Discussion:
Memorial to Thomas Neville, Canterbury Cathedral
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Arthur Neuendorffer
2016-05-26 11:28:31 UTC
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<<Memorial to Thomas Neville, Canterbury Cathedral

1544 to 1614 - a man who was held in affection and trust by his fellow countrymen as a person of culture, integrity and good taste. He achieved considerable status as Master of Trinity College Cambridge and subsequently as Dean of Canterbury Cathedral. Such was the trust and regard in which Neville was held that he was chosen by the Archbishop of Canterbury for the important function of bearing the united greetings of the clergy of England to King James in Scotland on his accession to the throne. When King James visited him at Cambridge in 1614, he stated that he was "proud of such a subject". A contemporary at Cambridge said of him: "he never had his like for a splendid, courteous and bountiful gentleman".
With the motto "Ne Vile Velis" Neville was able to embody his personal philosophy in a phrase that incorporated his own name (which he spelt Nevile). Its meaning is essentially: "Nothing distasteful or vulgar".>>
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http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/33585

Rare Shakespeare first folio found in French library
Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

<<One of only 233 known copies of the First Folio edition of Shakespeare’s plays has been discovered in the library of Saint-Omer, a small town in northern France 30 miles south of Calais. Missing its telltale title page, the volume was wrongly classified as an 18th century edition. The Saint-Omer copy is also missing the entire text of Two Gentlemen of Verona; the pages were deliberately torn out. There are also annotations that suggest the volume was used for performances. Some of the words are replaced with more modern language, and a character in Henry IV is changed from “hostess” to “host” and from “wench” to “fellow” with utter disregard for iambic pentameter.

The library has had the book in its stacks for 400 years, thanks to its arrangement with the now-defunct college of Jesuits in Saint-Omer which used the city library’s Heritage Room as its own library. Saint-Omer is a small town now, but in the Middle Ages it was an important city with the fourth greatest library in Western Europe. The Jesuit college was founded in the late 16th century when Catholics were forbidden by law to attend college in English. They could just cross the Channel and get an education in France instead, and Saint-Omer was well attended by English Catholics.

One particularly intriguing note is the name “Nevill” written on the first page of The Tempest (also the first page of the book entire since the title pages are gone).>>
--------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Neville_%28died_1615%29

<<Sir Henry Neville (1564 – 10 July 1615) was an English courtier, politician and diplomat, noted for his role as ambassador to France and his unsuccessful attempts to negotiate between James I of England and the Houses of Parliament. In 2005 Neville was put forward as a candidate for the authorship of Shakespeare's works.

In December 1584 Neville married Anne Killigrew (died 1632), the daughter of Sir Henry Killigrew (died 1603) and Catherine Cooke, sister-in-law of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, by whom he had Sir Henry Neville (II), 1588–29 June 1629, married Elizabeth Smyth; among his children was Henry Neville (writer).>>
--------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Neville_%28writer%29

<<Henry Neville (1620–1694) was an English politician, author and satirist, best remembered for his tale of shipwreck and dystopia, The Isle of Pines published in 1668. In 1651, he was elected to the English Council of State, where he played a part in foreign policy. Later, he was in opposition to Oliver Cromwell, against whom he wrote some political pamphlets.>>
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http://tinyurl.com/jxoje8f
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Isle_of_Pines

<<The Isle of Pines is a book by Henry Neville published in 1668. It has been cited as the first robinsonade before Defoe's work. An example of arcadian fiction, the book presents its story through an Epistolary frame: a "Letter to a friend in London, declaring the truth of his Voyage to the East Indies" written by a fictional Dutchman "Henry Cornelius Van Sloetten," concerning the discovery of an island in the southern hemisphere, populated with the descendants of a small group of castaways.

The book explores the story of these castaways—the British George Pine and four female survivors, who are shipwrecked on an idyllic island. Pine finds that the island produces food abundantly with little or no effort, and he soon enjoys a leisurely existence, engaging in open sexual activity with the four women.

Each of the women gives birth to children, who in turn multiply to produce distinct tribes, by which Pine is seen as the patriarch. One of the women, a black slave girl, gives rise to a tribe called the Phills, who increasingly reject the impositions of laws, rules, and Bible readings which are established in an effort to create some form of social order. Eventually one of the Phills tribe rapes a woman from the stark tribe, starting a civil war. At this point some Dutch explorers arrive, bringing with them guns which are used to quell the uprising.

The narrative is written from the viewpoint of the Dutch explorers and begins with their arrival and the discovery of a primitive white English-speaking native race. The explorers discover that the islanders are the grand and great-grandchildren of George Pine, and that in just three generations the islanders have lost the technological and industrial advantage of their British origins. They later discover that they possess an axe which lay blunt and never sharpened. The island itself is so productive in terms of food and shelter that the islanders leave newborn babies exposed to the elements with no harm.

While the island is bounteous and abundant the narrative raises questions concerning the morality of idleness and dependence on nature. Questions also exist over the status of the piece as utopian literature; elements of utopian writing are apparent, but there are inversions of the usual pattern. Instead of finding an advanced society from which the travellers can learn, the explorers discover a primitive island race in need of rescue from the brink of civil war. Although the island initially seems a paradise of sexual freedom and idyllic plenty, the story is one of dystopia, a devolution into a primitive and crucially unproductive state. The lack of creativity and industry are heightened by the fact that the islanders themselves reproduce in great numbers, leaving in three generations a large population with no scientific or artistic development.

Some critics have pointed to the possibility of Pines deriving from an anagram of penis, alluding to the sexual preoccupation of the early settlers.

The book also has political overtones. Neville was an anti-Stuart republican, and as a political exile he was clearly conscious of the socio-political concerns of the end of the early modern period. The island narrative is framed by the story of the Dutch explorers who are more organized and better equipped than the English voyage of three generations earlier, and who are needed to rescue a small English colonial nation-state from chaos. It is interesting to note that the book was written at the end of the Second Anglo-Dutch War.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
Brenda James's *Henry Neville* :
..............................................
_Henry Neville and The SHAKEspeare Code_
Review by P. G. Taylor (Sutton Courtenay, England)
http://www.scripophily.net/cornevisbrid.html
.
<<The code referred to here is in the 144 letter
dedication to the first edition of SHAKEspeare's sonnets:
.
. TOTHEO..-- *N* __..LIEBEGET
. TEROFT.._- *H* __..ESEINSVI
. NGSONN.. *E* __..TSMRWHAL
. LHAPPI..__- *N* __..ESSEANDT
. HATETE.._-- *R* __..NITIEPRO
. MISEDB.._-- *Y* __..OVREVERL
. IVING..__- *POET* __..WISHET
.
It took Brenda James years to figure it out!
.
Henry Neville's own nickname was Falstaff - and he himself was fat!
The first time Falstaff ever appeared in a play by SHAKEspeare
he was called "Oldcastle", a pun on Ne Ville - New Town. Neville
spent nearly 3 years in the Tower of London with Southampton,
to whom the sonnets are dedicated Southampton is the Mr W.H.
in the dedication. He is called Mr, because he lost
the title of Earl when he was put in the Tower.>>
.............................................................
[N HENRY] (or [HENRY N]) in Sonnets Ded. any skip: Prob. ~1 in 3,100
------------------------------------------------------------------
Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter Vol. 51, No. 3: Summer 2015

<<Since college, I've always wondered about who
"Mr. W.H." could be. Recently, I happened to count the
letters and found that there were 144 not counting the
"T.T." at the end. For fun, I tried putting them in a
12x12 square. I saw the name "Ben" and dismissed it as
a fluke, but the letters "ORIW" going down caught my
eye. Even though I went on to trying something else,
those letters brought me back to it and I realized
you could unscramble them to spell the name "H.
Wriotheslie, SH" ("SH" for Southampton, perhaps),
which isn't the modern spelling, but matches the
"onlie" in the dedication. In the grid below,
you can see the contiguous letters:

"To Wriotheslie"

There's an extra "s" in "Wriotheslie"
(perhaps it should be "Wriothesslie").>>

- Mark Stahley, St Paul MN
-----------------------------------------------
___ 12 X 12
.

. T O{T H E O}N L I E(B)E
. G E T T E{R}O F T H(E)S
. E I N S U{I}N G S O(N)N
. E T S M R{W}H A L L H A
. P P I N E{S}S E A N D T
. H A T E T{E}R[N]I T I E
. P R O M I(s|E]D B Y O U
. R E V E R(L|I}V I N G P
. O E T W[I]S H e T H T H
. E W E[L]L W I S H I N G
. A D(V)E N T U R E R I N
. S[E]T T I N G F O R T H
.

