Discussion:
Ald Lang Syne
(too old to reply)
Donald Cameron
2020-12-31 06:45:58 UTC
Permalink


YouTube with Rod Stewart rendering a fairly authentic "Auld Lang
Syne," the Robert Burns poem set to music.

In Scotland, they join hands at a certain point and sing it together
as the New Year starts. Probably helps if you are mellow and
sentimental with a few drams of Talisker.

Links to this news group could be that Robert Burns, like Shakespeare
are considered world-class poets, and some say Burns is more popular.
Then, too, Shakespeare's birthplace at Stratford is not that far from
the Scottish border, and perhaps his dialect reflects that.

As for the poem "Auld Lang Syne" and a Burns' link to Shakespeare, I
do believe it's there.
https://www.shakespeare.org.uk/explore-shakespeare/blogs/william-shakespeare-and-robert-burns-whaurs-yer-wullie-shakespeare-noo/
“Whaur’s yer Wullie Shakespeare noo?"
John W Kennedy
2020-12-31 19:44:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Donald Cameron
http://youtu.be/Al7ONqrdscY
YouTube with Rod Stewart rendering a fairly authentic "Auld Lang
Syne," the Robert Burns poem set to music.
In Scotland, they join hands at a certain point and sing it together
as the New Year starts. Probably helps if you are mellow and
sentimental with a few drams of Talisker.
Links to this news group could be that Robert Burns, like Shakespeare
are considered world-class poets, and some say Burns is more popular.
Then, too, Shakespeare's birthplace at Stratford is not that far from
the Scottish border, and perhaps his dialect reflects that.
It’s over 320 miles from Stratford-upon Avon to Alloway.
Post by Donald Cameron
As for the poem "Auld Lang Syne" and a Burns' link to Shakespeare, I
do believe it's there.
https://www.shakespeare.org.uk/explore-shakespeare/blogs/william-shakespeare-and-robert-burns-whaurs-yer-wullie-shakespeare-noo/
“Whaur’s yer Wullie Shakespeare noo?"
Burns (thank God!) cannot be blamed for “Douglas”.

“As we sat over our tea, Mr. Home‘s tragedy of ‘Douglas’ was
mentioned. I put Dr. Johnson in mind, that once, in a coffee
house at Oxford, he called to old Mr. Sheridan, ‘How came you,
Sir, to give Home a gold medal for writing that foolish play?’
and defied Mr. Sheridan to shew ten good lines in it. He did
not insist they should be together; but that there were not
ten good lines in the whole play.”
--
John W. Kennedy
My name is Kennedy, though China Lake
In Maine, not Culzean Bay, witnessed my birth.
My father, and his father, and his, too
All hailed from north of Albany, in Troy.
Donald Cameron
2020-12-31 22:08:42 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 31 Dec 2020 14:44:39 -0500, John W Kennedy
Post by Donald Cameron
http://youtu.be/Al7ONqrdscY
YouTube with Rod Stewart rendering a fairly authentic "Auld Lang
Syne," the Robert Burns poem set to music.
In Scotland, they join hands at a certain point and sing it together
as the New Year starts. Probably helps if you are mellow and
sentimental with a few drams of Talisker.
Links to this news group could be that Robert Burns, like Shakespeare
are considered world-class poets, and some say Burns is more popular.
Then, too, Shakespeare's birthplace at Stratford is not that far from
the Scottish border, and perhaps his dialect reflects that.
It’s over 320 miles from Stratford-upon Avon to Alloway.
https://www.npr.org/2012/03/24/149160526/shakespeares-accent-how-did-the-bard-really-sound

(quote)
The British Library has completed a new recording of 75 minutes of The
Bard's most famous scenes, speeches and sonnets, all performed in the
original pronunciation of Shakespeare's time. That accent sounds a
little more Edinburgh — and sometimes even more Appalachia — than
you might expect.

. . . .

When King James came to the throne after Queen Elizabeth — he was the
Scottish King James VI — and everyone in court started speaking with a
Scottish twang.
(unquote)

And I read that dialect in Macbeth is getting more attention, assuming
that "the Scottish play" has Scottish characters.
Post by Donald Cameron
As for the poem "Auld Lang Syne" and a Burns' link to Shakespeare, I
do believe it's there.
https://www.shakespeare.org.uk/explore-shakespeare/blogs/william-shakespeare-and-robert-burns-whaurs-yer-wullie-shakespeare-noo/
“Whaur’s yer Wullie Shakespeare noo?"
Burns (thank God!) cannot be blamed for “Douglas”.
“As we sat over our tea, Mr. Home‘s tragedy of ‘Douglas’ was
mentioned. I put Dr. Johnson in mind, that once, in a coffee
house at Oxford, he called to old Mr. Sheridan, ‘How came you,
Sir, to give Home a gold medal for writing that foolish play?’
and defied Mr. Sheridan to shew ten good lines in it. He did
not insist they should be together; but that there were not
ten good lines in the whole play.”
marc hanson
2021-01-14 17:02:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Donald Cameron
http://youtu.be/Al7ONqrdscY
YouTube with Rod Stewart rendering a fairly authentic "Auld Lang
Syne," the Robert Burns poem set to music.
In Scotland, they join hands at a certain point and sing it together
as the New Year starts. Probably helps if you are mellow and
sentimental with a few drams of Talisker.
Links to this news group could be that Robert Burns, like Shakespeare
are considered world-class poets, and some say Burns is more popular.
Then, too, Shakespeare's birthplace at Stratford is not that far from
the Scottish border, and perhaps his dialect reflects that.
As for the poem "Auld Lang Syne" and a Burns' link to Shakespeare, I
do believe it's there.
https://www.shakespeare.org.uk/explore-shakespeare/blogs/william-shakespeare-and-robert-burns-whaurs-yer-wullie-shakespeare-noo/
“Whaur’s yer Wullie Shakespeare noo?".
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