] n t o B a c o n a n d O
. x f o r [D] R o b e r t{G R E E N E}
. G e o r [G] e P e e l e,S a m u e l
. D a n i [E] l, T h o m a s N a s h e,
. *T H O M A S L O D G E*

[T.LODGE] 17 : Prob. stuck on *THOMAS LODGE* ~ 1 in 100,000
..................................................................
..................................................................
It should be apparent to anyone possessing normal common sense, then, that
Shakespeare's authorship of the works is not merely "pro[B]able" or "likely,"
as some softhe[A]ds have put it, but absolutely [C]ompelling. Yet it is
common kn[O]wledge that after Delia [BACON] published her vague notions
about authorship in 1856 defenders of her unorthodox views and creators
of others multiplied like rabbits, and any reader of the modern newspaper
knows that the tribe increases every year.
........................................................
________ <= 25 =>
.
. S h a k e s p e a r e's a u t h o r s h i p o f t
. h e w o r k s i s n o t m e r e l y"p r o[B] a b l
. e"o r"l i k e l y"a s s o m e s o f t h e[A] d s h
. a v e p u t i t,b u t a b s o l u t e l y[C] o m p
. e l l i n g.Y e t i t i s c o m m o n k n[O] w l e
. d g e t h a t a f t e r D e l i a [B A C O N] p u b
. l i s h e d h e r v a g u e n o t i o n s
.
[BACON] 25 : Prob. stuck on [BACON] ~ 1 in 325
..................................................................
..................................................................
<<H[E REVE]eals in the Sonnets... that he had latent homosexual tendencies
and that he carried on a protracted and degrading adulterous affair with a
repulsive dark-skin(N)ed lady who probably gave him a l(O)athsome disease.
In short, Shake(S)peare didn't write the plays bec(A)use we don't know enough
about hi(M) -- or because we know too much. The l(A)yman takes his choice.>>
....................................................
________ <= 27 =>
.
. a f f a i r w i t h a r e p u l s i v e d a r k-s k i
. n (N) e d l a d y w h o p r o b a b l y g a v e h i m a
. l (O) a t h s o m e d i s e a s e.I n s h o r t,S h a k
. e (S) p e a r e d i d n't w r i t e t h e p l a y s b e
. c (A) u s e w e d o n't k n o w e n o u g h a b o u t h
. i (M) o r b e c a u s e w e k n o w t o o m u c h.T h e
. l (A) y m a n t a k e s h i s c h o i c e.
.
(A MASON) -27
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shakespeare/reactions/murphyarticle.html
..................................................................
..................................................................
In May, 1956, twenty-two Oxfor{D I A N S}, including nine lawyers, took a
half-pag{E} ad in The Shakespeare Newsletter to berate {M}embers of the
Establishment for refusing t{O} give their case a fair hearing. The fact
is, of {C}ourse, that their case has been heard, thorou(G)hly explored,
and found without merit.
....................................................
. <= 37 =>
.
. InMay *twenty-two* OXFOR {D I A N S} includingnine
. lawye rstook aha lfpag {E}a d i n TheShakespear
. eNews letter tob erate {M}e m b e rsoftheEstabl
. ishme ntforr efu singt {O}g i v e theircaseafai
. rhear ingThe fac tisof {C}o u r s ethattheircas
. ehasb eenhea rdt horou (G)h l y e xploredandfou
. ndwit houtme rit.
..................................................................
..................................................................
Again, all the known evid[E]nce points to the STRATFO[R|D} SHAKESPEARE as
the writ[E|R} of Hamlet, Macbeth, Henry [V], {A}nd the other plays and
po[E|M}s that have kept the worl[D] {A}t the author's knees for almost
four hundred years.
....................................................
. <= *twenty-two* =>
.
. A g a i n,a l l t h e k n o w n e v i[D E N]
. c e p o i n t s t o t h e S T R A T F O [R]{D}
. S H A K E S P E A R E a s t h e w r i t [E]{R}
. o f H a m l e t,M a c b e t h,H e n r y [V]{A}
. n d t h e o t h e r p l a y s a n d p o [E]{M}
. s t h a t h a v e k e p t t h e w o r l [D]{A}
. t t h e a u t h o r's k n e e s f o r a l m
. o s t f o u r h u n d r e d y e a r s.