TO {THE/ORIW(s)ESL/I} : Prob. ~ 1 in 4000
_ [NE(V)IL(L)E] : Prob. ~ 1 in 2100
---------------------------------------------------
_______ Sonnet 134
.
SO now I hau[E] confest that he is thine,
And I my se[L]fe am morgag'd to thy will,
My selfe I[L]e forfeit, so that other mine,
Thou w[I]lt restore to be my comfort still:
.
B[U]t thou wilt not, nor he will not be fr[E]e,
For thou art couetous, and he is ki[N]de,
He learnd but suretie-like to wr(I)te for me,
Vnder that bo{N}d that him as fast doth binde.
The statute of thy b{E}auty thou wilt take,
Thou vsurer that put'st fort{H} all to vse,
......................................................
_________ <= 29 =>
.
. S O n o w I h a u [E] c o n f e s t t h a t h e i s t h i n
. e,A n d I m y s e [L] f e a m m o r g a g'd t o t h y w i l
. l,M y s e l f e I [L] e f o r f e i t,s o t h a t o t h e r
. m i n e,T h o u w [I] l t r e s t o r e t o b e m{Y}c o m f
. o r t s t i l l:B [U] t t h o u w i l t n o t,n o r h e w i
. l l n o t b{E}f r [E] e,F o r t h o u a r t c o u e t o u s,
. a n d h e i s k i [N] d e,H e l e a{R}n d b u t s u r e t i
. e-l i k e t o w r (I) t e f o r m e,V n d e r t h a t b o{N}
. d t h a t h i m a -s- f a s t d o t h b i n d e T h e s t a
. t u t e o f t h y -b-{E}a u t y t h o u w i l t t a k e,T h
. o u v s u r e r t -h- a t p u t's t f o r t{H}a l l t o v s e,
.
[NEUILLE] -29 {Prob. in any Sonnet ~ 1 in 60}
{HENR(e)Y} -40
............................................
And sue a friend, came debter for my sake,
So him I loose through my vnkinde abuse.
.
Him haue I lost, thou hast both him and me,
He paies the whole, and yet am I not free.
-----------------------------------------------------
. last lines of Hamlet (Q1 1603)
.
*PRINCE FORTINBRAS*:
. I have some rights of memory to this kingdome,
. Which now to claime my leisure doth inV{I}te mee:
. Let fo{U}re of our chi{E}fest Captai{N}es
. Bear[E] Ham{L}et like a sou{L}dier to his grav[E]:
. For he was likely, had he lived,
. To a p[R]ov'd most royall.
. Take up the bodie, such a sight as this
. Becomes the fieldes, but here doth much amisse.
..............................................
. <= 11 =>
,
. W h i c h n o w t o c
. l a i m e m y l e i s
. u r e d o t h i n V {I}
. t e m e e:L e t f o {U}
. r e o f o u r c h i {E}
. f e s t C a p t a i {N}
. e s B e a r[E]H a m {L}
. e t l i k e a s o u {L}
. d i e r t o h i s g r
. a v[E]F o r h e w a s
. l i k e l y,h a d h e
. l i v e d,T o a p[R] o
. v'd m o s t r o y a l l.
.
{LL-NEUI} Prob. at end ~ 1 in 1660
-----------------------------------------------------
. *PRINCE FORTINBRAS*
.
. F S
. R I
. B A C O N
. P R I N T E R
.
. SIR FRANCIS BACON, PRINTER
-----------------­-----------------------------------
http://www.sirbacon.org/nmsaunders.htm

THE NORTHUMBERLAND MANUSCRIPT AND
A REMARKABLE DISCOVERY BY SIMON MILES
by Walter Saunders 2007

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.......................................................
Nevill / ne vile velis 2
(Sir Henry Nevil: Bacon's nephew & Southampton's cellmate.)

By Mr ffrauncis Bacon 2
Anthony Comfort and consorte (an allusion to Anthony Bacon)
-----------------­-----------------------------------
Loading Image...

. Nevill, Nevill, *NE VILE Velis* .
. Multis annis iam transactis
. Nulla fides est in pactis
. Mell in ore Verba lactis
. *f(FEL)l* in Corde ffraus in factis
............................................
. *Cunnin* in heart and false in practice.
------------------------------------------------------
___ King Henry IV, part II > Act III, scene II
.
SHALLOW: I commend you well. *FRANCIS FEEBLE* !
.
*FEEBLE* : HERE , sir.
------------------------------------------------------
Probability of *FEEBLE* showing up in the first
line of the Sonnet's dedication: ~ 1 in 1,000,000
....................................................
. t{O}.th[E].on[L]ie.[B]eg[E]tt[E]r.o[F].
.
. [F]er[E]tt[E]ge[B]ei[L]on[E]ht{O}t
.
. [F]ee[B]le{O}
- r__- a
. a__. c
. n__ o
. c__- n
- i
. s
----------------------------------------------------
. (Only Sonnet *FEEBLE*) Sonnet 7
.
But when from high-most pich with wery car,
Like *FEEBLE* age [H]e reeleth from the day,
Th[E] eyes (fore dutious) now co[N]uerted are
From his low t[R]act and looke an other wa[Y]:
.
So thou, thy selfe out-goi[N]g in thy noon:
Vnlok'd on diest vnlesse thou get a sonne.
...............................................
. <= 21 =>
.
. L i k e*F E E B L E*a g e [H] e r e e l e t
. h f r o m t h e d a y T h [E] e y e s(f o r
. e d u t i o u s)n o w c o [N] u e r t e d a
. r e F r o m h i s l o w t [R] a c t a n d l
. o o k e a n o t h e r w a [Y]:S o t h o u t
. h y s e l f e o u t g o i [N] g i n t h y n
. o o n:V n l o k'd o n d i (e) s t v n l e s
. s e t h o u g e t a s o n n e

[HENRY N(e)] 21
------------------------------------------------------
The Queen's Cipher - David Taylor

...........................................................
Whilstwestudietobethankfuli nourpartic u larfor
themanyfavorswehavereceived fromyourLL
wearefalneupontheillfortune tomingle
twothemostdiversethingsthat canbeefear e
andrashnesserashnesseinthee nterprizea n d
feareofthesuccesseForwhenwe valewthepl a cesyourHH
sustainewecannotbutknowthei rdignitygr e aterthentodescendto
thereadingofthesetriflesand vvhilewena m ethemtrifleswehave
deprivdourselvesofthedefenc eofourDedi c ationButsinceyour
LLhavebeenepleasdtothinketh esetrifles s omethingheereto
foreandhaveprosequutedbotht hemandthei r Authourliving
vvithsomuchfavourwehopethat theyoutliv i nghimandhenot
havingthefatecommonvvithsom etobeexequ u tortohisownewri
tingsyouwillusethelikeindul gencetowar d themyouhavedone
untotheirparentThereisagrea tdifferenc [E] vvhetheranyBooke
choosehisPatronesorfindethe mThishathd [O] nebothFor
somuchwereyourLLlikingsofth eseverallp a rtsvvhen
theywereactedasbeforetheywe republishe d theVolumeaskdto
beyoursWehavebutcollectedth emanddonea n officetothe
deadtoprocurehisOrphanesGua rdiansvvit h outambitionei
iherofselfeprofitorfameonel ytokeepeth e memoryofsoworthy
aFriend&Fellowaliveaswasour[SHAKESPEAR E] byhum
bleofferofhisplayestoyourmo stnoblepat r onageWhereinas
wehavejustlyobservednomanto comeneerey [O] urLLbutvvith
akindofreligiousaddresseith athbintheh [E] ightofourcarewho
arethePresenterstomakethepr esentworth (y) ofyourHHbythe
perfectionButtherewemustals ocraveoura (b) ilitiestobeconsiderd
myLordsWecannotgobeyondouro wnepowersC [O] untryhands
reachfoorthmilkecreamefruit esorwhatth [E] yhaveandmany
Nationswehaveheardthathadno tgummes&in {C} enseobtai
nedtheirrequestswithaleaven edCakeItvv {A} snofaulttoapproach
theirGodsbywhatmeanestheyco uldAndthem {O} stthough
meanestofthingsaremademorep reciouswhe {N} theyarededicated
toTemplesInthatnametherefor ewemosthum {B} lyconsecrateto
yourHHtheseremainesofyourse rvant [SHAKESPEARE] that
whatdelightisinthemmaybeeve ryourLLthe r eputation
histhefaultsoursifanybecomm ittedbyapa y resocarefullto
shewtheirgratitudebothtothe livingandt h edeadasis
YourLordshippesmostbounden

