Discussion:
Lear - 'A journey, sir, shortly to go' .... Go where?
Add Reply
Audrey Lusk
2021-09-28 07:06:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Kent's master is Lear; the journey is death.
He is declining joint rule of the kingdom, feeling weary of the world,
and anticipating death and reunion with Lear.
What do these lines in King Lear mean?
I've never been able to work them out....
Kent
I have a journey, sir, shortly to go;
My master calls me, I must not say no.
--
Thanks
Tony
Fascinating stuff, Lads. May I ask, 21 years on, how are you all going on your own personal pilgrimages to your master - no matter who they may be. Do you still enjoy a cheeky Shakespeare perusal, or have you moved onto bigger and better things? Although, I know you John well enough to know that there is nothing bigger nor better than Shakespeare - what, with your 25 years knowledge at the time of your post.
marc hanson
2021-10-15 16:24:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Kent's master is Lear; the journey is death.
He is declining joint rule of the kingdom, feeling weary of the world,
and anticipating death and reunion with Lear.
What do these lines in King Lear mean?
I've never been able to work them out....
Kent
I have a journey, sir, shortly to go;
My master calls me, I must not say no.
--
Thanks
Tony
Fascinating stuff, Lads. May I ask, 21 years on, how are you all going on your own personal pilgrimages to your master - no matter who they may be. Do you still enjoy a cheeky Shakespeare perusal, or have you moved onto bigger and better things? Although, I know you John well enough to know that there is nothing bigger nor better than Shakespeare - what, with your 25 years knowledge at the time of your post..
Slimeball 4L
2021-11-09 20:17:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Kent's master is Lear; the journey is death.
He is declining joint rule of the kingdom, feeling weary of the world,
and anticipating death and reunion with Lear.
What do these lines in King Lear mean?
I've never been able to work them out....
Kent
I have a journey, sir, shortly to go;
My master calls me, I must not say no.
--
Thanks
Tony
are you still here 21 years later?
Margaret
2021-11-10 08:01:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Slimeball 4L
Kent's master is Lear; the journey is death.
He is declining joint rule of the kingdom, feeling weary of the world,
and anticipating death and reunion with Lear.
What do these lines in King Lear mean?
I've never been able to work them out....
Kent
I have a journey, sir, shortly to go;
My master calls me, I must not say no.
--
Thanks
Tony
are you still here 21 years later?
Faith, I must leave thee, love, and shortly too.
My operant powers their functions leave to do.
And thou shalt live in this fair world behind,
Honored, beloved, and haply one as kind
For husband shalt thou...

If that's how the First Player's writer (or Hamlet?) says "I'm going to die,

I have a journey, sir, shortly to go;
My master calls me, I must not say no.

is pretty magnificent by comparison.

But then Shakespeare's audience will be paying attention by now - Claudius may still be canoodling.
John W Kennedy
2021-11-10 22:06:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Margaret
Post by Slimeball 4L
Kent's master is Lear; the journey is death.
He is declining joint rule of the kingdom, feeling weary of the world,
and anticipating death and reunion with Lear.
What do these lines in King Lear mean?
I've never been able to work them out....
Kent
I have a journey, sir, shortly to go;
My master calls me, I must not say no.
--
Thanks
Tony
are you still here 21 years later?
Faith, I must leave thee, love, and shortly too.
My operant powers their functions leave to do.
And thou shalt live in this fair world behind,
Honored, beloved, and haply one as kind
For husband shalt thou...
If that's how the First Player's writer (or Hamlet?) says "I'm going to die,
I have a journey, sir, shortly to go;
My master calls me, I must not say no.
is pretty magnificent by comparison.
But then Shakespeare's audience will be paying attention by now - Claudius may still be canoodling.
“The Mousetrap” is, quite intentionally, written in an idiom as archaic
to Claudius and Gertrude as “East Lynne”’s is to us.
--
John W. Kennedy
Algernon Burbage, Lord Roderick, Father Martin, Bishop Baldwin,
King Pellinore, Captain Bailey, Merlin -- A Kingdom for a Stage!
Margaret
2021-11-11 07:47:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by John W Kennedy
Post by Margaret
Post by Slimeball 4L
Kent's master is Lear; the journey is death.
He is declining joint rule of the kingdom, feeling weary of the world,
and anticipating death and reunion with Lear.
What do these lines in King Lear mean?
I've never been able to work them out....
Kent
I have a journey, sir, shortly to go;
My master calls me, I must not say no.
--
Thanks
Tony
are you still here 21 years later?
Faith, I must leave thee, love, and shortly too.
My operant powers their functions leave to do.
And thou shalt live in this fair world behind,
Honored, beloved, and haply one as kind
For husband shalt thou...
If that's how the First Player's writer (or Hamlet?) says "I'm going to die,
I have a journey, sir, shortly to go;
My master calls me, I must not say no.
is pretty magnificent by comparison.
But then Shakespeare's audience will be paying attention by now - Claudius may still be canoodling.
“The Mousetrap” is, quite intentionally, written in an idiom as archaic
to Claudius and Gertrude as “East Lynne”’s is to us.
--
John W. Kennedy
Algernon Burbage, Lord Roderick, Father Martin, Bishop Baldwin,
King Pellinore, Captain Bailey, Merlin -- A Kingdom for a Stage!
Indeed.
Although I once saw East Lynne. It still works.
John W Kennedy
2021-11-12 19:53:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Margaret
Post by John W Kennedy
Post by Margaret
Post by Slimeball 4L
Kent's master is Lear; the journey is death.
He is declining joint rule of the kingdom, feeling weary of the world,
and anticipating death and reunion with Lear.
What do these lines in King Lear mean?
I've never been able to work them out....
Kent
I have a journey, sir, shortly to go;
My master calls me, I must not say no.
--
Thanks
Tony
are you still here 21 years later?
Faith, I must leave thee, love, and shortly too.
My operant powers their functions leave to do.
And thou shalt live in this fair world behind,
Honored, beloved, and haply one as kind
For husband shalt thou...
If that's how the First Player's writer (or Hamlet?) says "I'm going to die,
I have a journey, sir, shortly to go;
My master calls me, I must not say no.
is pretty magnificent by comparison.
But then Shakespeare's audience will be paying attention by now - Claudius may still be canoodling.
“The Mousetrap” is, quite intentionally, written in an idiom as archaic
to Claudius and Gertrude as “East Lynne”’s is to us.
--
John W. Kennedy
Algernon Burbage, Lord Roderick, Father Martin, Bishop Baldwin,
King Pellinore, Captain Bailey, Merlin -- A Kingdom for a Stage!
Indeed.
Although I once saw East Lynne. It still works.
So did I, at the theatre company of the same name.
--
John W. Kennedy
Algernon Burbage, Lord Roderick, Father Martin, Bishop Baldwin,
King Pellinore, Captain Bailey, Merlin -- A Kingdom for a Stage!
Loading...