[DEVERE/NED] -22 : Prob. ~ 1 in 175
..................................................................
..................................................................
But Shakespeare is not only a writer who expresses him[S]elf
beautif[U]lly: he is an o[R]acle, a proph[E]t, almost a di[V]inity.
No oth[E]r mortal writer shares his pinnacle.
..............................
. <= 11 =>
.
. S h a k e s p e a r e
. i s n o t o n l y a w
. r i t e r w h o e x p
. r e s s e s h i m [S] e
. l f b e a u t i f [U] l
. l y:h e i s a n o [R] a
. c l e,a p r o p h [E] t,
. a l m o s t a d i [V] i
. n i t y.N o o t h [E] r
. m o r t a l w r i t e
. r s h a r e s h i s p
. i n n a c l e.
.
[E.VERUS] -11 : Prob. ~ 1 in 13,000
..................................................................
..................................................................
Of the plays in the First Folio of 1623, all of which a[R]e univ[E]rsall[Y] conce[D]ed to b[E] by the same man (although some may be inaccurate in places and may even occasionally show the work of another hand), fifteen were published as separate works in one or more editions during Shakespeare's lifetime; fourteen of these bear Shakespeare's name on the title page.
..................................................................
..................................................................
Hundreds of books and pamphlets have been produced in the course of the cont[R]ov[E]rs[Y], an[D] th[E] literature of the Baconians alone would stock a fair-sized library.
-----------------------------------------------------------
Ben Jonson (1623) _To the Memory of Shakespeare_
.............................................
My Shakespeare, rise; I will no{T LODGE} thee by
Chaucer, or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lye
A little further, to make thee a roome :
Thou art a Moniment, without a TOMBe,
......................................................
Shine *FORTH*, thou Starr{E O}f Poets, and wi[T]h rage,
Or inf[L]uence, chide, [O]r cheere the [D]rooping Sta[G]e;
Which, sinc[E] thy flight fro' hence, hath mourn'd like night,
And despaires day, but for thy Volumes light.
.............................................
. <= 11 =>
.
. S h i n e*F O R T H* t
. h o u S t a r r{E O} f
. P o e t s,a n d w i [T]
. h r a g e.O r i n f [L]
. u e n c e,c h i d e,[O]
. r c h e e r e t h e [D]
. r o o p i n g S t a [G]
. e;W h i c h,s i n c [E]
. t h y f l i g h t
.
[T LODGE] 11 : Prob. at end of poem ~ 1 in 18,000
..................................................
(Shortest positive ELS [T LODGE] skip in KJV = 25)
-------------------------------------------------------------
david kathman wrote:

<<In 1596, *THOMAS LODGE* in his *WITS MISERy* mentioned
the "ghost which cried so MISERably at the Theatre,
*like an OISTER-WIFE*, 'HAMlet, REVEnge'.">>
---------------------------------------------------------------
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Lodge

<<THOMAS LODGE (1558 - September 1625) was an English dramatist.
He was born at West HAM, the second son of Sir Thomas Lodge,
who was Lord Mayor of the City of London in 1562-1563.

Young Thomas served as *PAGE* to the Stanleys, Earls of Derby,
until approximately 1571, when he enrolled in the
Merchant-Taylors' School. From there he went on to
Trinity College, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1577.>>
-----------------------------------------------------------
. CYNTHIA'S REVELS: ACT I SCENE I. -- Ben Jonson
.
CUPID: So Hercules might challenge priority of us both, because
. he can throw [T]he bar farther, or [L]ift more join'd st[O]ols at
. the arm's en[D], than we. If this mi[G]ht carry it, then w[E], who
. have made the whole body of divinity tremble at the twang of our bow,
. and enforc'd Saturnius himself to lay by his curled front, thunder,
. and three-fork'd fires, and put on a masking suit, too light
. for a reveller of eighteen to be seen in --
....................................................
. <= 15 =>
.
. h e c a n t h r o w [T] h e b a
. r f a r t h e r,o r [L] i f t m
. o r e j o i n'd s t [O] o l s a
. t t h e a r m's e n [D],t h a n
. w e.I f t h i s m i [G] h t c a
. r r y i t,t h e n w [E],