{BACON} anagram adjacent to a [SHAKESPEARE] Prob. ~ 1 in 1400.
[E.O. (by) E.O.]
--------------------------------------------------------------
dead, to procure his Orphanes, Guardians; vvithout ambitio{N} ei
iher of selfe-profit, or fame: onely to keepe the memor{Y} of so worthy
a Friend, & Fellow alive, as was our S H A K E S P E A{R}E , by hum
ble offer of his playes, to your most noble patro{N}age. Wherein, as
we have justly observed, no man to come ne{E}re your L.L. but vvith
a kind of religious addresse; it hat{H} bin the height of our care,
....................................................
. <= 46 =>
.
. toprocurehisOrphanesGuardiansvvitho utambiti o{N(e)}
. iiherofselfeprofitorfameonelytokeep ethememo r{Y}O]
. fsoworthyaFriendFellowaliveaswasour[SHAKESPE A{R}E]
. byhumbleofferofhisplayestoyourmostn oblepatr[O{N}a
. geWhereinaswehavejustlyobservednoma ntocomen[E{E}r
. eyourLLbutvvithakindofreligiousaddr esseitha t{H}b
. intheheightofourcare
.
{HENRY N(e)} -46 : Prob. anywhere ~ 1 in 645
-------------------------------------------------------
1596 (= 114 x 14) *LINES* in first 114 Sonnets
.......................................................
_______ Sonnet 115
.
1597 THose *LINES* that I before haue writ doe lie,
1598 Euen those that said I could not love you deerer,
1599 Yet the[N] my iudgement knew no reason wh[Y],
1600 My most full flame should afte[R]wards burne cleerer.
.
1601 But recke[N]ing time, whose milliond accid[E]nts
1602 Creepe in twixt vowes, and c[H]ange decrees of Kings,
...........................................................
______ <= 26 =>
.
. Y e t t h e [N] m y i u d g e m e n t k n e w n o r e
. a s o n w h [Y],M y m o s t f u l l f l a m e s h o u
. l d a f t e [R] w a r d {S} b u r n e c l e e r e r.B u
. t r e c k e [N] i n g t {I} m e,w h o s e m i l l i o n
. d a c c i d [E] n t s C {R} e e p e i n t w i x t v o w
. e s a n d c [H] a n g e d e c r e e s o f K i n g s,
.
{SIR} 26
[HENRY N] -26
...........................................................
{SIR} [HENRY N]eville was knighted in 1597:
.........................................................
1603 Tan sacred beautie, blunt the sharp'st intents,
1604 Diuert strong mindes to th' course of altring things:

1605 Alas why fearing of times tiranie,
1606 Might I not then say now I love you best,
1607 When I was certaine ore in-certainty,
1608 Crowning the present, doubting of the rest:

1609 Loue is a Babe, then might I not say so
1610 To giue full growth to that which still doth grow.
-----------------------------------------------------------
_______ Sonnet 149
.
CAnst thou O cruell, say I love thee not,
When I against my selfe with thee pertake:
Doe I not thinke on t[H]ee when I forgot
Am of my selfe, all tirant for thy sake?
.
Who hateth th[E]e that I doe call my friend,
On whom froun'st thou that I doe faune vpo[N],
{N}ay if thou lowrst on me doe I not spend
Reuenge vpon m{Y} selfe with p[R]esent mone?
.
What merrit do I in my selfe {R}espect,
That is so proude th[Y] seruice to dispise,
Whe{N} all my best doth worship thy defect,
Comma[N]ded by th{E} motion of thine eyes.
.
But love hate on for now I know t{H}y minde,
Those that can see thou lou'st, and I am blind.
....................................................
CAnst thou O cruell, say I love thee not,
When I against my selfe with thee pertak-
.
_________ <= 49 =>
.
-e-DoeIn-o-tthin-k-eont[H]e-ewhe-n-I-forg-o-t-Amof-m-yself-e-alltira
-n-tfort-h-ysake-W-hoha-t-e-thth[E]e-that-I-d-oeca-l-lmyfr-i-endOnwh
-o-mfrou-n-sttho-u-that-I-d-oefa-u-n-evpo[N|N}ayif-t-houlo-w-rstonme
-d-oeIno-t-spend-R-euen-g-e-vpon-m{Y}self-e-w-ithp[R]esent-m-oneWhat
-m-errit-d-oIinm-y-self-e{R}espe-c-t-That-i-s-sopr-o-udeth[Y]seruice
-t-odisp-i-seWhe{N}allm-y-b-estd-o-t-hwor-s-h-ipth-y-defectComma[N]d
-e-dbyth{E}motio-n-ofth-i-n-eeye-s-B-utlo-v-e-hate-o-nforn-o-wIknowt
{H}ymind-e-Those-t-hatc-a-n-seet-h-o-ulou's-t,andI-a-mblin-d.
.
{HENRY N} -43
[HENRY N] 55
-------------------------------------------------------------------
4 [HENRY N]'s (or [N HENRY]'s) in Sonnets: Prob. ~ 1 in 1,220
.
(With two of these in the same Sonnet: Prob. ~ 1 in 32,000)
--------------------------------------------------
. The Original 1590 quarto edition!
...............................................
http://tinyurl.com/pma5gmz
http://tinyurl.com/nsvfzdm
.
The Covntesse of Pembrokes Arcadia,
. written by Sir Philippe [SIDNEI].
.
London, Printed (For) William Ponsonbie,
. Anno Domini, 1590.
-----------------------------------------------------
Mr. Edw. Dyer "bore the canopy" {For}[SIDNEI]:

http://tinyurl.com/ptpxsdu
.......................................................
. Sonnet 125

. WEr't ought to me I "bore the canopy",
. With my extern the outward honoring,
. Or layd great bases (For) eternity,
. Which proues more [S]hort then wast or ruining?
. Haue [I] not seene dwellers o{N} f{O}r{M}e {A}n[D] fauor
. Lose all,and more by payi[N]g too much rent
. For compound sw[E]et;Forgoing simple sauor,
. Pitt[I]full thriuors in their gazing spent.
. Noe,let me be obsequious in thy heart,
. And take thou my oblacion,poore but free,
. Which is not mixt with seconds,knows no art,
. But mutuall render onely me for thee.
. Hence,thou subbornd Informer, a trew soule
. When most impeacht,stands least in thy controule.
.......................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. O r l a y d g r e a t b a s e s(F o r) e t e r n i t
. y W h i c h p r o u e s m o r e[S]h o r t t h e n w
. a s t o r r u i n i n g?H a u e[I]n o t s e e n e d
. w e l l e r s o{N}f{O}r{M}e{A}n{D}f a u o r L o s e
. a l l,a n d m o r e b y p a y i[N]g t o o m u c h r
. e n t F o r c o m p o u n d s w[E]e t;F o r g o i n
. g s i m p l e s a u o r,P i t t[I]f u l l t h r i u
. o r s i n t h e i r g a z i n g s p e n t

(For)[SIDNEI] *26*
{DAMON} -2
----------------------------------------------------------------
. Hamlet (First Folio, 1623) Act II, scene ii

Hamlet: What a piece of worke is a man! how Noble in
. Reason? how infinite in faculty? i{N} f{O}r{M}e {A}n{D} mouing
. how expresse and admirable? in Action, how like an An-
. gel? in apprehension, how like a Go[D]? the beauty of the
. world, the P[A]rragon of Animals; and yet to [M]e, what is
. this Quintessence [O]f Dust? Man delights not me; no,
. [N]or Woman neither; though by your smiling you seeme
. to say so.
.......................................................
. <= 24 =>
.
. W h a t a p i e c e o f w o r k e i s a m a n!h
. o w N o b l e i n R e a s o n?h o w i n f i n i
. t e i n f a c u l t y?i{N}f{O}r{M}e{A}n{D}m o u
. i n g h o w e x p r e s s e a n d a d m i r a b
. l e?i n A c t i o n,h o w l i k e a n A n-g e l?
. i n a p p r e h e n s i o n,h o w l i k e a G o
. [D]?t h e b e a u t y o f t h e w o r l d,t h e P
. [A] r r a g o n o f A n i m a l s;a n d y e t t o
. [M] e,w h a t i s t h i s Q u i n t e s s e n c e
. [O] f D u s t?M a n d e l i g h t s n o t m e;n o,
. [N] o r W o m a n n e i t h e r;t h o u g h b y y
. o u r s m i l i n g y o u s e e m e t o s a y s o.
.
[DAMON] -2,24 : Prob. in speech ~ 1 in 19,300
------------------------------------------------------
Dr. John Rollett points to an actual letter where
Henry Howard refers to Southampton's failure to obtain
for his " *DEAR DAMON* " (Harry Neville) the office of
Secretary of State. - [Notes, _The Truth Will Out_]
------------------------------------------------------
. This Figure, that thou here seest put,
. It vvas for ge[N]tle Shak[E]speare c[U]t:
. VVhere[I]n the Graver had a strife
. vvith Nature, to out-doo the life:
. O, could he but have dravvne his vvit
. As vve{LL I}n brasse, as he hath h{I}t
. Hisface; the Print {V}vould the[N] surpass{E}
. All, that [V]vas ever [I|N} brasse.
. But, since he cannot, Reader, looke
. Not on his picture, but his Booke.
.........................................
. <= 17 =>
.
. O,c o u l d h e b u t h a v e d r
. a v v n e h i s v v i t A s v v e
. {L L I}n b r a s s e,a s h e h a t
. h h{I}t H i s f a c e;t h e P r i
. n t{V}v o u l d t h e[N]s u r p a
. s s{E}A l l,t h a t[V]v a s e v e
. r[I|N}b r a s s e.

[NEUI] 8
[NEVI] 8
{NEVI} -17 : Prob. of 3[NEVI] ~ 1 in 128
.................................................
[NEVI] (Latin) I was spining; weaving, entwining.
------------------------------------------------------
. Hamlet, (Quarto 2, 1604) Act 3, Scene 2
.
Hor. Halfe a share.
.
Ham. A whole one I,
. For thou dost know: Oh *DAMON DEERE* ,
. This Realme dismantled was of Iove himselfe,
. And [N|O|W) reig{N|E|S) he(E)r{E}.
. A *[V]ER(I)E {V|E)R[I]E (P)a{I|O)cke*.
...........................................
. <= 7 =>
.
. A n d[N|O|W)r
. e i g{N|E|S)h
. e(E)r{E}A[V]E
. R(I)E{V|E)R[I]
. E(P)a{I|O)c k e
.
(PIE) -7
(E.O.) -7,7
[NEVI] 7,8 : Prob. in last 2 lines ~ 1 in 32,000
...................................................
Hora. You might haue Rim'd.

Ham. Oh good Horatio, Ile take the Ghosts word for
. a thousand pound. Did'st perceiue?

Hora. *VERiE* well my Lord.
------------------------------------------------------
Poets are borne not mad{E}, whe{N} I wo{U}ld p{R}ove
This *TRUTH* , the glad r[E]memberance I must lo[V]e
Of n[EVER] dying Shak[E]speare, who alone,
Is a[R]gument enough to mak[E] that one.
First, that he was a Poet none would {D}oubt, (if only he knew!)
That hard th' {A}pplause of what he sees set out
I{M}printed; where thou hast (I will n{O}t say)
Reader his Workes (for to co{N}trive a Play:

[E.VERE] 18
{DAMON} 27
---------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 21

So is it not with me as with that Muse,
Stird by a painted beauty to his verse,
Who heauen it selfe for ornament doth vse,
And EVERy faire with his faire [D]oth reherse,

M[A]king a coo{P}el[M]ent of proud c[O]mpare
With Su[N]ne and Moone, with earth and se{A}s rich gems:
With Aprills first borne flowers and all things ra{R}e,
That heauens ayre in this huge rondure hems,

O let me t[R]ue in lo{V|E] but trul[Y] write,
An[D] then bel[E]eue me, my love is as faire,
As any m{O}thers childe, though not so bright
As those gould candells fixt in heauens ayer:

Let them say more that like of heare-say well,
I will not prayse that purpose not to sell.

[DAMON] 12
{PARVO} 52
[E.DYER] -8
---------------------------------------------------------
_______ Sonnet 102

MY LOVE IS Strengthned though more weake in seeming
I love not lesse, thogh lesse the show appeare,
That love is marchandiz'd, whose ritch esteeming,
The owners tongue *DOTH PUBLI(S)H {EVER[Y] WH}E)re* .
Ou[R] lov(E) was [N]ew, an(D) th[E]n but in t[H]e spring,
{WH}en I was wont to greet it with my laies,
As Philomell in summers front doth singe,
And stops his pipe in growth of riper daies:
.
Not that the summer is lesse pleasant now
Then when her mournefull himns did hush the night,
But that wild musick burthens *EVERy bow* ,
And sweets growne common loose their deare delight.
.
Therefore like her, I some-time hold my tongue:
Because I would not dull you wiTH MY SONGE.
..................................................
Ferris (9 x 57) *perfect* Sonnet array:
.
. <= 9 =>
.
. M Y L O V E I S S
......................
......................
. D O T H P U B L I
. (S)H{E V E R[Y]W H}
. (E)r_e O u[R]
. (E)w a s[N] l o v
. (D)t h[E] e w a n
. -n-t[H] n b u t i
. -g{W H} e s p r i n
. e n I w a s
......................
......................
. T H M Y S O N G E
.
[W., HENRY] -8
--------------------------------------------------
_______ Sonnet 11

AS fast as thou shalt wane so fast thou grow'st,
In one of thine, from that which thou depar(TEST),
And that fresh bloud which yongly thou bestow'st,
Thou maist call thine, when thou from [Y]outh conuer(TEST),

Herein liues wisdome, beauty, and inc[R]ease,
Without this follie, age, and could decay,
If all we[R]e minded so, the times should cease,
And threescoore ye[A]re would make the world away:

Let those whom nature hat[H] not made for store,
Harsh, featurelesse, and rude, barre[N]ly perrish,
Looke whom she best indow'd, she gaue the more;
Which bountious guift thou shouldst in bounty cherrish,

. She caru'd thee for her seale, and ment therby,
. *Thou shouldst PRINT MORE, not let that coppy die*.
...............................................
______ <= 45 =>
.
. ASfastasth o ushaltwane sofa s ttho ugrowstInoneoft
. hinefromth a twhichthou depa r(TEST)Andthatfreshblo
. udwhichyon g lythoubest owst T houm aistcallthinewh
. enthoufrom [Y] outhconuer(TEST)H erei nliueswisdomebe
. autyandinc [R] easeWithou tthi s foll ieageandcouldde
. cayIfallwe [R] emindedsot heti m essh ouldceaseAndthr
. eescooreye [A] rewouldmak ethe w orld awayLetthosewho
. mnaturehat [H] notmadefor stor e Hars hfeaturelessean
. drudebarre [N] lyperrish

[N., HARRY] -45
------------------------------------------------------
. King Richard III Act 1, Scene 1

GLOUCESTER: Now, by Saint Paul, this news is bad indeed.
. O, he hath kept *AN EVIL* diet long,
. And overmuch consumed his royal person:
. 'Tis very grievous to be thought upon.
. What, is he in his bed?
------------------------------------------------------
. The Merchant of Venice Act 1, Scene 3

ANTONIO: Mark you this, Bassanio,
. The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
. *AN EVIL* soul producing holy witness
. Is like a villain with a smiling cheek,
. A goodly apple rotten at the heart:
. O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!
------------------------------------------------------
. Measure for Measure Act 2, Scene 3

JULIET: I do repent me, as it is *AN EVIL*,
. And take the shame with joy.
------------------------------------------------------------
. King Henry VI, Part iii Act 5, Scene 6

KING HENRY VI: The owl shriek'd at thy birth,--*AN EVIL* sign;
. The night-crow cried, aboding luckless time;
. Dogs howl'd, and hideous tempest shook down trees;
. The raven rook'd her on the chimney's top,
. And chattering pies in dismal discords sung.
------------------------------------------------------
. The Comedy of Errors Act 3, Scene 2

LUCIANA: Shame hath a bastard fame, well managed;
. Ill deeds are doubled with *AN EVIL* word.