[T.LODGE] 15
....................................................
....................................................
. CYNTHIA'S REVELS: ACT IV SCENE I
.
AMORPHUS: As that (I must mourningly say)
. is the only fault of my fortune, that, as it hath ever been my hap
. to be sued to, by all la[D]ies and beauties, wh[E]re I have come;
. so I ne[V]er yet sojourn'd or r[E]sted in that place o[R] part of
. the world, wh[E]re some high-born, admirable, fair feature died
. not for my love.
......................................................
. <= 17 =>
.
. b y a l l l a [D] i e s a n d b e a
. u t i e s,w h [E] r e I h a v e c o
. m e;s o I n e [V] e r y e t s o j o
. u r n'd o r r [E] s t e d i n t h a
. t p l a c e o [R] p a r t o f t h e
. w o r l d,w h [E] r e s o m e h i g
. h-b o r n,a d m i r a b l e
.
[DE VERE] 17
-----------------------------------------------------
. Henry IV, Part 1 (Quarto 1, 1598)

Wor. Peace coosen, say no more.
. And now I will vnclaspe a *SECRET BOOKE* ,
. And to your quicke conceiuing discontents
. Ile read[E] you matter deepe and daun[G]erous,
. As full of perill an[D] aduenterous spirit,
. As to [O]rewalke a Current roring [L]owd,
. On the vnstedfast foo[T]ing of a *SPEARE*.
......................................................
_______ <= 22 =>
.
. s a y n o m o r e A n d n o w I W I L L v n
. c l a s p e a *S E C R E T B O O K E*, A n d t
. o y o u r q u i c k e c o n c e i u i n g d
. i s c o n t e n t s I l e r e a d [E] y o u m
. a t t e r d e e p e a n d d a u n [G] e r o u
. s,A s f u l l o f p e r i l l a n [D] a d u e
. n t e r o u s s p i r i t,A s t o [O] r e w a
. l k e a C u r r e n t r o r i n g [L] o w d,O
. n t h e v n s t e d f a s t f o o [T] i n g o
. f a*S P E A R E*.
.
[T LODGE] -22 (one of 6 *SPEARE*s) (only *SECRET BOOKE*)
----------------------------------------------------
Thomas Cutwode in Caltha Poetarum: or The Bumble Bee (1599),
lists ancient and modern greats:

. For Homer, who imitated none, and Archilochus, who is compared with
Homer, only because they finished their workes in their life. And
[V]irgil, the curious Ap[E] of Homer. Ovid the Amo[R]ous, Martaill
the Lyc[E]ntious, Horace, the mixt betweene modest & Satirique vaine.
The flower of our age, sweete pleasing Sidney. Tasso the grave.
Pollished *DANIEL* the Historick *SPENCER* the Truthes Faith.
.............................................
. <= 18 =>
.
. A n d [V] i r g i l,t h e c u r i o u
. s A p [E] o f H o m e r.O v i d t h e
. A m o [R] o u s,M a r t a i l l t h e
. L y c [E] n t i o u s,H o r a c e,
---------------------------------------------------------------
Commendatory poem to 1640 version of the Sonnets.
by John Warren,

What, lofty Shak[E]speare, a[R]t agine R[E]VIV`d?
And [V]IRBIUS like now show`st thy self twice liv`d,
................................
. <= 8 =>
.
. W h a t,l {O} f t
. y S h a k [E] s p
. e a r e,a [R] t a
. g i n e R [E] V I
. V`d?A n d [V] I R
. B I U S l i k e

[VERE] -8 : Prob ~ 1 in 36
................................
Tis love that thus to thee is showne,
That LABOURs his, the *GLORY* still thine owne.
These learned poems amongst thine after-birth,
That makes thy name immortal on the earth,
Will make the learned still admire to see,
The Muses gifts to fully infus`d on thee.
Let carping Momus barke and bite his fill,
And ignorant Davus slight thy learned skill:
Yet those who know the worth of thy desert,
An{D} with true judg{E}ment can disce{R}ne thy art,
Wi[L]l {D}e admirers [O]f th\Y\ high tun`[D] straine,
Amon[G]st whose numb[E]r let me still remaine.
................................................
. <= 13 =>
.
. Y e t t h o s e w h o k n
. o w t h e w o r t h o f t
. h y d e s e r t,A n{D}w i
. t h t r u e j u d g{E}m e
. n t c a n d i s c e{R}n e
. t h y a r t,W i[L]l{B}e a
. d m i r e r s[O]f t h\Y\h
. i g h t u n[D]s t r a i n
. e,A m o n[G]s t w h o s e
. n u m b[E]r l e t m e s t
. i l l r e m a i n e.
.
{DERB\Y} 13
[LODGE] 12 : Prob. ~ 1 in 660
.
William Stanley, 6th Earl of {DERBY} died 29 September 1642.
--------------------------------------------------------------
. EPIGRAMS. BOOK I. The Author B. J.
.
134. On the Famous Voyage.
.
Arses were heard to c[R]oak, in st[E]ad of Fro[G]s;
And for [O]ne Cerbe[R]us, the whole Coast was Dogs.
Furies there wan{T}ed not: each Scold was ten.
And, for th{E} Cryes of Ghosts, Women, and Men,
Lade{N} with Plague-sores, and their Sins, w{E}re heard,
Lash'd by their Conscienc{E}s, to die affeard.
Then let the forme{R} Age, with this content her,
She brou{G}ht the Poets forth, but ours th' Adventer.