. Act 4, Scene 3

DROMIO OF SYRACUSE: he that goes in the calf's
. skin that was killed for the Prodigal; he that came
. behind you, sir, like *AN EVIL* angel, and bid you
. forsake your liberty.
------------------------------------------------------
. Othello, The Moor of Venice Act 1, Scene 1

BRABANTIO: It is too true *AN EVIL*: gone she is;
. And what's to come of my despised time
. Is nought but bitterness.
------------------------------------------------------
. The Tempest Act 1, Scene 2

PROSPERO: I, thus neglecting worldly ends, all dedicated
. To closeness and the bettering of my mind
. With that which, but by being so retired,
. O'er-prized all popular rate, in my false brother
. Awaked *AN EVIL* nature; and my trust,
. Like a good parent, did beget of him
. A falsehood in its contrary as great
. As my trust was; which had indeed no limit,
. A confidence sans bound. He being thus lorded,
. Not only with what my revenue yielded,
. But what my power might else exact, like one
. Who having into truth, by telling of it,
. Made such a sinner of his memory,
. To credit his own lie, he did believe
. He was indeed the duke; out o' the substitution
. And executing the outward face of royalty,
. With all prerogative: hence his ambition growing--
. Dost thou hear?
-------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
b***@yahoo.com
2020-07-26 07:05:00 UTC
Permalink
Some really interesting observations here, thanks.
Post by Arthur Neuendorffer
---------------------------------------------------
http://www.hollowaypages.com/images/STRATF.JPG
http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2636709
<<Memorial to Thomas Neville, Canterbury Cathedral
1544 to 1614 - a man who was held in affection and trust by his fellow countrymen as a person of culture, integrity and good taste. He achieved considerable status as Master of Trinity College Cambridge and subsequently as Dean of Canterbury Cathedral. Such was the trust and regard in which Neville was held that he was chosen by the Archbishop of Canterbury for the important function of bearing the united greetings of the clergy of England to King James in Scotland on his accession to the throne. When King James visited him at Cambridge in 1614, he stated that he was "proud of such a subject". A contemporary at Cambridge said of him: "he never had his like for a splendid, courteous and bountiful gentleman".
With the motto "Ne Vile Velis" Neville was able to embody his personal philosophy in a phrase that incorporated his own name (which he spelt Nevile). Its meaning is essentially: "Nothing distasteful or vulgar".>>
---------------------------------------------------
http://www.thehistoryblog.com/archives/33585
Rare Shakespeare first folio found in French library
Wednesday, November 26th, 2014
<<One of only 233 known copies of the First Folio edition of Shakespeare’s plays has been discovered in the library of Saint-Omer, a small town in northern France 30 miles south of Calais. Missing its telltale title page, the volume was wrongly classified as an 18th century edition. The Saint-Omer copy is also missing the entire text of Two Gentlemen of Verona; the pages were deliberately torn out. There are also annotations that suggest the volume was used for performances. Some of the words are replaced with more modern language, and a character in Henry IV is changed from “hostess” to “host” and from “wench” to “fellow” with utter disregard for iambic pentameter.
The library has had the book in its stacks for 400 years, thanks to its arrangement with the now-defunct college of Jesuits in Saint-Omer which used the city library’s Heritage Room as its own library. Saint-Omer is a small town now, but in the Middle Ages it was an important city with the fourth greatest library in Western Europe. The Jesuit college was founded in the late 16th century when Catholics were forbidden by law to attend college in English. They could just cross the Channel and get an education in France instead, and Saint-Omer was well attended by English Catholics.
One particularly intriguing note is the name “Nevill” written on the first page of The Tempest (also the first page of the book entire since the title pages are gone).>>
--------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Neville_%28died_1615%29
<<Sir Henry Neville (1564 – 10 July 1615) was an English courtier, politician and diplomat, noted for his role as ambassador to France and his unsuccessful attempts to negotiate between James I of England and the Houses of Parliament. In 2005 Neville was put forward as a candidate for the authorship of Shakespeare's works.
In December 1584 Neville married Anne Killigrew (died 1632), the daughter of Sir Henry Killigrew (died 1603) and Catherine Cooke, sister-in-law of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, by whom he had Sir Henry Neville (II), 1588–29 June 1629, married Elizabeth Smyth; among his children was Henry Neville (writer).>>
--------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Neville_%28writer%29
<<Henry Neville (1620–1694) was an English politician, author and satirist, best remembered for his tale of shipwreck and dystopia, The Isle of Pines published in 1668. In 1651, he was elected to the English Council of State, where he played a part in foreign policy. Later, he was in opposition to Oliver Cromwell, against whom he wrote some political pamphlets.>>
--------------------------------------------------------
http://www.thehistoryblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Nevill.jpg
http://tinyurl.com/jxoje8f
--------------------------------------------------------
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Isle_of_Pines
<<The Isle of Pines is a book by Henry Neville published in 1668. It has been cited as the first robinsonade before Defoe's work. An example of arcadian fiction, the book presents its story through an Epistolary frame: a "Letter to a friend in London, declaring the truth of his Voyage to the East Indies" written by a fictional Dutchman "Henry Cornelius Van Sloetten," concerning the discovery of an island in the southern hemisphere, populated with the descendants of a small group of castaways.
The book explores the story of these castaways—the British George Pine and four female survivors, who are shipwrecked on an idyllic island. Pine finds that the island produces food abundantly with little or no effort, and he soon enjoys a leisurely existence, engaging in open sexual activity with the four women.
Each of the women gives birth to children, who in turn multiply to produce distinct tribes, by which Pine is seen as the patriarch. One of the women, a black slave girl, gives rise to a tribe called the Phills, who increasingly reject the impositions of laws, rules, and Bible readings which are established in an effort to create some form of social order. Eventually one of the Phills tribe rapes a woman from the stark tribe, starting a civil war. At this point some Dutch explorers arrive, bringing with them guns which are used to quell the uprising.
The narrative is written from the viewpoint of the Dutch explorers and begins with their arrival and the discovery of a primitive white English-speaking native race. The explorers discover that the islanders are the grand and great-grandchildren of George Pine, and that in just three generations the islanders have lost the technological and industrial advantage of their British origins. They later discover that they possess an axe which lay blunt and never sharpened. The island itself is so productive in terms of food and shelter that the islanders leave newborn babies exposed to the elements with no harm.
While the island is bounteous and abundant the narrative raises questions concerning the morality of idleness and dependence on nature. Questions also exist over the status of the piece as utopian literature; elements of utopian writing are apparent, but there are inversions of the usual pattern. Instead of finding an advanced society from which the travellers can learn, the explorers discover a primitive island race in need of rescue from the brink of civil war. Although the island initially seems a paradise of sexual freedom and idyllic plenty, the story is one of dystopia, a devolution into a primitive and crucially unproductive state. The lack of creativity and industry are heightened by the fact that the islanders themselves reproduce in great numbers, leaving in three generations a large population with no scientific or artistic development.
Some critics have pointed to the possibility of Pines deriving from an anagram of penis, alluding to the sexual preoccupation of the early settlers.
The book also has political overtones. Neville was an anti-Stuart republican, and as a political exile he was clearly conscious of the socio-political concerns of the end of the early modern period. The island narrative is framed by the story of the Dutch explorers who are more organized and better equipped than the English voyage of three generations earlier, and who are needed to rescue a small English colonial nation-state from chaos. It is interesting to note that the book was written at the end of the Second Anglo-Dutch War.>>
--------------------------------------------------------------
..............................................
_Henry Neville and The SHAKEspeare Code_
Review by P. G. Taylor (Sutton Courtenay, England)
http://www.scripophily.net/cornevisbrid.html
.
<<The code referred to here is in the 144 letter
.
. TOTHEO..-- *N* __..LIEBEGET
. TEROFT.._- *H* __..ESEINSVI
. NGSONN.. *E* __..TSMRWHAL
. LHAPPI..__- *N* __..ESSEANDT
. HATETE.._-- *R* __..NITIEPRO
. MISEDB.._-- *Y* __..OVREVERL
. IVING..__- *POET* __..WISHET
.
It took Brenda James years to figure it out!
.
Henry Neville's own nickname was Falstaff - and he himself was fat!
The first time Falstaff ever appeared in a play by SHAKEspeare
he was called "Oldcastle", a pun on Ne Ville - New Town. Neville
spent nearly 3 years in the Tower of London with Southampton,
to whom the sonnets are dedicated Southampton is the Mr W.H.
in the dedication. He is called Mr, because he lost
the title of Earl when he was put in the Tower.>>
.............................................................
[N HENRY] (or [HENRY N]) in Sonnets Ded. any skip: Prob. ~1 in 3,100
------------------------------------------------------------------
Shakespeare Oxford Newsletter Vol. 51, No. 3: Summer 2015
<<Since college, I've always wondered about who
"Mr. W.H." could be. Recently, I happened to count the
letters and found that there were 144 not counting the
"T.T." at the end. For fun, I tried putting them in a
12x12 square. I saw the name "Ben" and dismissed it as
a fluke, but the letters "ORIW" going down caught my
eye. Even though I went on to trying something else,
those letters brought me back to it and I realized
you could unscramble them to spell the name "H.
Wriotheslie, SH" ("SH" for Southampton, perhaps),
which isn't the modern spelling, but matches the
"onlie" in the dedication. In the grid below,
"To Wriotheslie"
There's an extra "s" in "Wriotheslie"
(perhaps it should be "Wriothesslie").>>
- Mark Stahley, St Paul MN
-----------------------------------------------
___ 12 X 12
.
. T O{T H E O}N L I E(B)E
. G E T T E{R}O F T H(E)S
. E I N S U{I}N G S O(N)N
. E T S M R{W}H A L L H A
. P P I N E{S}S E A N D T
. H A T E T{E}R[N]I T I E
. P R O M I(s|E]D B Y O U
. R E V E R(L|I}V I N G P
. O E T W[I]S H e T H T H
. E W E[L]L W I S H I N G
. A D(V)E N T U R E R I N
. S[E]T T I N G F O R T H
.
TO {THE/ORIW(s)ESL/I} : Prob. ~ 1 in 4000
_ [NE(V)IL(L)E] : Prob. ~ 1 in 2100
---------------------------------------------------
_______ Sonnet 134
.
SO now I hau[E] confest that he is thine,
And I my se[L]fe am morgag'd to thy will,
My selfe I[L]e forfeit, so that other mine,
.
B[U]t thou wilt not, nor he will not be fr[E]e,
For thou art couetous, and he is ki[N]de,
He learnd but suretie-like to wr(I)te for me,
Vnder that bo{N}d that him as fast doth binde.
The statute of thy b{E}auty thou wilt take,
Thou vsurer that put'st fort{H} all to vse,
......................................................
_________ <= 29 =>
.
. S O n o w I h a u [E] c o n f e s t t h a t h e i s t h i n
. e,A n d I m y s e [L] f e a m m o r g a g'd t o t h y w i l
. l,M y s e l f e I [L] e f o r f e i t,s o t h a t o t h e r
. m i n e,T h o u w [I] l t r e s t o r e t o b e m{Y}c o m f
. o r t s t i l l:B [U] t t h o u w i l t n o t,n o r h e w i
. l l n o t b{E}f r [E] e,F o r t h o u a r t c o u e t o u s,
. a n d h e i s k i [N] d e,H e l e a{R}n d b u t s u r e t i
. e-l i k e t o w r (I) t e f o r m e,V n d e r t h a t b o{N}
. d t h a t h i m a -s- f a s t d o t h b i n d e T h e s t a
. t u t e o f t h y -b-{E}a u t y t h o u w i l t t a k e,T h
. o u v s u r e r t -h- a t p u t's t f o r t{H}a l l t o v s e,
.
[NEUILLE] -29 {Prob. in any Sonnet ~ 1 in 60}
{HENR(e)Y} -40
............................................
And sue a friend, came debter for my sake,
So him I loose through my vnkinde abuse.
.
Him haue I lost, thou hast both him and me,
He paies the whole, and yet am I not free.
-----------------------------------------------------
. last lines of Hamlet (Q1 1603)
.
. I have some rights of memory to this kingdome,
. Let fo{U}re of our chi{E}fest Captai{N}es
. For he was likely, had he lived,
. To a p[R]ov'd most royall.
. Take up the bodie, such a sight as this
. Becomes the fieldes, but here doth much amisse.
..............................................
. <= 11 =>
,
. W h i c h n o w t o c
. l a i m e m y l e i s
. u r e d o t h i n V {I}
. t e m e e:L e t f o {U}
. r e o f o u r c h i {E}
. f e s t C a p t a i {N}
. e s B e a r[E]H a m {L}
. e t l i k e a s o u {L}
. d i e r t o h i s g r
. a v[E]F o r h e w a s
. l i k e l y,h a d h e
. l i v e d,T o a p[R] o
. v'd m o s t r o y a l l.
.
{LL-NEUI} Prob. at end ~ 1 in 1660
-----------------------------------------------------
. *PRINCE FORTINBRAS*
.
. F S
. R I
. B A C O N
. P R I N T E R
.
. SIR FRANCIS BACON, PRINTER
-----------------­-----------------------------------
http://www.sirbacon.org/nmsaunders.htm
THE NORTHUMBERLAND MANUSCRIPT AND
A REMARKABLE DISCOVERY BY SIMON MILES
by Walter Saunders 2007
http://www.sirbacon.org/nmfacbig%20copy.jpg
.......................................................
Nevill / ne vile velis 2
(Sir Henry Nevil: Bacon's nephew & Southampton's cellmate.)
By Mr ffrauncis Bacon 2
Anthony Comfort and consorte (an allusion to Anthony Bacon)
-----------------­-----------------------------------
http://www.sirbacon.org/graphics/key-plate.gif
. Nevill, Nevill, *NE VILE Velis* .
. Multis annis iam transactis
. Nulla fides est in pactis
. Mell in ore Verba lactis
. *f(FEL)l* in Corde ffraus in factis
............................................
. *Cunnin* in heart and false in practice.
------------------------------------------------------
___ King Henry IV, part II > Act III, scene II
.
SHALLOW: I commend you well. *FRANCIS FEEBLE* !
.
*FEEBLE* : HERE , sir.
------------------------------------------------------
Probability of *FEEBLE* showing up in the first
line of the Sonnet's dedication: ~ 1 in 1,000,000
....................................................
. t{O}.th[E].on[L]ie.[B]eg[E]tt[E]r.o[F].
.
. [F]er[E]tt[E]ge[B]ei[L]on[E]ht{O}t
.
. [F]ee[B]le{O}
- r__- a
. a__. c
. n__ o
. c__- n
- i
. s
----------------------------------------------------
. (Only Sonnet *FEEBLE*) Sonnet 7
.
But when from high-most pich with wery car,
Like *FEEBLE* age [H]e reeleth from the day,
Th[E] eyes (fore dutious) now co[N]uerted are
.
Vnlok'd on diest vnlesse thou get a sonne.
...............................................
. <= 21 =>
.
. L i k e*F E E B L E*a g e [H] e r e e l e t
. h f r o m t h e d a y T h [E] e y e s(f o r
. e d u t i o u s)n o w c o [N] u e r t e d a
. r e F r o m h i s l o w t [R] a c t a n d l
. o o k e a n o t h e r w a [Y]:S o t h o u t
. h y s e l f e o u t g o i [N] g i n t h y n
. o o n:V n l o k'd o n d i (e) s t v n l e s
. s e t h o u g e t a s o n n e
[HENRY N(e)] 21
------------------------------------------------------
The Queen's Cipher - David Taylor
http://youtu.be/N0OtlJ7I3is
...........................................................
Whilstwestudietobethankfuli nourpartic u larfor
themanyfavorswehavereceived fromyourLL
wearefalneupontheillfortune tomingle
twothemostdiversethingsthat canbeefear e
andrashnesserashnesseinthee nterprizea n d
feareofthesuccesseForwhenwe valewthepl a cesyourHH