[ROGER] -8
{GREENE,T.} -29
----------------------------­-------------­--------
Art Neuendorffer
nordicskiv2
2018-02-27 12:55:44 UTC
Permalink
On Monday, February 26, 2018 at 12:23:36 PM UTC-5, Arthur Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter) wrote:

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 8 =>
.
. W h a t
. i s h e t h a t
. b u i l (d) s {S} t
. r o n g (e) r {T} h
. e n e y (t) h {E} r
. [T H E M (A) S {O} N]
. t h e S (h) y {P} w
. r i g h t, o r t
. h e C a r p e n
. t e r.
.
{POETS} -8: Prob. in question: ~ 1 in 660
.
Answer: (hated) [M(A)S{O}N] {POETS} ?
"Mason poets" is moronic nonsense, Art; the adjectival form of "Mason" is "Masonic". In any case, there is no earthly reason that such poets (if they existed) should be "hated". Why should the Masonic conspirators whom your Petulant Paranoid persona conjures up hate their own? It makes no sense!

You clearly have not thought this through VERy carefully, Art -- or rather, you *have* thought (usual disclaimer) it through, but as you usually do: in a manner that dictates that your mental processes deserve some special designation not coVERED by the VERb "to think".

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 60 =>
.
thatinallhislif e usethbu t aiar r i n g soundGr e enethou g habeino u ghto
writeyetdeeplye r searche d with [S] i c k enestha n EVERhee r etofore s ende
syouhisSwanneli k esongef o rtha [T] h e f eareshe s halneer a gaineca r roll
toyouwoontedlov{E}layesne{V}erag [A] i n{E}discove{R}toyouyo{U}thsplea{S}ures
HowEVERyetsicke n esserio t Inco [N] t i n encehav e atonces h ownthei r extr
emitieyetifIrec o veryous h alla [L] l s e emorefr e shsprig s thenEVE R spra
ngfrommedirecti n gyouhow t oliv [E Y] e t notdisw a dingyef r om
.
[STANLE/Y] 60
The string "STANLEY" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 60 -- or for that matter, of *any* skip whateVER -- in the above text, Art.

After all my patient attempts to educate you (someone must step in where George Mason Elementary failed), you *still* do not know what an equidistant letter sequence is, Art! Nor, for that matter, can you count to 60 consistently.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 22 =>
.
. I s i t n o t*S T R A N G E*t h a t I,t o w
. h o m t h e y a l h a u e b e e n e b e h o
. l d i n g:i s i t n o t l i k e t h a t y o
. u,t o w h o m e t h e y a l l h a u e b e e
. n e b e h o l d i n g,s h a l l(w e r e y e
. e i n t h a t c a s e t h a t I a m n o w)b
. e e b o t h a t o n c e o f t h{E}m f o [R]s
. a k e n?Y e s,t r u s t t h e m n o t:f [O]r
. t h e r e i s a n v p s t a r t C r{O}w,[B]e
. a u t i f i e d w i t h o u r f e a t h [E]r
. s,t h a t w i t h h i s T y g e r s h a [R T]
. w r a p t i n a P l a y e r s h y d e,
.
[ROBER/T] 22 : Prob. in *SHAKE-SCENE* paragraph ~ 1 in 225
The string "ROBERT" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 22 -- or for that matter, of *any* skip whateVER -- in the above text, Art.