sustainewecannotbutknowthei rdignitygr e aterthentodescendto
thereadingofthesetriflesand vvhilewena m ethemtrifleswehave
deprivdourselvesofthedefenc eofourDedi c ationButsinceyour
LLhavebeenepleasdtothinketh esetrifles s omethingheereto
foreandhaveprosequutedbotht hemandthei r Authourliving
vvithsomuchfavourwehopethat theyoutliv i nghimandhenot
havingthefatecommonvvithsom etobeexequ u tortohisownewri
tingsyouwillusethelikeindul gencetowar d themyouhavedone
untotheirparentThereisagrea tdifferenc [E] vvhetheranyBooke
choosehisPatronesorfindethe mThishathd [O] nebothFor
somuchwereyourLLlikingsofth eseverallp a rtsvvhen
theywereactedasbeforetheywe republishe d theVolumeaskdto
beyoursWehavebutcollectedth emanddonea n officetothe
deadtoprocurehisOrphanesGua rdiansvvit h outambitionei
iherofselfeprofitorfameonel ytokeepeth e memoryofsoworthy
aFriend&Fellowaliveaswasour[SHAKESPEAR E] byhum
bleofferofhisplayestoyourmo stnoblepat r onageWhereinas
wehavejustlyobservednomanto comeneerey [O] urLLbutvvith
akindofreligiousaddresseith athbintheh [E] ightofourcarewho
arethePresenterstomakethepr esentworth (y) ofyourHHbythe
perfectionButtherewemustals ocraveoura (b) ilitiestobeconsiderd
myLordsWecannotgobeyondouro wnepowersC [O] untryhands
reachfoorthmilkecreamefruit esorwhatth [E] yhaveandmany
Nationswehaveheardthathadno tgummes&in {C} enseobtai
nedtheirrequestswithaleaven edCakeItvv {A} snofaulttoapproach
theirGodsbywhatmeanestheyco uldAndthem {O} stthough
meanestofthingsaremademorep reciouswhe {N} theyarededicated
toTemplesInthatnametherefor ewemosthum {B} lyconsecrateto
yourHHtheseremainesofyourse rvant [SHAKESPEARE] that
whatdelightisinthemmaybeeve ryourLLthe r eputation
histhefaultsoursifanybecomm ittedbyapa y resocarefullto
shewtheirgratitudebothtothe livingandt h edeadasis
YourLordshippesmostbounden
{BACON} anagram adjacent to a [SHAKESPEARE] Prob. ~ 1 in 1400.
[E.O. (by) E.O.]
--------------------------------------------------------------
dead, to procure his Orphanes, Guardians; vvithout ambitio{N} ei
iher of selfe-profit, or fame: onely to keepe the memor{Y} of so worthy
a Friend, & Fellow alive, as was our S H A K E S P E A{R}E , by hum
ble offer of his playes, to your most noble patro{N}age. Wherein, as
we have justly observed, no man to come ne{E}re your L.L. but vvith
a kind of religious addresse; it hat{H} bin the height of our care,
....................................................
. <= 46 =>
.
. toprocurehisOrphanesGuardiansvvitho utambiti o{N(e)}
. iiherofselfeprofitorfameonelytokeep ethememo r{Y}O]
. fsoworthyaFriendFellowaliveaswasour[SHAKESPE A{R}E]
. byhumbleofferofhisplayestoyourmostn oblepatr[O{N}a
. geWhereinaswehavejustlyobservednoma ntocomen[E{E}r
. eyourLLbutvvithakindofreligiousaddr esseitha t{H}b
. intheheightofourcare
.
{HENRY N(e)} -46 : Prob. anywhere ~ 1 in 645
-------------------------------------------------------
1596 (= 114 x 14) *LINES* in first 114 Sonnets
.......................................................
_______ Sonnet 115
.
1597 THose *LINES* that I before haue writ doe lie,
1598 Euen those that said I could not love you deerer,
1599 Yet the[N] my iudgement knew no reason wh[Y],
1600 My most full flame should afte[R]wards burne cleerer.
.
1601 But recke[N]ing time, whose milliond accid[E]nts
1602 Creepe in twixt vowes, and c[H]ange decrees of Kings,
...........................................................
______ <= 26 =>
.
. Y e t t h e [N] m y i u d g e m e n t k n e w n o r e
. a s o n w h [Y],M y m o s t f u l l f l a m e s h o u
. l d a f t e [R] w a r d {S} b u r n e c l e e r e r.B u
. t r e c k e [N] i n g t {I} m e,w h o s e m i l l i o n
. d a c c i d [E] n t s C {R} e e p e i n t w i x t v o w
. e s a n d c [H] a n g e d e c r e e s o f K i n g s,
.
{SIR} 26
[HENRY N] -26
...........................................................
.........................................................
1603 Tan sacred beautie, blunt the sharp'st intents,
1605 Alas why fearing of times tiranie,
1606 Might I not then say now I love you best,
1607 When I was certaine ore in-certainty,
1609 Loue is a Babe, then might I not say so
1610 To giue full growth to that which still doth grow.
-----------------------------------------------------------
_______ Sonnet 149
.
CAnst thou O cruell, say I love thee not,
Doe I not thinke on t[H]ee when I forgot
Am of my selfe, all tirant for thy sake?
.
Who hateth th[E]e that I doe call my friend,
On whom froun'st thou that I doe faune vpo[N],
{N}ay if thou lowrst on me doe I not spend
Reuenge vpon m{Y} selfe with p[R]esent mone?
.
What merrit do I in my selfe {R}espect,
That is so proude th[Y] seruice to dispise,
Whe{N} all my best doth worship thy defect,
Comma[N]ded by th{E} motion of thine eyes.
.
But love hate on for now I know t{H}y minde,
Those that can see thou lou'st, and I am blind.
....................................................
CAnst thou O cruell, say I love thee not,
When I against my selfe with thee pertak-
.
_________ <= 49 =>
.
-e-DoeIn-o-tthin-k-eont[H]e-ewhe-n-I-forg-o-t-Amof-m-yself-e-alltira
-n-tfort-h-ysake-W-hoha-t-e-thth[E]e-that-I-d-oeca-l-lmyfr-i-endOnwh
-o-mfrou-n-sttho-u-that-I-d-oefa-u-n-evpo[N|N}ayif-t-houlo-w-rstonme
-d-oeIno-t-spend-R-euen-g-e-vpon-m{Y}self-e-w-ithp[R]esent-m-oneWhat
-m-errit-d-oIinm-y-self-e{R}espe-c-t-That-i-s-sopr-o-udeth[Y]seruice
-t-odisp-i-seWhe{N}allm-y-b-estd-o-t-hwor-s-h-ipth-y-defectComma[N]d
-e-dbyth{E}motio-n-ofth-i-n-eeye-s-B-utlo-v-e-hate-o-nforn-o-wIknowt
{H}ymind-e-Those-t-hatc-a-n-seet-h-o-ulou's-t,andI-a-mblin-d.
.
{HENRY N} -43
[HENRY N] 55
-------------------------------------------------------------------
4 [HENRY N]'s (or [N HENRY]'s) in Sonnets: Prob. ~ 1 in 1,220
.
(With two of these in the same Sonnet: Prob. ~ 1 in 32,000)
--------------------------------------------------
. The Original 1590 quarto edition!
...............................................
http://tinyurl.com/pma5gmz
http://tinyurl.com/nsvfzdm
.
The Covntesse of Pembrokes Arcadia,
. written by Sir Philippe [SIDNEI].
.
London, Printed (For) William Ponsonbie,
. Anno Domini, 1590.
-----------------------------------------------------
http://tinyurl.com/ptpxsdu
.......................................................
. Sonnet 125
. WEr't ought to me I "bore the canopy",
. With my extern the outward honoring,
. Or layd great bases (For) eternity,
. Which proues more [S]hort then wast or ruining?
. Haue [I] not seene dwellers o{N} f{O}r{M}e {A}n[D] fauor
. Lose all,and more by payi[N]g too much rent
. For compound sw[E]et;Forgoing simple sauor,
. Pitt[I]full thriuors in their gazing spent.
. Noe,let me be obsequious in thy heart,
. And take thou my oblacion,poore but free,
. Which is not mixt with seconds,knows no art,
. But mutuall render onely me for thee.
. Hence,thou subbornd Informer, a trew soule
. When most impeacht,stands least in thy controule.
.......................................................
. <= *26* =>
.
. O r l a y d g r e a t b a s e s(F o r) e t e r n i t
. y W h i c h p r o u e s m o r e[S]h o r t t h e n w
. a s t o r r u i n i n g?H a u e[I]n o t s e e n e d
. w e l l e r s o{N}f{O}r{M}e{A}n{D}f a u o r L o s e
. a l l,a n d m o r e b y p a y i[N]g t o o m u c h r
. e n t F o r c o m p o u n d s w[E]e t;F o r g o i n
. g s i m p l e s a u o r,P i t t[I]f u l l t h r i u
. o r s i n t h e i r g a z i n g s p e n t
(For)[SIDNEI] *26*
{DAMON} -2
----------------------------------------------------------------
. Hamlet (First Folio, 1623) Act II, scene ii
Hamlet: What a piece of worke is a man! how Noble in
. Reason? how infinite in faculty? i{N} f{O}r{M}e {A}n{D} mouing
. how expresse and admirable? in Action, how like an An-
. gel? in apprehension, how like a Go[D]? the beauty of the
. world, the P[A]rragon of Animals; and yet to [M]e, what is
. this Quintessence [O]f Dust? Man delights not me; no,
. [N]or Woman neither; though by your smiling you seeme
. to say so.
.......................................................
. <= 24 =>
.
. W h a t a p i e c e o f w o r k e i s a m a n!h
. o w N o b l e i n R e a s o n?h o w i n f i n i
. t e i n f a c u l t y?i{N}f{O}r{M}e{A}n{D}m o u
. i n g h o w e x p r e s s e a n d a d m i r a b
. l e?i n A c t i o n,h o w l i k e a n A n-g e l?
. i n a p p r e h e n s i o n,h o w l i k e a G o
. [D]?t h e b e a u t y o f t h e w o r l d,t h e P
. [A] r r a g o n o f A n i m a l s;a n d y e t t o
. [M] e,w h a t i s t h i s Q u i n t e s s e n c e
. [O] f D u s t?M a n d e l i g h t s n o t m e;n o,
. [N] o r W o m a n n e i t h e r;t h o u g h b y y
. o u r s m i l i n g y o u s e e m e t o s a y s o.
.
[DAMON] -2,24 : Prob. in speech ~ 1 in 19,300
------------------------------------------------------
Dr. John Rollett points to an actual letter where
Henry Howard refers to Southampton's failure to obtain
for his " *DEAR DAMON* " (Harry Neville) the office of
Secretary of State. - [Notes, _The Truth Will Out_]
------------------------------------------------------
. This Figure, that thou here seest put,
. VVhere[I]n the Graver had a strife
. O, could he but have dravvne his vvit
. As vve{LL I}n brasse, as he hath h{I}t
. Hisface; the Print {V}vould the[N] surpass{E}
. All, that [V]vas ever [I|N} brasse.
. But, since he cannot, Reader, looke
. Not on his picture, but his Booke.
.........................................
. <= 17 =>
.
. O,c o u l d h e b u t h a v e d r
. a v v n e h i s v v i t A s v v e
. {L L I}n b r a s s e,a s h e h a t
. h h{I}t H i s f a c e;t h e P r i
. n t{V}v o u l d t h e[N]s u r p a
. s s{E}A l l,t h a t[V]v a s e v e
. r[I|N}b r a s s e.
[NEUI] 8
[NEVI] 8
{NEVI} -17 : Prob. of 3[NEVI] ~ 1 in 128
.................................................
[NEVI] (Latin) I was spining; weaving, entwining.
------------------------------------------------------
. Hamlet, (Quarto 2, 1604) Act 3, Scene 2
.
Hor. Halfe a share.
.
Ham. A whole one I,
. For thou dost know: Oh *DAMON DEERE* ,
. This Realme dismantled was of Iove himselfe,
. And [N|O|W) reig{N|E|S) he(E)r{E}.
. A *[V]ER(I)E {V|E)R[I]E (P)a{I|O)cke*.
...........................................
. <= 7 =>
.
. A n d[N|O|W)r
. e i g{N|E|S)h
. e(E)r{E}A[V]E
. R(I)E{V|E)R[I]
. E(P)a{I|O)c k e
.
(PIE) -7
(E.O.) -7,7
[NEVI] 7,8 : Prob. in last 2 lines ~ 1 in 32,000
...................................................
Hora. You might haue Rim'd.
Ham. Oh good Horatio, Ile take the Ghosts word for
. a thousand pound. Did'st perceiue?
Hora. *VERiE* well my Lord.
------------------------------------------------------
Poets are borne not mad{E}, whe{N} I wo{U}ld p{R}ove
This *TRUTH* , the glad r[E]memberance I must lo[V]e
Of n[EVER] dying Shak[E]speare, who alone,
Is a[R]gument enough to mak[E] that one.
First, that he was a Poet none would {D}oubt, (if only he knew!)
That hard th' {A}pplause of what he sees set out
I{M}printed; where thou hast (I will n{O}t say)
[E.VERE] 18
{DAMON} 27
---------------------------------------------
. Sonnet 21
So is it not with me as with that Muse,
Stird by a painted beauty to his verse,
Who heauen it selfe for ornament doth vse,
And EVERy faire with his faire [D]oth reherse,
M[A]king a coo{P}el[M]ent of proud c[O]mpare
With Aprills first borne flowers and all things ra{R}e,
That heauens ayre in this huge rondure hems,
O let me t[R]ue in lo{V|E] but trul[Y] write,
An[D] then bel[E]eue me, my love is as faire,
As any m{O}thers childe, though not so bright
Let them say more that like of heare-say well,
I will not prayse that purpose not to sell.
[DAMON] 12
{PARVO} 52
[E.DYER] -8
---------------------------------------------------------
_______ Sonnet 102
MY LOVE IS Strengthned though more weake in seeming
I love not lesse, thogh lesse the show appeare,
That love is marchandiz'd, whose ritch esteeming,
The owners tongue *DOTH PUBLI(S)H {EVER[Y] WH}E)re* .
Ou[R] lov(E) was [N]ew, an(D) th[E]n but in t[H]e spring,
{WH}en I was wont to greet it with my laies,
As Philomell in summers front doth singe,
.
Not that the summer is lesse pleasant now
Then when her mournefull himns did hush the night,
But that wild musick burthens *EVERy bow* ,
And sweets growne common loose their deare delight.
.
Because I would not dull you wiTH MY SONGE.
..................................................
.
. <= 9 =>
.
. M Y L O V E I S S
......................
......................
. D O T H P U B L I
. (S)H{E V E R[Y]W H}
. (E)r_e O u[R]
. (E)w a s[N] l o v
. (D)t h[E] e w a n
. -n-t[H] n b u t i
. -g{W H} e s p r i n
. e n I w a s
......................
......................
. T H M Y S O N G E
.
[W., HENRY] -8
--------------------------------------------------
_______ Sonnet 11
AS fast as thou shalt wane so fast thou grow'st,
In one of thine, from that which thou depar(TEST),
And that fresh bloud which yongly thou bestow'st,
Thou maist call thine, when thou from [Y]outh conuer(TEST),
Herein liues wisdome, beauty, and inc[R]ease,
Without this follie, age, and could decay,
If all we[R]e minded so, the times should cease,
Let those whom nature hat[H] not made for store,
Harsh, featurelesse, and rude, barre[N]ly perrish,
Looke whom she best indow'd, she gaue the more;
Which bountious guift thou shouldst in bounty cherrish,
. She caru'd thee for her seale, and ment therby,
. *Thou shouldst PRINT MORE, not let that coppy die*.
...............................................
______ <= 45 =>
.
. ASfastasth o ushaltwane sofa s ttho ugrowstInoneoft
. hinefromth a twhichthou depa r(TEST)Andthatfreshblo
. udwhichyon g lythoubest owst T houm aistcallthinewh
. enthoufrom [Y] outhconuer(TEST)H erei nliueswisdomebe
. autyandinc [R] easeWithou tthi s foll ieageandcouldde
. cayIfallwe [R] emindedsot heti m essh ouldceaseAndthr
. eescooreye [A] rewouldmak ethe w orld awayLetthosewho
. mnaturehat [H] notmadefor stor e Hars hfeaturelessean
. drudebarre [N] lyperrish
[N., HARRY] -45
------------------------------------------------------
. King Richard III Act 1, Scene 1
GLOUCESTER: Now, by Saint Paul, this news is bad indeed.
. O, he hath kept *AN EVIL* diet long,
. 'Tis very grievous to be thought upon.
. What, is he in his bed?
------------------------------------------------------
. The Merchant of Venice Act 1, Scene 3
ANTONIO: Mark you this, Bassanio,
. The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
. *AN EVIL* soul producing holy witness
. Is like a villain with a smiling cheek,
. O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!
------------------------------------------------------
. Measure for Measure Act 2, Scene 3
JULIET: I do repent me, as it is *AN EVIL*,
. And take the shame with joy.
------------------------------------------------------------
. King Henry VI, Part iii Act 5, Scene 6
KING HENRY VI: The owl shriek'd at thy birth,--*AN EVIL* sign;
. The night-crow cried, aboding luckless time;
. Dogs howl'd, and hideous tempest shook down trees;
. The raven rook'd her on the chimney's top,
. And chattering pies in dismal discords sung.
------------------------------------------------------
. The Comedy of Errors Act 3, Scene 2
LUCIANA: Shame hath a bastard fame, well managed;
. Ill deeds are doubled with *AN EVIL* word.
. Act 4, Scene 3
DROMIO OF SYRACUSE: he that goes in the calf's
. skin that was killed for the Prodigal; he that came
. behind you, sir, like *AN EVIL* angel, and bid you
. forsake your liberty.
------------------------------------------------------
. Othello, The Moor of Venice Act 1, Scene 1
BRABANTIO: It is too true *AN EVIL*: gone she is;
. And what's to come of my despised time
. Is nought but bitterness.
------------------------------------------------------
. The Tempest Act 1, Scene 2
PROSPERO: I, thus neglecting worldly ends, all dedicated
. To closeness and the bettering of my mind
. With that which, but by being so retired,
. O'er-prized all popular rate, in my false brother
. Awaked *AN EVIL* nature; and my trust,
. Like a good parent, did beget of him
. A falsehood in its contrary as great
. As my trust was; which had indeed no limit,
. A confidence sans bound. He being thus lorded,
. Not only with what my revenue yielded,
. But what my power might else exact, like one
. Who having into truth, by telling of it,
. Made such a sinner of his memory,
. To credit his own lie, he did believe
. He was indeed the duke; out o' the substitution
. And executing the outward face of royalty,
. With all prerogative: hence his ambition growing--
. Dost thou hear?
-------------------------------------------------
Art Neuendorffer
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