After all my patient attempts to educate you (someone must step in where George Mason Elementary failed), you *still* do not know what an equidistant letter sequence is, Art! Nor, for that matter, can you count to 22 consistently.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 18 =>
.
. {S} e e k e y o u b e t t e r M a i s
. {T} e r s;f o r i t i s p i t t i e m
. {E} n o f s u c h r a r e w i t s,s h
. {O} u l d b e s u b i e c t t o t h e
. {P} l e a s u r e o f s u c h r u d e
. {G} r o o m e s.
.
{G-POETS} -18
"GPOETS [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 18 =>
.
. S c r a t c h i n g i t a n d p a t
c h i n{G}a t w i t h a p r o m p t
f r o m a{P}r i m e r.A n d w h a t
s c r i p s{O}f n u t s n o l l e g
e s I p e c k{E}d u p m e m e s e l
f E V E R y l e{T}t e r i s a h a r
d b u t y o u r s{S}u r e i s t h e
h a r d e s t c r u x E V E R.
.
{G POETS} 19
"GPOETS [sic]" is moronic nonsense, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
-----------------------------------------------------------------
I first got excited
Too much information, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
about Oxfordian ciphers from reading about 2
..................................................
. OUR EVER-LIVIN(g) POET
. VERO NIL VERIU(s) POET
. ENVIOU(s) SLIVER broke
. NIL VE(r)O VERIUS broke
Neither of those is an anagram, Art. Nor is either remarkable.

[Lunatic logorrhea snipped]
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
<= 34 =>
TE RRAT E (G) I TPOP U L U S M Æ R E T O{L Y M P U S H A B E}T
..................................................................
ST AYPA S (S) E NGER W H Y G O E S T T H O U B Y S O F A S T R
EA DIFT (H)(O) U CANS T W H O M[E N V I O U S]D E A T H H A T H
PL ASTW (I)(T) H INTH I S {M O N[U]M E N T|S H A K S P E A R E}W
IT HWHO (M)(E) Q UICK(N)a {T U R[E|D]I D E|W H O S E N A M E D}O
<TH DECK> Y (S) T OMBE F A R M O[R|E]t H E N C O S T{S I E H}A L
LY THEH A (T) H WRIT T L E[A.V|E|S L I V]I N G A R T B U T P A
GE TOSE R V E HISW I T T
...............................................................
"[ENVIOUS SLIV/ER] broke"
Huh?! The text "ENVIOUSSLIVERER" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 34 in the above text, Art.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
I read Michell's hardback
But Art -- a hard in back was what Orazio Cogno most dreaded!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
book 25 years ago and it
soon after fell apart so I bought a new paperback.
Michell not only sold me
Did Michell's other books also "sell" you, Art? The one on Atlantis, for instance? Or the one on ley lines and extraterrestrial visitations? Or the one on crop circles? Or his compilation of favorite Hitler quotations?
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
on ciphers but also on group theory...
I think
Usual disclaimer, Art! Don't forget it!
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
Oxford wrote the (self referential) Hamlet 1603
For at least the twentieth time, Art (although you have posted this idiocy many orders of magnitude more often than that), what on earth makes you think (usual disclaimer) that _Hamlet_ is "self referential"? Do you even know what the phrase "self referential" *means*?

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
____ *AND MORE STRANGE RE(t)URN*
____ *ROGER MANNERS, E. RUT(l)AND*
That's not an anagram, Art.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. *GROS(s)ER NAME* : *ENVIOU(s) SLIVER*
. *ROGE(r) MANERS* : *NIL VE(r)O VERIUS*
Neither of those is an anagram either, Art.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_________ <= 17 =>
. [M]R. W i l l i a m S (H) A K <E S> P E
. [A|R} E S C o m e d i (E) s,H <I> s t o
. [R|I} e s&T r a g e d (I) e s <P> u b l
. [I|S} h e d a c c o r (D) i n g t o t
. [H E} T r u e O r i g (I) n a l l C o
. {P I E S}.
.
[MARI.H(e)] -17
The string "MARIHE [sic]" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip -17 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip whateVER -- in the above text, Art.

Even if it had, it would not be remarkable, since "MARIHE [sic]" is moronic nonsense.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_________ <= 17 =>
. T O T H E (O) N L I E B E G E T T(E)
. R O F T H (E) S E I N S V I N G S(O)
. N N E T S [M] R W H A L L {H} A P P I
. N E S S E [A] N D T H A T {E} T E R N
. I T I E P [R] O M I S E D {B} Y O V R
. E V E R L [I] V I N G P O {E} T W I S
. H E T H T [H (E)]W E L L W I S H I N
. G A D V E N T V R E R I N S E T T
. I N G F O R T H T T
[MARI.H(e)] -17
The string "MARIHE [sic]" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip -17 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip whateVER -- in the above text, Art.

Even if it had, it would not be remarkable, since "MARIHE [sic]" is moronic nonsense.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
_____ <= 12 =>
.
. S w e e t s w a n o f (A)
. v o n! w h a t a {S I G}(H)
. t i t w e r e T {O} s e (E)
. t h e e i n o u {R} w a (T)
. e r s y e t a p p e a r
. e, A n d m a k e t h o s
. e f l i g h t s u p o n
. t {H e B} a n k e {S} o f T
. <H> a [M] e} s, T h a {T} s o d
. <I> d t [A] k e E l {I} z a, a
. <N> d o u [R] J a m {E} s! B u
. <T> s t a y [I] s e e t h e
. (E) i n t h e {H e} m i s p
. {H e} r e A d v a n c' d, a
. n d m a d e a C o n s t
. e l l a t i o n t h e r
. e! S h i n e f o r t h, t
. h o u S t a r r e o f P
. o e t s, a n d w i [T] h r
. a g e, O r i n f [L] u {E} n
. c e, c h i d e,[O] r {C} h e
. e r e t h e [D] r {O} o p i
. n {G} S (T) a [G] e; W h i c h,
. s {I} n c [E] t h y f l i g
. h t f r o'(H) e n c e, h a
. t h m o u r n' d l i k e
. n i g h t, A n d d e s p
. a i r e s d a y, b u t f
. o r t h y V o l u m e s
. l i g h t.
.
[{He/Be}MARI{He}] 13
The string "MARIHE [sic]" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 13 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip whateVER -- in the above text, Art.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
________ <= 27 =>
.
. a f f a i r w i t h a r e p u l s i v e d a r k-s k i
. n (N) e d l a d y w h o p r o b a b l y g a v e h i m a
. l (O) a t h s o m e d i s e a s e.I n s h o r t,S h a k
. e (S) p e a r e d i d n't w r i t e t h e p l a y s b e
. c (A) u s e w e d o n't k n o w e n o u g h a b o u t h
. i (M) o r b e c a u s e w e k n o w t o o m u c h.T h e
. l (A) y m a n t a k e s h i s c h o i c e.
.
(A MASON) -27
You could be misinterpreting this, Art -- it could be intended to read "Am a son", thereby reinforcing Mr. Streitz's PT/DT scenario!

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
. <= 13 =>
.
. Y e t t h o s e w h o k n
. o w t h e w o r t h o f t
. h y d e s e r t,A n{D}w i
. t h t r u e j u d g{E}m e
. n t c a n d i s c e{R}n e
. t h y a r t,W i[L]l{B}e a
. d m i r e r s[O]f t h\Y\h
. i g h t u n[D]s t r a i n
. e,A m o n[G]s t w h o s e
. n u m b[E]r l e t m e s t
. i l l r e m a i n e.
.
{DERB\Y} 13
The string "DERBY" does not appear as an equidistant letter sequence of skip 13 -- or for that matter, as an equidistant letter sequence of *any* skip whateVER -- in the above text, Art.

Incidentally, Art, your subject line, "I haue sifted out of my weake brayne", raises an obvious objection: while I'll grant you that yours is a weak brain indeed, the VERb "sifted" is clearly wrong -- what you've done here can better be characterized as a core dump. Or perhaps just as a dump.

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Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
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Art Neuendorffer (aka Noonedafter)
Arthur Neuendorffer
2018-02-27 19:22:29 UTC
Permalink
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https://aws.scientificamerican.com/article/is-truth-an-outdated-concept/

Is Truth an Outdated Concept?
Are we living in a post-truth world?

By Michael Shermer | Scientific American March 2018 Issue

<<Despite the backfire effect, in which people double down on their core beliefs when confronted with contrary facts to reduce cognitive dissonance, an “affective tipping point” may be reached when the counterevidence is overwhelming and especially when the contrary belief becomes accepted by others in one's tribe. This process is helped along by “debiasing” programs in which people are introduced to the numerous cognitive biases that plague our species, such as the confirmation bias and the availability heuristic, and the many ways not to argue: appeals to authority, circular reasoning, ad hominem and especially ad Hitlerem. Teaching students to think critically about issues by having them discuss and debate all sides, especially articulating their own and another's position is essential, as is asking, “What would it take for you to change your mind?”>>
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Standard Stratfordian techniques:

1) appeals to authority,

2) circular reasoning,

3) ad hominem and

4) ad Hitlerem
(a.k.a, Anti-Stratfordianism is equivalent to Holocaust denial)
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Art Neuendorffer

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